Podcasts about caregivers

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  • 2,463PODCASTS
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  • Dec 2, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about caregivers

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Latest podcast episodes about caregivers

Caregiver Connection Podcast
How to be Grateful When your Life Sucks

Caregiver Connection Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 7:54


Do you hate it when people try to tell you that you shouldn't be so sad, angry, stressed out because things could be worse? Does it anger you when people tell you to find the silver lining in this storm of caregiving? Learning how to be grateful can help when life gets really difficult Gratitude should not be Dismissive or used to minimize what you're going through A way for you to say things could be worse A method of showing you that you have things to be grateful for and by default have nothing to complain about. There's nothing worse than having a moment when someone tells you that it could be worse or try to tell you things aren't as bad as they seam. So I'm not suggesting that this is what gratitude should look like for you because that's not helpful for you. This episode is about  Learning how to validate your struggle by naming it and seeing it Not using gratitude as the solution to your problems Understand how to attend to the hardships of caregiving but at the same time learn how to be grateful in a way that is supportive of your caregiving needs. Listen to this episode and learn how gratitude can be a part of your life even when life sucks.  Find the show notes and free resources at www.loveyourcaregivinglife.com

Ogletree Deakins Podcasts
Oregon Employment Law, Episode 3: COVID-19, School Closures, and Employee Leave Entitlements for Caregivers

Ogletree Deakins Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 15:04


In this episode of our Oregon Employment Law podcast series, Paul Cirner and Florence Mao discuss the employment law implications of school closures and quarantine orders related to COVID-19 exposure. The speakers detail the relevant requirements under federal laws and the Oregon Family Leave Act (OFLA) in addition to explaining issues regarding verification of caregivers' need for leave, the amount of leave required under leave laws, and the interplay between federal and state law.

The Dana & Parks Podcast
D&P Highlight: Dana is NOT enjoying being a caregiver.

The Dana & Parks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 6:07


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

OffScrip with Matthew Zachary
Celebrating World AIDS Day 2021

OffScrip with Matthew Zachary

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 40:43


In celebration of World AIDS Day 2021, Matthew Zachary and guest co-host Elura Nanos welcome Krishna Stone, director of community relations for Gay Men's Health Crisis, and Damon Jacobs, New York-based licensed therapist and HIV/AIDS activist. They discuss early HIV/AIDS activism, the latest scientific advancements, and what we can all do to end the HIV/AIDS epidemic. The theme for the WAD 2021 observance is “Ending the HIV Epidemic: Equitable Access, Everyone's Voice.” World AIDS Day was first observed in 1988. Each year, organizations and individuals across the world bring attention to the HIV epidemic, endeavor to increase HIV awareness and knowledge, speak out against HIV stigma, and call for an increased response to move toward Ending the HIV Epidemic in the U.S. For more about WAD, visit https://www.hiv.gov.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Parenting UP! Caregiving adventures with comedian J Smiles
Dentures and Dementia are Oral Care Hell!

Parenting UP! Caregiving adventures with comedian J Smiles

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 49:36


Zetty had dentures much of her adult life  but J never had to get involved -- until now. As a caregiver, J Smiles is learning that it is not as simple as her brain-health mom made it seem all those years. Because teeth are required to chew, Smiles is determined to master these objects to keep her mom properly nurishhed. But J loses many battles along the way. Who knew such humor and health care could be contained within denture debacles?  Get ready for problems putting the dentures in, taking them out, mishaps at church, near panic trips to the ER and more. The Snuggle Up® to the idea that it is more dentures and dementia are oral care hell!PODCAST SHOW NOTES:Sponsor:CircleOf (Caregiver App)https://www.circleof.com/downloadParentingUp! Weekly LIVE TV/Internet INTERACTIVE Show on GetVokl.com:https://getvokl.com/channel/parenting-up

Happy Bones, Happy Life
121. Tools for Reducing Stress for Caregivers | Mary Elaine Petrucci

Happy Bones, Happy Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 37:17


“I recommend that caretakers take a break. Even if it's for 5 minutes, you will be able to be more focused and present with the person you're caring for.” -Mary Elaine Petrucci  Mary Elaine Petrucci is a speech-language pathologist who has been working for over twenty years with children and adults working in schools, home care, hospitals, nursing homes, and memory care settings as well as independent and assisted living facilities. She has an MBA in Healthcare Management from Boston University. As part of the “sandwich generation'', she assisted her parents in choosing qualified home healthcare services that matched their needs as well as finding a quality adult day care program and providing financial support to meet their social and emotional needs. During this process, she realized that there are huge groups of people seeking guidance around their parents' healthcare and wellness as they retire in record numbers daily! Mary-Elaine has decided to assist these family caregivers just as she did her own parents Mary Elaine is the host of the health and wellness podcast Caregiver Cast. She is launching a Caregiver Conference and has an ongoing Facebook group full of resources, expert information and interviews for caregivers. In today's episode, we discuss tools and strategies caregivers can use to be prepared, reduce stress, and help those they love.   Links: Caregiver Conference (free and virtual) https://tinyurl.com/happycaregiver Website: https://maryelainepetrucci.com

At the window with Dementia
At the window with Dementia - Episode 47 "Strategy to enjoy the holidays - Manage your expectations"

At the window with Dementia

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 11:29


This episode discusses how you can change your approach to the holiday season so that both you and your LO will have a more enjoyable time.

OffScrip with Matthew Zachary
Giving MS the Finger with Kathy Reagan-Young

OffScrip with Matthew Zachary

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 31:40


Today I talk to multimedia guru and patient influencer Kathy Reagan Young. She's been blogging since before that was a word. She's a video producer. And she hosts an amazing podcast called FUMS, an acronym for Fuck You Multiple Sclerosis. And yes swearing like a sailor is also in her toolkit. When Kathy was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis she didn't let that stop her from being the badass that she is. Instead, she took to the web and started an online MS support community. And she launched the FUMS podcast - a new addition to the OffScrip Health network. Kathy talks about all that as well as the psychedelic effects of Amazonian frog venom and the physics behind '80s hair.For more on Kathy's podcast, visit FUMSnow.com. And for information on us, visit https://OffScrip.com and follow @MZOutofPatients, @MatthewZachary, @VaxOnPod, and @OffScripMedia on Twitter. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

PBS NewsHour - Health
How unresolved grief could haunt children who lost a parent or caregiver to COVID

PBS NewsHour - Health

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 9:25


The number of U.S. deaths from COVID-19 has surpassed 775,000. But left behind are tens of thousands of children -- some orphaned entirely -- after their parents or a grandparent who cared for them died. In this report co-produced with the NewsHour, Kaiser Health News correspondent Sarah Varney looks at the risks these grieving children face to their well-being, both in the short and long term. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - World
How unresolved grief could haunt children who lost a parent or caregiver to COVID

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 9:25


The number of U.S. deaths from COVID-19 has surpassed 775,000. But left behind are tens of thousands of children -- some orphaned entirely -- after their parents or a grandparent who cared for them died. In this report co-produced with the NewsHour, Kaiser Health News correspondent Sarah Varney looks at the risks these grieving children face to their well-being, both in the short and long term. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
How unresolved grief could haunt children who lost a parent or caregiver to COVID

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 9:25


The number of U.S. deaths from COVID-19 has surpassed 775,000. But left behind are tens of thousands of children -- some orphaned entirely -- after their parents or a grandparent who cared for them died. In this report co-produced with the NewsHour, Kaiser Health News correspondent Sarah Varney looks at the risks these grieving children face to their well-being, both in the short and long term. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

The Dana & Parks Podcast
There's a 'family plan'...but what about a 'single caregiver plan'? Hour 2 11/29/2021

The Dana & Parks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 34:20


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Feisty Side of Fifty
Karen Warner Schueler: The Sudden Caregiver

Feisty Side of Fifty

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 21:00


Those of us over fifty know only too well that age brings challenges. And some of them, in fact, are so big they can seem insurmountable. Caring for a loved one with a debilitating disease is one of the biggest and our guest today has some valuable information to share with us that can be incredibly helpful. Karen Schueler was a wife, a mother, a consultant and business owner, a coach, a runner, and a friend. In other words, Karen's life was full of both business and family responsibilities. But nothing prepared her for becoming an instantaneous caregiver. She joins us to share her story, the insights she gained from her personal experience and all about the book she wrote to help others who find themselves in her situation. Her book is called The Sudden Caregiver: A Roadmap for Resilient Caregiving. If you are caregiver and looking for help to cope with some of life's biggest challenges, you'll want to be sure to tune in for this one!

Mayo Clinic Q&A
Well-being and hope for dementia patients, caregivers

Mayo Clinic Q&A

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 16:49


November is Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month, a time to raise awareness of the disease while recognizing the important work that caregivers do when caring for a loved one with Alzheimer's or dementia. Approximately 5.8 million people in the U.S. age 65 and older live with Alzheimer's disease. Of those, 80% are 75 and older. Of the approximately 50 million people worldwide with dementia, between 60% and 70% are estimated to have Alzheimer's disease.For those living with Alzheimer's and their caregivers, common questions include:  When it comes to memory, what is typical aging?  What is the difference between Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia?  How can you keep your brain healthy?  On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Jonathan Graff-Radford, a behavioral neurologist at Mayo Clinic, and Angela Lunde, an investigator in Mayo Clinic's Alzheimer's Disease Research Center — both co-authors of the second edition of "Mayo Clinic on Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias: A Guide for People With Dementia and Those Who Care for Them" — share stories of those living with dementia and offer practical advice for caregivers.

Positively Living
Boost Caregiver Resilience through Creativity with Kate Chapman

Positively Living

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 35:51


As a caregiver, there is so much that is demanded of you on a daily basis so it is more important than ever to build resilience. That's why episode 81 of The Positively Living Podcast is about boosting caregiver resilience through setting boundaries and using creativity! In this episode of The Positively Living Podcast, my guest Kate Chapman shares the importance of bringing joy into difficult moments and actionable steps you can take right now to find a creative outlet or create your sanctuary, whether it be physically or mentally. Kate and I cover the following topics:The life and mindset pivots that happen when you become a caregiver. Choosing the meaning you are putting onto everyday scenarios in order to change your perspective on the situation at hand. Bringing a theatre games mindset into the everyday world of caring for an Alzheimers or dementia patient. Finding a creative outlet for yourself or building a sanctuary for you to escape to and be with yourself as needed. How Kate's constant creative response led her to buy a billboard and alter her environment to reflect back reminders to herself that she needed in that moment of time.Using the tips we talked about today, you can build resilience no matter what caregiving or other demands come your way. Learn more about Positively Living and Lisa at https://positivelyproductive.com/podcast/If you're ready to reduce stress and overwhelm by doing less, yet still achieving more, I invite you to join me for a Strategy Session: a heart-opening, mind-expanding, goal-setting session that gives you the clarity needed to determine your best steps forward. Go to www.positivelyproductive.com/strategy and use the promo code PODCAST for a special listener discount.CONNECT WITH KATE CHAPMAN:YouTubeWebsiteFacebookCONNECT WITH LISA ZAWROTNY:FacebookInstagramResourcesWork with Lisa! Buy Lisa a coffee!LINKS MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE:Martha Beck Resources:The Gathering RoomBewildered PodcastBooksPositively Living Episodes:Building Resilience Through Self Care with Gillian BehnkeMy Caregiving and Clutter StoryForgiveness and Resilience with R. Patryce Bryant Intentional Happiness with Julie LeonardReduce Stress and Connect More Through Humor with Lisa David OlsonDance Song Playlist Volume 1, Volume 2, Volume 3Music by Ian and Jeff ZawrotnyStart your own podcast with Buzzsprout!

Parenting UP! Caregiving adventures with comedian J Smiles

J Smiles gives family caregivers the real, confusing truth about celebrating Thanksgiving when your LO has dementia, ALZ. Yeah, you want to love on them and smother them with food, family and fun. But is it a good idea? J has tried a variety of celebrations so you do not have to go in blindly... let's Snuggle Up®PODCAST SHOW NOTES:Sponsor:CircleOf (Caregiver App)https://www.circleof.com/downloadParentingUp! Weekly LIVE TV/Internet INTERACTIVE Show on GetVokl.com:https://getvokl.com/channel/parenting-up

Love Conquers Alz
THIAGO DADALT & KIRK MOODY: "WHERE IS NANCY?" - A First-Hand Account on the Realities of Wandering

Love Conquers Alz

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 57:58


Wander (verb) - To walk or move in an aimless way.Wandering is an all-too-common behavior amongst people with dementia, Autism spectrum disorder, and Down syndrome, and are a huge fear for those concerned for their safety and well-being. A person's failing memory and declining ability to communicate can make it impossible for them to remember or explain the reason they wandered.In episode 47, Don and I had the honor of speaking with retired Manager, Systems Engineer, *Kirk Moody, and filmmaker, *Thiago Didalt.  Kirk's wife was a brilliant aerospace engineer and entrepreneur, top of her class at the USC/Davis and highly respected across the industry, Nancy Paulikas, 55, was tragically diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's disease.  In 2016, she left to use the restroom at LACMA (Los Angeles County Museum of Art), never to be seen again. Kirk led a relentless two-year search that helped to uncover the gaps in the USA's social and health systems and bring about systemic change across L.A. County by forming LA FOUND, an organization that helps caregivers of those living with Alzheimer's, dementia, autism, or other cognitive impairments locate their missing loved ones.We hope you find this very special episode helpful.  If you know someone who would benefit from this information, please share our LINKS to listen to LOVE CONQUERS ALZ. Loads of love,Susie xo* Filmmaker, Thiago Dadalt, made the fictionalized Oscar's qualified short film, “Chocolate”, about a middle-age housewife with early onset Alzheimer's disease who goes missing in downtown Los Angeles. Ironically, the film led him to direct the documentary about a family's very real struggle to find missing housewife Nancy Paulikas. “Where is Nancy?” is currently making the rounds on the film festival circuit where it is gaining high praise and awards.  Where you can follow Thiago Didalt:INSTAGRAMFACEBOOKLINKEDINTWITTER *Kirk Moody is an active Board Member of Alzheimer's Los Angeles and Citizen Advocate, Participant in LA Found.  Where you can follow Kirk Moody:INSTAGRASupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/preview/3feccac8decf451cbee818066461f7c1)

Ask the Doulas
Talking About Tricky Topics With Your Caregivers

Ask the Doulas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 26:06


Today we discuss the importance of having difficult conversations with your nanny or caregiver. Joining us is Carol Kramer Arsenault of Boston Baby Nurse & Nanny.

All Home Care Matters
Alzheimer's Disease - The End Stage (Mini-Series Part 3)

All Home Care Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 20:43


Today, is the third installment of our Seven Stages of Alzheimer's series. On this episode we will be discussing the final stage, stage seven. The final stage of Alzheimer's is often referred to as end-stage Alzheimer's. First, we'll discuss what happens during this final stage and how you, as a caregiver, friend, and family member can support your loved one during this time. Then, we'll move on to how you can prepare yourself for what will happen. Finally, we'll talk about the importance of a support system and asking for help. Now let's move on to the rest of the show.   Alzheimer's is a progressive disease that ultimately ends in death. This seventh and final stage is scary. Caring for a loved one with late-stage Alzheimer's is difficult and impossible to do alone. We want to stress the importance of reaching out to your own support group when you need help. And, if you are finding yourself unable to take care of your loved one on your own, talk to your doctor. Depending on how much time your loved one has left, your doctor may suggest hospice care, a memory care facility, or professional home care. Taking care of a loved one with Alzheimer's is difficult, but it can be even harder in this final stage, so make sure you are doing what is best for you, as well as what is best for your loved one.   According to Senior Link, stage seven is the final stage in the progression of Alzheimer's disease. At this stage, most people lose their ability to speak or communicate and they often require assistance with most of their activities, including things such as toileting, eating, dressing, and bathing. Because people in stage seven often lose psychomotor capabilities, which is what helps someone think and act upon that thought, they may be unable to walk or require significant assistance when walking. On average, this final stage lasts two and a half years and ends when the person struggling with the disease passes away.   Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disease that gradually worsens over a period of four to twenty years. On average, however, most people live between four and eight years following a diagnosis. The progression of the disease is different for each individual person, but family members and caregivers should familiarize themselves with the typical stages that occur throughout the progression of the disease. It's a challenging road to travel for both the person with Alzheimer's disease and those who love them, but knowing what to expect can help to ease some stress and uncertainty.   Crossroads Hospice and Palliative Care states that it is important for caregivers to know when an individual with dementia is close to the end of their life because it helps ensure they receive the right amount of care at the right time. It can be difficult to know exactly when this time is due to the variable nature of dementia's progression, but understanding common end-of-life symptoms of seniors with dementia can help. However, it cannot be overstated that symptoms, progression, and signs of Alzheimer's can vary widely from individual to individual. A well-respected and renowned dementia expert that we work closely with has summed up the comparison of dementia patients perfectly when she explains to families that “when you see a person with dementia, you've only seen that one person.” Again, this is because it can vary widely between individuals.   In the final six months, many people with Alzheimer's are diagnosed with life-threatening conditions, such as cancer, congestive heart failure, or COPD and they tend to have an increase in hospital visits and admissions. In the final two or three months, someone with Alzheimer's will also lose their ability to speak. They may be able to speak short sentences at a time during the start of this period, but they will only be able to utter one or two words at a time if any by the end. They will also experience difficulty swallowing. Choking and aspiration is a very large concern during this final stage of Alzheimer's. They will also lose the ability to walk or sit up without assistance. If they haven't already, they will also begin experiencing incontinence.   In the final days and weeks leading up to the very end, your loved one will have increasingly cold hands, feet, arms, and legs. They will also lose their ability to swallow. Many people with Alzheimer's pass away due to this reason. Many people with Alzheimer's see an increase in restlessness and agitation, as well as an increase in the amount of time sleeping or being unconscious. And finally, they will experience changes in breathing, possibly due to the inability to swallow. They may take shallow breaths or stop breathing for short periods of time.   If your loved one begins experiencing any of the symptoms we just listed, speak to your doctor about your loved one's end-of-life plan. Patients with dementia are eligible to receive hospice care if they have a diagnosis of six months or less to live if the disease progresses in a typical fashion and these symptoms typically appear when someone with Alzheimer's has six months or less left. Talk to your doctor and a hospice professional about how they can help provide added care and support for your loved one during this extremely hard and upsetting time.   Right now, Alzheimer's is the sixth-leading cause of death in the United States and unfortunately, there is no cure for this disease as of yet. If you are currently dealing with this disease, either with yourself or a loved one, know that you are not alone. Over five million Americans are living with Alzheimer's. Join a support group in your area to connect with others in your situation or consider going to therapy. Find whatever works best for you and your family. You can also call the Alzheimer's Association's hotline anytime, at 1-800-272-3900. They have a lot of resources and knowledge to offer.   Crossroads Hospice and Palliative Care also says that perhaps the hardest thing for families is when a loved one with dementia is no longer able to eat or swallow. Because an individual with dementia is unable to understand the benefits of feeding tubes or IV drips, they will often be incredibly distressed and attempt to remove them, causing added pain and risk of infection. Instead, focus on keeping the individual comfortable. Supporting them with mouth care to prevent their mouth from becoming dry will allow them to make their final transition in peace.   Now that you know what will happen to your loved one during the seventh and final stage of Alzheimer's, let's move on to how you can help your loved one during this time.   The Alzheimer's Association says that as the disease progresses and intensifies, around-the-clock care is usually required. During the late stages, your role as a caregiver focuses on preserving their quality of life and dignity. Although a person in the late stage of Alzheimer's typically loses the ability to talk and express needs, research tells us that some core of the person's self may remain. This means you may be able to continue to connect with your loved one throughout the late stage of the disease.   At this point in the disease, the world is primarily experienced through the senses. You can express your caring through touch, sound, sight, taste, and smell. You can try playing their favorite music, reading portions of books that have meaning for them, or looking at old photos together. You can also make one of their favorite foods. Try rubbing lotion with a favorite scent into their skin and brushing their hair. Sitting outside together on a nice day can also be a way to engage them and spend time with them.   If your loved one is living in a facility, the best way to help them is to visit them, even if it is difficult for you. A touching story we read that we hope can help you and your family have a sense of hope during this time, is that of Tony Hawke, the skateboarder, and his mother. In a blog post for Alzheimer's Association, Tony Hawke wrote that when he visits his mother now, she doesn't recognize him. Sometimes there is a slight glimmer in her eye, sometimes she babbles incoherently, and sometimes she uncontrollably bursts into tears.   On this particular day, they mostly sat in silence. He gave her updates on their family and fed her Coca-Cola through a straw every few minutes (which she still loves, even in her catatonic condition). But then he noticed her fingers twitching. He's not sure for how long; maybe they'd been moving the whole time and he wasn't paying attention.   As he watched, he was reminded of her habit of typing unconsciously throughout his life. And even though it may have only been her body (yet again) betraying her, it gave him comfort knowing that perhaps she is still in there somewhere typing away about her life, her experiences, her feelings, and their current conversation. Most of his visits end with a feeling of despair and impending finality, but on this day, he left with a sense of hope.   You can find the entire story written by Tony Hawke in our show notes for this episode. If you have time, we highly recommend reading it. It can be helpful to see what someone else in a similar situation is going through.   If you are currently experiencing the early stages of the disease, we know you probably don't want to think about this last stage yet, but now is the time to talk about end-of-life care and any wishes your loved one may have for when the time comes. It is better to create a plan with your loved one than to second guess your own decisions later. If you decide to be the primary caregiver during this final stage, there are several things you can do to help make your loved one as comfortable as possible, and after all, that's all you really can do at this stage.   One of the most important daily caregiving tasks during late-stage Alzheimer's, according to the Alzheimer's Association, is monitoring eating. As a person becomes less active, they will require less food. But, a person in this stage of the disease also may forget to eat or lose their appetite. Adding sugar to food and serving them their favorite foods may encourage eating and their doctor may even suggest supplements between meals to add calories if weight loss is a problem.   The Alzheimer's Association also says that difficulty with toileting is very common at this stage in the disease. The person may need to be walked to the restroom and guided through the process. Incontinence is also common during late-stage Alzheimer's and is something your loved one will likely experience. For more information on toileting, you can listen to our recent Quick Tips episode on Helping in the Bathroom. You can find the episode on our website, on our YouTube channel, or wherever you get your podcasts. You can also find more episodes on Alzheimer's and dementia on our YouTube playlist.   During this final stage, your loved one will have decreased mobility and will likely be unable to stand or sit up on their own. Being bedbound or chairbound can introduce new health risks for your loved one. Make sure to move your loved one every two hours to prevent bedsores and improve their blood circulation. Helping them do muscle exercises can stop their joints from freezing, but make sure you consult their doctor before doing any exercises with them. Similarly, make sure you have proper training on how to lift your loved one so that you do not injure them in the process or yourself. A nurse or a physical therapist can teach you how to properly lift someone, but for now, know that you should never lift someone by pulling on their arms or shoulders.   Your loved one will be more vulnerable to illnesses and infections during this stage. It is important to keep their mouth and teeth clean and clear to reduce the risk of bacteria that can cause pneumonia. The flu can also lead to your loved one getting pneumonia. Make sure you, your loved one, and those in close contact with them get the flu vaccine to lower their risk of developing pneumonia. Finally, treat cuts and scrapes immediately and call their doctor if they have a deep cut or if it doesn't heal.   The Alzheimer's Association states that communicating pain becomes difficult in the late stages of the disease. If you suspect that your loved one is in pain or is suffering from an illness, see a doctor as soon as possible to find the cause. In some cases, pain medication may be prescribed.   To recognize pain and illness, look for physical signs. Signs of pain and illness include pale skin tone, flushed skin tone, dry, pale gums, mouth sores, vomiting, feverish skin, and swelling of any part of the body. You should also pay attention to nonverbal signs. Gestures, spoken sounds, and facial expressions (wincing, for example) may signal pain or discomfort. And you should be alert to changes in behavior. Anxiety, agitation, trembling, shouting, and sleeping problems can all be signs of pain. If you suspect your loved one is in pain, call their doctor immediately. They can help make your loved one comfortable with medication.   Now that we've covered how you can help your loved one during this stage, let's move on to how you can prepare yourself for what happens during this stage and after.   The National Institute on Aging says that Dementia causes the gradual loss of thinking, remembering, and reasoning abilities, making it difficult for those who want to provide supportive care at the end of life to know what is needed. Because people with advanced dementia can no longer communicate clearly, they cannot share their concerns. Is Uncle Bert refusing food because he's not hungry or because he's confused? Why does Grandma seem agitated? Is she in pain and needs medication to relieve it, but can't tell you?   As these conditions progress, caregivers may find it hard to provide emotional or spiritual comfort. How can you let Grandpa know how much his life has meant to you? How do you make peace with your mother if she no longer knows who you are? Someone who has severe memory loss might not take spiritual comfort from sharing family memories or understand when others express what an important part of their life this person has been. Palliative care or hospice care can be helpful in many ways to families of people with dementia.   Sensory connections—targeting someone's senses, like hearing, touch, or sight—can bring comfort. Being touched or massaged can be soothing. Listening to music, white noise, or sounds from nature seem to relax some people and lessen their agitation.   There are many things you can do to prepare yourself for this final stage of Alzheimer's. As we mentioned earlier, during the first few stages of Alzheimer's, you should make an end-of-life plan with your loved one so you can know how to best uphold their wishes. If you didn't make a plan early on, it's not too late to create one now. You may not be able to include your loved one while making their plan, but you can sit down with your family and caregiving team to create a plan together.   When making an end-of-life plan, think about what you think your loved one would want, but also consider what is best for them. You also have to think about what is best for you during this time. If you think your loved one would want to stay in your care at home, but you cannot take care of them by yourself anymore, that is something you need to seriously consider. Ultimately, you are trying to make your loved one as comfortable as possible during this last part of their life.   The National Institute on Aging also tells us that quality of life is an important issue when making healthcare decisions for people with dementia. For example, medicines are available that may delay or keep symptoms from becoming worse for a little while. Medicines also may help control some behavioral symptoms in people with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease. However, some caregivers might not want drugs prescribed for people in the later stages of Alzheimer's. They may believe that the person's quality of life is already so poor that the medicine is unlikely to make a difference. If the drug has serious side effects, they may be even more likely to decide against it.   When making care decisions for someone else near the end of life, consider the goals of care and weigh the benefits, risks, and side effects of the treatment. You may have to make a treatment decision based on the person's comfort at one end of the spectrum and extending life or maintaining abilities for a little longer at the other.   With dementia, a person's body may continue to be physically healthy while his or her thinking and memory are deteriorating. This means that caregivers and family members may be faced with very difficult decisions about how treatments that maintain physical health, such as installing a pacemaker, fit within the care goals.   Now that we've talked some about how you can prepare yourself for the final stage, we're going to move on to the final part of this episode, which is what happens after.   The National Institute on Aging states that many family members taking care of a person with advanced dementia at home feel relief when death happens—for themselves and for the person who died. It is important to realize such feelings are normal. You may feel guilty that you are feeling relieved, and that's normal, too. Calling the Alzheimer's hotline or joining a local support group may be beneficial after your loved one has passed on.   After your loved one is gone, don't forget to celebrate their life and remember that Alzheimer's wasn't their identity. Remember the person they were before the disease set in. Look over scrapbooks you made together and photo albums or other items that remind you of them.   The National Institute on Aging says that hospice—whether used at home or in a facility (such as a nursing home)—gives family caregivers needed support near the end of life, as well as help with their grief, both before and after their family member dies. If you used hospice during the final stage, they can be another great resource you can utilize even after the passing of your loved one.   Many people find it helpful to get involved after their loved one is no longer with them. Joining an Alzheimer's advocacy group or donating to a research center are both good ways to stay involved in the Alzheimer's community. You can also offer support and help to other families if you want to. You are in a unique position to help others that are currently going through what you have been through. Offering support to others can also help you reclaim a sense of purpose if you are struggling after losing your loved one.   This stage and this disease are hard to go through and impossible to go through alone. Reach out to your loved ones and your community for support. There is no cure now, but one day soon, we hope we will be able to End Alzheimer's together. Visit the Alzheimer's Association website to learn more about their End Alzheimer's campaign.   We want to say thank you for joining us here at All Home Care Matters, All Home Care Matters is here for you and to help families as they navigate these long-term care issues. Please visit us at allhomecarematters.com there is a private secure fillable form where you can give us feedback, show ideas, or if you have questions. Every form is read and responded to. If you know someone who could benefit from this episode, please share it with them.   Remember, you can listen to the show on any of your favorite podcast streaming platforms and watch the show on our YouTube channel and make sure to hit that subscribe button, so you'll never miss an episode. We look forward to seeing you next time on All Home Care Matters, thank you.   Sources: https://www.seniorlink.com/blog/the-7-stages-of-alzheimers   https://www.crossroadshospice.com/hospice-resources/end-of-life-signs/dementia/   https://www.alz.org/help-support   https://www.alz.org/help-support/caregiving/stages-behaviors/late-stage   https://www.alz.org/blog/alz/october-2018-(1)/tony-hawk-shares-his-personal-alzheimer-s-story   https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/end-life-care-people-dementia    

Everyone Dies (Every1Dies)
What You Need to Know About Breathing at the End of Life

Everyone Dies (Every1Dies)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 25:46


 Breath sounds and rhythms for a dying person can be alarming, even though it is a normal part of the process.  Learn about pulmonary congestion, rattle, and changes to breathing patterns as we continue our series about what to expect during the dying process. 

All Home Care Matters
Alzheimer's disease a Mild Case (Mini-Series Part 2)

All Home Care Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 19:03


Today, we are continuing with our Seven Stages of Alzheimer's series. Last episode, we discussed what Alzheimer's is and some of the common signs and symptoms, as well gave a brief overview of the seven stages. We went a little more in-depth with the first two stages and today we are going to be moving on to stage three.   But first, we'll discuss how stages one through three are seen as the early or mild stage of Alzheimer's and what mild Alzheimer's can look like. After that, we'll jump straight into talking about stage three Alzheimer's – mild cognitive decline. Now let's move on to the rest of the show.   There are a few different models of the progression of Alzheimer's disease. The seven-stage model we are looking at in this series, the five-stage mode, which combines a few stages of the seven-stage model, and the three-stage model, which is what you may be most familiar with. The three-stage model shows the progression as being mild or early-stage, and then it goes on to the mid-stage, ending with late-stage dementia or Alzheimer's.   When talking about the first three stages in the seven-stage model, what we are discussing today, it is easiest to relate them to the preclinical stage in the three-stage model. The preclinical stage is Alzheimer's before it has been diagnosed, which is why it isn't listed as a stage in the three-stage model. In the model we're discussing today, a diagnosis usually happens during the third stage – mild cognitive decline, which triggers the transition to stage four – moderate cognitive decline. Now, this isn't the case for every single person with Alzheimer's. Not everyone is diagnosed this early. But, according to the National Institute on Aging, a new study has found that half of the people living with Alzheimer's may have mild Alzheimer's rather than moderate or severe cases. Researchers studied a sample of one thousand people and found that among people with Alzheimer's disease, 50.4 percent had mild disease, 30.3 percent had moderate disease, and 19.3 percent had severe disease.   According to the Senior Link, the preclinical stage of Alzheimer's makes up the first three stages of the seven-stage model of Alzheimer's. During these stages, a person is not considered to have Alzheimer's until they have an official diagnosis. During these early stages, many of the signs and symptoms of Alzheimer's can easily be confused with signs of normal aging.   As we discussed last episode, there are no signs of the disease being displayed in stage one. There are changes happening in the brain, but nothing physically telling of the disease. A WebMD article explains that Alzheimer's disease usually starts silently, with brain changes that begin years before anyone notices a problem. When your loved one is in this early phase, they won't have any symptoms that you can spot. Only a PET scan, an imaging test that shows how the brain is working, can reveal whether they have Alzheimer's.   The second stage, where some symptoms may start to appear, masks itself as normal aging, especially since most cases of Alzheimer's happen in older adults. As we age, forgetfulness begins to become a part of our daily lives. Forgetfulness also happens to be one of the most noticeable symptoms of Alzheimer's. Most of the time, a friend or family member may notice signs or symptoms during this stage before a person with Alzheimer's does. WebMD also says that you still might not notice anything amiss in your loved one's behavior, but they may start developing small signs or symptoms, things that even a doctor is unable to catch. This could include forgetting words or misplacing objects. At this stage, subtle symptoms of Alzheimer's don't interfere with their ability to work or live independently. It's also important to keep in mind that these symptoms might not be Alzheimer's at all, but simply normal changes from aging.   Stage three is usually where you can start noticing the signs and symptoms in a loved one with dementia. A neuroscience blog for Penn Medicine states that common difficulties in this stage go beyond forgetting names and misplacing objects. Your loved one may have trouble remembering recently read material, such as books or magazines, or they may find remembering plans or organizational tasks becoming increasingly difficult. They may also have more difficulty retrieving a name or word and experience challenges in social settings or at work.   This stage may bring about more anxiety for your loved one, and some people may even deny that anything is wrong. If you or your loved one have noticed any of these signs or symptoms, you should schedule an appointment with their doctor. These feelings of anxiety are normal, but not talking to a physician will only allow symptoms to get worse. The best way to keep symptoms at bay is to talk to your loved one's physician about treatment options, including medications, and care planning. Early detection is key for this disease, the earlier it is diagnosed, the longer you loved one will be able to maintain their independence and enjoy a fulfilling life.   Now that we've gone over the basics of the first three stages of Alzheimer's, let's take a closer look at the changes that happen between stages two and three.   Alzheimer's News Today tells us that patients with Alzheimer's disease experience a slow progressive decline in memory and cognitive ability, among other symptoms, due to the spread of damage in the brain. Between stages two and three, changes in a person's abilities or behavior may only be minor. As a result, the symptoms may not be noticed as a sign of Alzheimer's, and may not be noticeable to others, except those who are close to the patient, like family members and close friends, which we have already talked about today.   Alzheimer's News Today also says that people with early-stage Alzheimer's are mostly independent and can usually perform the same actions they could prior to the onset of the disease, such as driving, working, and engaging in social activities. At stage three and moving into stage four, however, they may need assistance with some of the more complicated tasks. The most common feature of mild Alzheimer's is lapses in memory and concentration, making it more difficult to recall recent events and to learn new things.   Alzheimer's affects everyone differently. WebMD says that the stages don't always fall into neat boxes, and the symptoms might vary, but they can be a guide and help you plan for your loved one's care. The symptoms your loved one may experience will differ from those that other people living with Alzheimer's experience and some symptoms may not appear until the later stages of Alzheimer's, or not at all. Once a symptom is evident, however, it tends to worsen with time. Although in some cases, some symptoms may disappear in later stages, such as irritability.   During stage three, the symptoms that your loved one were showing in stage two become more prominent and are more easily distinguishable between the signs of normal aging. WebMD states that there is no cure for Alzheimer's disease, so it can help to know what to expect so you can plan to meet your loved one's needs in each stage.   According to Senior Link, since there is no medical consensus for Alzheimer's stages, as there is with something like cancer, it is important for caregivers to be aware of the individual symptoms and situation that their patient or loved one is experiencing. While healthcare providers may refer to a patient's condition as “late” or “early” stage, any specific stage is less important than the context and understanding of what this means for care going forward.   Senior Link also says that learning about the stage of Alzheimer's disease that a loved one is experiencing helps provide perspective and context. This knowledge makes it easier to have conversations with doctors about the patient's condition and how to approach future treatment options. Understanding the later stages of the disease also helps when planning for lifestyle changes, new equipment, and other items that may be needed. One of the other major benefits in understanding the overall progression of Alzheimer's disease is preparing for future living arrangements, such as a memory care community or professional home care, that could become a preferred option during later stages of the disease. Because the cost of dementia care is high, families should begin planning as soon as possible following a diagnosis.   The Alzheimer Society says that the early stage of Alzheimer's disease, also referred to as “mild Alzheimer's disease”, marks a beginning that will bring with it significant changes for your loved one and the people that care about them. They will likely retain many of their abilities and require minimal assistance during this third stage. They may have insight into their changing abilities and therefore, can inform others of their experience of living with the disease and help to plan and direct their future care.   They may also be feeling overwhelmed and apprehensive about the future. It is normal for both you and your loved one to have many mixed emotions including feelings of grief and sadness. Many people are concerned about how the changes will affect them, how they will plan for the future, and how they will get the help and information that they need.   If you or your loved one are worried about how to handle some of the common symptoms of Alzheimer's, the Alzheimer Society has a handy chart that you may find useful. We have a link to the document in our show notes if you would like to look at it yourself, but we're going to be going over it here, as well.   If your loved one is experiencing some forgetfulness, try using labels, notes, calendars, alarms and timers, and pill dispensers to make their day easier. You can also create a memory station by the phone to post emergency numbers and people that they contact frequently.   Is your loved one having difficulty learning new things and following conversations? Try breaking tasks into smaller steps. Make sure you, and your loved one, acknowledge their limits. Knowing where to stop can be hard but setting boundaries ahead of time can save you time and frustration later. When visiting with groups, try to keep the size of the group as small as possible. The larger the group, the more confusing it can be for someone with Alzheimer's to follow the conversation. Have a conversation with your loved one to understand what they need in order to participate in conversations. They may need to take more frequent breaks or rests or need to write things down to follow a conversation. Having this conversation with your loved one can make sure they have all the tools they need to participate in and enjoy a conversation and keep up with their social life.   Your loved one may have difficulty concentrating or have a limited attention span. Try picking activities that are manageable by them and do only one thing at a time. Listening to audio books or music or watching movies can also help them practice concentrating. Make sure they have the option to take breaks and be careful to avoid overstimulation. Following a daily routine can also help your loved one concentrate on tasks better.   Many people with Alzheimer's develop problems with orientation, getting lost, and following directions. If this happens to your loved one, you can schedule rides with family and friends or call for a cab. When the time comes, make sure to have a conversation with your loved one about their ability to drive. During the early stages of Alzheimer's, many people are still able to drive, but everyone is different. If it is unsafe for them or others on the road, your loved one should not be driving.   Communication difficulties are something many with Alzheimer's face. Make sure that your loved one has enough time to talk or think through their answer. Inform friends and family that your loved one may be slower to respond, but to make sure to not try to fill in the silence between their responses. Go with your loved one to their appointments or make sure someone else is able to go with them if you are unable to make it. Your loved one may need someone there to help communicate for them and add much needed clarity that they may not be able to do themselves.   If your loved one is currently working, they will want to have a plan for when they have difficulty handling problems at work. It's important that they are realistic about their abilities and that they don't try to push themselves too hard. When necessary, they should also talk to their manager about reducing their hours or finding new tasks and opportunities. The part that they will need your help with the most is planning for a time when they will not be able to work. You can help them determine at what point they will step away and make a financial plan for that time, as well.   You loved one may experience mild coordination problems at times. You will want to make sure that they have safe and secure handrails and grab bars available. You should also make sure that their living space is free from items that may cause tripping hazards, like rugs. Brighter lighting can also help them to see better and make it easier, and safer, for them to get around.   If your loved one has an impaired ability to perform challenging cognitive tasks, again, discuss their abilities and limitations with them. Help them with tasks but try not to do the tasks for them. If they do a task, but it isn't done quite how you think it should be done, don't correct them, unless it could be dangerous or unsafe for them or someone else. If they don't want to do tasks or get frustrated easily, focus on tasks you know they can manage and enjoy. Completing a task successfully can increase their self-esteem and help improve their mood.   We've already talked about mood shifts, depression, passiveness, and withdrawing from social situations and hobbies in previous episodes so we are not going to be going over these strategies, but you can see what the Alzheimer's Society suggests by finding their link in our show notes.   Now that you've heard some strategies that you may find useful during stage three and beyond, we're going to hear from people that have been diagnosed with Alzheimer's and what they want you, as a caregiver, family member, or friend, to know.   One person, in regards to having a conversation and getting details of a memory wrong, says please don't correct me. I know better – the information just isn't available to me at that moment. Another says remember, my feelings are intact and get hurt easily. A third says try to ignore off-hand remarks that I wouldn't have made in the past. If you focus on it, it won't prevent it from happening again. It just makes me feel worse.   You may find that your loved one says the wrong word when referring to an item. For example, they may call a watch a hand clock. Another person with Alzheimer's says I usually know when the wrong word comes out and I'm as surprised as you are.   I need people to speak a little slower on the telephone, one says. While another says speak to me clearly, one thought at a time; don't ask a question when you can provide a statement.   Some people become confused at times. One person that experiences times of confusion says I may say something that is real to me but may not be factual. I am not lying, even if the information is not correct. Don't argue; it won't solve anything.   In group settings, someone with Alzheimer's recommends that you please keep an eye on me because I can get lost easily! But please don't shadow my every move. Use gentle respect to guide me. Another person says that if you can anticipate that I am getting into difficulty, please don't draw attention to it, but try to carefully help me through it so nobody else will be aware of the problem.   When talking with your loved one with Alzheimer's, there are many times where you can both accidentally offend or hurt the other's feelings. One person living with Alzheimer's says sometimes you give me the message that you think I am faking these problems. What you don't see is my terrible confusion and my hurt knowing how you feel. Another person says I don't mean to frustrate you. I know you get impatient and tired of telling me things, three times in a row. Please be patient.   People with Alzheimer's also say they want you to ask them what they think or want. Don't assume that you know and ask them in a straightforward language when you have their attention.   The most important quote we found is believe I still love you, even if I am having trouble showing it. You loved one is going through a lot of changes and struggles, and the change in dynamics of your relationship with them may be confusing, but they still love you, even if it becomes harder for them to tell or show you.   The Alzheimer's Society says that despite your best efforts, caring for someone with dementia becomes harder as the disease moves on, and the person you are caring for becomes more dependent on you. This is a time when many family members need more support for themselves. Our goal is to be a place of support for you during this difficult time. We hope that this episode has helped you learn more about the third stage of Alzheimer's and how you can support your loved one with Alzheimer's through this stage of mild cognitive decline and into the next four stages.   If you would like to learn more about Alzheimer's and how you can prepare now to support yourself or a loved one later, check out our website for resources. You can also visit your local senior center or the Alzheimer's Association to see what help is available in your area. You can also check out our Alzheimer's and Dementia playlist on YouTube for a complete list of all the episodes we have done on this topic.   We want to say thank you for joining us here at All Home Care Matters, All Home Care Matters is here for you and to help families as they navigate these long-term care issues. Please visit us at allhomecarematters.com there is a private secure fillable form there where you can give us feedback, show ideas, or if you have questions. Every form is read and responded to. If you know someone who could benefit from this episode, please share it with them.   Remember, you can listen to the show on any of your favorite podcast streaming platforms and watch the show on our YouTube channel and make sure to hit that subscribe button, so you'll never miss an episode. We look forward to seeing you next time on All Home Care Matters, thank you.   Sources: https://www.nia.nih.gov/news/half-alzheimers-disease-cases-may-be-mild   https://www.seniorlink.com/blog/the-7-stages-of-alzheimers   https://www.webmd.com/alzheimers/guide/alzheimers-disease-stages   https://www.pennmedicine.org/updates/blogs/neuroscience-blog/2019/november/stages-of-alzheimers   https://alzheimer.ca/sites/default/files/documents/progression_early-stage-3.pdf   https://alzheimer.ca/en/help-support/im-caring-person-living-dementia/what-expect-persons-dementia-progresses

Caregiver Connection Podcast
Ways For Caregivers to Enjoy Holidays

Caregiver Connection Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 13:42


Show Notes A big problem most of us caregivers have is feeling lonely. There are always times of the year when the people we know start to go on trips or have celebrations that we just can't make it to. We catch those moments as they post them on social media or tell us about it and it hurts doesn't it. It makes it feel as if the world, our friends and family have moved on and left us behind.  Let's talk about making our own fun and connecting with people we love. Caregiving is an extremely difficult role to take on and loneliness can be a major problem if we feel that we aren't seen. That's why when people are giving you the highlight real of their life it makes you angry, frustrated with your situation, and sad. It makes you jealous and leads you to make the mistake of comparing your life with theirs. It makes you feel that caregiving style of loneliness that really hurts deep down.  Some of us may be waiting to be invited to the fun. Others are wanting to make some fun but don't know how and don't have the energy to figure things out.  If you are a caregiver for someone who can't leave the house, can't be around groups of people, or leaving the house is just too difficult even if you wanted to it is easy to feel left out. Just because celebrations have to be done differently right now doesn't mean you have to give up on the fun. Thing is… you can't wait around to be invited. If you can't go to where people are celebrating because traveling is out of the question or the person you care for can't really leave the house you have to find ways to still be part of their lives. Unfortunately, you will have to do some of the work because, just like you, they might not know how to do things differently either. I'm going to give you a list of things you can try to do and once you hear the one thing that really sticks out to you I want you to call the person you want to do it with or can help you organize it. It's going to feel like more work than you'd like to give but I promise you even it is worth it. Laughing, having fun, talking to people who care for you is worth it. Just let them know that you'd really like to have them be a part of your life and miss doing things with them. It's ok for it to feel vulnerable. It's ok to worry they'll say no. But you won't know until you try. Everything listed in this podcast is put together for you as a PDF download on the website. You can go to www.loveyourcaregivinglife.com find the podcast link and click on episode 87. There you will find the PDF with more information and suggestions for each of the ideas I'm going to tell you about today. It's the perfect thing to download and send to the people you want to set something up with so they can read it through as well. So don't forget to go and download it for free from the website. If you are on my mailing list you will get it in the November 18th newsletter. Ok on to how you can enjoy celebrations even if you can't leave the house. One of the things I like doing the most is cooking with people I love. Being able to tell stories, laugh, and sing with people you care about can feed you more than the food you're making. It can make you feel sad if you can't do that and you may feel like it isn't even worth making that dish you love making so much. Just because you can't be together doesn't mean you can't continue to have that experience. Invite those people into your home via Zoom or a video call. You all can cook something together in your own kitchens and catch up on how things are going, still tell those stories, sing those songs, and laugh. You can all make the same thing or something different. If you live in the same city you could even do a swap and share with everyone else. It's just about finding different ways to do the things you love doing.  You can watch a movie together. Maybe there is a holiday movie you love to watch with your sister but you can't this year. Set up a movie date and watch it together. There are lots of ways you can do this. Sometimes the simplest is to get on a video call with the other person and set the camera so they can see your face. Then you try to press play at the same time. Being on camera might be weird for you because you don't usually see your face while watching a movie but it's just what that other person would see and they love you so try not to feel too self-conscious about it. You can hide the part that shows your face and just focus on theirs. It can be as simple as sticking a piece of paper on the part of the screen that has your little square. There are other ways to start the movie together. Some streaming services allow you to watch with someone else. That way the movie will start and stop at the same time. Some phones will also let you watch something together.  Or you can both watch the movie on your own time and then make a date to sit down and talk about it, kind of like a book club. There are movie discussion topics in the pdf download. Who knows this might be something you do every month! Make a playlist. If there are songs you love to listen to during the holidays sharing them with family and friends can be fun especially if they contribute to the list too. You all will start to see how similar your tastes are and also learn about songs you might not even know existed. There are a lot of different ways to do this. If you belong to a streaming service like Spotify you can share your playlist and those people can add to it. Or you can create a group text or email and everyone can start sharing their favorite songs. Is it someone's birthday? See how many different birthday songs you all can find and put it together for them. It's just a fun way to interact with people you love. Get yourself invited to dinner. Sure you can't physically be at that special meal everyone is going to be at but that doesn't mean you can't have a place at the table. Ask a person who will be there to set you up on a zoom or video call for the meal. Ask for them to set it up in a place you can see most of the table and join them while you eat your own meal. You'll get to talk to everyone and hear all the updates and won't have to help clean up the dishes. That's can be a win! Maybe there is someone in your group of loved ones that has a small child that you would really like to connect with but aren't able to visit. Why not set up a time to read them a book. Maybe it's a book that's special for this time of the year or a book you really loved as a child. Make sure the length is appropriate for the child's age and have a parent set up a time when they will be able to focus. Of course, it might not work out the way you'd like it to. You might not make it past the first couple of pages or you might spend the entire time talking to them about their favorite toy. No matter what, you are creating memories with a little person you love and that is the most important thing to be able to do. No matter if it's paper or electronic everyone loves getting a letter especially now that no one really does it anymore. If there is someone you really miss seeing grab that box of tissues and a piece of paper. Write what you love about them. Share the things you loved doing with them or memories of holidays or celebrations the two of you have shared in the past. This could be the highlight of the year for them. It's always so much fun to hear from another person but it can also make you feel good as you write it. Sometimes giving helps us feel better about our world than receiving and this might be one of those times. Singing can be so cathartic especially when you're doing it with a group of people who care for you. Maybe the person you love has a favorite song, maybe it's someone's birthday or there are holiday songs you and your family and friends would always sing. Just because you can't do it in person doesn't mean you give it up. You can get everyone on a zoom call and record it and then send it to the person you made it for. Or maybe you all just got together to simply enjoy singing.  One of the things my family does more often during holidays and celebrations is play games. Of course, we can do it any time of the year but when we are taking a break from work and school we love playing a game together. Now just because you can't be in person with someone to play doesn't mean you have to give it up this year. There are a lot of games you can play over video call or zoom. Think of things that don't require a board to play. You can play Pictionary or Bingo. Yahtzee or Tenzi will work too. There is a list of more games in the PDF download. Remember, it doesn't have to be perfect. It might be comical when Aunt Sarah's video freezes as she's playing charades! You can create a family holiday story. Over text or email, one person starts the story with a short paragraph and then they send it off to the next person and so on. In the end, the last person finishes it off and it can all be put together as a keepsake or just something to look at and laugh about. It's a super simple way for people to connect and not have to do it at a specific time.  Do you always put together a puzzle during the holidays? Set up a date with the person who would always sit down to help you and get on a call with them. Putting together the puzzle was only half the fun anyway. It was really all about getting caught up with that cousin you only see once a year.  Are you part of a. Musical family? Plan a concert. Have everyone put together a song they can perform and get everyone on zoom to watch and participate in the concert. Or everyone can record their song or their part of a song and send it off to a Google Drive that everyone can access. There are so many different ways to do this. You could all even practice the same song and get together on the video to try to play it together. Sure sometimes there's a lag but it's about the fun of it. You could also have a gift wrapping date with someone. Get on the phone and talk about things while both of you wrap gifts. Sometimes it's fun to wrap and talk. You could also have a recipe swap. You know you always wanted the recipe for grandma's rolls but never asked for it. Now all of you can share your favorite recipes or the recipes that have been with the family for generations and maybe you can make that one thing you really wanted to eat this year but didn't think you'd be able to because you have to stay at home. The thing to remember is You deserve to find ways to enjoy your life. Just because you're a caregiver doesn't mean you're destined to never enjoy life again. Things can be fun even though they are different. Traditions and rituals are grounding, they make you feel comfortable because sometimes it's the way things are always done. Caregiving has taught you that sometimes you have to learn how to do things a different way so you already have the ability to figure out how to still celebrate even though it has to be done differently.  Remember, you are a caregiver because you love the person you care for. You are dedicating your life to helping them live. So enjoy the life you live with them as best you can.  Remember to download the PDF and get a few more tips and ideas for celebrations as well as more information for the ones' I've told you about today.  You can find it at www.loveyourcaregivinglife.com Thanks for listening

PsychU Community Podcast
Patient & Caregiver Perspective: Adherence In Schizophrenia – Kathy Day

PsychU Community Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 13:16


Listen to Amica Simmons-Yon, PharmD, PhD and Dennis Sholler, PhD as they spill the tea on adherence in schizophrenia with special guest, Kathy Day. During this episode, Kathy Day highlights a recent interview where she discusses the most important factors that impact adherence from a patient and caregiver perspective. Kathy is a caregiver and a mental health advocate; she also plays a key role in PsychU.org as Section Advisor of the Patient & Caregiver Resource Center. Featuring: • Kathy Day, MPA, BA, AA; Patient & Caregiver Section Advisor • Amica Simmons-Yon, PharmD, PhD; Clinical & Scientific Liaison, OPDC • Dennis Sholler, PhD; Clinical & Scientific Liaison, OPDC #mentalhealth PsychU | Patient & Caregiver Resource Center https://bit.ly/3nvh6I2 PsychU | Adherence In Schizophrenia: A Patient & Caregiver Perspective https://bit.ly/3FsNh14 Kathy Day is a paid consultant of Otsuka Pharmaceutical Development & Commercialization, Inc Amica Simmons-Yon is an employee of Otsuka Pharmaceutical Development & Commercialization, Inc. Dennis Sholler is an employee of Otsuka Pharmaceutical Development & Commercialization, Inc. PsychU is supported by Otsuka Pharmaceutical Development & Commercialization, Inc. (OPDC), Otsuka America Pharmaceutical, Inc. (OAPI), and Lundbeck, LLC – committed supporters of the mental health treatment community. The opinions expressed by PsychU's contributors are their own and are not endorsed or recommended by PsychU or its sponsors. The information provided through PsychU is intended for the educational benefit of mental health care professionals and others who support mental health care. It is not intended as, nor is it a substitute for, medical care, advice, or professional diagnosis. Health care professionals should use their independent medical judgement when reviewing PsychU's educational resources. Users seeking medical advice should consult with a health care professional. No CME or CEU credits are available through any of the resources provided by PsychU. Some of the contributors may be paid consultants for OPDC, OAPI, and / or Lundbeck, LLC.

Listen Boys And Girls
CELEBRATING THE CAREGIVER w/Dr. Cynthia Hickman

Listen Boys And Girls

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 50:47


It's the close of one of my month favorite months y'all! It is National Hospice and Palliative Care Month, National Family Cargivers Month ANNNND Alzheimer's Awareness Month as well!! This week we walk with the wisdom, closing this month with celebrating of the GREAT value of caregivers, in all capacities!! No matter who you are caring for or how much care you're giving, you are a CAREGIVER!!! Understanding that there ARE on 4 types of people in the world when it comes to caregiving! While we may not always see an instant manifestation of gratitude for the work done of the sacrifices made, know that the love that is planted through caring for others will bloom and flourish in your own life, sometimes when you least expect it! Dr. Cynthia Hickman, Your Proactive Caregiver Advocate, is my guest this week and you don't want to miss this GREAT conversation! We, each of us, are on this journey and we ALL need someone to care at some time. Be it a full time caregiver, or a loved one running errands or picking up the slack wherever it may be-it all counts as CAREGIVING!! What you give, in any capacity is an opportunity to make a difference in the life of another. We are all human with our frailties, hurts, scars and fears. But what we don't all do, is exhibit the grace and hold space to allow a vulnerable soul to be human in front of us and ask for the help connecting to what they need to figure things out, but we should. We can use our compassion with humility and Grace to truly CARE for others! I'm thankful to have you join the journey through this topic with us. Whether you're returning or just connecting for the first time, I'm glad to have you! Learning, sharing, caring, growing… it's a great way to spend part of your day you don't want to miss this episode that aired today on Apple Podcasts You can also find “The Listen Boys And Girls Podcast” is available on Google Podcasts, PocketCast, Breaker, Overcast, Spotify and RadioPublic as well!

The World and Everything In It
11.24.21 Washington Wednesday, World Tour, and caregivers

The World and Everything In It

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 37:01


On Washington Wednesday, Paul Butler talks to Zack Cooper about what came out of last week's virtual summit between President Biden and China's Xi Jinping; on World Tour, Onize Ohikere reports on international news; and part two of Myrna Brown's report on caregivers. Plus: commentary from Joel Belz, and the Wednesday morning news.Support The World and Everything in It today at wng.org/donate. Additional support comes from Samaritan Ministries, a health care sharing ministry. It's affordable, there are no networks, and you can join today. More at samaritanministries.org/worldpodcast. From Ambassadors Impact Network, a group of faith-driven investors who finance private companies led by gospel-advancing entrepreneurs. More at ambassadorsimpact.com And from North Greenville University. Christ-centered academic excellence begins—at ngu.edu

BayCare HealthChat
Memory Disorders Series - Caregiver Self-Care

BayCare HealthChat

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021


In the final episode of our five part series on memory disorders, Kim Saberi, MSW explains the importance of self-care for a caregiver for someone with dementia.

BayCare HealthChat
Caregiver Self-Care

BayCare HealthChat

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021


Kim Saberi, MSW explains the importance of self-care for a caregiver for someone with dementia.

Elevate Eldercare
Setting the Gratitude Table for Caregivers

Elevate Eldercare

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 48:14


This Thanksgiving week, “Elevate Eldercare” hands the mic over to three dedicated caregivers from the Green House Cottages of Homewood in Mena, Ark. Administrator Vicki Hughes, RN Toni Lawrence, and Shahbaz/CNA Kerri Rye gather around a virtual gratitude table to discuss their reasons for working in eldercare, the power of the Green House model for staff and elders alike, and how caregivers can creatively balance pandemic safety with the need for unstructured social events and interactions. As the sector continues to sort out ways to solve workforce shortages and improve care in nursing homes, it's vitally important to take a break from big-picture debates and let the selfless professionals who work with elders every day tell their stories. The Green House Project thanks Vicki, Toni, and Kerri for sharing their unique perspectives – and we thank all of the frontline caregivers and support staff who will spend this holiday season working around the clock to keep elders healthy, safe, and empowered to live a full life no matter their physical or cognitive abilities.     Learn more about the Green House Cottages of Homewood:  https://www.homewoodghc.com/ https://www.facebook.com/The-Green-House-Cottages-of-Homewood-1502571206663071/ Show notes/call to action: Learn more about The Green House Project: www.thegreenhouseproject.org

Outcomes Rocket
Better Quality of Care: How a Matching Algorithm for Elderly Care Helps to Find the Right Caregiver with Anja Silberbauer, CEO at Harmony&Care

Outcomes Rocket

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 14:34


In this episode, we are privileged to host the outstanding Anja Silberbauer, CEO at Harmony&Care, an Austrian start-up that focuses on supporting elderly home care. Anja talks about her company's mission to help find the right match for the elderly and sourcing caregivers better. She shares the benefits of both the patients, families and the caregiver agencies, reducing the turnovers and lack of satisfaction in care. She also shares some of the key learnings she made when she began her company. It's exciting what other countries are doing on the home care front, so make sure to tune in to learn about Harmony&Care!

MFLN Family Development Anchored Podcast Series
An Introduction to the Traumatic Brain Injury Center of Excellence’s Caregiver and Provider Resources| Anchored Episode 24

MFLN Family Development Anchored Podcast Series

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021


https://ia601508.us.archive.org/13/items/an-introduction-to-the-traumatic-brain-injury-center-of-excellences-caregiver-an/An%20Introduction%20to%20the%20Traumatic%20Brain%20Injury%20Center%20of%20Excellence%27s%20Caregiver%20and%20Provider%20Resources_Ep%2024.mp3 About the Episode  This episode provides an overview of traumatic brain injury, including the signs and symptoms to look for, and an intro to the Traumatic Brain Injury Center… Continue Reading An Introduction to the Traumatic Brain Injury Center of Excellence’s Caregiver and Provider Resources| Anchored Episode 24

Self-Care Hacks
SCH 074 Self-Care Hacks From the Happy, Healthy Caregiver

Self-Care Hacks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 21:01


Family caregivers, whether you care for a family member long term, or for just a few months, will want to listen in as I interview Elizabeth, the Happy, Healthy Caregiver, as she shares hacks for taking care of yourself so you can serve others. #NationlFamilyCaregiveMonth #caregiver #selfcare #selfcarehacks #sandwichgeneration #agingparents #cancercaregiving #familycaregiver #podcast

Forgotten America
Ep.033: The Hallmark Movie Plan to Save Small Town USA

Forgotten America

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 58:44


Today Nolan Gray joins Garrett to discuss how principles of market urbanism and regional planning can be applied to rural America and small towns. Nolan is originally from Lexington, KY and is studying to receive his PhD in Urban Planning at UCLA. He is also one of the co-authors of the Cardinal Institute's recent paper entitled Homegrown Revival: Removing Barriers to Home Based Entrepreneurship in West Virginia. Nolan shares the importance of building an echo system of entrepreneurs rather than relying on corporate welfare and explains the role local power can have in creating a brighter future for rural American towns.    Follow Nolan on Twitter @mnolangray    Read our paper on home based business regulations in West Virginia   Nolan Gray & Olivia Gonzalez have authored another paper on home based business regulations with the Center for Growth & Opportunity at Utah State   Books on the topic recommended by Nolan: Death & Life of Great American Cities by Jane Jacobs Triumph of the City: How Our Greatest Invention Makes Us Richer, Smarter, Greener, Healthier, and Happier by Edward Glaeser The Use of Knowledge in Society by Friedrich A. Hayek   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------   Donate: www.cardinalinstitute.com/donate Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/cardinalinstitute Newsletter: www.cardinalinstitute.com/contact YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCosCMp86mjLbf8ZWfE5yS7Q Twitter: @CardinalWV Facebook: /CardinalInstitute/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/cardinal-institute-for-wv-policy/ Instagram: @teamcardinalwv

The World and Everything In It
11.23.21 Built to break, democracy in Myanmar, and caregivers

The World and Everything In It

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 36:25


Caleb Bailey reports on why tech devices don't last longer; Paul Butler talks to Olivia Enos about the effort to restore democracy in Myanmar; and caring for a spouse. Plus: commentary from Steve West, a big sneaker sale, and the Tuesday morning news.Support The World and Everything in It today at wng.org/donate. Additional support comes from North Greenville University. Christ-centered academic excellence begins—at ngu.edu From Samaritan Ministries, a health care sharing ministry. It's affordable, there are no networks, and you can join today. More at samaritanministries.org/worldpodcast And from Ambassadors Impact Network, a group of faith-driven investors who finance private companies led by gospel-advancing entrepreneurs. More at ambassadorsimpact.com

At the window with Dementia
At the window with Dementia - Episode 46 "If you're struggling to find hope during the holiday season know you aren't alone"

At the window with Dementia

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 10:22


Thanksgiving is a holiday of hope and giving thanks. What if you can't find something to be grateful for?  Listening to this episode will hopefully help you find peace, hope and maybe even something to be thankful for.

Mama Trauma- Christian Healing, Empowerment, and Spiritual Growth For Daughters of Narcissistic Mothers Recovering From Narci
HELP! I'm My Elderly Narcissistic Mother's Caregiver! How Do I Cope With Her Toxic Behaviors?

Mama Trauma- Christian Healing, Empowerment, and Spiritual Growth For Daughters of Narcissistic Mothers Recovering From Narci

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 16:58


As daughters of narcissistic mothers, we oftentimes have questions about our situations... But it's hard to find safe people to ask who won't judge us.In this segment of the show, you can ask your burning questions about your narcissistic mother and get anonymous advice without any judgment... and best of all... one of your fellow sister survivors is probably wondering the same thing!Got A Question Of Your Own- hop on over into my email at info@ronicacormier.com and leave your question there. Just say "Question For The Show" or you can head to ronicacormier.com and scroll down on the homepage to the section "Letters To Ronica" and leave your question anonymously.In today's episode we're going to discuss how to cope with being the caregiver of your elderly narcissistic mother.Jump in for my advice on this topic!Women of Worth Courses- bit.ly/womenofworthcoursebit.ly/traumacoach - Coachingronicacormier.com- Learn Morebit.ly/mtsisterhood- FB Mama Trauma Sisterhood Grouphttps://www.instagram.com/ronicacormier97/-Connect On Instagram info@ ronicacormier.com- CONNECT/COACHING/COLLABS

OffScrip with Matthew Zachary
How to Survive a WTF Whirlwind And Live To Tell About It

OffScrip with Matthew Zachary

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 27:19


Amanda Ferraro is the Iron Woman of cancer survivorship. She's endured a WTF whirlwind — double pneumonia, seven brain surgeries to treat a cyst on her cerebellum, hydrocephalus, appendicitis, acute myeloid leukemia, and various complications related to those illnesses. But Amanda lived to tell the tale. She started a blog called “Cancer is an Asshole,” which she expanded into a podcast. Amanda continues to share her story, advocates for patients, and runs a nonprofit, all while fighting chronic health problems and being a mom.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Welcome to the Field
SPECIAL MINI-SERIES: RACE & RACISM IN CHILD WELFARE Part 3 – Birth, Foster, & Adoptive Families

Welcome to the Field

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 55:40


Part 3 - Focuses on Families & Caregivers. Make sure to listen to the end for a special bonus conversation with Tabitha that digs deeper into how to talk to families about race. Join Tabitha Moore as she explores critical themes in Race & Racism in Child Welfare with Dr. Ken Hardy. In this series Tabitha and Ken explore critical themes in race/racism as they relate to the Child Welfare Workforce, Caregivers, and children and youth of color in the child welfare system. Please note- although each episode in this mini-series does have a distinct focus, our hope is that you listen to all three, in the order of their release, as some of the concepts Tabitha and Ken discuss will build on ideas from the previous episode. 

The Neil Haley Show
Caregiver Dave Shares Stories of Caregiving

The Neil Haley Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 14:00


Today on the Caregiver Dave Celebrity Segment, Caregiver Dave will share stories of caregiving.

CXMH: On Faith & Mental Health
142 - People Living With Dementia and Their Caregivers (feat. Dr. Brianna Garrison & Dr. Dennis Myers)

CXMH: On Faith & Mental Health

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 53:21


This week we're joined by Dr. Brianna Garrison & Dr. Dennis Myers. They teach us about dementia, how to care for those living with it, and how to care for their caregivers. In the intro, Robert & Holly talk about ways they've been cared for.

Make Dementia Your B*tch!
Episode 20: How Do I Know if My Family Member with Dementia Can Safely Make Decisions?

Make Dementia Your B*tch!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 28:06


In today's podcast, I answer the question, “How do I know if my family member living with dementia can safely make decisions?” This concern usually comes up around financial issues and living arrangements. It is important for caregivers to understand that the ability to make a decision is not an "on/off" light switch. It is more like a gradual dimmer and must be evaluated for each individual and for each circumstance. The ability to make a decision is called decisional capacity. How do you know if someone living with dementia has the decisional capacity for a specific problem or situation? These 5 questions can start the conversation rolling. Caregivers will probably have other related questions for each of the big ones. Tell me about the decision. (What is the decision? What does it mean to you?) If you go through with your decision, what may happen? Tell me who your decision may help. Tell me who your decision may hurt. Is someone or something "pushing" you to make this decision? The Make Dementia Your B*tch book is getting ready to launch. You can read the first 3 chapters for free! Go to www.makedmentiayourbitch.com for a free pdf! Have a dementia question? Want to hear it answered on a future podcast? Email me: info@makedementiayourbitch.com. Looking for a community? I have my own Facebook page for dementia caregivers: https://www.facebook.com/DementiaCentric I show caregivers how to confidently manage dementia behaviors, so that their lives and the lives of their loved ones become easier and calmer. Check out my offerings: https://dementiacentricsolutions.com/caregiver-coaching/ #alzheimers #lewy body #frontotemporal #dementia #caregiving #care refusal #caregiving --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/rita-a-jablonski/message

Story Discovery Podcast
The Caregiver by Kendall Klym

Story Discovery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 74:06


Patrice worries about her determined aging mother who refuses to leave her three-story Queen Anne Victorian home. In search of a caregiver, mother and daughter discover the challenge and gravity of taking care of one another. During the interview, author Kendall Klym explains the motivation behind the story, the impact of dance on his writing style, and how he interprets storytelling. It might just ‘move' you. If you'd like to read this story or learn more about Kendall, head over to Etched Onyx Magazine at www.onyxpublications.com. All audio, story, and poetry material are copyright 2021, all rights reserved.

All Home Care Matters
Quick Tips: Winter Safety Tips for Seniors

All Home Care Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 10:02


We want to thank you for joining us for another Quick Tips episode of All Home Care Matters. Today, we are talking about how to stay warm, stay safe, and stay active this winter. Winter can be beautiful, but dangerous for seniors. We want to make sure you can enjoy this cold weather safely! Now let's move on to the rest of the show.   If you've been listening to the podcast for a while, you probably heard our episode on extreme heat. If you missed the episode, you can find our episode, Keeping Seniors Safe in the Heat, wherever you listen to your podcasts and also on our YouTube channel. In this episode, we talked about how our natural ability to regulate our body temperature diminishes as we age and seniors may have trouble cooling themselves off when exposed to heat for too long. Because of this, seniors often experience heat stroke and sickness. It's no different when it comes to colder weather.   According to the National Institute on Aging, older adults can lose body heat fast—faster than when they were young. Changes in your body that come with aging can make it harder for you to be aware of getting cold. A big chill can turn into a dangerous problem before an older person even knows what's happening. Doctors call this serious problem hypothermia.   Hypothermia is what happens when your body temperature becomes critically low. For an older person, a body temperature of 95°F or lower can cause many health problems, such as a heart attack, kidney problems, liver damage, or worse. Being outside in the cold, or even being in a very cold house, can lead to hypothermia.   How cold is too cold? It can be hard to tell yourself if you are experiencing hypothermia. We found Bob's story from the National Institute on Aging that illustrates how one senior experienced hypothermia. Bob says that Vermont winters can be very cold. Last December, he wanted to save some money so he turned his heat down to 62°F. He didn't know that would put his health in danger.   Luckily, his son Tyler came by to check on him. Tyler saw that his dad was only wearing a light shirt and that his house was cold. Tyler said he was speaking slowly, shivering, and having trouble walking. Tyler wrapped him in a blanket and called 9-1-1.   It turns out that Bob had hypothermia. His son's quick thinking saved his life. Now on cold days, he keeps his heat at least at 68°F and wears a sweater in the house.   Bob's story luckily has a happy ending, but if his son hadn't stopped by, it may have ended very differently. Hypothermia can happen when you least expect it. Knowing the signs ahead of time could save your life.   According to HealthInAging.org, the warning signs of hypothermia include cold skin that is pale or ashy, feeling very tired, confused, and sleepy, feeling weak, problems walking, and slowed breathing or heart rate. If you notice any of these signs, call 911 immediately and try to warm up.   HealthInAging.org also recommends taking the following precautions to prevent hypothermia:   Stay indoors (or don't stay outside for very long). Keep indoor temperature at 65 degrees or warmer. Stay dry because wet clothing chills your body more quickly. Dress smart – protect your lungs from cold air and layer up! Wearing 2 or 3 thinner layers of loose-fitting clothing is warmer than a single layer of thick clothing. Think about getting your thermals! When going outside during the winter, make sure to wear a hat, gloves (or preferably mittens), winter coat, boots, and a scarf to cover your mouth and nose. You should also keep a backup of these items in your vehicle in case of an emergency.   Another major concern for seniors during the winter is frostbite. According to The AGS Foundation for Health in Aging, extreme cold can also cause frostbite, which is damage to the skin that can go all the way down to the bone. Frostbite usually affects the nose, ears, cheeks, chin, fingers, and toes. In very bad cases, it can result in loss of limbs. People with heart disease and other circulation problems are also at a higher risk of getting frostbite. To protect against frostbite, cover up all parts of your body when you go outside. If your skin turns red or dark or starts hurting, go inside immediately. You should also know the telltale signs of frostbite: numbness, skin that's grayish-yellow or ashy, or skin that feels hard or waxy.   If you think you or someone else has frostbite, call for medical help immediately. A person with frostbite may also have hypothermia, so check for those symptoms, as well.   Seniors should also be cautious when walking outside. Snow and ice can make the ground hazardous by covering up cracks and making slick spots. Dr. Stanley Wang, a physician at Stanford Hospital in Palo Alto, California recommends older adults wear shoes with good traction and non-skid soles and stay inside until the roads are clear. Replacing a worn cane tip can make walking easier, and older people are advised to take their shoes off as soon as they return indoors, because often snow and ice attach to the soles and, once melted, can lead to slippery conditions inside.   For more information about reducing your risk of a fall, you can listen to our episode on fall safety tips. If you don't have time for a full episode, we also have a quick tips episode on fall prevention. You can find these episodes on our website, our YouTube channel, and wherever you get your podcasts.   Seniors should also be cautious shoveling snow. No one really enjoys this task, but it can be dangerous for older individuals. If you have heart problems, trouble balancing, or are feeling weak, you should avoid shoveling snow. If you have any health issues, ask your doctor if it is safe to shovel snow.   During the winter, it's nice to sit in front of a fireplace or a heater, but make sure you are properly taking care of these heat sources to prevent fires and carbon monoxide poisoning. Make sure to properly vent and clean your fireplace and appliances and know the warning signs of carbon monoxide poisoning.   According to HealthInAging.org, carbon monoxide poisoning can cause headaches, weakness, nausea or vomiting, dizziness, confusion, blurred vision, and loss of consciousness. Carbon monoxide poisoning is also behind several ghost sightings. Many people that believed they were living in a haunted house actually were suffering from carbon monoxide poisoning. Pacific Heating and Cooling warns that if you are hearing and seeing things, feeling zapped of energy, and sense a strange presence at home, it may be due to a carbon monoxide leak. If you suspect you may have a gas leak in your home, evacuate your home and call 911 immediately. You should also have a carbon monoxide detector in your house since we can't detect it ourselves.   If anyone in your family is showing any signs of carbon monoxide poisoning, you should also get them to the emergency room as soon as possible. According to Pacific Heating and Cooling, even small amounts of carbon monoxide can cause irreparable damage, including brain and organ damage. See a doctor immediately if there is any evidence of carbon monoxide leaks in the home.   Now that we've told you all about staying warm and staying safe this winter, let's move on to the final part of our episode, staying active.   It may be harder to exercise in the winter when you can't walk outside as often, but you should still exercise in other ways. Signing up for indoor classes is a great way to exercise and socialize during the winter. If you don't want to leave your home to exercise, you can take a virtual class or use items around your home to work out.   The Mayo Clinic suggests doing some of the following in your home workout routine:   Use cans of soup or water bottles as hand weights. Go from a sitting to a standing position out of a dining room chair two to three times in a row instead of just once. Walk up and down a hallway or large open space. Go up and down your stairs multiple times. Turn up the music and dance in your kitchen.   Staying active doesn't just mean exercising. You should keep up on other social activities, as well. If you normally go for walks with a friend, consider walking around an indoor mall. Going to the movies or a museum is a great way to get out of the house and both of these activities can be done solo or with a group.   Whatever you do, don't let the cold weather stop you from doing what you enjoy. As long as you bundle up and listen to your body, you can still enjoy the cold weather. Just remember to stay safe, stay warm, and stay active.   We want to say thank you for joining us here at All Home Care Matters, All Home Care Matters is here for you and to help families as they navigate these long-term care issues. Please visit us at allhomecarematters.com there is a private secure fillable form there where you can give us feedback, show ideas, or if you have questions. Every form is read and responded to. If you know someone who could benefit from this episode, please share it with them.   Remember, you can listen to the show on any of your favorite podcast streaming platforms and watch the show on our YouTube channel and make sure to hit that subscribe button, so you'll never miss an episode. We look forward to seeing you next time on All Home Care Matters, thank you.   Sources: https://www.hchcares.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/wintersafety_tips.pdf   https://www.healthinaging.org/tools-and-tips/tip-sheet-winter-safety-older-adults   https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/cold-weather-safety-older-adults   https://www.care.com/c/winter-safety-tips-for-seniors   https://www.pacificheatingcooling.com/2018/12/27/carbon-monoxide-hauntings-co-furnace-safety/   https://www.mayoclinichealthsystem.org/hometown-health/speaking-of-health/ways-for-seniors-to-remain-active-this-winter

Everyone Dies (Every1Dies)
What is Near Death Awareness, and How do I Respond?

Everyone Dies (Every1Dies)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 31:43


Near death awareness (NDA) is a term to describe a dying person's experiences of the dying process and broadly refers to a variety of experiences such as end of life dreams or visions.   Up  to 50-60% of patients will experience some form of NDA prior to their death.  How do you respond?  Learn about the difference between NDA and delirium, the impact it can have to decrease existential stress, and what to do when someone has deathbed visions.

A Woman's View with Amanda Dickson
"It's time to look outside ourselves and see who needs help."

A Woman's View with Amanda Dickson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 8:00


A new study finds increasing rates of depression in Utah in the wake of the pandemic. One of Amanda's guests on A Woman's View said, "2020 was bad, 2121 was worse. In 2022 we're not going to be responsible for what comes out of our mouths!" Her guests this week include Kathy Aiken, long time sportscaster for KSL TV and founder of The Forget Me Not Project, Katie Matheson, Deputy Director of Better Utah, and Kathy Nelson with Salt Lake County Aging and Adult Services.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

TODAY
TODAY 3rd Hour: Music therapy to help caregivers for Dementia parents. Vanessa Hudgens on playing three roles in “The Princess Switch 3: Romancing the Star.” Must-have items to prepare for the holidays.

TODAY

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 36:52


It's Alzheimer's Awareness Month and we're shining a light on the work done by caregivers — MSNBC anchor Richard Lui is sharing how music is helping aging loved ones and their caregivers. Plus, Maria Shriver and Sheinelle Jones are chatting with Vanessa Hudgens about her new movie, “The Princess Switch 3: Romancing the Star,” and what it's like playing three roles. Also, Shop All Day contributor Makho Ndlovu has all the products you need to be the perfect holiday host.

Caregiver Connection Podcast
Making Self Care Work: Step by Step Guide to Making Self Care Possible for Caregivers

Caregiver Connection Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 22:16


You'd like to take care of yourself but have no idea what you'd do or how you'd do it?  I have the solution! This is the last of the self-care series for caregivers. In this episode, I go through the process of how to choose your form of self-care and how to incorporate it into your day. Listen today as I take you through the same process I do with clients and learn how to make self-care in your life a reality. ------------------------------------------ Show Notes This is the last episode of the Caregiver self-care series. Today I'm going to show you how to put everything together so you can start taking moments to care for yourself throughout the day. Let's talk about bringing one self-care tool into your day. Over the past month, I've shared with you the reasons why you might not think you can bring self-care into your days so you can be better able to care for the person you are a caregiver for. If you haven't listened to the past four episodes I suggest you go back to them after you've listened to this one. To summarize… It is difficult for you to make yourself a priority to care for yourself and that comes from a lot of different reasons. You feel like you can't take time for yourself because you'll be judged or you'll judge yourself for it. There isn't time in the day for self-care. Or you can't afford self-care because you think it costs money. I've given you six different types of self-care tools that don't cost money and take as little or as much time as you'd like for them too. In one of the episodes, I even lead you through an extremely short breathing exercise to teach you the first step to learning how to use your breath to reduce stress. Last week I stressed that a lot of not being able to prioritize yourself is not your fault. If you had more support from your social circles and society in general it would be easier for you to take time for yourself. People would expect you to care for yourself so you could continue doing the important work you're doing right now. So the last thing we need to work on together is figuring out how to fit one new thing into your day. How to get yourself to take at least five minutes for yourself every day. I can tell you for certain that when you are finally able to be consistent and show up for yourself. Life changes! If you've listened to the earlier episodes of this podcast you know that when I became a caregiver it was rough for me. I was reactive. I cried a lot and didn't have a handle on the way my life was turned upside down. I was overwhelmed with stress and anxiety but at the same time was working as a Yoga and meditation teacher. It was ironic that my doctor had to suggest that I try meditating for me to realize that my training was what would help me out of the overwhelm and burnout I was experiencing. I was able to take all of my yoga and meditation training and bring self-care back into my day so I could go back to being able to enjoy my life with my husband and daughter even though caregiving was extremely difficult for me. If I hadn't already had all of that training I don't know where I would be right now. I certainly didn't have anyone warn me not to lose myself in caregiving or that if I didn't care for myself I would become bitter and resentful, depressed and overwhelmed. It was simply a small suggestion from a doctor that made me realize that I already had what I needed but caregiving had been thrown on me with such a force that all I could do was fight to keep up. I didn't have the energy or the willpower, in the beginning, to figure out how to care for myself with tools I already had and I didn't have a connection with other caregivers who could let me know I wasn't alone in all the things I was experiencing. That's actually why this podcast exists. It's my way of helping you know you aren't alone and to hopefully help you find ways to enjoy your life as a caregiver easier than I did. It makes sense why it's difficult for you to figure out how to do something for yourself. Caregiving is rough and most times you're just trying to keep up with things. Caregiving can also be long-term and you won't be able to sustain the pace you are at if you don't start caring for yourself. What a lot of us need is for someone to help us figure out how to make ourselves a priority again. If you are burnout right now you might not be able to think of what or how to do something for yourself. As I said in last week's episode - shame on the people who tell you that you need to care for yourself and then don't take the time to help you do that. Having someone come sit in your house to make sure things are ok while you go for a walk or a drive is a way a friend or family member can help. They can help you escape by inviting you to do something that takes as much or as little energy as you'd like to use. Maybe a quick hike or just a drive to pick something up to eat. Maybe someone can sit with a spouse during chemo treatments or play a game with your child so you can take a much-needed nap. So now that we know there are ways to care for yourself, and there are things that you can ask people to do to support you caring for yourself let me take you through the process I use with my clients in helping them figure out how and what to do for self-care. Step into my office... First of all, you have to start with just one thing. So you'll need to pick something from one of the six categories I went over in the first three episodes of this series. They were: Stop - Finding a way to be still. Do absolutely nothing for a few minutes and take a moment to just be. Get Out - Getting yourself out of the house. From just sticking your head out of the window of your house or apartment, taking one step out of the front door to taking a walk or a drive somewhere.  Connect - Finding a way to connect with a friend or family member, go to a support group meeting, find a caregiver mentor, or do anything you would like to do that involves you interacting with a person you don't live with. Touch - Anything you can do with your hands. From just snuggling up with something soft and cozy to creating something with your hands or journaling. Anything that you can use your sense of touch to do.  Thought - Would include meditation, prayer, mantras, manifestation, reading anything that allows you to escape into your thoughts. Breath - can be simply breathing or it can be other things like breath work, singing, or humming. I have my clients sit with this list and think about the ones that interest them and then we dive a little deeper into the one category to see if there is something they would really like to do and know that they will do. Wanting to and actually doing something are two different things. So you have to pick something you will actually do and will be enjoyable for you. This first thing has to be easy for you. We need to eliminate as many roadblocks as we can before even starting. So you pick that one thing. It's something that is accessible for you. You know you should be able to do it every day and you write it down. So let's say you pick enjoying a cup of coffee during the day. You know this isn't the cup that you drink quickly in the morning or the one you continually warm up in the microwave because you don't get to drink it before it gets cold. You like coffee. You know how to make coffee and it's something you always have in your house. The next step would be how can we make this coffee part of your self-care? How do we make this just a little more than just drinking a cup of coffee and turning it into a short break for you? I would have you change how you approach this cup of coffee. Instead of just drinking a cup of coffee I would have you notice the smell of it as it brews. Notice the sounds as you pour it into a cup and stir in the sugar and cream. Then you would take the coffee to a quiet place. Maybe it's the kitchen table, maybe sitting on the stairs or the sofa. A place that you most likely won't be disturbed. Then when you sit down with the coffee you just really try to focus on the experience. The feeling and texture of the mug. Notice the color of the mug and how it feels in your hands. Notice how the warmth of it feels. See the steam coming from it and the color of the coffee. How are your taste buds reacting? How is your body reacting to the promise of a sip of coffee? Then before taking a sip take three nice deep breaths in so you can truly enjoy the scent of the drink you're holding. Then you take a sip. Just a sip and really taste the coffee. You focus on just this… not the things you really have to do, not worry about all the things you have to worry about because - these next 3,15, 20 minutes are just for you. Almost anything that can happen in three minutes can wait for a short period of time. You have to let go of it all and focus just on that cup of coffee. After the first sip, you continue drinking and enjoying the coffee. You don't bring anything with you by the way. It's just you and that cup. So, no list-making or social media surfing. It's just you and that cup of coffee. You continue to enjoy just that cup of coffee for as long as you can and then… when you're done you don't just get up and walk away. You take one second to bring in a deep breath say to yourself something that lets you know it's time to move on like - on to the next thing. Or, you got this. And then you move on. This can easily be three minutes of your time. Sitting with just a cup of coffee. And it doesn't have to be coffee. It can be a piece of chocolate, a meal, spending time with a pet, or just breathing. The focus is on just that one thing because it lets your brain take a break. It helps you reset and can bring you a sense of calm when you most need it. So now that we have identified the one thing you'll do and how you'll do it we have to find a time you will commit to it. It has to be a time when you know there is a 75% chance you will be able to do it. When during your day can you do this one thing? When can you sit down to enjoy this cup of coffee? So whatever it is you choose the next step is to figure out when in your day you will do it. It's important to start out with something you will and can do every day. The first step towards making yourself a priority and being ok with caring for yourself needs to be something you will be able to do every day. Of course, it's good to have things you might only do on the weekend or monthly but first, that doesn't help you with your day-to-day stress, and second if you don't make it work once it's very easy to give it up altogether. So once you find the one thing you will do for yourself, identify what and how you will do it and then when you will do it each day. Find that window of time that's open for you. After that, you have to plan. Set things up so there is no excuse not to try. Staying with the coffee example I would have you make sure you have coffee. Choose the cup that you would want to use and set it aside. The cup doesn't matter but having the cup ready for you does. You have to ask yourself what will get in the way of you doing this one thing. Are you trying to set this up at a time of the day that the person you care for will need you or are you doing it when they usually take a nap? Figure out what will get in the way and then see how you can get around that. Then the next part is important. You have to set boundaries and it can be difficult to do when the boundaries are for you. So let's say you care for your husband and you have decided that every afternoon at three pm you're going to enjoy a cup of coffee. It's a time when nothing is really happening in the house and your husband is usually doing something on his own. You have to make this time for yourself a priority. Maybe your husband will ask for some coffee if he can smell it. That's not a problem just make extra and serve him some and then go and enjoy your coffee on your own. If he asks why you're making coffee or why you are going somewhere else to drink it you can just explain to him that you're trying something new. Everyone has their special relationships with the people they care for so what needs to happen is for you to already know that you aren't going to be made to feel like what you're trying to do is stupid or selfish. You have to tell yourself that you won't allow anyone to shame you for trying to take a moment out of the day for yourself.  It's a little bit easier for me to go through this with a person one on one because they can explain what the other person's reaction might be. You will have to go with what you think they will react to. However, it's very possible they won't even notice you're gone. You'll have to choose if you're going to talk to them about it. It would be a great conversation to have with your loved one. Letting them know why and how you plan on caring for yourself a little bit more and assuring them it's because you want to be a better caregiver for them. People don't like change and it's vulnerable to try to make changes. So this can be a non-event or a bigger conversation that you need to have. The most important thing for you to know is - yes it's just a cup of coffee or just a walk but it's also more than that. It's time you need to take it for yourself and if it is just a cup of coffee then it shouldn't be a big deal to do it.  Don't let anyone make you feel bad for doing something for yourself. This will be easier for some people than others. That's why it might help to have a partner in crime. Your hype girl. Your backup singer. However, you want to think of it. The person you can talk this over with. The one that can be there and not let you talk yourself out of enjoying that cup of coffee. The person that genuinely will say - you're full of crap you need to just do this when you try to make excuses. Your support person. If you don't have a support person, send me an email and I help you talk through these things so you know what to do when you want to back out. Because that cup of coffee, that is just a cup of coffee, is starting to feel like more isn't it. And what happens is when that time gets hijacked you can get very emotional about it and give up altogether. So let's try to keep it important enough to want to do but not what could turn into the last straw. We are all holding on to a lot of frustration. It's completely understandable when your life has become nothing like you expected it to be. But setting up self-care is not a way to start a fight or air your frustrations. It isn't a symbol of how things just never go right in your life or how you aren't allowed to have happiness. Those are self-limiting beliefs that can be worked on once you start caring for yourself more. Or with a therapist. So we've identified the one thing you want to do. We have decided how you plan to do it. You've found the best time during the day that you can try We've identified what can get in the way of you being successful and how to get around those roadblocks before they even happen. You've thought about the boundaries you need to set. Found a person you can have hold accountable or you've reached out to me for support. What happens next? You do it. You get to tomorrow afternoon and you have your coffee. You sit with it and you enjoy it and when you are done you end it by saying something like “on to the next thing” or You got this and — Important part here - you are going to take one quick second and see how you're feeling. Then you go live the rest of the day. If you are a list writer you might want to create a note in your phone or a notebook and just write the date, if you drank that coffee and how you felt after. At the end of the day, you're going to check in before you go to sleep to see how the rest of your day went. You do the same thing if you miss that time for yourself. That way you can see if this one thing is working for you. Or if you start to notice you are really missing it a lot then maybe it isn't what you should be trying to focus on. There's nothing wrong with the first form of self-care that you pick to not be the right one for now. It might fit all the criteria except one and that one thing is what will make it difficult for you to do.  If that's the case you go back through the process again. The good thing is, each time you are reinforcing how important it is to prioritize your care. Now there will be days that are difficult for you and you aren't able to care for yourself the way you've been trying to. Or you feel like it just isn't worth it to try to find joy in your day. When this happens I want you to remember why you are a caregiver. Who is that person you give so much of your life to? Remember how much you love them. How badly you wish things would be different for both of you. Remember why you decided to care for them and know that this simple cup of coffee or a short walk or whatever it is you decided to try to do is not only important for you it's important for them because doing this one thing is how you come back to loving your life a little bit more, become a better caregiver, find ways to enjoy that person you care for and find a little bit of joy in your life. You can do this. You are worth it! Find more at www.loveyourcaregivinglife.com

Brain Injury Today
The Ultimate Guidebook for Brain Injury Survivors, Caregivers and Professionals (Pt. 1)

Brain Injury Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 33:24


This is the first of a two part episode about a groundbreaking new book called Understanding Traumatic Brain Injury: A Guide for Survivors and Families. BIAWA Board Member Richard Adler, who authored the book, joins Deborah along with Brandon Blake and Sabrina Bonaparte, who contributed their perspectives as a survivor and caregiver, to discuss how it can serve as an invaluable resource for those navigating the difficulties of brain injury. Richard, Brandon and Sabrina discuss how they worked together to create this comprehensive, step-by-step guidebook and their hopes for getting it into the hands of as many people as possible. To get your copy of Understanding Traumatic Brain Injury: A Guide for Survivors and Families, visit biawa.org/understanding-traumatic-brain-injury Get in touch with Richard at adler@adlergiersch.com Reach out to Brandon using bonustimemusic@gmail.com, via bonustimemusic.com or find him on social media with the handle @bonustimemusic Connect with Sabrina using  sabrina.bonaparte@gmail.com This episode of Brain Injury Today was produced by Goal 17 Foundation and sponsored by the Washington State Traumatic Brain Injury Council.   For more resources related to traumatic brain injury visit: Brain Injury Today Podcast Brain Injury Alliance of Washington The Pooled Alliance Community Trusts Brain Injury Art Show

Sojourner Truth Radio
Sojourner Truth Radio: November 18, 2021 - Care Income for People and Planet

Sojourner Truth Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 58:19


Today on Sojourner Truth: We focus on the inter-relationship between caregiving and environmental protection. Family unwaged caregivers " most of whom are women, including mothers and grandmothers, and the most impoverished women on welfare " provide care for relatives, children, the elderly and persons with disabilities. Caregivers are expected to pick up the slack without any acknowledgement of the value or resources for their work. The International Labor Office has estimated that women do two-thirds of the worlds work for five percent of the income. And according to a report released by Oxfam in January 2020, women around the world perform 12.5 billion hours of unpaid labor every day. Overall, the work of unwaged caregivers has been estimated to contribute at least $11 trillion to the global economy, according to a Human Development Report. Meanwhile, Indigenous peoples who are protecting the forests and natural farmers around the world are showing the way amid the ongoing climate crisis. Many of them are unwaged caregivers, who are providing both for people and the environment. They point out that in order to address the main cause of the climate crisis, we must transform our relationship with the natural world, beginning with agriculture. The interaction of soil, water and sun generates the water cycle on which the climate and all life depend. This forms part of the broader soil regeneration movement, which can help to reverse climate change by rebuilding soil organic matter and restoring degraded soil biodiversity " resulting in both carbon drawdown and improving the water cycle. Imagine a world where unwaged caregivers would be compensated for regenerating our soul and protecting our planet, instead of money going to governments and corporations. During todays show, we bring you audio from a recent webinar hosted by the Global Women's Strike, titled Care Income for People and Planet: Why Our Future Lies in the Soil. The webinars speakers help us better understand the interconnections between the movement for the rights of unwaged caregivers, and the need to protect our environment through progressive new methods, such as soil regeneration. We hear from speakers around the world, who comment on the need to unite both movements.

America's Heroes Group
Ep. 206- Caregiver Services available through Jesse Brown VA

America's Heroes Group

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 23:03


Katherine Miller  - JBVA LCSW Coordinator Program of General Caregiver Support Services