Podcasts about Duke University

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Private university in Durham, North Carolina, United States

  • 3,620PODCASTS
  • 6,259EPISODES
  • 43mAVG DURATION
  • 3DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jun 25, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about Duke University

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Latest podcast episodes about Duke University

Two Brothers and Their Sports
S3: Episode 25 - Interview with Duke Basketball Commit & #3 Player in '23 Mackenzie Mgbako, NBA Draft Reflection, Rob Gronkowski Retires

Two Brothers and Their Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 24:35


In this amazing episode, Aarav and Arsh discuss the Top-5 NBA Draft Picks and Rob Gronkowski retiring from the NFL. To end the episode, they interview the #3 Player in the Class of 2023 and Duke Basketball Commit, Mackenzie Mgbako!For sponsorship and advertising opportunities, please contact us at: twobrothers.sportspodcast@gmail.comChapters:0:00 NBA Draft Reflection5:14 Rob Gronkowski Retires8:24 Interview with Mackenzie MgbakoFollow Mackenzie Mgbako on:- Instagram @mack.mgbako- Twitter @MackenzieMgbako- Tiktok @skimaskmackBe sure to check us out on YouTube at: https://www.youtube.com/c/TwoBrothersandTheirSportsSupport the show

Voice Lessons Podcast
A Lesson On Belonging with Dr. Sarah Gaither

Voice Lessons Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 38:21


“What are you?” It's a question Dr. Sarah Gaither was asked a child growing up mixed race. Now she studies the effects of that question and others related to identity at Duke University's Identity & Diversity Lab. In this episode on belonging, we talk about identity denial, identity accessibility, and why she's using her own multiracial identity to help create a more inclusive world.

Here We Are
Ancestral Cousins w/Steven E. Churchill

Here We Are

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 71:08


In this first ever in-person video episode of Here We Are I talk with human paleontologist, Steven E. Churchill in his lab at Duke University. We talk about the lingering Neanderthal DNA in modern humans, genetic diversity, the recent discovery of Homo naledi, and the Rising Star Expedition which is a part of the Cradle of Humankind World Heritage Site in South Africa. Learn more about Steven's work: https://scholars.duke.edu/person/churchy Steven will also be coming to the MUM Campout so come meet him and check out some cool fossils! https://mindunderpod.com/pages/campout

Recovery Survey
#117 – Britt Frank: The Science of Stuck

Recovery Survey

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 42:20


Britt Frank, MSW, LSCSW, SEP is a licensed psychotherapist, trauma specialist, and author of _The Science of Stuck: Breaking Through Inertia to Find Your Path Forward. _She received her BA from Duke University and her MSW from the University of Kansas, where she later became an award-winning adjunct professor. Britt writes and speaks widely about the mental health myths that keep us feeling stuck and overwhelmed. Website | Instagram

I Want to Put a Baby in You!
Megan Hanson For 6.22.2022 - 6:9:22, 5.55 PM

I Want to Put a Baby in You!

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 65:09


Megan's professional experience includes health care marketing and non-profit management. She left her most recent role with Baxter Healthcare to focus full-time on the Recurrent Pregnancy Loss Association (RPLA). She holds a BS in Biomedical Engineering from Duke University and an MBA from Kellogg School of Management. She blogs about her personal experience of recurrent miscarriage at MisbehavingUterus.com. Megan lives in Seattle with her husband and her daughter who was born via gestational surrogacy. RPLA is dedicated to eliminating recurrent pregnancy loss through the advancement of research into causes and treatments; to providing support and resources to those affected; and to increasing awareness of the impact of miscarriage and fertility challenges on women and families. Listen to Megan as she discusses with Ellen and Jenn: • Getting pregnant very quickly, experiencing a missed-miscarriage and a D&C. • Experienced another miscarriage. • Trying for over a year to get pregnant. • Going through a medically managed miscarriage and her (strong) thoughts on that choice. • The feeling of betrayal from her body after the 5th miscarriage. • Exploring alternative family building options. • Once emotionally feeling stronger, reaching out to a surrogacy agency • Leaving her job and incorporating a non-profit while starting her surrogacy journey. • How the non-profit is helping those experiencing pregnancy loss. • Having her first experience in a delivery room with her child being born via surrogacy. • Her surrogate truly becoming family. • How to join and/or support the RPL community Want to share your story or ask a question? Call and leave us a message on our hotline: 303-997-1903. Learn more about our podcast: https://iwanttoputababyinyou.com/ Learn more about our surrogacy agencies: https://www.brightfuturesfamilies.com/ Get your IWTPABIY merch here! https://iwanttoputababyinyou.com/merch Learn more about Ellen's law firm: http://trachmanlawcenter.com/ Learn about Recurrent Pregnancy Loss Association here: https://rplassociation.org Find support with Recurrent Pregnancy Loss Association here: https://rplassociation.org/events Check out Megan's Blog here: www.MisbehavingUterus.com

Sleep Apnea Stories
64 - Dr. Robert W. Turner II - Sleep Apnea Research - Raising OSA Awareness Among Black Men

Sleep Apnea Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 35:52


Emma is joined by Dr. Robert W Turner II, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Clinical Research and Leadership at The George Washington University School of Medicine & Health Science. He earned his Ph.D. in sociology at the Graduate Center, City University of New York. He also holds a position as a Research Scientist in the Center for Biobehavioral Health Disparities Research at Duke University. Together they discuss: * Dr. Turner discusses his research identifying the most effective ways to spread the word among black men about the serious health consequences of untreated sleep apnea. * The shocking death of Reggie White from untreated sleep apnea and how that raised awareness in the black community. * Emma praises the excellent documentary Dr. Turner took part in called "Student Athlete" view the trailer here. * The future of football and the need for more awareness of sleep apnea among players and ex-players. * Dr. Turner discussed the Black Men's Brain Health Conference held this year and the plans for next year's event. More details here: https://www.mensbrainhealth.org/conference Find out more about Dr. Turner and his work here: https://www.robertturnerphd.com/ Reggie White article here. This episode is sponsored by Inspire https://www.inspiresleep.com/ Airway Management https://tapintosleep.com/ BetterHelp https://www.betterhelp.com/emma Get your free video download "Emma's 3 Tips for Better Sleep with Obstructive Sleep Apnea" here. Follow the podcast on Instagram: @sleepapneastories Email Emma at sleepapneastories@gmail.com www.sleepapneastories.com Disclaimer: this episode of the podcast includes people with sleep apnea discussing their own experiences of medical procedures and devices. This is for information purposes only and you should consult with your own medical professionals before you start or stop any medication or treatment.

The Joe Pomp Show
#91 How A Duke Football Player Raised $100 Million And Built One Of The Most Essential Businesses In Sports

The Joe Pomp Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 31:19


Zach Maurides is the founder and CEO of Teamworks, a digital software that more than 5,000 sports organizations use to manage their operations globally. We discuss how Zach started the business as a student-athlete at Duke University, the journey from bootstrapping to raising $100 million, the future of sports tech, and more. Enjoy!

New Books in Anthropology
Mark Fathi Massoud, "Shari'a, Inshallah: Finding God in Somali Legal Politics" (Cambridge UP, 2021)

New Books in Anthropology

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 76:13


Western analysts have long denigrated Islamic states as antagonistic, even antithetical, to the rule of law. Mark Fathi Massoud tells a different story: for nearly 150 years, the Somali people have embraced shari'a, commonly translated as Islamic law, in the struggle for national identity and human rights. Lawyers, community leaders, and activists throughout the Horn of Africa have invoked God to oppose colonialism, resist dictators, expel warlords, and to fight for gender equality - all critical steps on the path to the rule of law. Shari'a, Inshallah traces the most dramatic moments of legal change, political collapse, and reconstruction in Somalia and Somaliland. In Shari'a, Inshallah: Finding God in Somali Legal Politics (Cambridge UP, 2021), Massoud upends the conventional account of secular legal progress and demonstrates instead how faith in a higher power guides people toward the rule of law. Mark Fathi Massoud is professor of politics and legal studies at UC Santa Cruz, where he directs the Legal Studies Program and serves as affiliated faculty with the Center for the Middle East and North Africa. Massoud also holds an appointment as a Visiting Professor at the University of Oxford. Sara Katz is a Postdoctoral Associate in the History Department at Duke University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/anthropology

New Books in History
Moses E. Ochonu, "Emirs in London: Subalteran Travel and Nigeria's Modernity" (Indiana UP, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 93:08


Emirs in London: Subalteran Travel and Nigeria's Modernity (Indiana UP, 2022) recounts how Northern Nigerian Muslim aristocrats who traveled to Britain between 1920 and Nigerian independence in 1960 relayed that experience to the Northern Nigerian people. Moses E. Ochonu shows how rather than simply serving as puppets and mouthpieces of the British Empire, these aristocrats leveraged their travel to the heart of the empire to reinforce their positions as imperial cultural brokers, and to translate and domesticate imperial modernity in a predominantly Muslim society. Emirs in London explores how, through their experiences visiting the heart of the British Empire, Northern Nigerian aristocrats were enabled to define themselves within the framework of the empire. In doing so, the book reveals a unique colonial sensibility that complements rather than contradicts the traditional perspectives of less privileged Africans toward colonialism. Moses E. Ochonu is Professor of African History at Vanderbilt University. He is author of Africa in Fragments: Essays on Nigeria, Africa, and Global Africanity; Colonialism by Proxy: Hausa Imperial Agents and Middle Belt Consciousness in Nigeria, which was named finalist for the Herskovits Prize; and Colonial Meltdown: Northern Nigeria in the Great Depression. He is editor of Entrepreneurship in Africa: A Historical Approach. Sara Katz is a Postdoctoral Associate in the History Department at Duke University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Islamic Studies
Mark Fathi Massoud, "Shari'a, Inshallah: Finding God in Somali Legal Politics" (Cambridge UP, 2021)

New Books in Islamic Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 76:13


Western analysts have long denigrated Islamic states as antagonistic, even antithetical, to the rule of law. Mark Fathi Massoud tells a different story: for nearly 150 years, the Somali people have embraced shari'a, commonly translated as Islamic law, in the struggle for national identity and human rights. Lawyers, community leaders, and activists throughout the Horn of Africa have invoked God to oppose colonialism, resist dictators, expel warlords, and to fight for gender equality - all critical steps on the path to the rule of law. Shari'a, Inshallah traces the most dramatic moments of legal change, political collapse, and reconstruction in Somalia and Somaliland. In Shari'a, Inshallah: Finding God in Somali Legal Politics (Cambridge UP, 2021), Massoud upends the conventional account of secular legal progress and demonstrates instead how faith in a higher power guides people toward the rule of law. Mark Fathi Massoud is professor of politics and legal studies at UC Santa Cruz, where he directs the Legal Studies Program and serves as affiliated faculty with the Center for the Middle East and North Africa. Massoud also holds an appointment as a Visiting Professor at the University of Oxford. Sara Katz is a Postdoctoral Associate in the History Department at Duke University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/islamic-studies

New Books in Political Science
Mark Fathi Massoud, "Shari'a, Inshallah: Finding God in Somali Legal Politics" (Cambridge UP, 2021)

New Books in Political Science

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 76:13


Western analysts have long denigrated Islamic states as antagonistic, even antithetical, to the rule of law. Mark Fathi Massoud tells a different story: for nearly 150 years, the Somali people have embraced shari'a, commonly translated as Islamic law, in the struggle for national identity and human rights. Lawyers, community leaders, and activists throughout the Horn of Africa have invoked God to oppose colonialism, resist dictators, expel warlords, and to fight for gender equality - all critical steps on the path to the rule of law. Shari'a, Inshallah traces the most dramatic moments of legal change, political collapse, and reconstruction in Somalia and Somaliland. In Shari'a, Inshallah: Finding God in Somali Legal Politics (Cambridge UP, 2021), Massoud upends the conventional account of secular legal progress and demonstrates instead how faith in a higher power guides people toward the rule of law. Mark Fathi Massoud is professor of politics and legal studies at UC Santa Cruz, where he directs the Legal Studies Program and serves as affiliated faculty with the Center for the Middle East and North Africa. Massoud also holds an appointment as a Visiting Professor at the University of Oxford. Sara Katz is a Postdoctoral Associate in the History Department at Duke University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science

New Books in African Studies
Moses E. Ochonu, "Emirs in London: Subalteran Travel and Nigeria's Modernity" (Indiana UP, 2022)

New Books in African Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 93:08


Emirs in London: Subalteran Travel and Nigeria's Modernity (Indiana UP, 2022) recounts how Northern Nigerian Muslim aristocrats who traveled to Britain between 1920 and Nigerian independence in 1960 relayed that experience to the Northern Nigerian people. Moses E. Ochonu shows how rather than simply serving as puppets and mouthpieces of the British Empire, these aristocrats leveraged their travel to the heart of the empire to reinforce their positions as imperial cultural brokers, and to translate and domesticate imperial modernity in a predominantly Muslim society. Emirs in London explores how, through their experiences visiting the heart of the British Empire, Northern Nigerian aristocrats were enabled to define themselves within the framework of the empire. In doing so, the book reveals a unique colonial sensibility that complements rather than contradicts the traditional perspectives of less privileged Africans toward colonialism. Moses E. Ochonu is Professor of African History at Vanderbilt University. He is author of Africa in Fragments: Essays on Nigeria, Africa, and Global Africanity; Colonialism by Proxy: Hausa Imperial Agents and Middle Belt Consciousness in Nigeria, which was named finalist for the Herskovits Prize; and Colonial Meltdown: Northern Nigeria in the Great Depression. He is editor of Entrepreneurship in Africa: A Historical Approach. Sara Katz is a Postdoctoral Associate in the History Department at Duke University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-studies

New Books in African Studies
Mark Fathi Massoud, "Shari'a, Inshallah: Finding God in Somali Legal Politics" (Cambridge UP, 2021)

New Books in African Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 76:13


Western analysts have long denigrated Islamic states as antagonistic, even antithetical, to the rule of law. Mark Fathi Massoud tells a different story: for nearly 150 years, the Somali people have embraced shari'a, commonly translated as Islamic law, in the struggle for national identity and human rights. Lawyers, community leaders, and activists throughout the Horn of Africa have invoked God to oppose colonialism, resist dictators, expel warlords, and to fight for gender equality - all critical steps on the path to the rule of law. Shari'a, Inshallah traces the most dramatic moments of legal change, political collapse, and reconstruction in Somalia and Somaliland. In Shari'a, Inshallah: Finding God in Somali Legal Politics (Cambridge UP, 2021), Massoud upends the conventional account of secular legal progress and demonstrates instead how faith in a higher power guides people toward the rule of law. Mark Fathi Massoud is professor of politics and legal studies at UC Santa Cruz, where he directs the Legal Studies Program and serves as affiliated faculty with the Center for the Middle East and North Africa. Massoud also holds an appointment as a Visiting Professor at the University of Oxford. Sara Katz is a Postdoctoral Associate in the History Department at Duke University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-studies

New Books Network
Moses E. Ochonu, "Emirs in London: Subalteran Travel and Nigeria's Modernity" (Indiana UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 93:08


Emirs in London: Subalteran Travel and Nigeria's Modernity (Indiana UP, 2022) recounts how Northern Nigerian Muslim aristocrats who traveled to Britain between 1920 and Nigerian independence in 1960 relayed that experience to the Northern Nigerian people. Moses E. Ochonu shows how rather than simply serving as puppets and mouthpieces of the British Empire, these aristocrats leveraged their travel to the heart of the empire to reinforce their positions as imperial cultural brokers, and to translate and domesticate imperial modernity in a predominantly Muslim society. Emirs in London explores how, through their experiences visiting the heart of the British Empire, Northern Nigerian aristocrats were enabled to define themselves within the framework of the empire. In doing so, the book reveals a unique colonial sensibility that complements rather than contradicts the traditional perspectives of less privileged Africans toward colonialism. Moses E. Ochonu is Professor of African History at Vanderbilt University. He is author of Africa in Fragments: Essays on Nigeria, Africa, and Global Africanity; Colonialism by Proxy: Hausa Imperial Agents and Middle Belt Consciousness in Nigeria, which was named finalist for the Herskovits Prize; and Colonial Meltdown: Northern Nigeria in the Great Depression. He is editor of Entrepreneurship in Africa: A Historical Approach. Sara Katz is a Postdoctoral Associate in the History Department at Duke University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books Network
Mark Fathi Massoud, "Shari'a, Inshallah: Finding God in Somali Legal Politics" (Cambridge UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 76:13


Western analysts have long denigrated Islamic states as antagonistic, even antithetical, to the rule of law. Mark Fathi Massoud tells a different story: for nearly 150 years, the Somali people have embraced shari'a, commonly translated as Islamic law, in the struggle for national identity and human rights. Lawyers, community leaders, and activists throughout the Horn of Africa have invoked God to oppose colonialism, resist dictators, expel warlords, and to fight for gender equality - all critical steps on the path to the rule of law. Shari'a, Inshallah traces the most dramatic moments of legal change, political collapse, and reconstruction in Somalia and Somaliland. In Shari'a, Inshallah: Finding God in Somali Legal Politics (Cambridge UP, 2021), Massoud upends the conventional account of secular legal progress and demonstrates instead how faith in a higher power guides people toward the rule of law. Mark Fathi Massoud is professor of politics and legal studies at UC Santa Cruz, where he directs the Legal Studies Program and serves as affiliated faculty with the Center for the Middle East and North Africa. Massoud also holds an appointment as a Visiting Professor at the University of Oxford. Sara Katz is a Postdoctoral Associate in the History Department at Duke University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts
Advanced Practice Providers - APPs 101: What and Who Are Advanced Practice Providers (APPs)?

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 37:14


Partners in cancer care – who are advanced practice providers? In the first episode of ASCO Education's podcast series on Advanced Practice Providers (APPs), co-hosts Todd Pickard (MD Anderson Cancer Center) and Dr. Stephanie Williams (Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine), along with guest speaker, Wendy Vogel (Harborside/APSHO), discuss who advanced practice providers are, share an overview of what they do, and why they are important to oncology care teams. If you liked this episode, please subscribe. Learn more at https://education.asco.org, or email us at education@asco.org   TRANSCRIPT Todd Pickard: Hello everyone, and welcome to the ASCO Education Podcast, episode number one of the 'Advanced Practice Providers' series, 'APPs 101: What and Who Are Advanced Practice Providers?' I'd like to introduce my co-host for this series, Dr. Stephanie Williams. My name is Todd Pickard. I'm an advanced practice provider, I'm a PA, and I work at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas. I'm also the Executive Director of Advanced Practice and my clinical practice is in urology. Dr. Williams, how about you introduce yourself? Dr. Stephanie Williams: Thanks, Todd, and thanks for this opportunity to present this incredibly important topic. I am currently retired from clinical practice. I had been in practice for over 35 years both in an academic setting, a private practice, and more recently in a large institutional, multi-specialty institutional type of practice. My primary clinical care has been in stem cell transplants and cellular therapy. And we have used APPs, both PAs and NPs for a couple of decades in our particular area. Todd Pickard: Great, thanks for that. I'd also like to introduce you to our guest panelist today, Wendy Vogel from Harborside, who is a certified oncology nurse practitioner with over 20 years of clinical experience and expertise. We're excited to be chatting with Wendy today about the basics of advanced practice providers and who they are. This will be an introduction for the rest of the upcoming episodes of APP Podcasts. Wendy, why don't you tell us a little bit about yourself and your practice. Wendy Vogel: Thanks, Todd. It is a pleasure to be here. I appreciate you asking me to talk. I am an oncology nurse practitioner as you said. I do a high-risk cancer clinic and do that a couple of days a month. And I am also the executive director of APSHO, the Advanced Practitioner Society for Hematology and Oncology. Todd Pickard: Great! We're looking forward to a robust and informative discussion today between the three of us. So, I'd like to get started with some basics. Wendy, do you want to always start with a definition of advanced practice registered nurse? Wendy Vogel: Okay, great question! So, APRNs or advanced practice registered nurse include nurse practitioners. It can include clinical nurse specialists, nurse anesthetists, and nurse midwives. And generally, APRNs hold at least a master's degree in addition to some initial nursing education as a registered nurse. Some APRNs have doctorates like the DNP or Doctorate of Nursing Practice. But licensure for APRNs generally falls under the State Board of Nursing.   So, we're also required to have a board certification, usually as some sort of generalist as in family medicine, pediatrics, geriatrics, women or acute care. But in oncology, many APRNs also carry oncology certification. Todd Pickard: Excellent! Thanks for that. I'll go ahead and add to the conversation by defining physician assistant. So, physician assistants are individuals who are trained in the medical model and are licensed to practice medicine in team-based settings with physicians. Very much like advanced practice registered nurses, we come from a variety of backgrounds, and our education model is really focused on thinking about the patient the same way that our physician colleagues do. We're trained in really taking a very broad look at patient care, and our education as a generalist model. PAs are certified by the National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants, which is one national certification that includes all of the content areas in which we will practice. Dr. Stephanie Williams: For those out there who don't know, what are the differences between a physician assistant and an APRN? Or are there differences in practical terms, in terms of how we practice our field? Wendy Vogel: That is a great question, Stephanie, thanks for asking that. We function very much the same. The main difference is just in our educational background, where nurse practitioners come from a nursing background and the nursing model of care, and I'll let Todd speak to where PAs come from, but basically, our functions are very much the same. Todd Pickard: I very much agree. If you are in a clinical setting, and for some reason, Wendy or myself failed to identify who we are, you wouldn't really detect a distinction between the care either of us provide, because we are there in that provider setting and we're really there to assess the conditions you have like appropriate history in physical examination, think through differential diagnosis or a workup, create a diagnosis and then a therapeutic plan and also to educate you as the patient or to make an appropriate referral. So, really, when APPs, PAs, and NPs work side by side, there's really not a lot of difference in what people detect in what we're doing and how we're doing things. But there are some educational differences, which are pretty minimal. So, for example, one small difference is that PAs include surgical assisting as part of our core fundamental training, and our APRN colleagues generally don't. So, in my institution, we do have nurse practitioners that go to the OR and do assisting, but in order to get there, they did a Registered Nursing First Assist Program, it's a certification. So, they learn those fundamentals of sterile technique and surgical technique. So, in essence, there's really not a whole lot of difference. Dr. Stephanie Williams: I think what I was struck with about the difference was the history and the fact that PAs came out of the Mobile Army Surgical Hospitals. To me, that was just fascinating. I think Duke was the first graduating class. Wendy Vogel: You know, the role of the APRN has really changed drastically. It began in the 1960s, because there were not enough primary care providers, particularly for children in the urban and rural areas of the US, and the first nurse practitioner program was in 1965, at the University of Colorado. So, gosh! Have we come a long way since then, both the PA role or the NP role. When was the first PA role, Todd, when was that? Todd Pickard: We were born at the same time in 1965, we just happened to be at Duke University and y'all were in Colorado. You know, I think that the most important thing about working with advanced practice providers is that you look to work with somebody who has the competencies, the skills, interpersonal communication, and the pertinent experiences because honestly, I know fantastic APRNs, I know fantastic PAs, and I know some of either profession that really just don't quite fit a particular role. And so, there is some kind of mythology around PAs and APRNs, and who should work where, like PAs should be more procedural and more in surgery, and nurse practitioners should be more in medicine in the hospital. And really, there's nothing in our training that defines that per se, I think it's just a natural progression of we're over 50 now, so our professions are middle-aged. And we're starting to really have our feet underneath us. And I think people who've worked with PAs or NPs really understand, it's about the individuals and what they bring to the table. It's not really about the initials behind our names, because honestly, that's not what makes me do good work. It's not that I have the PA or NP behind my name. It's my commitment and dedication to my patients and supporting the rest of my team. Wendy Vogel: I think Stephanie, that's why we use the term advanced practitioner, advanced practitioner provider because it doesn't single out either one of us because we are functioning in the same manner. It's easier to say than say, PAs and NPs, so we just say, APPs. Todd Pickard: Yeah. And it doesn't mean that we don't identify as individual professions, because we do. I mean, I'm a PA, but I am part of a larger group. And part of that larger group is identifying as advanced practice provider because, at my institution, there are over 1000 of us, and we are a community of providers, and that's the way that we sense how we function within the team and within the institution. And so, it's really about that kind of joint interprofessional work. And speaking of work, Wendy, tell us a little bit about what are typical things that advanced practice providers do? Wendy Vogel: It might be easier to say what we don't do. I've got a list. Do you want to hear my list? Todd Pickard: Yeah, lay it on us. Wendy Vogel: Okay, here you go. Staff and peer education, survivorship care, palliative care, hospice care, pain management, acute care clinics, case management, research, cancer patient navigator, genetic services, lung nodule clinics, quality improvement. We're writers, we're authors, we're speakers, we mentor, and we do all kinds of public education. We can have clinical roles with faculty and professional organizations. We do procedures like bone marrows, paracentesis and suturing, and all that kind of stuff. We do a lot with all the other things like diagnosing, all the things you said earlier, diagnosing, ordering lab tests, ordering chemotherapy, etc. Todd Pickard: I think what's amazing about advanced practice providers is the flexibility we have to fill in gaps on teams or in service lines, no matter what that is. You know, I like to say and I'm sure everybody thinks that they originated this, but I feel that advanced practice providers are the stem cells of the team because we differentiate into whatever is necessary. At my institution, we recently had a gap in how our peer-to-peers were handled. Many times, you order an MRI or a PET scan, and the payer will, the day of or the day before, say, ‘Oh, I need to talk to somebody.' How that gets to the clinical team and when the clinical team has time to do that, it's really hard to coordinate. So, we created a team of advanced practice providers who spend one day a week doing the regular clinical roles, but then the rest of the time, they are dedicated to facilitating these peer-to-peer conversations. They have over a 95% success rate. And the payers, the medical directors, have actually gotten to know them. And so, they'll say, ‘Hey, I want to talk to so and so because she's fantastic and knows our program, and it's really easy to have these conversations.' And so, patients are taken care of and these business needs are taken care of, and then our clinical teams can really focus on what they're there for, which is to see those patients in and out every day. So, that's the power of advanced practice, its flexibility, filling in gaps; we can bend and morph to whatever we need to do because one of the things that's in our DNA is part of PA and advanced practice RN, we're here to serve, we're problem solvers or doers, too. When we see something, we pick it up and take care of it. That's just in our nature. Stephanie, tell us a little bit about your experience working with an advanced practice provider, is what Wendy and I are saying ringing true, or what's your experience? Dr. Stephanie Williams: Oh, absolutely! As I look back on my career, I'm not certain that I could have accomplished much of what I did, without my team members and advanced practice providers, both PAs and NPs. We also use them in an inpatient setting. And I can't remember Wendy mentioned that to take care of our stem cell transplant patients, because of residency, our requirements were removed from our services, and they became the go-to's to taking care of the patients. It actually improved the continuity of care that the patients received because they would see the same person throughout their 4 to 6-week course in the hospital, they also helped run our graft versus host clinics. I hate that term physician extender because they're really part of our health care team. We are all healthcare professionals working together, as Todd beautifully mentioned, for a common goal to help that patient who's right there in front of us. And not only that, from a kind of selfish viewpoint, they help with a lot of the work, doing the notes, so that we could all split up the work and all get out on time and all have at least some work-life balance. And I think that's a very important part of any team is that we can each find our own work-life balance within the team. So, I feel that they're a very important part of the oncology healthcare team. And I would recommend that everyone who wants to take care of patients, incorporate them into their team. Wendy Vogel: Can I say something right here that you mentioned that I'm so glad you did, which was physician extender. That is a dirty, dirty word in the AP world now because we don't know what part we're extending, that is not what we do. And also, we don't want to be called mid-level providers because – you can't see but I'm pointing from my chest to my belly - I don't treat just the mid-level, nor do I treat in mid-level care. I give superior care. I just give different care. And I give care on a team. And the last one is a non-physician provider. That is also a no-no because I wouldn't describe a teacher as a non-fireman, nor would I describe you, Stephanie, as a non-nurse practitioner. So, I don't want to be a non-physician provider either. Todd Pickard: It is an interesting phenomenon that even after 50 years, so many different places, whether it's the Joint Commission, or the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services, whether it's a state legislator, an individual state, an individual institution like Memorial Sloan Kettering or an MD Anderson or a Moffitt, everybody comes up with these different terms. And it's so interesting to me. Physicians are either physicians, doctor, sometimes they're called providers. But as a PA, who's an advanced practice provider, those are the two things that resonate with me: either call me PA or call me advanced practice provider. All these other names seem to just be, it's an alphabet soup, and it really doesn't carry any meaning because some places just come up with these strange terms. And I agree, physician extenders has been the one that always has amused me the most because it reminds me of hamburger helper. Am I some noodles that you add to the main meal so that you can extend that meal out and serve more people? I think what Wendy and I are really trying to get at, I know this has been with a little bit tongue in cheek, but we are part of the team. We work with physicians in a collaborative team-based setting, just like we all work with social workers and schedulers and business people and pharmacists and physical therapists. I think the main message here is that oncology care and taking care of patients with cancer is a team effort because it is a ginormous lift. It's a ginormous responsibility and our patients deserve a full team that works collaboratively and works well and has them in our focus like a laser, and I know that's what APPs do. Dr. Stephanie Williams: I think that's well said, Todd. What I enjoyed in the clinic in particular, was sitting down and discussing patient issues and problems with my APPs. And we worked together to try to figure out how to resolve issues that would come up. But we also learned from each other, you're never too old to learn something from people. I just felt the interaction, the interpersonal interaction was also very satisfying as well. Wendy Vogel: I think that the job satisfaction that comes from being a team player and working together is so much higher and that we're going to experience so much less burnout when we're working together each to the fullest scope of our practice. Todd Pickard: So, Wendy, one of the things that people ask a lot about when they work with advanced practice providers is, ‘Well, gosh! How do I know that they have this training or this experience or this competency?' And then the question arises about certification. So, let's talk a little bit about certification and what that means and what it doesn't mean. So, tell me, are advanced practice providers certified? And are they required to get a variety of certifications throughout their career? Let's talk a little bit about that. Why don't you open up the dialog. Wendy Vogel: Okay, happy to! So, to be able to practice in the United States, I have to have a board certification. And it can vary from state to state, but generally, it has to be either a family nurse practitioner certification, acute care nurse practitioner, geriatrics, women's health, pediatrics, there are about five. So, you are generally certified as one of those. There are a few oncology certifications across the US, board certifications to be able to practice at the state level, but not all states recognize those. So, most of us are educated in a more generalist area, have that certification as a generalist, and then can go on to get an additional certification. So, many nurse practitioners in oncology will also get an advanced oncology nurse practitioner certification. So, that's a little bit different. It's not required to practice. But it does give people a sense that, ‘Hey, she really knows what she's doing in oncology.' Todd Pickard: The PA profession has one national certification, and it is a generalist certification. It's probably similar to USMLE, where you really are thinking about medicine in its entirety. So, whether that be cardiology, orthopedics, family medicine, internal medicine, geriatric, psychiatry, or ophthalmology. I mean it's everything – and oncology is included as well. And that certification really is the entree into getting licensure within the states. It's basically that last examination that you take before you can get that license just to make sure that you have the basic knowledge and fundamentals to practice. And so, I always respond to this kind of question about certification, I say, ‘Well, is it really the experience and the onboarding and the training that one gets on the job and the mentoring and the coaching that one gets from our physician colleagues and other advanced practice providers that brings them the most value? Or is it going through an examination, where basically you're responding to a certain amount of information, and you either pass it or you don't, and you can get a certification? I'm not saying there's not value in that, but I'm also making the argument that if you are working with your APPs well, and they have good mentors, and they have good resources, they're going to be excellent clinicians. And having an additional certification may or may not make some huge difference. Many times I see people use it as a differentiator for privileges or something. It's really an external kind of a pressure or a desire, it doesn't really have anything to do with patient care. I mean, Wendy what has your experience been around that need for additional certification? Wendy Vogel: I've seen it used in practices to merit bonuses, which isn't really fair when a PA does not have that opportunity to have a specialty certification per se. So, I've seen it used negatively. I'm a great believer that any additional education that you can get is beneficial. However, I will say just like you said, if you are getting your mentoring, you have good practice, you're doing continuing education, then it's essentially the same thing. To be able to have an oncology certification, I had to practice for a year and I had to take a test that really measured what I should know after one year. And that's what a certification was for that. Is it beneficial, do I want it? Yeah, I want it. Do I have to have it to practice? No. Todd Pickard: I think that is a great way to segue to having a brief conversation about how you bring APPs in? I mean, just at a very high level, should people expect for an APP to come in right out of school and just hit the ground running without any additional investment? And I could ask the same question about a resident or a fellow who completes an oncology training program. Do you just put those people to work? Maybe that's an older model, and now really mentorship and that additional facilitated work is, I think, critical. So, I'll start with Stephanie, tell us a little bit about what's your experience been with advanced practice providers, or even young physicians as they enter the workforce? What's the role of onboarding or mentoring program? Dr. Stephanie Williams: So, it's important. We had a set process for bringing on our new APPs and it pretty much followed the guidelines from the American Society of Cellular Transplantation in terms of the knowledge base that they would need to know. So, it was a checklist. And we would also have them do modules from ASCO's oncology modules, as well looking at primarily hematologic malignancies, so they could get a background there. And then we would slowly bring them on board. Usually, they would start taking care of autologous patients, a certain subset of patients, and then move on to the more complicated patients. We did the same clinic, whether they were clinic or inpatient APPs. So, it took us about three to four months to onboard our APPs. In terms of a fellow becoming an attending physician, I'd like to say that there's specific onboarding there. Unfortunately, sometimes they're just, ‘Okay, these are your clinic days, this is when you start.' I mean, you're right Todd, we really need to work more on onboarding people. So, that one, they like their jobs, they're not frustrated, and they want to stay and continue to work in this field. I see many times after two or three years, if they're not onboarded properly, they just get frustrated and want to move on to a different area. Wendy Vogel: We know that most of the advanced practitioners who come into oncology don't have an oncology background, PA or NP.  They just don't, and we don't get a lot of that in school. So, it takes months, it would probably, I dare say, take 12 months of full-time practice to feel comfortable in the role. But how many practices particularly in the area that I've practiced in you get this AP, and you throw them in there, and in four weeks, you're supposed to be seeing patients. How can you make those decisions when you haven't been properly mentored? So, absolutely important to have a long onboarding time till that APP feels comfortable. Todd Pickard: Yeah, I think that it is critically important that we set up all of our team members for success, whether they be physicians, or PAs, or nurse practitioners or nurses, or pharmacists, and I think that is the role of onboarding and mentoring, having people who will invest time and energy in what you're trying to accomplish. You know, Wendy is spot on. Advanced practice providers have specific types of training within their educational program. As a PA, my focus in oncology was to screen for and detect it. So, to understand when a patient presents with a mass or some symptoms that may make you think that, oh gosh, maybe they've got acute leukemia or something else and looking at those white counts and, and understanding. But that transition from identifying and screening and diagnosing cancers is very different than how do you care for specific types of tumors and specific disciplines, whether it be radiation oncology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, cancer prevention. There's a lot that folks need to be brought up to speed about the standards of what do we do in this practice and how do we care for these types of cancers? And that really is the role for the onboarding and mentoring. You know, you may be lucky, you might get an advanced practice provider who used to work at a big academic cancer center in the same field, whether it be breast medical oncology or GI, and yeah, that's a much easier task. That person probably really needs mentoring about the local culture, how we get things done, what are the resources, and which hospitals do we refer to. But for the most part, working with an advanced practice provider means that you've got a PA or an NP, who has a strong foundation in medical practice. They know how to care for patients, they know how to diagnose, they know how to do assessments, they know how to critically think, they know how to find resources, and they know how to educate. But they may not know how long does a robotic radical prostatectomy patient going to be in the hospital? And how long does it take to recover and what are some of the things you need to be considering in  their discharge and their postoperative period? That is very detailed information about the practice and the local resources. Every advanced practice provider is going to need to have that kind of details shared with them through mentorship, and a lot of it is just how do we team with each other? What are the roles and responsibilities? Who does what? How do we have backup behaviors to cover folks? So, a lot of this really is just deciding, ‘Okay, we've got a team. Who's doing what? How do they work together and how do we back each other up?' Because at the end of the day, it's all about the team supporting each other and that's what I love about advanced practice. Wendy Vogel: Very well said, yes. I had an AP student yesterday in clinic, who told me - I was asking about her education in oncology and what she got - and she said, ‘Well, so for lymphoma, we treat with R-CHOP. So, a student, of course, raised their hand and said, ‘What's R-CHOP? She's like, ‘Well, the letters don't really line up with what the names of the drugs are, so, just remember R-CHOP for the boards.' So there you go. That's kind of what a lot of our education was like specific to oncology. And again, I'm a little tongue in cheek there also. But Todd, are you going to tell everybody about the ASCO Onboarding tool that's now available? Todd Pickard: Absolutely! ASCO has done a really great job of trying to explore what advanced practice is, and how teams work together. All of us are part of the ASCO Advanced Practice Task Force. One of the things we did was really to look at what are some best practices around onboarding, orientation, scope of practice, and team-based cancer care, and we created a resource that is available on the ASCO website, and I think that it is a great place to start, particularly for practices, physicians, or other hospital systems that don't have a lot of experience with advanced practice. It's a  great reference, it talks about the difference between orientation and onboarding. It gives you examples of what those look like. It talks about what are the competencies and competency-based examinations. So, how you assess people as they're going through the onboarding period. It has tons of references, because ASCO has done a lot of great research in this field, around collaborative practice and how patients experience it, and how folks work on teams, and what do those outcomes look like. So, I highly recommend it. Wendy, thank you for bringing that up. It's almost like you knew to suggest that. Well, this has been a really, really good conversation. I'm wondering, what are some of those pearls of wisdom that we could all provide to the folks listening? So, Stephanie, what are some of your observations that, you know, maybe we haven't just thought about, in your experience working as a physician with advanced practice providers? Dr. Stephanie Williams: One, it's important to integrate them into the team, and, as Wendy mentioned, to mentor them – mentor anybody correctly, in order for them to feel that they're contributing the most that they can to the care of the patient. I think there are other issues that we'll get into later and in different podcasts that come up that make physicians hesitant to have nurse practitioners or physician assistants. Some of those are financial, and I think we'll discuss those at a later time. But really, that shouldn't keep you from employing these particular individuals for your team. It really is a very rewarding type of practice to have. You're not alone. You're collaborating with other providers. I think it's just one of the great things that we do in oncology. Todd Pickard: I wanted to share a moment as a PA, advanced practice provider, when I most felt grateful for the opportunity to work as an advanced practice provider. My clinical practice has been in urology for the past 24 years for the main part. I've had a few little other experiences, but mainly urology, and I'll never forget a patient who was a middle-aged lady who had been working with transitional cell bladder cancer. It was superficial. So, the treatment for that is BCG and repeat cystoscopies and surveillance. And I walked into the room and I was going to give her BCG installation, and she was so angry. I wanted to know what was going on. I thought, gosh, should I make her wait too long or something else? So, I asked her, I said, ‘How are you doing today? You seem to be not feeling well.' And she said, ‘Well, I'm just so tired of this. I don't understand why y'all don't just fix me. Why don't y'all just get this right? Why do I have to keep coming back?' And as I looked at the medical record, this patient had had superficial bladder cancer for years. And I thought, ‘Has nobody ever really kind of sat down and mapped this out for her?' So, I asked her to get off the examining table, and I pulled the little paper forward, so I had someplace to draw. And I drew a big square and I said, ‘This is a field, just think of any big field anywhere near you. And it's full of weeds.' And I drew some weeds on there. And I said, ‘You know we can pull them out and we can pluck them, and we can put some weed killer in that field,' I said,  ‘do you think that if you come back in three months and there will be any weeds on that field?' She said, ‘Of course, there will be. There are always weeds because they always come back. It's very hard to get rid of.' And I said, ‘Well, this field is your bladder. And the type of cancer you have are like these weeds, and we have to constantly look for them, remove them, and then put this treatment down, that's why you come.' And she started crying. And I thought, ‘Well, I've blown it.' Because this was in the first couple of years of working as a PA in urology. And I said, ‘I'm so sorry. I really apologize.' She said, ‘Don't you dare apologize to me.' I said, ‘Man, I've really blown it now.' She said, ‘Todd, I've had this disease now for this many years. This is the first time I've ever fully understood what's happening to me. I am so grateful to you.' I will never forget this patient. I will never forget this experience. And I'm extraordinarily proud. It's not because I'm the smartest person in the world. I just happened to investigate, take the time, and I drew it out. I explained it in the simplest of terms because I wanted her to understand. And then whenever she came back, she always wanted to see me. So, it was great. I really developed a really lovely relationship with this patient. It was very rewarding. Wendy, can you think of a story that you have about an advanced practice provider that makes you particularly happy or where some big lesson was learned? Wendy Vogel: Yeah. I love your analogy. That's a great analogy. I think that part of what I love to do is similar to you, Todd, in that I like to make things understandable because I consider myself an East Tennessee southern simple person, I want to understand things in the language that I understand. So, I like using a language that a patient understands. I think if I was to say about some of the proudest things, or what makes me so excited about oncology is what we've seen in our lifetime. So, Todd, you and I practice probably about the same number of years and we could say we remember when Zofran came out, and how that revolutionized chemotherapy nausea and vomiting – Stephanie's nodding here, too. We all know that. And then wow! When we found out that we could maybe cure CML, that we're having patients live normal lives in our lifetime, that we've seen non-small cell lung cancer patients living past a year that are metastatic – Oh my gosh! This is such an exciting field and we learn something every day. There's new drugs, there's new treatments, there's new hope, every single day, and that's what makes me proud to be a part of that. Todd Pickard: Yeah, I think that oncology and the work that we get to do as a team is so incredibly rewarding. It's challenging, and we have losses, but we also have wins, and those wins are amazing, and transformative, not only for us but for our patients. So, some final pearls of wisdom. I'll share and then Wendy, I'll turn it over to you. One thing that I really want to convey to folks is to know about the state that you work in and what are the practice acts for advanced practice providers. Because, unlike our physician colleagues who have a very standard scope of practice across the country, advanced practice can drastically change from state to state and place to place even from institution to institution. So, be aware of that, so that you can build your team-based practice around what are the constraints, what is the scope of practice, and you can comply with that. It just takes a little bit of pre-work at the beginning. It's not daunting. These things are written in English. We're all smart folks. We can understand them and we can build our teams in the right way. So, just keep that in the back of their mind. It is not an obstacle. It's the instruction manual of how to build your team. That's all it is if you just think about it simplistically like that. So, Wendy, what's one or two things that you would say you really want our listeners to understand about advanced practice? Wendy Vogel: I loved what you said, Todd, both of our PA Associations and our Nurse Practitioner Associations have that information online, so it's very easy to find. But I think I would say, don't be afraid to stand up for yourself as an advanced practitioner or as a physician who wants an advanced practitioner. Don't be afraid to stand up for yourself and your scope of practice, know what you can do, know what you can't do, know and demand the respect that you deserve. I would always say that just don't forget that ‘no' is the first step to a ‘yes,' and keep on trying. Todd Pickard: I think we can all appreciate that sentiment, whether we be a PA an NP or a physician. Many times, we're advocating for our patients within our systems or our practices or with our payers or insurance providers. And yeah, sometimes you start from a place of ‘no' and then you work until you get to that ‘yes', or at least a compromise, if you can get to a 'maybe,' that's a good place too. Stephanie, any particular last words of wisdom or wrap us up with our conclusion? Dr. Stephanie Williams: Thanks, Todd and Wendy, for sharing your insights today. It's always a pleasure chatting with you both. Stay tuned for upcoming episodes where we plan to dig deeper into the various types of APPs, how they are trained, what a day in the life looks like for an oncology APP, their scope of practice, and the importance of team-based care, especially in oncology. Thank you to the listeners as well. Until next time. Thank you for listening to the ASCO Education Podcast. To stay up to date with the latest episodes, please click subscribe. Let us know what you think by leaving a review. For more information, visit the comprehensive education center at education.asco.org.   The purpose of this podcast is to educate and inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guest statements on the podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product , service, organization, activity or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement.  

Bits of Gold
BOG # 106 Crossing Your Own Chasm and Becoming More Fully Alive w/ Bob Goulet

Bits of Gold

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 36:15


Bob Goulet is an American entrepreneur, inventor, and life artist.In this episode, Bob shares his improbable life journey from tormented child, tragedy, and inmate in one of the world's toughest prisons to his transcendence into wholeness. He shares his deepest struggles, dead ends, achievements, and messy transformation into a being more peaceful and aligned than he ever imagined. Along the way, you may find yourself inspired to cross your own chasm and become more fully alive.Bob has a BS and MS in chemical engineering from the University of Connecticut and Clemson University. He also holds anMBA from Duke University. Bob is the inventor on more than two dozen patents globally and is a two-time Inc. 500 awardwinner who has also been recognized globally in the sciences.Bob Goulet LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/bobjgoulet/Bob Goulet Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/goulet.bobTo Purchase Chasm: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09TWY7CLR/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&btkr=1 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Leadership Is Changing
314: Kenneth Harbaugh - The Mission Is Critical

Leadership Is Changing

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 30:25


Being part of the military requires going beyond skill and talent–the foundation lies in the grit for the mission to serve. In today's episode, Kenneth Harbaugh shares his story in the military and how the values from this experience are relevant to leadership. He talks about how important it is for veterans to continue serving their communities after they leave the military and stresses the importance of rewarding talent and drive in this population. Ken Harbaugh is a former Navy pilot and past president of Team Rubicon Global, a disaster relief organization that has helped train over 100,000 veterans as disaster responders. He has served in senior leadership roles at multiple veteran service organizations, and is a prominent commentator on leadership and civil-military affairs, serving as a guest fellow at Yale University and writing for The New York Times, The Atlantic, and elsewhere. He is the host of several award-winning podcasts, including Reclaiming Patriotism (Crooked Media) and Warriors In Their Own Words (Evergreen Podcasts). He holds a BS from Duke University and a JD from Yale Law School. One of the most valuable assets in the workplace is diversity and this is done by promoting the varying perspectives and experiences. Listen closely to Denis and Kenneth as they share their wisdom on how to embrace change. In this episode: Kenneth discusses how veterans bring a unique ethic to their service after leaving the military and his organization helps with the transition into civilian life. Skill and talent in leadership are important, but the ethic of service is a key factor in success. The key thing that makes a good leader is having a real-world mission. Kenneth tackles how President Zelensky has changed people's opinions of him and is changing the way Ukraine feels about itself and about him as a leader. Leadership has had to adapt to different expectations among employers, clients, and customers in the current generation. Leaders need to be aware of the diversity of opinion and experience in order to be successful in today's fast-paced world. Leadership in the business world will have to be even more aware of employee expectations and adapt to changing labor markets. Key Takeaways: Ethic of service is a key factor to success True leadership requires stronger actions than words With the changing times arises the need to adapt dramatically Today's generation looks for meaning in the work they do Embracing diversity allows you to step up in the game The lack of awareness is the biggest detriment in today's world Tweetable Quotes: “There is just this immense reservoir of talent out there among the veteran population. They want to continue being part of something bigger than themselves.” - Kenneth Harbaugh “Leaders have had to grow with the times. And we have to understand that our employees have much different expectations in the 2020s than they did a generation ago.” - Kenneth Harbaugh Connect with Kenneth on https://www.facebook.com/TeamHarbaugh (Facebook), https://twitter.com/Team_Harbaugh (Twitter), and https://www.linkedin.com/in/kenneth-harbaugh-201a7b8/ (LinkedIn). Check out the podcasts https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/warriors-in-their-own-words-first-person-war-stories/id1350499924 (Warriors In Their Own Words) and https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/burn-the-boats/id1485464343 (Burn the Boats). You can also look into https://teamrubiconusa.org/ (Team Rubicon). Email: denis@leadingchangepartners.com Website:http://www.leadingchangepartners.com/ ( http://www.leadingchangepartners.com/)  Leadership Is Changing Facebook Group:https://www.facebook.com/groups/LeadershipIsChanging/ ( https://www.facebook.com/groups/LeadershipIsChanging/) Leadership is Changing LinkedIn Page: https://www.linkedin.com/company/leadership-is-changing-podcast/ (https://www.linkedin.com/company/leadership-is-changing-podcast/)

The Health Investment Podcast with Brooke Simonson
Best Practices When It Comes To Weight Loss/Maintenance | Dr. Michael Albert

The Health Investment Podcast with Brooke Simonson

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 45:31


EPISODE 140 - Dr. Michael Albert is a co-founder and the Chief Medical Officer of Accomplish Health, a virtual obesity medicine practice. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and a Diplomate of the American Board of Obesity Medicine. Before joining Accomplish Health, he served a joint faculty appointment at Cedars-Sinai and UCLA. In addition, Dr. Albert founded the Medical Weight Loss Program at Cedars-Sinai under the Weight Loss Center. He completed his internship and residency at Cedars-Sinai, where he served as the Kennamer Fellow for UCLA. He earned his MD from the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and his BS from Duke University. In his spare time, Dr. Albert cohosts the Impossible Healthcare podcast and is an active social media user, including TikTok, where he educates his over 220K followers on obesity and health. In the episode, he shares why the prevalence of obesity continues to rise; how food processing affects satiety; weight loss approaches that are a waste of time, money, and energy…and more! EPISODE WEBPAGE: thehealthinvestment.com/140 P.S. – If you're liking The Health Investment Podcast, be sure to hit “subscribe/follow” so that you never miss an episode

REimagine
Episode #117 Discipleship and Community without Judgmentalism. A Conversation with Dr. Mark D. Baker

REimagine

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 46:45


This week on the show we talk to Dr. Mark D. Baker.Mark D. Baker (PhD, Duke University) is professor of mission and theology at Fresno Pacific Biblical Seminary in Fresno, California. He served as a missionary in Honduras for ten years and has written a number of books, including Ministering in Honor-Shame Cultures (with Jayson Georges) and Recovering the Scandal of the Cross (with Joel B. Green). Today we talk about his latest work, Centered-Set Church:  Discipleship and Community Without Judgmentalism.Find out more about Mark HEREBuy Centered-Set Church

Beat the Often Path
Ep. 83 - Kyle Rand: CEO of Rendever

Beat the Often Path

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 53:24


Kyle Rand is the co-founder and CEO of Rendever. He grew up volunteering at a senior living community and later went on to study cognitive decline in the aging population at Duke University. He was recently named to Forbes 30 Under 30 and his company was just listed on Time's list of 100 most influential companies in 2022, outstanding achievements both. Watch this episode on YouTube All episodes: beattheoftenpath.com When you meet him, you'll understand why. His company has raised millions in funding pursuing a truly noble cause, empowering the elderly to form communities through virtual reality. In case you didn't know, loneliness and isolation are two of the biggest problems facing us as we age, and he's found a life and career of meaning solving that challenge.

Theology on Mission
S7: E14: Christ & The Common Life with Luke Bretherton

Theology on Mission

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 48:32


Luke Bretherton kindly grace the podcast to discuss the relationship between the church and the world, the place of politics in the Christian life, and gives us a masterful Hauerwas impersonation. Luke Bretherton is Robert E. Cushman Distinguished Professor of Moral and Political Theology and senior fellow of the Kenan Institute for Ethics at Duke University. Check out Luke's newest book on political theology: Christ and the Common Life: Political Theology and the Case for Democracy.

Journal of Accountancy Podcast
‘What of this should I bring back to my people?': Highlights from ENGAGE

Journal of Accountancy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 14:57


AICPA & CIMA ENGAGE 22 emcee Jill Schlesinger, a CBS News business analyst, reviews some of the top moments from the event last week in Las Vegas. Schlesinger had conversations with keynote speakers and CPA profession leaders and has memories and knowledge to share from several of those conversations. Journal of Accountancy content mentioned in this episode: A previous JofA podcast episode with ENGAGE keynote Carla Harris. Coverage of the keynote session with Schlesinger and former Duke University men's basketball coach Mike Krzyzewski. A survey showing a rise in spending on Sarbanes-Oxley compliance. The IRS announcement about a midyear increase to the standard mileage rate. Small business owners discuss post-Wayfair burdens with the Senate Finance Committee.

Bloomberg Business of Sports
College Hoops with Duke University's Nina King and NIL chat with Marty Edel

Bloomberg Business of Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 32:42


Join Michael Barr, Scarlet Fu and guest host Damien Sassower as they chat with Duke University's Director of Athletics, Nina King, a discussion on NIL in college sports with Marty Edel plus family drama at the Baltimore Orioles home. All that and more on the Business of Sports. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Unstoppable Woman®
Britt Frank | Move Through Trauma to Business Growth

The Unstoppable Woman®

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 42:46


To move through trauma to growth, you first have to name what's happening to you AS trauma, and get real about exactly what that means. The truth is, trauma doesn't have to be a life sentence! But that doesn't mean you can go into trauma denial and just choose to avoid the pain (psst—this will backfire!) Listen in to my interview with trauma therapist Britt Frank to learn all about what to do when this comes up for you and starts to affect your business, so you can learn how to get your trauma to work for you rather than against you! What To Listen For Intro [0:00] Trauma is not a synonym for an excuse to stay where you are [5:12] A trauma therapist's take on how to approach your goals and build momentum in your business [8:50] Myths about exposure therapy (including one I believed before this interview!) [20:20] How to create safety [30:56] How Britt provided a source of just a few - but important - details about mental health [35:04] Final Questions & Wrap-up [37:38] Resources Check out our free resources for listeners Join the Morning Mindset Club Join our Facebook Group Schedule a Strategy to Scale Consultation About Britt Frank: Britt Frank is psychotherapist, trauma specialist, and author of The Science of Stuck: Breaking Through Inertia to Find Your Path Forward. She received her BA from Duke University and her MSW from The University of Kansas. She speaks and writes widely about the mental health myths that keep us stuck and stressed. Her work focuses on empowering people to understand the inner mechanisms of their brains and bodies. Find Britt At: Instagram @brittfrank https://www.scienceofstuck.com/

Dr. GPCR Podcast
#78 with Dr. Stuart Maudsley

Dr. GPCR Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 97:51


For more details, visit the #DrGPCR Podcast Episode #78 page https://www.drgpcr.com/episode-78-with-stuart-maudsley/ ------------------------------------------- About Dr. Stuart Maudsley Stuart graduated from the University of Leeds in the U.K. with a First Class Honors degree in Pharmacology. At the end of his studies, he was awarded the Pfizer Prize for undergraduate research. He then completed his Ph.D. at Leeds as well as the University's Ackroyd, Brotherton, and Brown Scholar. Following his Ph.D., Dr. Maudsley was awarded a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Fellowship to train with Professor Robert Lefkowitz at Duke University. Following this tremendous experience, he was recruited to be the Principal Investigator of the Receptor Biology Section at the Medical Research Council (MRC) -Human Reproductive Sciences Unit within the University of Edinburgh. At the MRC he developed novel prostate cancer therapeutics based upon his research into GPCR pluridimensional signaling. To broaden his biomedical skill-set Stuart next accepted the position of Head of the Receptor Pharmacology Unit at the National Institutes of Health – National Institute on Aging at the Johns Hopkins University Medical Center. At the NIH he was the recipient of the coveted NIH ‘Bench-to-Bedside' Translational Research Grant Award, one of the few awards available within the intramural NIH program. Upon starting a new family, and returning to Europe, Dr. Maudsley continued his scientific journey with the award of the highly-valued Odysseus Program Type I Program Grant to work as both the Adjunct Director of the VIB Center for Molecular Neurology and also Vice-Chair of the Department of Biomedical Sciences at the University of Antwerp. Stuart's current research, in the Receptor Biology Lab, focuses on the development of novel GPCR-based therapeutics that interdict diseases based on their gerontological underpinnings. This research stream is now forming the basis of a new technology-based start-up company, HeptOME, to help screen and develop novel longevity/disease-regulating compounds with multidimensional disease efficacy profiles. ------------------------------------------- Become a #DrGPCR Ecosystem Member ------------------------------------------- Imagine a world in which the vast majority of us are healthy. The #DrGPCR Ecosystem is all about dynamic interactions between us who are working towards exploiting the druggability of #GPCR's. We aspire to provide opportunities to connect, share, form trusting partnerships, grow, and thrive together. To build our #GPCR Ecosystem, we created various enabling outlets. Individuals Organizations ------------------------------------------- Are you a #GPCR professional? Subscribe to #DrGPCR Monthly Newsletter Listen and subscribe to #DrGPCR Podcasts Listen and watch GPCR focused scientific talks at #VirtualCafe

Closer Mentality
Ep. 71: Morgan's Message

Closer Mentality

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 35:13


Episode 71 brought on representatives from the non-profit "Morgan's Message". Named for Duke University women's lacrosse player Morgan Rodgers, who passed in 2019, the initiative aims to debunk athlete mental health stories and share experiences, peer-to-peer. Today's guests help give context to the nationwide work that Morgan's Message now does. Morgan's twin sister, Aberle, and East Carolina women's lacrosse player, and Morgan's Message ambassador, CeCe Bartley joined the episode today. This episode is sponsored by BetterHelp. Get 10% off of your first month at www.betterhelp.com/closermentality Morgan's Message: https://morgansmessage.org/ Closer Mentality UNCENSORED: www.youtube.com/channel/UCJuZfwIP9ny-WIqpcUaQnWA Season 2's Playlist: www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLd…3p1aXW0xVjceLdJhG The episode is presented by MindReady Studios

Draft SZN: Fantasy Sports & Entertainment Podcast
2022 NBA Draft: AJ Griffin Jr Breakdown

Draft SZN: Fantasy Sports & Entertainment Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 17:24


Official breakdown of strengths & weaknesses of future lottery pick AJ Griffin Jr, Forward out of Duke University. One of the best shooters in the NBA Draft with one of the more tantalizing athletic frames makes him an intriguing player to watch. Hosts: @PoloPiffington @iLoveShawn5000 @DraftSZNPodcast @RiseNetworkUS For the full breakdown check out the Draft SZN Youtube page for the accompanying video element. The DraftSZN Podcast is brought to you by Underdog Fantasy, the best and easiest way to play fantasy sports for cash prizes.Through Underdog's slick mobile app and easy-to-use website, you can draft a season-long NBA team in minutes, and the best part is, you don't have to worry about ANY in-season management.There are no waivers, trades, or lineup setting; at Underdog, you get the best possible score from your team each and every week.Head to underdogfantasy.com today, OR download their app from the App Store/Google Play Store, and you'll get a FREE deposit match up to $100 when you sign up and make your first deposit with the promo code: DRAFTSZN

Guy Kawasaki's Remarkable People
John Biewen: Author, Journalist, and Documentarian

Guy Kawasaki's Remarkable People

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 51:14


John Biewen is a journalist and documentarian. He directs the audio program at the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University where he produces the two-time Peabody Award–nominated podcast, Scene on Radio, This podcast dares to ask the hard questions. It goes deep and covers topics such as: What is the origin of racism? What's up with white people? Why is it important to examine our dubious past? Are we at the end of democracy? Do you think there will be a civil war? Is there still time to save ourselves? Let's just say that it's a good thing that I don't have self-governing status in Florida. If you know what I mean. John is also the co-editor of the book Reality Radio: Telling True Stories in Sound, and has produced for the, This American Life, Studio 360, American RadioWorks, and the BBC World Service.

New Books Network
Michael Munger, "The Sharing Economy: Its Pitfalls and Promises" (Duke UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 55:36


Transactions have always taken place. For hundreds of years that 'place' was a market or, more recently, a shopping mall. But in the past two decades these physical locations have increasingly been replaced by their virtual counterparts - online platforms. In this book Michael Munger explains how these platforms act as matchmakers or middlemen, a role traders have adopted since the very first exchanges thousands of years ago. The difference today is that the matchmakers often play no direct part in buying or selling anything - they just help buyers and sellers find each other. Their major contribution has been to reduce the costs of organizing and completing purchases, rentals or exchanges. The Sharing Economy: Its Pitfalls and Promises (Duke UP, 2021) contends that the key role of online platforms is to create reductions in transaction costs and it highlights the importance of three 'Ts' - triangulation, transfer and trust - in bringing down those costs. Professor Munger trained as an economist at Washington University in St. Louis under Nobel Prize-winning economic historian Douglass North. He has published prolifically across disciplines in the areas of political economy and public choice, and is now a professor of political science at Duke University, with secondary appointments in economics and public policy.  Professor Munger is also an avowed libertarian, and has stood for office as a candidate of the Libertarian Party. In our interview, he explains how the emergence of the platform economy creates concentrations of economic power that are just as concerning to him as concentrations of political power.  He also explains how thinking through the many changes and disruptions in our working lives that will result from the platform economy has led him to the view that Universal Basic Income and single-payer healthcare are necessary to creating the kind of free and prosperous society that he and other libertarians want. Host Peter Lorentzen is an Associate Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of San Francisco, where he leads a new Master's program in Applied Economics that trains students in the skills of data analytics needed to understand, succeed in, or make positive changes to the evolving digital platform economy. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society
Michael Munger, "The Sharing Economy: Its Pitfalls and Promises" (Duke UP, 2021)

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 55:36


Transactions have always taken place. For hundreds of years that 'place' was a market or, more recently, a shopping mall. But in the past two decades these physical locations have increasingly been replaced by their virtual counterparts - online platforms. In this book Michael Munger explains how these platforms act as matchmakers or middlemen, a role traders have adopted since the very first exchanges thousands of years ago. The difference today is that the matchmakers often play no direct part in buying or selling anything - they just help buyers and sellers find each other. Their major contribution has been to reduce the costs of organizing and completing purchases, rentals or exchanges. The Sharing Economy: Its Pitfalls and Promises (Duke UP, 2021) contends that the key role of online platforms is to create reductions in transaction costs and it highlights the importance of three 'Ts' - triangulation, transfer and trust - in bringing down those costs. Professor Munger trained as an economist at Washington University in St. Louis under Nobel Prize-winning economic historian Douglass North. He has published prolifically across disciplines in the areas of political economy and public choice, and is now a professor of political science at Duke University, with secondary appointments in economics and public policy.  Professor Munger is also an avowed libertarian, and has stood for office as a candidate of the Libertarian Party. In our interview, he explains how the emergence of the platform economy creates concentrations of economic power that are just as concerning to him as concentrations of political power.  He also explains how thinking through the many changes and disruptions in our working lives that will result from the platform economy has led him to the view that Universal Basic Income and single-payer healthcare are necessary to creating the kind of free and prosperous society that he and other libertarians want. Host Peter Lorentzen is an Associate Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of San Francisco, where he leads a new Master's program in Applied Economics that trains students in the skills of data analytics needed to understand, succeed in, or make positive changes to the evolving digital platform economy. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/science-technology-and-society

New Books in Public Policy
Michael Munger, "The Sharing Economy: Its Pitfalls and Promises" (Duke UP, 2021)

New Books in Public Policy

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 55:36


Transactions have always taken place. For hundreds of years that 'place' was a market or, more recently, a shopping mall. But in the past two decades these physical locations have increasingly been replaced by their virtual counterparts - online platforms. In this book Michael Munger explains how these platforms act as matchmakers or middlemen, a role traders have adopted since the very first exchanges thousands of years ago. The difference today is that the matchmakers often play no direct part in buying or selling anything - they just help buyers and sellers find each other. Their major contribution has been to reduce the costs of organizing and completing purchases, rentals or exchanges. The Sharing Economy: Its Pitfalls and Promises (Duke UP, 2021) contends that the key role of online platforms is to create reductions in transaction costs and it highlights the importance of three 'Ts' - triangulation, transfer and trust - in bringing down those costs. Professor Munger trained as an economist at Washington University in St. Louis under Nobel Prize-winning economic historian Douglass North. He has published prolifically across disciplines in the areas of political economy and public choice, and is now a professor of political science at Duke University, with secondary appointments in economics and public policy.  Professor Munger is also an avowed libertarian, and has stood for office as a candidate of the Libertarian Party. In our interview, he explains how the emergence of the platform economy creates concentrations of economic power that are just as concerning to him as concentrations of political power.  He also explains how thinking through the many changes and disruptions in our working lives that will result from the platform economy has led him to the view that Universal Basic Income and single-payer healthcare are necessary to creating the kind of free and prosperous society that he and other libertarians want. Host Peter Lorentzen is an Associate Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of San Francisco, where he leads a new Master's program in Applied Economics that trains students in the skills of data analytics needed to understand, succeed in, or make positive changes to the evolving digital platform economy. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/public-policy

Physician's Guide to Doctoring
Doctor, Make Your Money Move with Altelisha Taylor, MD, MPH

Physician's Guide to Doctoring

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 36:16


Dr. Altelisha “Lisha” Taylor is a family medicine resident, professional speaker, doctor-preneur, and money coach who promotes physician wellness through financial literacy. She is the founder of  CareerMoneyMoves.com and creator of the Facebook Group Financial Grand Rounds, two platforms that help busy young professionals, especially doctors, put systems in place to build wealth. We first discussed something unrelated to personal finance and it was how someone who went to a super competitive undergrad like Duke, chose the not so competitive specialty of family medicine, and ultimately it came down how one defines success, and why its important to make sure we have internal measures of success rather than external ones. Then we got into the money stuff, like how as a resident she can discuss real estate when none of us had two nickels to rub together, the worst advice she every got, money mistakes she's made, common advice she gives to colleagues, why physicians love Robert Kiyosaki so much (who has become a doomsday prepper).  Dr. Taylor got her bachelors from Duke University, MPH from George Washington University, MD from the University of Florida, and did her residency at Emory University. She was an exclusive content writer for Doximity, worked at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, spent time in private equity, and even created the Personal Finance guide for Residents and Fellows at Emory University that is now on the GME website.

First Person Plural: EI & Beyond
Karen Ziegler - Conflict and Leadership

First Person Plural: EI & Beyond

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 53:13


At the height of the AIDS epidemic, Karen Ziegler was senior pastor of an LGBTQ church in Greenwich Village. In this interview she shares how she led her congregation through a period of intense conflict.Karen led the church from 1978-1988 and then was a full-time organizer for several years in the AIDS community before becoming a nurse. Since retiring from work as a Nurse Practitioner 6 years ago she has been as a volunteer activist, serving as lead organizer for Democracy Out Loud Indivisible. She also works with the Poor People's Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival and several other organizations. Having meditated on her own since 1979, she finally found a teacher in 1989 and since then has studied with teachers of vedic trantra, Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) Insight Meditation, plant medicine, and Tibetan Buddhism. She holds an MDiv from Union Theological Seminary, DMin from New York Theological Seminary, and an MSN from Duke University. Since 1917 Lama Rod Owens has been her primary teacher. Support the show

Tests and the Rest: College Admissions Industry Podcast
346. TUTORING FOR TEENS WITH ADHD

Tests and the Rest: College Admissions Industry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 27:46


Students with attention disorders have difficulty staying on task, sustaining focus, and staying organized–all of which are critical to academic and testing success. Amy and Mike invited educator Jenn Cohen to share strategies for tutoring teens with ADHD. What are five things you will learn in this episode? What kind of learning challenges do teens with attention deficits face? What strategies are most effective in helping students with ADHD excel academically? What makes standardized testing so challenging for teens with ADHD? What should students with ADHD know about testing accommodations? Of the SAT and ACT, which tends to be better for ADHD students? MEET OUR GUEST Jenn Cohen has been in the test prep trenches for over 20 years, but she prides herself in never feeling too comfortable calling herself an expert. She is always learning from her students, families, other pros and the research literature. She's a lover of art and science, and believes the world is a better place with both. Meeting Neil deGrasse Tyson is on her bucket list.  Jenn has been featured in The Dallas Morning News, ADDitude Magazine and Good Morning Texas, as well as numerous blogs around the web. She has also been a presenter at the Learning Disabilities Association national conference, as well as a speaker at high schools and parent associations. She currently serves as Treasurer of the Learning Disabilities Association of Texas. She is a graduate of Duke University, and completed graduate work in clinical psychology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. She is a hardcore Duke sports fan, and general sports junkie, so she gets a particular kick out of her student's sports victories.  Jenn lives in Dallas, TX with her husband and business guru, Gary, and her daughter, Erin. She enjoys cooking, museums, '80's bands and reading Harry Potter with Erin (with voices, of course)!  Find Jenn at launchpadeducation.com. LINKS Ace the ACT: College Admissions Test Tips in ADDitude Magazine Test Prep Planning for ADHD/LD Students 8 ADHD teaching strategies RELATED EPISODES EXECUTIVE FUNCTION AND ADD/ADHD TEST PREP FOR STUDENTS WITH ACCOMMODATIONS THE SCIENCE OF MEMORY ABOUT THIS PODCAST Tests and the Rest is THE college admissions industry podcast. Explore all of our episodes on the show page. ABOUT YOUR HOSTS Mike Bergin is the president of Chariot Learning and founder of TestBright. Amy Seeley is the president of Seeley Test Pros. If you're interested in working with Mike and/or Amy for test preparation, training, or consulting, feel free to get in touch through our contact page.

Locked On Blue Devils - Daily Podcast On Duke Blue Devils Football & Basketball

JJ Jackson chats with Josh Cox of Duke Football Talk's Section 17 Podcast about Jacob Grandison's decision to transfer to Duke University and join the Duke Men's Basketball team. Grandison has played collegiately for Holy Cross and Illinois and has plenty of NCAA experience and fills a need at the shooting guard position for the Blue Devils. JJ and Josh talk about the completed roster for Duke Men's Basketball going into next season. Twitter: @LO_BlueDevils | @_JJ_Jackson_ The Locked On Blue Devils Podcast with host JJ Jackson is a daily show that brings you the latest news & headlines from Duke Blue Devils Athletics. Every day, we will discuss the biggest stories from Duke Basketball and Football and feature special guests including athletes, coaches and insiders for an in-depth look. Locked On Blue Devils is a part of the Locked On Podcast Network. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline BetOnline.net has you covered this season with more props, odds and lines than ever before. BetOnline – Where The Game Starts! Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Empowered Athlete Podcast
Jackie Insinger - Author, Executive Coach

Empowered Athlete Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 55:31


Ready to Spark Brilliance (it's also the title of her new book on Leadership)?  Jackie Insinger is your source. Jackie has a Psychology degree from Duke University and a Masters in Human Development and Psychology from Harvard. She is a member of both the Forbes Coaches Council and the Harvard Business Review Advisory Council.  She is a wife and mother of 2 and is dedicated to helping leaders become extraordinary.  Listen in to discover what the Platinum Rule is and how to really create massive outcomes in the workplace. https://www.linkedin.com/in/jackieinsinger/   The Empowered Team is your ticket to your next level - learn more via the link below: Check out the Team!

Radio Free Hillsdale 101.7 FM
Interview: John Staddon, June 13, 2022

Radio Free Hillsdale 101.7 FM

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 21:00


John Staddon, professor of psychology and biology at Duke University, discusses his book, Science in an Age of Unreason.

Cryptonite with Rich Goldberg
E11. The De-Final Frontier

Cryptonite with Rich Goldberg

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 52:00


Bette Chen Host Rich Goldberg explores the wild world of decentralized finance, or DeFi, with Bette Chen, co-founder of Acala, a DeFi network. They break down how DeFi works, why an average person would want access to it, how Web 2.0 could soon fuse with Web 3.0, the difference between Bitcoin and Ethereum, how stablecoins work and more. Bette Chen is a graduate of the Duke University – The Fuqua... Source

New Books in the American West
Sarah Deutsch, "Making a Modern U.S. West: The Contested Terrain of a Region and Its Borders, 1898-1940" (U Nebraska Press, 2022)

New Books in the American West

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 55:33


In less than half a century, the American West changed dramatically from a region of dynamic borders, politics, and identities to a more fixed zone of borders and demarcations. This is the argument made by Sarah Deutsch, professor of history at Duke University, in Making a Modern U.S. West: The Contested Terrain of a Region and Its Borders, 1898-1940 (U Nebraska Press, 2022), a major new synthetic work and part of Nebraska's History of the American West series. In this wide ranging and transnational book. Deutsch connects movements often seen as separate, such radical organizing in the labor movement, in Mexican politics, and women's suffrage, to make the case that Western politics in the early 20th century were particularly unsettled, the region's political future yet undecided. Similarly fluid dynamics defined racial and sexual histories of the region. It was World War I and the years following when the US government found the tools it deemed necessary to define and categorize people and places in ways that would curtail this fluidity. A remarkable work, Deutsch strongly makes the case that the early 20th century was a crucial period for defining how exactly the modern US West would look. Dr. Stephen R. Hausmann is an assistant professor of history at the University of St. Thomas in Minnesota. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-west

Seize The Moment Podcast
Darryl Stickel: Building Trust, Strong Leaders, Teams & Removing Uncertainty | STM Podcast #133

Seize The Moment Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 59:18


On episode 133, we welcome Darryl Stickel to discuss the elements of building trust in various types of relationships, the levers of trust - integrity, benevolence, ability, how to foster all three and why we need to, confirmation bias and why positive perceptions of others become more positive over time and negative ones become increasingly more negative, our overly positive self-conceptions and how challenging them helps improve our relationships, generosity and vulnerability begetting more generosity and vulnerability and the importance of becoming less self-protective, and the value of empathy and learning to take others' behaviors less personally. Darryl Stickel has devoted his career to understanding trust, what it is, how it functions, and how to increase it. He holds a PhD in Business from Duke University. Before founding Trust Unlimited in 2001, he was a consultant at McKinsey and Company, the world-renowned global management consulting firm. He has helped leaders build trust in a wide range of business and personal environments, including financial services, telecoms, hi-tech, families, and the Canadian Military in Afghanistan. He is also a professor at the Luxembourg School of Business teaching in the MBA program and in their executive education program. His new book, out now, is called Building Trust: Exceptional Leadership in an Uncertain World. | Darryl Stickel | ►Website | https://www.trustunlimited.com/about/ ►Building Trust Book Link | https://bit.ly/3zCGQIX Where you can find us: | Seize The Moment Podcast | ► Facebook | https://www.facebook.com/SeizeTheMoment ► Twitter | https://twitter.com/seize_podcast  ► Instagram | https://www.instagram.com/seizethemoment ► TikTok | https://www.tiktok.com/@seizethemomentpodcast ► Patreon | https://www.patreon.com/user?u=32208666

一席英语·脱口秀:老外来了
一席主播Jerry暂别:我去服兵役啦!临走唱首歌给你们!

一席英语·脱口秀:老外来了

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 8:40


主播:Jerry | 翩翩歌曲 : 开场:Hero结束:Jerry原创歌曲Sometimes 今天是主播Jerry暂时告别的一期podcast,因为Jerry是Korean(韩国人),他要go to the army(参军),to serve in the military(去服兵役)。Jerry这次要服18个月的兵役,所以他跟Duke University申请了a gap year(休学一年)。在我们的认知里,服兵役都是两年。但在韩国,不同的兵种,兵役时长也不一样。The soldiers in air force(空军)serve for 21 months.The soldiers in the navy(海军) serve for 20 months.The soldiers in the army(陆军) serve for 18 months. 现在服兵役的时间已经缩短了。Jerry's dad has served in the army for 30 months, back then. Jerry的爸爸当时在军队服役30个月。*military/ˈmɪləteri/ n. 军队*soldiers in air force 空军*soldiers in the navy 海军*soldiers in the army陆军Jerry在部队applied for the military interpreter position(申请了军事翻译),而且已经passed the interview(通过了面试),他要work with US soldiers(和美国士兵对接)。Jerry还申请了中东地区的United Nations peacekeeper(联合国维和人员),Jerry希望借此机会,further expand his perspective of the world(进一步拓宽他对世界的看法)。*apply /əˈplaɪ/ v. 申请*interpreter /ɪnˈtɜ:rprətər/ n. 口译者*perspective /pərˈspektɪv/ n. 视角Jerry进部队后,会有training(培训)。主要是学习how to shoot a gun(如何开枪),how to throw a grenade(怎么扔手榴弹),还有how to survive under a chemical attack(如何在化学物质的攻击下生存),等等。聊到这些培训内容,身为学霸的Jerry表示很scared。*survive /sərˈvaɪv/ v. 生存*attack/əˈtæk/ v. 袭击最后,Jerry想对我们广大粉丝说:能录podcasts是 such a great pleasure(极大的乐趣),I genuinely enjoyed it(非常享受)。Thank you all ASeat listeners, once again. 再次感谢所有的听众朋友!最后,Jerry把自己作词作曲、自己演唱的歌曲Sometimes[音频5:45开始],送给了所有喜爱“老外来了”节目的朋友们,谢谢大家的鼓励、支持!Jerry, see you next October! 我们明年10月再见!欢迎大家在节目下方留言给Jerry:你有什么想对Jerry说的?

CrowdScience
Human v Machine

CrowdScience

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 31:10


Humans can walk for miles, solve problems and form complex relationships using the energy provided by daily meals. That is a lot of output for a fairly modest input. Listener Charlotte from the UK wants to know: how efficient are humans? How do they compare to cars, other animals and even to each other? Presenter Marnie Chesterton pits her energetic self against everything from cars to rabbits to find out how she shapes up. Marnie also explores whether humans are born equal when it comes to fuel efficiency. Does the energy from one banana get converted into the same amount of movement from person to person? Marnie gets on a treadmill to find out how efficient she really is. With contributors from Herman Pontzer, Duke University, Rhona Pearce, Loughborough University and Christian Gammelgaard Olesen from Wolturnus wheelchair manufacturing company. Presenter: Marnie Chesterton Producer: Caroline Steel Image credit: Getty Images

The Pulse
The Future of Embryo Selection

The Pulse

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 48:27


IVF clinics have long tested embryos for genetic disorders and abnormalities — but in recent years, new startups have been pushing the envelope of genetic testing, helping parents screen their future children for all kinds of health risks, ranging from diabetes to breast cancer. Many people see this technology as promising — it can give parents, many of whom have already faced devastating losses, their best shot at having happy, healthy children. But others see a dark side to the advancing field of embryo screening. What happens when testing goes beyond health and parents get the chance to select for other traits, like eye color, height, or intelligence? What does it mean to want “the best” for your child? On this episode, we look at new and emerging DNA technologies aimed at selecting embryos. We discuss critics' fears, concerns, and the ethics of embryo screening. We also hear about one experiment from the past that went very wrong. Also heard on this week’s episode: We talk with Nita Farahany — a professor of law and philosophy at Duke University who studies ethical, legal, and social implications of emerging technologies — about the thorny legal and ethical issues surrounding embryo screening. Back in the 1980s, a wealthy inventor named Robert K. Graham came up with an idea to make the world a better place — a sperm bank for geniuses. His goal was to create a new generation of intellectual elites, spawned from the sperm of noted scientists. More than 200 children were born from this bank. The new podcast series BioHacked: Family Secrets, hosted by T.J. Raphael, sheds light on this experiment, and introduces us to one of the people who was conceived from one of the donors. We'll hear an excerpt of his story.

Jerm Warfare: The Battle Of Ideas
Andrew Kaufman on viruses not existing

Jerm Warfare: The Battle Of Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 49:58


Andrew Kaufman is a medical doctor. More specifically, Andrew Kaufman is a Medical Doctor, Psychiatrist and Molecular Biologist who received his training and degrees from Duke University, MIT and South Carolina Medical University. He says there are no such things as "viruses" and the "Coronavirus Global Pandemic" is a "manufactured event." The conversation around whether or not viruses exist, appears to conjure up all kinds of emotions, and is met with resistance. My guess is because virology is a deeply entrenched paradigm, and it is what we were taught as kids. A cult-like approach would be to dismiss dissenting views and, instead, to perpetuate a previously held belief. David Rasnick refers to this as the Tyranny Of Dogma. The science is never settled. Andrew joined me for a conversation about viruses and what they are; causation and indirect evidence; observation versus computer modelling; the origins of SARS-CoV-2; and the causes of illness, if not viruses. PLEASE SUPPORT MY WORK.

CREOGs Over Coffee
#Wellness - Financial Series #3: Budgeting

CREOGs Over Coffee

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 23:12


We welcome back Mike Foley, CFP, CSLP to continue our financial wellness series. Today, we discuss budgeting! Mike talks to us about where to allocate our funds: what do we contribute to, what do we want to spend our money on?  Don't forget to check out our Rosh Review question of the week! Go on our website to find out how to win a whole year's worth of board review questions.  Michael is a comprehensive financial advisor who runs his practice out of Scottsdale, Arizona, under North Star Resource Group. Michael was trained at Duke University and holds his Certified Financial Planner designation alongside his Certified Student Loan Professional designation. Although Michael serves a diverse group of clients with their financial and student loan needs, with two physician parents, Michael has found a specialty in working with those in the healthcare space.  North Star Resource Group is independently owned and operated. 6720 N Scottsdale Rd Ste 290, Scottsdale, AZ 85253. Separate from the financial plan and his role as financial planner, Michael may recommend the purchase of specific investment or insurance products or accounts. These product recommendations are not part of the financial plan and you are under no obligation to follow them. Financial Professionals do not provide specific tax/legal advice and this information should not be considered as such. You should always consult your tax/legal advisor regarding your own specific tax/legal situation. Twitter: @creogsovercoff1 Instagram: @creogsovercoffee Facebook: www.facebook.com/creogsovercoffee Website: www.creogsovercoffee.com Patreon: www.patreon.com/creogsovercoffee You can find the OBG Project at: www.obgproject.com

Trust Your Gut
13. Dr. Tawny Kross: The Mind-Body Connection In Healing Chronic Pain

Trust Your Gut

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 53:58


This is the first interview airing on the podcast! I talk with Dr. Tawny Kross, a physical therapist who specializes in chronic pain. So much of what she shares about her mind-body approach applies to those who struggle with chronic symptoms. Dr. Tawny Kross graduated with her Doctorate in Physical Therapy from Duke University in 2013. She has worked in a Veterans Affairs hospital for nearly a decade now. Through the course of her practice, she has developed a very comprehensive and integrative approach to PT, which evolved from the necessity of such an approach in her work with the complexities of those who have chronic pain. This includes nutrition, hypnosis, guided imagery, mindfulness among other practices. Focusing on mental health and being trauma-sensitive is of particular importance, as many of her clients have experienced military sexual trauma. She helps her clients move beyond pain and fear by connecting them with internal motivations, guiding them to see innate strengths and realize their inner healing abilities. She recently started her own business, Kross Centered Care - Integrative PT, Health and Wellness in order to bring her expertise to more people. Find out more about Tawny: Website Instagram Find out more about Trust Your Gut: Download your free guide: Why Your Healthy Diet Isn't Solving Your Gut Issues If this resonated with you, be sure to let me know over on: Instagram: @trustyourgut.health Facebook: @healthbytrustyourgut Book a free 30 minute discovery call with me HERE To find out more: www.trustyourguthealth.com Please SUBSCRIBE, leave a review, and share this podcast with anyone you think may benefit! Thank you!

Columbia Energy Exchange
Corporate Climate Disclosure: US SEC Weighs Rules

Columbia Energy Exchange

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 41:18


Earlier this year, the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) proposed new regulations that would require publicly-traded companies to estimate their greenhouse gas emissions and disclose certain climate risks. The mandated rules around disclosure would be unprecedented in the United States and come at a time when investors are increasingly concerned about companies' environmental, social, and governance (ESG) commitments. But the controversial measure is stirring up complaints – from those who say it goes too far, and others who say it doesn't go far enough.  For deeper insight into the SEC's proposed rules, host Bill Loveless spoke with Dr. Shivaram Rajgopal, the Kester and Byrnes Professor of Accounting and Auditing at Columbia Business School.  Shivaram was previously a faculty member at Duke University, Emory University and the University of Washington, and his work is frequently cited in outlets like The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Bloomberg, and Forbes.  Together, they discuss some of the key provisions in the proposal and the broader implications it could have for the future of corporate climate accountability.