Podcasts about Regulation

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General term for rules, including delegated legislation and self-regulation

  • 3,412PODCASTS
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  • Nov 26, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Regulation

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Latest podcast episodes about Regulation

ThePrint
ThePrintPod : Modi govt must not ban cryptocurrencies. But regulation shouldn't be slack either

ThePrint

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 6:47


The revenue generated from cryptocurrencies can be an incentive for the Modi government to allow this trade with restriction rather than ban it and lose the 'sin tax'.

Free Man Beyond the Wall
Episode 662: An Entrepreneur Overcomes Government's Crushing Regulation w/ Jared Wall

Free Man Beyond the Wall

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 55:53


56 Minutes PG-13 Jared Wall is an entrepreneur and former guest on this podcast. Jared joins Pete to talk about his moving out of the northeast when CV19 madness started to kick in. He talks mostly about the business he started this year that has run into every form of obstruction it possibly could from the State and its apparatchiks and how he overcame it. Today's Sponsor: Open a Crypto IRA w/ iTrustCapital to Invest in Cryptocurrency & Physical Gold. Get $100 in Bitcoin when you sign up and fund your account through the link below. https://itrust.capital/freeman THC Hemp Spot - Promo Code "Pete" for 15% off any Order Episode 328: Using Pop Culture to Communicate the Ideas of Liberty: Breaking Bad Edition Get Autonomy 19 Skills PDF Download The Monopoly On Violence Support Pete on His Website Pete's Patreon Pete's Substack Pete's Subscribestar Pete's Paypal Pete's Books on Amazon Pete on Twitter

Thanks For Visiting
139. Renting Responsibly: Playing a Role in Your Local Regulation

Thanks For Visiting

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 48:33


We're continuing to bring our favorite speakers from the VRMA onto the show! This time, we're joined by the wonderful Dana Lubner. As Head of Leadership Development at Rent Responsibly, Dana works closely with alliance leadership teams to build united voices at the local level. She also serves on Denver's short-term rental advisory committee alongside members of the city council.  In Fall of 2020, Dana and VRMB's Matt Landau launched a 10-part educational podcast titled “How to Save Your Vacation Rental Business,” with a second season in the works bravely tackling the difficult question of “What is fair regulation?”  We dive into those plans and much more during this discussion. She delivers actionable tips and tricks to get involved in making sure the rental industry remains accessible to those who know, use, and love it appropriately. To learn more, and for the complete show notes, visit: https://thanksforvisiting.me/ (thanksforvisiting.me) Resources: http://www.rentresponsibly.org (rentresponsibly.org) https://www.vrmb.com/how-to-save-your-vacation-rental-business-podcast-dana-lubner/ (How to Save Your Vacation Rental Business - Hosted by Dana Lubner) https://effortlessrentalgroup.com/ (effortlessrentalgroup.com) https://www.rentresponsibly.org/resources (rentresponsibly.org/resources) Don't have a STR alliance in your location? Start one! Check out our https://www.rentresponsibly.org/diy-alliance/ (ULTIMATE GUIDE: Building a Self-Sustainable Short-Term Rental Alliance) Visit https://www.thanksforvisiting.me/workshop (thanksforvisiting.me/workshop) to watch our Hosting Business Mastery Method workshop! #STRShareSunday: https://www.instagram.com/thejbbeachhouse/ (@thejbbeachhouse) Thanks for Visiting is a production of http://crate.media (Crate Media)

Motherhood in ADHD
E120: 4 Things You Should Do To Prepare for Your ADHD Diagnosis Appointment: Taking the fear out of this intimidating and scary step: Q+A Session

Motherhood in ADHD

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 13:42


ADHD is NOT well understood by most doctors. I know, shocking, right? We often expect our doctors to be the "know all, be all, end all" of medical information, and as much as they want to help us... they just don't get the in-depth training necessary on every single area... And ADHD is one of them. This Q&A session covers my top recommendations when it comes to prepping for an ADHD Diagnosis appointment. Don't get me wrong, I truly believe most doctors want to help us and their hearts are in the right place. I also believe it's important to be our own advocates by making sure we understand our diagnosis and we're prepared to ask the right questions. The question, "How should I prepare for my ADHD Diagnosis appointment?" comes up a lot so I thought it was time I shared my two cents on the subject. Don't worry, Successful Mama. The info in this episode will help you feel confident talking with your doctor about your options and what the right path FOR you will be on your ADHD journey. What other tips would you give someone who's about to talk to their doctor about getting an ADHD diagnosis? Drop your thoughts in the comments. P.s. Real quick - I wanted to mention the totally free Motherhood in ADHD Facebook community. If you're looking for other moms who "get it"...I invite you to join us. Always accepting new members. :-) Click here for transcription.

Thinking Crypto Interviews & News

Huge Ripple XRP news today as Fox Business releases an in-depth report outlining the SEC Ripple XRP lawsuit and the conflicts of interest from Jay Clayton and Bill Hinman. Ripple formed a partnership with the Republic of Palau to explore the country's first national digital currency using the XRPL. Ripple CEO Brad Garlinghouse tweets an article which shows India wants a new tech like Ripple's instead of Swift. Morgan Stanley's funds bought +2 million shares of Grayscale Bitcoin Trust in Q3. $46.8 billion Australian retirement fund open to investing in crypto in order to diversify investments.https://www.foxbusiness.com/features/sec-ripple-crypto-future-blockchain

The Big Story
831: With a Potential Ban on Cryptocurrency, What Should You Do With Your Investment?

The Big Story

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 16:14


The entire cryptocurrency market in India had a bloodbath on the evening of 23 November as panic set in with retail investors over the news coming out that the government is tabling a bill in the upcoming Parliament to ban "private cryptocurrencies". By midnight, the entire market fell by around 15 percent, with Bitcoin down by 17 percent, Ethereum down by nearly 15 percent and Tether by almost 18 percent. The root of this volatility is The Cryptocurrency and Regulation of Official Digital Currency Bill, 2021, which “seeks to ban all private cryptocurrencies in the country, but will allow certain exceptions to promote underlying technology and its uses.” Along with this, the document also states that the Reserve Bank of India will be introducing its own digital coin as well. But, there is no knowledge so far on how this RBI coin will work or its purpose. An unregulated market so far, for the past few months, the Centre has been dropping hints regarding its intent on regulating cryptocurrency in India. Even Prime Minister Narendra Modi in a recent speech at Sydney Dialogue said that the “democratic countries need to work together on cryptocurrency and ensure that it does not end up in the wrong hands.” But with reportedly 10 crore retail investors in the crypto market, how can a ban impact India's crypto market? What is the Centre's concerns regarding cryptocurrencies? And if you are an investor, what should you do with your investment? Guests:  Subhash Garg, former finance Secretary of India and Naimish Sanghvi, the CEO of CoinCrunch, a crypto news platform. Host and Producer: Himmat Shaligram Editor: Shelly Walia Music: Big Bang Fuzz Listen to The Big Story podcast on: Apple: https://apple.co/2AYdLIl Saavn: http://bit.ly/2oix78C Google Podcasts: http://bit.ly/2ntMV7S Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2IyLAUQ Deezer: http://bit.ly/2Vrf5Ng Castbox: http://bit.ly/2VqZ9ur

Dr. Berkson's Best Health Radio Podcast
Keeping the Noodles from Sticking Together in These Pandemic Times with Dr. Mary Ruwart PhD (#232)

Dr. Berkson's Best Health Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 74:11


To vaccine or not to vaccine, that has become a polarizing question. But why is there censorship of early interventions and also of doctors writing scripts for them? Why are we being pitted against each other? Dr. Ruwart has been in the pharmaceutical industry for many years, run for the presidential primary on the Libertarian ticket, and is author of three books, one on how the FDA became what she thinks it is today. This is a tell-it-like-we-think-it conversation. Mary J. Ruwart, Ph.D. chairs a for-profit IRB and is a former research scientist in the pharmaceutical industry.  She has a B.S. in biochemistry and a Ph.D. in Biophysics from Michigan State University. She did post-doctoral work at the St. Louis University Medical School's Department of Surgery and became an Assistant Professor of Surgery before joining the Upjohn Company.  Science is always changing, and we are in a circumstance that is evolving, but it seems that the “narrative” of much of the media is not representing accurately both sides of the science. Turns out there are details not widely discussed on most TV or radio shows. You will hear some of that here including: Who is most apt to die from Covid and why. What does obesity have to do with it. Is heart damage happening more in vaccinated young adults than from Covid. Why getting two boosters a year exposes you to the “inflammatory spike” protein. The Covid spike protein binds to human tissues than any other animal the bat it derives from, and this is very unusual and makes us wonder about human gain-of-functioning engineering. We are seeing a level of censorship worldwide - bigger than we have ever seen before, even in the medical journals which are thus becoming untrustworthy now. So, in this show we ponder what is going on. Did you know that the Pfizer submission to FDA for Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) is still under EUA? The full approval has been for Biotech – in this show Dr. R. discusses the difference. You cannot have a vaccine on an EUA if there are already “early effective interventions”. Critical to keep in mind. We discuss the veracity of VAERS (Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System) and why this is not being discussed, tracked, and Dr. R's interpretation of the numbers. Dr. Ruwart believes, teaches, and writes that “Whoever controls your body, controls your mind.” Think, read, question, debate, learn… but stay calm. And informed. Dr. Ruwart says, “If the vaccine works, then you don't need to worry about an unvaccinated person. If the vaccine doesn't work, it makes no sense to have a mandate. Especially with something so new.” Dr. Ruwart says the research on the children 5 to 12 years old was done on a group of 2000 children. None in the experiemental nor placebo arm during this time got Covid. 5% of the children were lost to follow-up. Is this enough safety data to inject our children? Dr. Ruwart says it is something to ponder. We discuss blood labs to see if heart damage is occurring and suggest nutraceuticals to take prophylactically, especially in children and young adults, that may be heart-protective - if you decide that moving forward is the best way to go. These are suggestions based on physiology, not studies. Many studies are included below for your personal reading. Dr. Ruwart's three books, “Healing Our World,” “Short Answers to the Tough Questions,” and “Death by Regulation” are available at Amazon.

F**kface
Regulation Listeners // Geoff's at 36%

F**kface

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 67:21


Geoff, Gavin, and Andrew talk about Geoff's colonoscopy & if he has to run, Andrew's formal apple apology, and Betty White contests to fund the show. Jet Ski Club Merch: Cyber Monday, November 29th at 10am CST Want to contribute to bits? Email what you can do to ffacebits@gmail.com Sponsored by Raycon (http://buyraycon.com/face), Better Help (http://betterhelp.com/face), and HelloFresh (http://hellofresh.com/face14).

The Skillful Podcast
#47: Emotion Regulation Overview Part 1

The Skillful Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 40:02


The Emotion Regulation skills in DBT offer lots of ways to help you identify and respond to emotions. Some of the Emotion Regulation skills focus on change, while others focus on acceptance. This toggling back and forth between acceptance and change is the primary dialectic we are continually balancing in DBT. This episode provides an overview of the Emotion Regulation skills as a whole, and takes a deep dive into change-oriented strategies such as Check the Facts, Opposite Action, and Problem Solving. For full show notes, visit our website. Ask us a Question We'd love to hear from you! Where are you getting stuck with your skills application? Ask us a question for the chance to have it answered on the podcast. Submit your question here.  Please note that questions, and this podcast in general, are not a substitute for individual mental health treatment.

Audio Mises Wire
Antitrust Regulation Assumes Bureaucrats Know the "Correct" Amount of Competition

Audio Mises Wire

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021


The process of learning what's most efficient and profitable includes merging with competitors and taking over different stages of the supply chain—all tactics that would be considered in violation of current antitrust laws. Original Article: "Antitrust Regulation Assumes Bureaucrats Know the "Correct" Amount of Competition" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

Farming Today
24/11/21 - Pesticide regulation, breeding disease resistance in seeds, regenerative dairy farming

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 13:40


New research questions whether the rules assessing the toxicity of pesticides are doing enough to prevent harm to pollinators. Regulation of pesticides usually focuses on the impact of the active ingredients of a product, but this study found a additional chemical used in commercial fungicides in the UK can damage the health of bumblebees. We visit a seed breeding organisation where they're developing winter wheat that can resist diseases like yellow rust and septoria. And ‘regenerative farming' has been gaining attention around the world as a means of improving soils, increasing biodiversity and mitigating climate change. Big companies like Nestle, Unilever, McCain and Pepsi have announced they'll be investing in the idea, but so far there's little data-driven proof of its impact. We find out about a project run by the dairy co-operative Arla which will gather data from 24 farms across Europe. Presented by Anna Hill Produced for BBC Audio in Bristol by Heather Simons

Mises Media
Antitrust Regulation Assumes Bureaucrats Know the "Correct" Amount of Competition

Mises Media

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021


The process of learning what's most efficient and profitable includes merging with competitors and taking over different stages of the supply chain—all tactics that would be considered in violation of current antitrust laws. Original Article: "Antitrust Regulation Assumes Bureaucrats Know the "Correct" Amount of Competition" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Michael Stack.

I Survived Theatre School
Carole Schweid

I Survived Theatre School

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 98:48


Intro: buzzsaws and clean slates, rage, Where the Wild Things AreLet Me Run This By You: MoneyInterview: We talk to Carole Schweid about Juilliard, Phoebe Brand, John Lehne, Michael Brand, Midnight Cowboy, musical comedy performance, open dance calls, starring in the original cast of A Chorus Line, Bob Fosse, Pat Birch, Martha Graham, Minnie's Boys, Mervyn Nelson, playing Fastrada in the first national tour of Pippin, being a lone wolf in theatre, Lewis J. Stadlen, doing West Side Story at Bucks County Playhouse, Shelly Winters, Mary Hinkson, Nellie Forbush in South Pacific, playing Tzeitel in Fiddler on the Roof, Peppermint Lounge, Nick Dante, Michael Bennett, Marvin Hamlisch, Public Theater, Gerry Schoenfeld, The Shubert, the wish for a job vs. the real experience of working, Theda Bara & The Frontier Rabbi, Agnes de Mille, Play With Your Food, Staged Reading Magic, Albert Hague.FULL TRANSCRIPT (unedited):2 (10s):And I'm Gina Pulice.1 (11s):We went to theater school together. We survived it, but we didn't quite understand it. 20 years later,2 (16s):We're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense1 (20s):If at all we survived theater school and you will too. Are we famous yet? As more space is actually a huge thing.2 (36s):Yeah. I have to apologize for the sound of buzz saws. What is going to be going the whole time I'm talking, doing well, you1 (50s):Took some trees down, right.2 (53s):You know, that's how it started. Yeah. It started with actually, you know, it all was a surprise to me, basically one we've been talking about taking down all the trees in the front of our house. And one day Aaron said, they're coming tomorrow to take down the trees. And I'm like, how much did that cost? Because you know, taking down trees is usually really expensive. And so he says, well, he's going to do everything in the front for whatever. It was $5,000.1 (1m 22s):Yeah. She was pretty good for more than one tree. Cause one tree we had removed was $5,000 at my mom's.2 (1m 28s):Well, and it's not like they have to extract the whole tree. It's just, you know, just chopping it down. Like it's not, I don't know if it's different when they have to take out the, yeah,1 (1m 38s):I think it is when they have to take the stump out the roots and all that.2 (1m 43s):So that was fine. Although I did think to myself, Hmm. We have $5,000 to spend and this is what we're spending it on.1 (1m 54s):I've been there. Oh, I've been there2 (1m 56s):So the morning, but I'm letting it go. And so the morning comes and he tells me to go outside so we can talk about the trees and, and, and I, anyway, we, we designate some trees and they're all in the lower part of the front of our house.1 (2m 10s):Yes. You, and by the way, for people that don't know, like you have a lot of land for, for, for, for not being in the super super country, you have a lot of courage. I mean, you got a lot of trees.2 (2m 21s):Well, yeah, we have an acre and it's a lot of trees and it's a lot of junk trees. What they call junk trees. Because the idea here is once upon a time, when everybody got their heat from wood, you had to have fast growing trees. So it's these skinny trees. Yeah. Anyway, so I thought we were sort of on the same page about what we were going down. This is where I'm getting with this. And I had a couple of meetings yesterday and I was hearing the sound pretty close, but it wasn't until I looked outside that I saw, they took everything out.2 (3m 1s):The, every living thing out in the, in the front, in front of our house, including the only tree I was really attached to was I have a beautiful lilac tree.1 (3m 14s):Okay. Oh shit. And everything out.2 (3m 21s):What's that? Why they1 (3m 22s):Take everything out? Is that the plant? I think,2 (3m 25s):I think what happened was for the first couple of days, the boss was here. And then I think yesterday, the boss was like, you guys just go and finish up. And I don't know that anyway, you know what, I'm just choosing it to be, I'm choosing to look at it like, okay, well we're getting to start over and it can be exactly how we want it to be. So yeah,1 (3m 45s):That is a great attitude because there's nothing you can do you really do about it? Absolutely. Zero. You can do about threes coming out.2 (3m 53s):The only bummer is that it sounds like buzz saws all day at my house and at my neighbor's house, I'm sure they're annoyed with us too. Well,1 (4m 2s):What are you going to put? It is. Okay. So, so, okay. The good, that's the sort of wonky news, but what the good news is, what are you going to put in? Like, is there going to be a whole new,2 (4m 12s):I think it's just going to GRA, I mean, I think it's just going to be grass, which is fine. I mean, my thing was actually, it does a little bit of a metaphor because when we first moved here, we loved how quiet and private and everything is. And part of why everything feels very private at our house is there's trees and bushes blocking our view of anything. I mean, all we can see is trees and bushes when we're laying on the front, which for a while seemed cozy. And then it started to seem like annoying that we could never see. And actually there's kind of a really beautiful view of the mountains behind us. So our mountains Hills.1 (4m 51s):Yeah. But I mean, small mountains, like small2 (4m 53s):Mountains. Yeah. So I realized that it does coincide with our psychological spelunking and trying to just be like more open about everything. Like totally. You know what I mean? Like this is just be open to people seeing our house. This is open to seeing out and let's have, and actually my kids were kind of like, oh, but it's just also open and we don't have any privacy. And I'm like, yeah, well you have your room and bathroom. I mean, there's, there's places to go if you don't want people to, to see you, but let's just be open.1 (5m 31s):There's like a whole, yeah. It's a great metaphor for being visible. Like I am all about lately. I have found a lot of comfort and refuge in the truth of the matter, even if it's not pretty, even if I don't actually like it. So like getting the facts of the matter and also sharing the, of the matter without a judgment. So I appreciate this, like wanting to be seen and then letting go of what people make of that, whether your house is this way or that way, or the neighbors think this or that, I'm also the, I I'm all about it.1 (6m 15s):I'm like, you know, this is, there's something about transparency. That's very comforting for me. It's also scary because people don't like it when they can see, or they can say whatever they want, but the hiding, I think I'm pretty convinced hiding from myself and from others leads to trouble.2 (6m 37s):It leads to trouble. And any time you're having to kind of keep track of what you're, you know, being open about and what you're not, and what you've said, you know, it just it's like it's T it's listen. If I only have a certain amount of real estate in my mind, I really don't want to allocate any of it too. Right. Hiding something and trying to remember. Right.1 (7m 1s):And it's interesting, the more that we do this podcast, the more I see that, like, you know what I thought gene, I thought when we're dead, this podcast is going to remain. And then our children's children's children. I mean, I don't have kids, but my nieces and nephew and your children's children's children will have a record of this. And, and I'd rather it be a record of the truth, the truth and transparency, then some show about pretending. So I think it's going to be good for them to be able to look back and be like, for me, it's like the, my crazy aunt, like, what was she doing? And what did she think? And, and, oh my God, it's a record of the times too.1 (7m 43s):Yeah.2 (7m 43s):I think about that kind of a lot. And I think about, of course I say all this and my kids are probably like going to be, have no interests unless the, until they get to a certain age, I mean, I'll put it to you this way. If I could listen to a podcast of my mother in her, you know, in the time that I don't really the time of life, certainly before I was born, but in my life where I still didn't see her as a person until, you know, I'd love to just things like what her voice sounded like then, and that kind of thing. I mean, it's interesting.1 (8m 16s):I have nothing of my mom, like we have a very few, it was interesting because we didn't, you know, we, there was not a lot of video of my mother and today's actually the 10th anniversary of her passing.2 (8m 28s):Oh, wow. Wow. That's hard.1 (8m 31s):It is hard. You know, it is hard. And I'm working through, I started therapy with a new therapist, like a regular LCSW lady. Who's not because my last guy was an Orthodox Jewish man who wanted me to have children. Like it was a whole new, I just got involved in all the Shannon Diego's of like weirdness. I attracted that weirdest and whatever. So this lady is like a legit, you know, therapist. And they only bummer is, and I totally understand she's on zoom, but like, I I'm so sick of like, I would love to be in a room with a therapist, but I get it. She's in, she's an older lady, which is also great. I was so sick of having like 28 year old therapists.1 (9m 13s):Yeah,2 (9m 13s):Yeah, yeah. For sure.1 (9m 16s):I don't even seem right. Unless clients are like, you know, fit seven to 17. So anyway, so, but all this to say about my mom, I was thinking about it and I think what's harder than right. My mom's death right now is that there's I just, you know, and this is something I wanted to bring up with you is just like, I have a lot of rage that's coming up lately about my childhood and we weren't allowed to feel rage. And my mom was the only one allowed to feel rage. And so this rage mixed with perimenopause slash menopause. I mean, like I still get a period, but like, it's, it's a matter of time before that's over.1 (9m 58s):So, but the rage, so I guess, right. I get, you know, people like to talk about rage as some or anger as something we need to process and we need to do this and that, but the truth of the matter is since we're being transparent, like rage can be really scary. Like sometimes the rage, I feel, it's not like I'm going to do anything. Why wonky? I hope, but it's more like a, I don't know what to do with it. That is my, and I was talking in therapy about that. Like, I'm not actually sure. Practically when the feelings come up, what to do with rage. And I feel like it speaks to in our culture of like, we're all about now, this sort of like, we talk about this fake positivity and shit like that.1 (10m 41s):And also like embracing all your feelings, but there's not really practical things that we learn what to do when you feel like you're going to take your laptop and literally take it and throw it across the room and then go to jail. Like you, you. So I have to like look up things on the internet with literally like what to do with my rage.2 (11m 1s):I think that's why that's part of my attraction to reality. Television shows is a, is a performance of rage. That's that I wouldn't do just because I don't think I could tolerate the consequences. I mean, an upwards interpretation is, oh, it's not my value, but it's really just like, I don't think I can manage the content of the consequences. I'm totally at having all these blown up1 (11m 30s):And people mad at me and legal consequences. I can't,2 (11m 35s):It's something very gratifying about watching people just give in to all of their rage impulses and it's yeah. I, it it's, it may be particularly true for women, but I think it's really just true for everybody that there's very few rage outlets, although I guess actually maybe sports. Well, when it turns, when it turns sideways, then that's also not acceptable.1 (12m 3s):Yeah. I mean, and maybe that's why I love all this true crime is like, these people act out their rage, but like lately to be honest, the true crime hasn't been doing it for me. It's interesting. That is interesting. Yeah. It's sort of like, well, I've watched so much of it that like now I'm watching stuff in different languages, true crime. And I'll start again. No, no, just stories. I haven't all been the only stories that I haven't heard really, really are the ones from other countries now. So I'm watching like, like true crime in new, in Delhi.2 (12m 42s):Do you need your fix? I actually was listening to some podcasts that I listened to. There's always an ad and it's exactly about this. It's like, we love true crime, but we've heard every story we know about every grisly murder, you know, detail. And it was touting itself as a podcast of, for next time I listened to it. I'll note the name of it so I can share it with you. You know, about this crimes. You haven't heard about1 (13m 9s):T the thing is a lot of them now, because I'm becoming more of a kind of sewer. Like a lot of it is just shittily made. So like the, the they're subtitled and dubbed in India, like India. So you've got like the, the they're speaking another language and then they're and if they don't match, so then I'm like, well, who's right. Like, is it the dubbing that's right. Or the subtitles that are right. And, and actually the words matter because I'm a writer. So it was like one anyway, it's poorly done is what I'm saying in my mind. And so it sort of scraped scraping the bottom of the barrel. It's like deli 9 1 1. I swear to God. That's what it, and, and it's, and also it's, it's horrifying because the, you know, the legal systems everywhere fucked, but India has quite a system.2 (13m 57s):I think that to the rage, like, tell me more about what comes up for you with rage and where you,1 (14m 6s):Yeah. Okay. So some of it is physiological, like where I feel literally like, and I think this is what my doctor's talking about. The menopause symptoms. I literally feel like a gnashing, my teeth. Like, I feel a tenseness in my jaw. Like, that's literally that. And she's like, that could also be your heart medication. So talk to your heart doctor. I mean, we're checking out all the things, but like, but it's tension. That's what it really feels like in my body is like tight tension where I feel earth like that. If I had to put a sound effect to it, it's like, ah, so I, I feel that is the first symptom of my rage. And then I feel like, and, and I say out loud, sometimes I hate my life.1 (14m 54s):That's what I say. And that is something I have never allowed myself to say before. Like I, I think unconsciously, I always told myself, like, you just, you have to be grateful and you know, those are the messages we receive, but sometimes life just fucking sucks. And sometimes my life, I just, I just can't stand. And, and in moments, you know, I never loved myself. So it's mostly a physical symptom followed by this is intolerable, what someone is doing. Sometimes my dog or my husband, but even, even if the coworking space, you know, like the lady was talking too loud and I was like, oh my God, this is intolerable.1 (15m 34s):She has to shut up. So agitation, that's what it is. And, and then it passes when I, if I, if I can say, oh my gosh, I am so fricking in Rouge right now. Then it passes.2 (15m 52s):Yeah. Well, it, it kind of sounds like from, from you and probably for most people, the only real option is to turn it in on yourself, you know, like you're not going to put it elsewhere. So you've, you know, you have, which is, so I guess maybe it's okay if you turn it on yourself, if you're doing, if you're working, if you're doing it with acceptance, which is the thing I'm gathering from you, as opposed to stewing and festering. And1 (16m 21s):I mean, it becomes, it's interesting. Yes, it is. So it's like, so red, hot, and so sudden, almost that the only thing I can do is say, okay, this is actually happening. Like, I can't pretend this isn't happening. I, it I'm like physically clenching my fists. And then I, yeah, there is a level of acceptance. I don't get panicked anymore. Now that I, that something is wrong. I just say, oh, this is rage. I name it. I'm like, I feel enraged and white, hot rage, and then it, and then it, and then I say, that's what this is.1 (17m 3s):I don't know why. I don't know where it's coming from. Right. In this moment. It's not proportionate to the lady, like literally talking on the phone at my coworking space that she's not shouting. So it's not that. And I don't want to miss that. I'm not like I can't fool myself to think that it's really, that lady's problem. That I feel like throwing my laptop at her head. And then, and then it passes. But, but, but it is, it is more and more. And, and I think a lot of it, not a lot of it, but you know, my doctor really does think that it's, it's hormonal. A lot of it just doesn't help the matter. I mean, it's not like, oh, great. It's hormonal. Everything's fine. But it, it does help to make me feel a little less bonkers.2 (17m 45s):Maybe you should have like a, a whole rage. Like what, like a rate. Well, first I was thinking you should have a range outfit. Like, oh, for me, if I, I noticed I pee in the winter anyway, I pick like my meanest boots and my leather jacket. When I'm feeling, you know, maybe say maybe kind of a rage outfit, when did Pierce?1 (18m 9s):No, I, I scratched myself in my sleep. Oh no, it's okay. It happens all the time. I do it in my sleep. It's a thing that it's like a little skin tag that I need to get removed. It's2 (18m 23s):So you could have a rage outfit and then you could have a rage playlist, And then you might even have like rage props. I'm just trying to think about a way that your ma you, you could write because if, if how you process something is artistically creatively, then maybe you needed a creative outlet that's specifically for, for race.1 (18m 48s):Yeah. And you know, the, I, I love that. And now I'm thinking about like, as a kid, we, because we, anger was so off limits to us. I used to violently chew gum. Like I would chew on the gum. That was a way, and my mom did the same thing, even though she also got her rage out, but it was like, you know, when people violently chew on their gum, like that was a way I could get my aggression out. That's so sad that that's like the only way.2 (19m 16s):Well, I mean, you find it wherever you can find me. It's like water looking for whatever that expression is, right? Yeah. Huh. Well, I have to get more in touch with my rage because I I'm told that I seem angry a lot.1 (19m 33s):You do.2 (19m 35s):I, I do get told that, but, but that sucks for me because I feel like I'm not expressing my anger and I'm, but I'm not. So I'm not, and I'm being seen as angry at certain times. So that means I didn't even get the benefit of like letting out the anger that somebody is.1 (19m 56s):Right. You didn't even get to act out the anger. It's like, yeah. So for me, miles tells me that all the time, like, he's like, you seem really in couples therapy. Also, I have to admit yesterday was a big day. We had couples therapy on zoom. Then I had individual therapy. And in between I had all kinds of like, just stuff happening. So, but yeah, I'm told I a miles is like, you seem so angry and he's not wrong. And, and we take it out on the people that we live in a two by four apartment with. So I also feel like this office space is helping with that, but yeah, I dunno, I'm going to have to keep exploring my, my rage and that's what it is.1 (20m 37s):And also it is like, I am the character in where the wild things are that kid, that is what I feel like. And it feels it's like the perfect cause he wants to gnash his teeth and, and he does, and a thrash, thrash, thrashing mash, or the words 2 (21m 6s):Let me run this by you that I wanted to do when we're going to talk to Molly that we didn't get to do. And it was based on made, you know, and just about money and, and wondering like what your relationship is right now with money. And also, but when were you at your lowest with money? What do you remember as being your lowest moment? Sure, sure. With money with money.1 (21m 40s):Okay. I have moments of what first comes to mind was when right. I was at DePaul. So it's an apropos in college and there was obviously a sense. I had a sense of lack, always, even though based on whatever, but it was phone. Somehow my accounts were always negative, right? Like, and I would call the number, the banking number, incessantly to check, and it would always be negative. So I have this panic thoughts about that. Like being a time of like, and that's not the only time that happened like that.1 (22m 23s):Where, what is the feeling? The feeling was that, and this was in college where it started to happen, where I felt like there's never enough. No, one's going to help me. I'm irresponsible with money. Was the message I told myself and I probably was, I was in college, but I can't handle money. And literally that, that panic was also, I mean, it was true. I had no money, but my parents would have backed me, probably helped me out, but I was too scared to ask for help. So that's like, that's when, when you asked that question, that's where I go.1 (23m 4s):But, but that's also a college kind of me. So like in terms of an adult, me, that's a really great, great question. My lowest, I don't know. What about you?2 (23m 22s):Well, I've got a lot of Loma Loehmann's moments with money when I was in high school. The thing was, I lost my wallet all the time.1 (23m 35s):Oh, I remember this. I remember you talking about,2 (23m 38s):Yeah, that'd be still lose stuff all the time. That actually started at a young age with, you know, my mom would, she, my mom was really into jewelry and she would buy me destroyed. And there's nothing wrong with the fact that she brought me jewelry, but I lost it. You know, she buy me nice gold jewelry1 (23m 59s):Because she likes nice things. That's right. Yeah.2 (24m 4s):In college it was pretty bad. And the first time it was pretty bad. I had to move back in with my mom because I couldn't afford rent. And then the second time I just, I re I really, if I had more bravery, I probably would have signed up to be one of those girls in the back of the Chicago reader. Like, I, I, I just figured what ha how literally, how else? Because I had a job, but I only worked however much I could work given the fact that we were in rehearsals and like busy all day, so I never could make enough money. And then I just, I think I always have had a dysfunctional relationship with money.1 (24m 51s):Wait a minute, but I have to interrupt. Why, why didn't our parents fucking help us? Okay. Look, I know I sound like a spoiled asshole brat, but like, when I think of the anxiety that we were going through and I know your mom did, so I'm not going to talk shit about your mom or anything, but I'm just saying like, why did we feel so alone in this when we were so young, this is not right.2 (25m 11s):Yeah. Well, my mom did help me out as much as she possibly could, but I think part of it too, my dad certainly didn't think it was that. I mean, when my mom was 18 and my dad was 19, they bought a house and had a baby. So I think part of it is, has been like, what's the matter with you? Cause I didn't go to college, you know, that's the other thing. So, so then when I, then I had a period for like 10 years where I always had three jobs, me two, what1 (25m 46s):Did you have enough then? I mean like, could you make rapid enough?2 (25m 49s):I had enough then yeah, I had enough then. But then when Aaron decided he wants to go to medical school, it was really on me to, to bring in the income. I mean, his parents always gave him money. They helped, it was a lot more. I mean, and actually it's why he became a therapist because I thought, well, we're going to be living with no income because he's going to be a student. Right. So I better giddy up and get a job. So the whole time I was in social work school, I was bartending. I remember that. And then I went quickly into private practice so that I could make money.2 (26m 29s):And it turned out to be, it turned out to backfire on me. Tell1 (26m 35s):Me, tell me, tell me more.2 (26m 37s):It backfired in two ways. Number one, I was, I shouldn't have been operating a private practice without my LCSW. I had my MSW and I was working at the time in a psych hospital. And all of the psychiatrist said, you should start your private practice. You should start your private practice. And I remember saying at the beginning, I don't know if I'm allowed to oh yes, yes. You definitely can. I know tons of MSWs into plenty of people and it's true. I don't know if it's still true now in New York, but at that time you could walk around and see plenty of nameplates for offices where somebody in private practice and that just have an MSW.2 (27m 18s):They just had to have a supervisor1 (27m 19s):Or something.2 (27m 22s):I don't know. Okay. I dunno. Right. So that ended up coming to haunt me when a disgruntled patient. And they're all disgruntled in some way, a family who actually had been swindled by a con artist, like they, they were a blue blood, rich ass family and they got swindled by a con artist. And so they were talking about rage. They had a lot of rage about that. When this guy who was paying for his daughter's treatment, didn't think it was going where, you know, he wanted it to right.2 (28m 4s):He started pushing back about the fee and then he was submitting to his insurance company and they were not reimbursing because I didn't have the LCSW. So then he reported me to the New York state office of professional discipline or1 (28m 21s):Whatever yeah.2 (28m 21s):Regulation or whatever. Yeah. And I ha I had to go through a whole thing. I had to have a lawyer and I had to go, yeah, yeah. It was a nightmare. It was a complete and total nightmare. And I, and I said nothing, but like, yeah, I did that. I did do that. And I did it because I needed to make the money. I mean, in some ways I don't regret it because I did it worked for the time that it worked. And then by the time it stopped working, I was ready to leave private practice anyway. Oh my God. Yeah. But then it also backfired because we were taking in this money, which we desperately needed living in New York city with two kids.2 (29m 3s):And, and we were, we were spending it all and not hold withholding any for taxes. So then that started, that started, that started almost 10 year saga of just, I mean, I, it's embarrassing to even say how much money we've paid in just in fees, compounded fees. Nope. I'm sure. In the last 10 years we've given the government a million dollars.1 (29m 29s):That sounds, that sounds about right. And you know, I think the thing with money too, is the amount of forgiveness I've need to muster up for the financial decisions that I have made. So one of them that I'm super embarrassed about is that, and I, and I hear you when it's like, yeah, I, it, it's embarrassing. I, I, when I did my solo show, I inherited the year that my mom died. My great aunt also died, who I very barely knew. And I inherited like, like a lot of money. Well, to me, a lot, like 50 grand from her, and I spent 15,000 on a publicist for my solo show that did nothing.1 (30m 14s):So I was swindled. Oh,2 (30m 17s):I'm so sorry to hear that. That really did nothing.1 (30m 22s):I could have done it all on my own. I could have done it all on my own, on drugs, in a coma. Do you know what I'm saying? Like, like, come on. So I have done made some questionable decisions. I did the best we did the best we could with, with the information that we all had at the time. I would never make that decision. I wouldn't, I will never make that mistake again. So yeah. Money is very, very, obviously this is so like kind of obvious to say, but it is, it is. So it is a way in which we really, really use it to either prize or shame ourselves. Right. And, and, and w I do it either way, like I do it.1 (31m 2s):Oh, I'm so fancy. I inherited this dough. And then I also do it. It's that thing that they talk about in program, which is like, you're the worm, but you're the best worm for the festival, special worms. And like, you're not a worker among workers. I'm just like the best idiot out there. It's like,2 (31m 18s):Dude. Yeah. And you're making me realize that money might be the only very quantifiable way of understanding your psychology list. The money is like, understanding your psychology through math. It's going okay. If you're a person like me who gets offered a credit card at age 20 totally signs up and, and immediately maxes it out at whatever, to get 27% interest rate. So whatever little thousand dollars of clothes I got, I probably paid $10 for it. And for the longest time. So, so that's me being afraid of the truth of my financial situation, being unwilling to sacrifice, having, you know, whatever, cute clothes being about the immediate gratification of it all and not thinking longterm.2 (32m 15s):Yeah.1 (32m 16s):Okay. Well, not asking for help either. Like, like, I don't know who I'd asked, but someone had to know more than me. I didn't ask my parents. They didn't really know what was happening at, or that just was their generation of like, not teaching us about money. It was sort of like, good luck. Get it together. We got it together. You get it together. Okay. Fine. But like unwillingness and fear to ask, to be taught something about money. Like, I didn't know, Jack shit about credit or interest Jack shit.2 (32m 46s):Yeah. And I recently realized that I'm basically redoing that with my kids, because we supposedly have this allowance. Only one of my kids ever remembers to ask for it because you know, only one of my kids is very, you know, very interested in money, but like, in a way I can understand why the others don't because it's like, well, anytime they want something, I pay for it. I never say sometimes I'll say recently, I've gotten better about saying, if we're going to go back to school shopping I'll especially if the oldest one, I'll say, this is your budget. If you, if you spend it all on one pair of sneakers, then I hope you're okay with your sweat pants that don't fit and wear them everyday for the rest of the school year.2 (33m 31s):Right. But it's, we've, we've just been extremely inconsistent in tying, like, for example, chores to your allowance,1 (33m 42s):It's fucking miserable and hard. And I have trouble doing that for myself. I wouldn't be able to do that for my children. If I had children, I can't not give the dog people food. What are you talking about? How am I going to bring it? Doesn't shock me. We didn't learn the skills and I'm not blaming. I mean, I'm blaming, of course my parents, but I'm also just saying, it's just the facts. If we're going to be that in the truth, like, I didn't learn, I didn't educate myself and nobody educated me. So I'm really learning through trial and error. Mostly error, how to be okay with money. And it is you're right. Like finances, romance, and finance teach us the most about our psychology.2 (34m 24s):Yeah. Yeah. Romance finance. I love that. 1 (34m 28s):I think that my boss at Lutheran social services to say all the time, finance and romance, romance, and finance, that's what all these addictions are about is that's how you see them. I'm like, she's right. I mean, she was, I liked her. She was bonkers, but I liked her. She said some good. She, she also is famous for saying, and she didn't say it, but she would always quote, the, no one gets out of here alive. You know, none of us getting out of here life, we might as well start2 (34m 54s):. Well, today on the podcast, we were talking to Carol Schweid and original cast member of the original production of a chorus line on Broadway. She's got great stories to tell she's a fascinating person. And I think you're going to really enjoy this conversation with Carol Schweid. Exactly. Carol shrine. Congratulations. You survived theater school. I did. You did.2 (35m 34s):And where did you go to theater school. Okay. First of all,3 (35m 38s):Let me just take my coffee, my extra coffee off of the stove and put it on my table. Cause it's gonna burn because we don't want that.4 (35m 51s):Okay. You're I am looking for a cop. If you have one, you know, this is ridiculous.3 (36m 2s):Hi there. Hi. This is a riot that you talk about surviving theater school. I think it's great. Okay. So this is working, right? You can hear me. Yeah, no, totally. A hundred percent. So this is my, I started college at Boston university. I was an acting major, which I loved. I really did, but I, what I loved more than anything was I loved the history of the theater. We had a great professor who told the tales of the gladiators and the, you know, the gladiators on the island and the fighting, and then the island, the survivors, and then the island would slowly sink into the water.3 (36m 45s):What is this? What did I miss? It was the early history of the theater. It was starting on the church steps. It was, you know, the second, whatever all of that history was, I found it really interesting. I also loved the station shop crew stuff. I liked learning about lighting. I was terrible at it. I, you know, I would fall off ladder, but I, I, I enjoyed the backstage stuff as much as I enjoy. I just, I liked it. I, we did the rose tattoo and my, and my first job was to take care of the goat. I was on the prop crew.3 (37m 28s):I took care of the goat. Was it a stuffed goat? No, it was a real goat. Wow. What can I tell you? The rose tattoo. There's a goat in the play. I didn't realize you could have livestock and colleges, college, whatever it was. I look like I have jaundice with is that something's wrong with the light jump I sent you stop your, where is the microphone part of your, do you want me to hold it up better? Because when you move, it hits your shirt and it makes like a scratching, right? That's right. I'll do it this way. I won't move around. When you look tan, you look, you don't like jaundice at all. Okay. Well then that's all right. Good. Thanks. Were the goat handlers.3 (38m 8s):Good to talk to you. I mean, that was, and I didn't mind, I didn't mind being an usher. All of those things, you know, I remember somebody sitting us down and saying, you're you are the first person. The audience we'll meet tonight as an usher. I took all of the stuff I did, but the acting business was very confusing to me. I didn't quite know. I had done a lot of theater and dancing and been in the shows and stuff, but I really, I was a little more of a dancer than an actor. I'd taken class in the city. I'd followed some cute guy from summer camp to his acting class. But half the time, I honestly didn't understand a word.3 (38m 48s):Anybody said, I just, nobody does. I really didn't get it so much at the time I loved it, but I didn't always get it. And for some reason, and I have no idea where this, why this happened. I had a boyfriend in summer stock whose mother worked at Barnard and her best friend was a woman named Martha Hill. Martha Hill ran the dance department at a school called Julliard. Nope. I had no idea. Cool. Just a little, nothing school. This is back in the day. It's a long time ago. It was just a plain old school. It wasn't like a school, you know, where you bow down. And I really was a very good dancer and always loved dancing.3 (39m 33s):You know, I've been dancing since I'm like a kid, a little five or six or whatever. So I was a little disenchanted with my successes at Boston U even though I had friends, I was having a great time. I mean, Boston in the late sixties was amazingly fun, but I felt like I wasn't getting it. I mean, it wasn't a school that was cutting people. Thank God, because that would have been torture. I don't know how anybody survives that, but I audition for this dance department in this school called Juilliard and got in and then told my parents that I was going to change colleges. I remember making up a dance in the basement of my dorm in Boston.3 (40m 17s):Cause you had a sort of take class and then you had to show something that you should have made up. And somebody else from college was leaving school to come to New York to be a singer. So we decided we were going to be roommates. And then we had a summer stock. Somebody at BU started some summer theaters. So I had a job or two, I think I had some friends from there. So I ended up moving, changing colleges and going to Juilliard. And I spent three years there. I was a modern dancer major. So we had the Limone company, including Jose Lamone wow teachers and the Graham company.3 (40m 59s):I mean, Martha, Martha Graham did not teach, but her company did as a winter and Helen, I was Helen McGee. One of the, they were maniacs. I mean, they're, they're like gods and goddesses and their whole life is about dance. And I was one of those demonstrators for her eight o'clock beginning class, my third year of school. I mean, I, it was all about technique. We had amazing ballet teachers. We had Fiorella Keane who, I mean, Anthony tutor taught class there and he was Anthony. I mean, so I got a out of being at that school that I have never lost. I mean, I can, I'm making up the answers for high school kids now really.3 (41m 42s):I'm just finishing up a production of grease, which is really kind of boring, but whatever I liked Greece, tell me more. Yeah. It's okay. If you hear it enough, you really get sick of it. Well, that's true. Yeah. I mean high school kids doing high school kids is like, Jesus, God, you just want to slit your throat. The moodiness when it comes to the girls. I mean, I love them. I really love them. I love the guys because puppies, they fall all over each other and they're fabulous, but that's a lie anyway. So I did something that I don't know why I did it and how it worked out. That way I left. I had a very best friend in college that was, you know, and I came to New York and made, made and shared an apartment with this slightly crazy woman.3 (42m 32s):And a year later I got myself a studio apartment on west end avenue and 71st street. And my mom co-signed the lease. And I spent three years dancing, honestly dancing almost every day. I wanted to take sights singing, but they wouldn't let me because I was in the dance department. And I didn't know, you could advocate for that. Sure. I didn't know. You could take classes at Columbia. I mean, who had time anyway, but was it a three-year program? It was a four year program, but I had taken a music class at BU that was like music appreciation one. Yeah. And for whatever reason, they gave me credit for that.3 (43m 14s):So I had a full year credit. Yep. Three years of Juilliard where I really worked my tail off. What's weird about it is that I am, you know, just a plain old Jewish girl from New Jersey, you know, a middle-class Jewish girlfriend. And to, to think that I could have a profession where people don't talk and don't eat, which is what the answers do is a riot to me. Yeah. Yeah. It's an absolute riot because you know, I mean, that should be basically the manual for dancers. Don't talk, don't eat, but I always knew that I was heading to Broadway. I really have always wanted to do that.3 (43m 55s):And I, and, and w was not really ever in question that I would, I somehow assumed if I worked hard and figured it out enough, I would find my way to working on Broadway. And I, and I made the right choice in the sense of switching colleges. Because in the seventies, if you look at your list of Broadway shows, all the directors were choreographers. They were all dancers, all of them Fauci, Michael Bennett champion, all of them. So I started working when I got out of school, you know, it was, and I had already done a couple of summers of summer stock and I did a summer Bushkill pencil, you know, these ridiculous, stupid theaters all over, but it was a blast.3 (44m 36s):It was fun. Where, what was your first job out of school? I was still, I was in school and it was the Mount Suttington Playhouse, which was like a tin shell in Connecticut. And I think it was still in college. Cause two guys from school had opened this theater at the skiing place, but it wasn't skiing. Then it was a sh it was like a tin shell. So couldn't really do a show when it was raining very well. And I believe it was stopped the world. I want to get off and I can still remember the Alto harmony to some of the songs. So you okay. Wait, so you don't consider, you didn't consider yourself a, an actor or did you?3 (45m 20s):Well, I did, but I think what happened was I had to audition for something. It'd be you like, they had grad programs and it wasn't that I was unsuccessful there, but somebody came and I didn't get cast. I didn't get hired. And I didn't understand, you know, like they give you all these acting exercises. We do sense memory. Well, I didn't know they were exercises. I didn't, they were they're like plea aids. Right. They're like learning things. I took this all very seriously. I would stand in a room and try to feel it was like that song from chorus line, you know, try to feel the emotion, feel the, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah.3 (46m 5s):I did all of that. I didn't really understand the simple, what am I want here? And what's in my way of trying to get it. Yeah. It took me so long to find teachers that I really could understand and make me a better actor. So when did you find them? When did you start to find them? Oh, that's interesting. Well, I found a couple of good teachers in New York. I mean, honestly there was a woman named Mary Tarsa who had been in the group theater and an older lady. I mean, it's a long time ago anyway, you know, but I remember sitting in her class and she would talk about using imagery and th and I started to sort of understand a little bit, which is amazing to me because after I moved to Westport and I met, do you know the name Phoebe brand?3 (46m 58s):Yeah. Phoebe brand was in our theater workshop. Oh, taught a class. She was already up in her eighties and she taught a class, a Shakespeare class on Sunday mornings. And all of a sudden these things that I didn't understand from decades before. Hmm. It sort of pulled it all together. But for me, I went, I was in California after I got married and moved to LA for a couple of years, found a teacher named John LAN and Lee H N E and two years in his class. I started to really understand how to do it. And then when I came back to New York, he sent me to Michael Howard and Michael Howard, Michael Howard was a great teacher for me.3 (47m 44s):He's still a great, I don't know if he's still around if he's teaching or not, but he was a wonderful teacher. And I started to understand how to do it. Was Len the, did he teach the method or what was yes, he was, he was an actor studio teacher. And I started to understand about being present on the stage and being able to deal with people. All of it, it just changed dramatically. I mean, I started to understand what this was about and seeing other good actors and chipping away at it and finding people to rehearse with. And1 (48m 22s):You, you, from what I know, and what I'm gathering is that once you graduated Juilliard, you were cast in New York.3 (48m 30s):Well, you know, I did get my very, my V I I've. I mean, I, I remember going to see midnight cowboy, which was about the same time as I got out of college. And I remember going into a terrible panic of, oh my God. I mean, really scared about all of it. And I, I went, I joined a class that a friend of mine, somebody told me about this class, you know, I always follow somebody to a class. I'm always, I have good friends. And I, somebody says, oh, I love this guy come to class and I'd show up.3 (49m 12s):And this was a musical comedy singing class, kind of where there were writers in the class and actors in the class. And the writers in the class would work on a musical that they didn't have permission for. It wasn't like they were, we were doing this for money or for, for future. So my friend who I became friends with wrote her musical version of barefoot in the park and which has never been done, but I remember I was in it and this guy was in it. And we, it was the kind of a class where it was a very warm, funny group, funny group of wacko theater people. And I would go to open calls and I'd usually go to open dance calls because that was a door for me.3 (49m 59s):And also I used to have to sneak out of Jew, not sneak necessarily, but essentially sneak out to take my singing lessons. And I took singing lessons every, you know, every week for years, for three years, I would, you know, and I, and I was not really, I don't think a very good singer, but I became a good singer. I would sneak out of school and go to an acting class. I don't even know when I started that, but I know that I would find the time to do it and then talk about acting and find a teacher so that when I would audition for a musical and I would get through the dancing. Usually if I got through the first cut, I would make it to the end. I wouldn't always get the job, but if I made it through that first horrible, random cut, you know, where there's 200 people in your dancing across the stage and it's yes, no, yes, no.3 (50m 47s):Is it really?1 (50m 48s):Because I'm not a dancer. So I never had this. I, when my agents are like, oh, there's an open dance call. I'm like, ah, that's you sent the wrong person, the email. So it's really like that, like in, in chorus line where they say, you know,3 (51m 1s):Oh yeah. It's like all that jazz. It's really like that.2 (51m 6s):Wait, I have a question. I want to hear the re the rest of that. But I, I just, I've never asked anybody. What's the biggest difference between the people who got cut immediately. I mean, was it training or were there people that, in other words, were there people who were just walking in off the street with no training trying to audition? Yeah,1 (51m 29s):No, truly an open call.3 (51m 31s):No. And sometimes these were equity calls. Cause I, I, I did get my equity card on a summer. That one summer I worked for a non-union, you know, we were in either Bushkill Pennsylvania or Southern Eaton Connecticut, or I did a couple of those summers. And then the next summer, the choreographer from that show had an equity job. And he hired like three of us from our non-unions summer stock, because we were good enough. And1 (52m 4s):So when you went to these open calls, everyone, there was a bad-ass dancer. No one, there was like,3 (52m 10s):That's not true. That's not true. There were all different levels of dancers, but it was also a look await, you know, it was always, I was always like seven pounds overweight. It was like, the torture is thing of weight does enough to put anybody over the edge1 (52m 26s):That they literally3 (52m 27s):Weigh you, Carol. Oh God. No. Oh, but it's so look, and I will tell you there's one. There was one time when I remember auditioning for above Fossey show and there were a lot of people on the stage and we were whatever we were doing. And then at 1.3 Fossey dancers, it was their turn. And these three gals, okay. Their hair was perfect. Their makeup was fabulous. They had a little necklace, they had a black leotards, you know, cut up high, but not out of control. Good tights, no, no runs, nice shoes, nails done.3 (53m 7s):And they were fantastic. They were clean. They were technically, and we all sort of went, oh fuck.1 (53m 16s):Right.3 (53m 18s):Right. And I have friends who became Fossey dancers. I mean, I worked for Bob, but I have friends who did a lot of shows him. And they had that same experience where they saw other people, the way it should be. And then they would go back a month later and get the job because they knew what it took. It was all about knowing what it takes. But the thing about having studied acting and having slowly studied singing is that in the world of musical theater, I was ahead of the game because there's not that much time. So you have to be willing to spend all of your time.3 (54m 0s):Right.1 (54m 1s):There are some people I'm assuming Carol, that could dance wonderfully, but couldn't do the singing and the acting part. And that's where you were like, that's the triple threat newness of it all is like, you could do3 (54m 12s):Well, I could do them better than a lot of people. And I certainly could sing well, and I had, I could sing a short song and I knew that you sing a short song. I knew that you'd probably do an uptempo, you know? And also I tend to be a little angry when I go into an audition. It's like, why do I fuck? Do I have to audition? I better, duh. So I needed to find things that allowed me to be a little angry so I could be myself. And I could also be a little funny if I could figure out how to do that. So all of these things worked in my favor. And then of course, like everybody else in her, a lot of people, pat Birch, who was a choreographer, she had like a gazillion shows running, including Greece on Broadway. And now over here, I don't know if she did grease, but she did over here.3 (54m 55s):She did. She was very prolific choreographer. She had been a Martha Graham dancer and she had taught a couple of classes at Julliard. And when it came to my auditioning for her, she needed girls who could dance like boys. She didn't need tall leggy, chorus girls. We were doing the show she was working on, was a show called Minnie's boys. And it was a show about the Marx brothers and the last number of the show. We were all the whole chorus was dressed up like different Marx brothers. And she needed girls who could be low to the ground, who can, you could turn who and I was the right person.3 (55m 36s):And I remember being in that class, that wonderful musical theater class with a teacher named Mervin Nelson, who was just a great older guy who kind of worked in the business. I remember I had to go to my callback. I went to my class and the callback was at night. And I remember him walking me to the door, putting his arm around me and saying, go get the job. And if you don't get this one, we'll get you. The next one1 (56m 4s):That makes me want to3 (56m 4s):Cry. Well, it made me feel like part of the family, cause we all want to be part of that theater family. And so I tend to do that when I'm with an actor, who's going to go get a job or go get, you know, you want to feel like it's possible. Yeah. You feel like you can, you deserve it.1 (56m 29s):You said, you mentioned briefly that you worked for Bob3 (56m 32s):Fossey. I did.1 (56m 35s):Oh my gosh. Did you turn into one of those ladies that looked like a bossy dancer too? Like, did you then show up to those auditions? Like, oh3 (56m 43s):No, I don't think I, I couldn't, I didn't, I could not get into a chorus of Bob Fossey, but I did get to play for strata in Pippin in the, in the, in the first national tour. And he, Bob was the, he was the director and I, I knew I was the right person for that job. It was also a funny, kind of lovely circumstances that I was in some off-Broadway an off-Broadway show that had started as an awful off, off of a, that, that Bubba, that moved to an off-Broadway theater. I got some excellent reviews. And I think the day the review came out was the day I had my audition for Bob Fossey.3 (57m 24s):So I, and I played it. I had talked to people who knew him. I talked to, you know, I, I knew that I, I don't know, I just, I, I had done some work and I just, I don't know the right person at the right time, somebody, he needed it. That part required a good dancer. Who could, I don't know how I got the part. I just,1 (57m 57s):I'm kind of getting the impression that we're talking about being a strong dancer.3 (58m 0s):Well, let's strong dancer. And also being able to, being able to talk and sing was really the key. I'm not sure that I certainly, as a young person, I, I didn't do nearly as much comedy as I did when I got a little older, but, and also there were a lot of divisions. You sort of either did musicals or you did straight plays and it was hard to get into an audition even for a straight play. And the truth is I think that a lot of us who thought we were better than we were as you get better, you see when you really, wasn't a very strong actor.1 (58m 43s):Right. But there's something about that. What I'm noticing and what you're talking about is like, there's something about the confidence that you had by maybe thinking that you might've been a little better than you were that actually behooves young actors and performers that, you know, cause when Gina and I talked to these people were like, oh my God, they have a healthy ego, which actually helps them to not give up as where I was like, I'm terrible. I'm giving up at the first hour.3 (59m 9s):Exactly. Right. Right. And, and it, and it goes back and forth. It's like a CSO one day, you feel like, oh yeah, I'm good at this. I can walk it. I get, I'm like, I'm okay with this. And the next day you just to hide under the bed, I think that's sort of the way it goes. I didn't know that people who worked on Broadway even then all had coaches and teachers and support systems and you know, being kind of a little more of a lone Wolf, which I was, and still fight against in a way I come against that a lot, for whatever reasons, you know, whatever it doesn't work, what to be a lone Wolf.3 (59m 54s):Yeah. Yeah. You can't do this alone. You can't do it without a support system. It's just too hard because when I actually had the best opportunity I had, which was being part of a chorus line, it was harder than I thought to just be normal, come up with a good performance every night, you know, it was up and down and loaded and that you lost your voice and had nobody to talk to because you couldn't talk anyway. And we didn't have the internet yet. You know, there was so many, it was so much pressure and so much, and I hadn't really figured out how to create that support system up for myself.3 (1h 0m 42s):And it was harder, harder than it needed to be. Did you ultimately find it with the cast? No. Oh, not really where they mean, oh, none of the cast was fine. It wasn't that anybody was mean it's that I didn't take care of myself and I didn't know how I was supposed to take care of my shirt. How old were you when you were cast in a chorus line? 27? Maybe I was, I was young and, but I wasn't that young. I just, but it wasn't that C w it was a strange situation to, I was, I had already had one Broadway show, so I had done, and then I had gone out of town to bucks county Playhouse.3 (1h 1m 25s):And did west side story Romeo was your first Broadway show. I'm sorry. It was called Minnie's boys. Oh, that was it. That was my, I did. And it was a show about the Marx brothers. Right. And I don't know if you know who Louis. We would probably do Louis Stadol and Louis J Staglin who works with, he works with Nathan Lane a lot. Oh yeah. Yeah. He's like second bun and he's incredibly talented. He played Groucho. Okay. We were all 25 years old. We were kids. We were right out of college. And the weirdest part of all was that the mother was played by Shelley winters. And this was a musical. What a weird you've really. Okay. So then you went onto chorus line.3 (1h 2m 6s):Well then, well then in between that, this is like, you know, then, then I went out of town to bucks county. I love being in bucks county for a year. We did west side story. We did Romeo and Juliet during the week. We do them together, one in the morning, one in the afternoon for high school kids. And then on the weekends, we do one of the, and I was the only person in the cast who liked dancing at 10 o'clock in the morning. You know, I didn't mind doing west side at 10 in the morning. I'd been up at eight, being a demonstrator for Mary Hinkson, teaching people how to do a contraction. So I didn't care. I love working in the daytime. That's what I play with your food is such a nice success. My lunchtime theaters here, I get tired at night.3 (1h 2m 47s):I don't know.2 (1h 2m 49s):Most people do wait. So was the, was the audition process for chorus line?3 (1h 2m 56s):I have a great story. I can tell you what my story is. Okay. So I, I was in, I don't know what I was doing. I had done a lot of off-Broadway work. I had been doing, I had been working a lot. And then of course there were the year where I didn't work. And then I went off to south North Carolina and played Nellie Forbush in south Pacific, in the dinner theater for three months. And I loved that. Actually, I think it was one of those times I had a job and a boyfriend and it was like a relief. It was wonderful to have like a life and then do the show at night. You know, I, I enjoyed that a lot and I didn't, you know, it was a big part and I didn't panic about seeing it.3 (1h 3m 37s):And it was just, I learned a lot from doing a part like that. I was doing Fiddler on the roof at a dinner theater in New Jersey, down the street from where my folks lived. And occasionally my mom would stop by her rehearsal and watch the wedding scene. Honest to God. I'm not kidding. She's like, Carol, you ever gonna get married? Are you ever gonna? Okay. So I'm doing Fiddler on the roof, in New Jersey. And there's a guy in the cast, one of the bottle dancers who were dropping off at night on 55th street, because he's working on this little musical about dancers and he would bring in monologues and he'd asked me to read them at rehearsal because he wanted to hear them out loud.3 (1h 4m 25s):And there was some stuff about this place to ever hear the peppermint lounge back in the studio. Right. It was a disco thing, but it was also a place where there was something. I remember one the couch girls, girls who would just lie on the couches and the guys, I mean really crazy stuff that did not make it into the show, but some interesting stuff. And I was playing the eldest daughter sidle, and it's a terrific part for me. So I was good. Yeah. And Nick knew I was a dancer. Anyway, this little show called the chorus line was in its workshop. Second workshop. They had already done the I, cause I was not a Michael Bennett dancer. I didn't, you know, I, I, I had auditioned for my goal once for the tour of two for the Seesaw.3 (1h 5m 10s):And it was the leading part and I didn't get it. I auditioned, I sang and I read and I read and I sang and I didn't get the part. And I came home and I was like in hysterics for like five days. I just, you know, I, I didn't get the part year and a half later, I'm doing Fiddler on the roof with Nick, Dante in New Jersey. And somebody leaves the second workshop and Nick brings up my name because there's a job all of a sudden to cover, to be in the opening and to cover a couple of parts next, bring up my name. And Michael Bennett says, wait a minute. I know her. I know she's an actress and she's a singer. Can she dance?3 (1h 5m 52s):So I showed up the next morning and I danced for 10 minutes and I got the job. I mean, I think, wow. Yeah. That's a great story.2 (1h 6m 1s):No. So that means you didn't have to participate in3 (1h 6m 4s):Callbacks or nothing. Oh, I started that day. I mean, honestly, it was Fiddler on the roof, you know what, I don't remember whether, how it went. Cause we were already in performance tour or something, you know, I, I it's a long time ago, so I don't really remember, but I know that this particular story is the absolute truth. That's fantastic. That2 (1h 6m 27s):Was it a hit right away3 (1h 6m 29s):Chorus line. Well, it wasn't, we were in previews. I'm no, we weren't even previous the second workshop, which means it was still being figured out. And when I came to the first rehearsal and sat and watched what was going on, I could not believe what I was seeing because the truth of what was happening on stage and the way it was being built was astounding. It was absolutely astounding because something about it was so bizarre. Oh. And also, also Marvin Hamlisch was the rehearsal pianist on Minnie's boys.3 (1h 7m 10s):Wow. So I knew him a little bit, not well, you know, but he was the rehearsal pianist that nobody would listen to a show about the Marx brothers, Marvin would say, wait, this is the Marx brothers. You got to have a naked girl running out of the orchestra pit. You gotta, you gotta, and of course, nobody would listen to him. Wait a minute, just turn this off, stop, stop, turn off. Sorry. So I couldn't get over what I was seeing. And I, I knew from the beginning, of course, I think most of us did that. Something very, very unique was going on and it was always changing. Like Donna McKechnie came in late at the audition, all dressed up in like a fur thing.3 (1h 7m 56s):And it was like, I'm sorry, I'm late. I'm sorry. I'm late. And then Zach says, would you put on dance clothes? And she said, no, no, wait a minute. Anyway, you couldn't help. But know sort of, you just kind of put,2 (1h 8m 8s):I mean, I remember seeing it when I was a kid and not, not being able to relate as an actor, but now that I think back, it just must've felt so gratifying to be seen for all of the, you know, because like we w the Joe Montana episode, we3 (1h 8m 28s):Haven't listened to yet, but I'm looking forward to2 (1h 8m 30s):It here today. But he was saying, I love3 (1h 8m 33s):Him2 (1h 8m 34s):For you. You were saying that when he won the Tony and everybody would say, well, it's like to win the Tony, what's it? Like he said, it's like, you won the lottery, but you been buying tickets for 15 years. You know, that's the part of acting that people now, I think it's a pretty common knowledge that it's really difficult to be an actor, but I don't know how Hmm, how known that was then. And it just, must've been so gratifying for all of those people. I mean, who are living in their real life? The story of that musical. Yeah.3 (1h 9m 9s):I think that that's true. And also, I mean, it really did come out of people's experiences. Those stories are so, so to be part of something like that, and down at the public theater, which of course it was a vol place to be, you know, you, you knew that Meryl Streep was walking down the hallway and you knew that. I mean, talk about confidence. I mean, I don't know if you've read her new book, no book about her. No, it's worth the time I listened to it. Actually, I didn't read it. I listened to, it's quite wonderful because you see a very confident person who's working on creating who she is.1 (1h 9m 47s):Do you feel, I feel like you have a really strong sense of confidence about yourself too. Where did that come from? Would you agree? First of all, that you have, it sounds like you had some comps, some real chutzpah as a youngster and maybe now as well. Where'd that come from3 (1h 10m 5s):Beats me. I have it now because I, I, I, I've had a lot of, a lot of experience. And I, I think that, that, I, I think I know a lot about this, but I don't know that I had it. The trick was to have this kind of confidence when it really matters. Yes. And I think I had it, like if I was in an off-Broadway show, I could say, I don't think that's good enough. Could you restage this blah, blah, blah. Or if I'm in North Carolina, I'm not, I think we need to dah, dah, dah, dah, dah. But when it comes down to the real nitty gritty of standing up for yourself, when it really, really matters, boy, that's harder than it looks.3 (1h 10m 51s):You know, even things like, I mean, my character, when I eventually took over the role of Miralis, which I under, you know, I was we've covered all these parts. There were nine of us. We sang in the little booth in the wings. We had microphones and little headsets. And the coolest part of all was Jerry Schoenfeld, who was the chairman of the Schubert organization would bring any visiting dignitary who was visiting the city that he was showing around his theaters. He would bring them into our little booth. And then we would watch the show from stage left in our little booth while we're singing, give me the ball, give him the ball. Cause half the dancers on the stage, cause stop singing because they had a solo coming up.3 (1h 11m 31s):So, you know, singing in a musical is not easy. You know, there's a lot of pressure and you got to hit high notes and you, you know, you just wake up in the middle of the night going torture, torture, and you have to work through that and finally go, fuck it. You know, fuck it. I don't care what I weigh. Fuck it. I don't care if I, if I can't hit the high note, but it, it takes a long time to get there. You know, I see people who do this all the time. I don't know how they live. I don't know how they sleep at night. There's no wonder people like to hire singers who have graduated from programs where they really understand their voice, know how to protect that, which you don't, you know, you have to learn, you have to learn how to really take.3 (1h 12m 24s):That's why, you know, it's wondering about ballet companies now have misuses and we didn't have any of that. You were hanging out there alone. I felt maybe I'm wrong, but that's how I felt. And if I was vulnerable or if I didn't feel well, and I was like, oh, what am I going to do? I can't tell anybo

Markets Daily Crypto Roundup
Crypto Update 11/22/21 | A Few Unorthodox Thoughts on DeFi Regulation

Markets Daily Crypto Roundup

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 15:47


With bitcoin stabilizing after a pullback this weekend and a look at the controversy behind DeFi regulation, CoinDesk's Markets Daily is back with the latest news roundup.This episode is sponsored by Kava, Nexo.io and Market Intel by Chainalysis.Today's Stories: ... Read the full show notes here.This episode was edited & produced by Adrian Blust. -Kava lets you mint stablecoins, lend, borrow, earn and swap safely across the world's biggest crypto assets. Connect to the world's largest cryptocurrencies, ecosystems and financial applications on DeFi's most trusted, scalable and secure earning platform with kava.io.-Nexo is a powerful, all-in-one crypto platform where you can securely store your assets. Invest, borrow, exchange and earn up to 12% APR on Bitcoin and 20+ other top coins. Insured for $375M and audited in real-time by Armanino, Nexo is rated excellent on Trustpilot. Get started today at nexo.io.-Market Intel by Chainalysis—the Blockchain Data Platform—arms your team with the most complete on-chain dataset to make informed crypto investments, deliver original research, and identify and confidently fund emerging players in the market. See Chainalysis Market Intel in action now.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Jabbedu Education Podcast
Fostering Self-Regulation and Emotional Control with ZONES with Leah Kuypers

Jabbedu Education Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 58:33


Have you ever had one of those moments where you feel out of control?  Where your don't seem to have a grip on your emotions? Emotional control can be a challenge for students - throw in the hormonal changes that mess with the limbic system during puberty and you can really see it!  That's why teaching the skills of self-regulations can be so crucial for a child's success in the classroom.  Enter: The ZONES of Regulation.In this episode, I chat with the developer and author of the ZONES of Regulation curriculum and resources, Leah Kuypers.  We cover topics likeHow the ZONES originated from her work as a Occupational TherapistWhy there's no hierarchy, and why you can be in multiple ZONES at once.The four steps to support regulation: recognize, identify, select a tool, regulate!As well as the extensive number of books, lessons, apps, and other resources available at www.zonesofregulation.com.Tune in!Show notes available at jabbedu.com/show57

New Books in Law
Postscript: The Supreme Court, Concealed Carry, and How Your Laws Might Change

New Books in Law

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 54:48


An earlier Postscript explained what was at stake for concealed carry laws in a case before the U.S. Supreme Court – and guessed at what the oral arguments might reveal. Now that arguments have been heard in New York State Rifle & Pistol Association v. Bruen, three legal scholars join the podcast to analyze the oral argument. Even if you are not a SCOTUS junky -- this conversation is important because 80 million (or 25% of) Americans may have their democratically crafted gun laws overturned by the decision of 9 justices. Jacob D. Charles is the Executive Director & Lecturing Fellow at the Center for Firearms Law at Duke University School of Law. His work on the Second Amendment has appeared in numerous law journals and “Securing Gun Rights By Statute: The Right To Keep and Bear Arms Outside the Constitution,” (forthcoming, University of Michigan Law Review) interrogates the non-constitutional gun rights that create broad powers for gun owners beyond the Second Amendment. His extensive public-facing scholarship includes a new piece in the Washington Post's Monkey Cage, “Supreme Court justices sounded suspicious of New York's gun law. Here's what might come next.” Eric Ruben is an assistant professor of Law at SMU Dedman School of Law and a Brennan Center fellow. Working at the intersection of criminal law, legal ethics, and the Second Amendment, his scholarship has been published in law reviews such as California, Duke and Georgetown as well as public facing outlets like The Atlantic, New York Times, Vox, Jurist, The Conversation, and Scotusblog. He organized -- and contributed scholarship to the 2021 Brennan Center Report, Protests, Insurrection, and the Second Amendment. Joseph Blocher is the Lanty L. Smith '67 Professor of Law at Duke University School of Law and one of the attorneys who helped write the brief for DC in Heller. He co-authored The Positive Second Amendment: Rights, Regulation, and the Future of Heller (Cambridge University Press, 2018) with Darrell Miller in 2018 (New Books interview here). Among his numerous law review articles is “When Guns Threaten the Public Sphere: A New Account of Public Safety Regulation Under Heller” (Northwestern University Law Review, Vol 116, 2021) in which he and Reva Siegel interrogate the impact of gun rights on free speech. Recently, he has been a guest on the podcast Strict Scrutiny, contributed to the New York Times and NPR reporting of the case. Joseph and Eric's recent op ed, “No, courts don't treat the Second Amendment as a ‘second-class right': The latest gun-rights case may hinge on some conservatives' sense of victimhood” just appeared in the Washington Post. Susan Liebell is Dirk Warren '50 Professor of Political Science at Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/law

New Books Network
Postscript: The Supreme Court, Concealed Carry, and How Your Laws Might Change

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 54:48


An earlier Postscript explained what was at stake for concealed carry laws in a case before the U.S. Supreme Court – and guessed at what the oral arguments might reveal. Now that arguments have been heard in New York State Rifle & Pistol Association v. Bruen, three legal scholars join the podcast to analyze the oral argument. Even if you are not a SCOTUS junky -- this conversation is important because 80 million (or 25% of) Americans may have their democratically crafted gun laws overturned by the decision of 9 justices. Jacob D. Charles is the Executive Director & Lecturing Fellow at the Center for Firearms Law at Duke University School of Law. His work on the Second Amendment has appeared in numerous law journals and “Securing Gun Rights By Statute: The Right To Keep and Bear Arms Outside the Constitution,” (forthcoming, University of Michigan Law Review) interrogates the non-constitutional gun rights that create broad powers for gun owners beyond the Second Amendment. His extensive public-facing scholarship includes a new piece in the Washington Post's Monkey Cage, “Supreme Court justices sounded suspicious of New York's gun law. Here's what might come next.” Eric Ruben is an assistant professor of Law at SMU Dedman School of Law and a Brennan Center fellow. Working at the intersection of criminal law, legal ethics, and the Second Amendment, his scholarship has been published in law reviews such as California, Duke and Georgetown as well as public facing outlets like The Atlantic, New York Times, Vox, Jurist, The Conversation, and Scotusblog. He organized -- and contributed scholarship to the 2021 Brennan Center Report, Protests, Insurrection, and the Second Amendment. Joseph Blocher is the Lanty L. Smith '67 Professor of Law at Duke University School of Law and one of the attorneys who helped write the brief for DC in Heller. He co-authored The Positive Second Amendment: Rights, Regulation, and the Future of Heller (Cambridge University Press, 2018) with Darrell Miller in 2018 (New Books interview here). Among his numerous law review articles is “When Guns Threaten the Public Sphere: A New Account of Public Safety Regulation Under Heller” (Northwestern University Law Review, Vol 116, 2021) in which he and Reva Siegel interrogate the impact of gun rights on free speech. Recently, he has been a guest on the podcast Strict Scrutiny, contributed to the New York Times and NPR reporting of the case. Joseph and Eric's recent op ed, “No, courts don't treat the Second Amendment as a ‘second-class right': The latest gun-rights case may hinge on some conservatives' sense of victimhood” just appeared in the Washington Post. Susan Liebell is Dirk Warren '50 Professor of Political Science at Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in American Studies
Postscript: The Supreme Court, Concealed Carry, and How Your Laws Might Change

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 54:48


An earlier Postscript explained what was at stake for concealed carry laws in a case before the U.S. Supreme Court – and guessed at what the oral arguments might reveal. Now that arguments have been heard in New York State Rifle & Pistol Association v. Bruen, three legal scholars join the podcast to analyze the oral argument. Even if you are not a SCOTUS junky -- this conversation is important because 80 million (or 25% of) Americans may have their democratically crafted gun laws overturned by the decision of 9 justices. Jacob D. Charles is the Executive Director & Lecturing Fellow at the Center for Firearms Law at Duke University School of Law. His work on the Second Amendment has appeared in numerous law journals and “Securing Gun Rights By Statute: The Right To Keep and Bear Arms Outside the Constitution,” (forthcoming, University of Michigan Law Review) interrogates the non-constitutional gun rights that create broad powers for gun owners beyond the Second Amendment. His extensive public-facing scholarship includes a new piece in the Washington Post's Monkey Cage, “Supreme Court justices sounded suspicious of New York's gun law. Here's what might come next.” Eric Ruben is an assistant professor of Law at SMU Dedman School of Law and a Brennan Center fellow. Working at the intersection of criminal law, legal ethics, and the Second Amendment, his scholarship has been published in law reviews such as California, Duke and Georgetown as well as public facing outlets like The Atlantic, New York Times, Vox, Jurist, The Conversation, and Scotusblog. He organized -- and contributed scholarship to the 2021 Brennan Center Report, Protests, Insurrection, and the Second Amendment. Joseph Blocher is the Lanty L. Smith '67 Professor of Law at Duke University School of Law and one of the attorneys who helped write the brief for DC in Heller. He co-authored The Positive Second Amendment: Rights, Regulation, and the Future of Heller (Cambridge University Press, 2018) with Darrell Miller in 2018 (New Books interview here). Among his numerous law review articles is “When Guns Threaten the Public Sphere: A New Account of Public Safety Regulation Under Heller” (Northwestern University Law Review, Vol 116, 2021) in which he and Reva Siegel interrogate the impact of gun rights on free speech. Recently, he has been a guest on the podcast Strict Scrutiny, contributed to the New York Times and NPR reporting of the case. Joseph and Eric's recent op ed, “No, courts don't treat the Second Amendment as a ‘second-class right': The latest gun-rights case may hinge on some conservatives' sense of victimhood” just appeared in the Washington Post. Susan Liebell is Dirk Warren '50 Professor of Political Science at Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

Good Morning Business
Le Journal de l'économie - 22/11

Good Morning Business

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 7:04


Ce lundi 22 novembre, Sandra Gandoin a présenté le Journal de l'économie dont voici les premiers sujets : Régulation, l'Europe veut frapper fort, Powell ou Brainard, Biden tarde à trancher, le Salvador veut bâtir "Bitcoin city". Retrouvez l'émission du lundi au vendredi et réécoutez la en podcast.

Coffee & Regs
Special Episode with the Deputy Commissioner, Securities Division of the Vermont Department of Financial Regulation

Coffee & Regs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 31:19


In this special episode, CSS's Director of Retail Wealth Manager Services, Korrine Kohm and William R. Carrigan, Deputy Commissioner, Securities Division of the Vermont Department of Financial Regulation discuss the latest news for registered investment advisers, including what will be required in 2022 surrounding continuing education requirements, the implementation of the new Marketing Rule and what's next for Form CRS.

Non Serviam Media
APTTI #14 - Coasian Class Conflict with Cool Cat Nathan Goodman

Non Serviam Media

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 88:23


Frank brings on econ-smartypants Nathan Goodman to talk about the latent class theory present in Public Choice Theory and how it explains not just capitalism and why leftists have failed to overcome capitalism but also why leftists have failed to realize how to overcome and understand capitalism. Mentioned: Public Choice Theory Introduction to the Three Volumes of Marx's Capital, Michael Heinrich Politics Without Romance, James Buchanan Political Capitalism (book), Randall Holcomb Triumph of Conservtism, Gabriel Kolko The Problem of Social Costs, Ronald Coase Nature of the Firm, Ronald Coase Seeing Like a State, James C. Scott Rent Extract and Rent Creation in the Economic Theory of Regulation, Fred McChesney https://www.jstor.org/stable/724475 The God that Failed, Richard Crossman ed https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_God_that_Failed Calculation and Coordination, Peter Boettke Soviet Venality: A Rent Seeking Model of the Soviet State, Peter Boettke The Road to Crony Capitalism, Michael Munger and Mario Villarreal-Diaz https://dukespace.lib.duke.edu/dspace/bitstream/handle/10161/18113/Munger%20and%20Villareal%20Published%20version%202019.pdf?sequence=2&isAllowed=y The Rise and Decline of Nations, Mancur Olson Collective Action and the Civil Rights Movement, Dennis Chong Freedom in Contention: Social Movements and Liberal Political Economy, Mikalya Novak Evasive entrepreneurship, Niklas Elert and Mangus Henrekson https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11187-016-9725-x Approaching the Singularity Behind the Veil of incomputability: on Algorithmic governance, the economist-as-expert, and the piecemeal circumnavigation of the Administrative State, Abigail Devereaux https://cosmosandtaxis.files.wordpress.com/2019/08/devereaux_ct_vol_7_iss_1_2_rev.pdf Transitional Gains Trap, Gordon Tullock https://www.jstor.org/stable/3003249 Calculus of Consent, James Buchanan and Gordon Tullock Democracy in Chains, Nancy MacLean Effective Altruism https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Effective_altruism Fragments of an Anarchist Anthropology, David Graeber https://theanarchistlibrary.org/library/david-graeber-fragments-of-an-anarchist-anthropology Political Capitalism (paper), Randall Holcomb https://www.cato.org/sites/cato.org/files/serials/files/cato-journal/2015/2/cj-v35n1-2.pdf The Coase Theorem, Applied to Markets and Government, Randall Holcomb https://www.independent.org/publications/tir/article.asp?id=1325

Power of Prepaid Podcast
Visa Brings Cash Deposits to Fintechs

Power of Prepaid Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 15:11


One challenge of banking with a digital-only bank is making cash deposits. With no branches, it can be tough on a consumer who wants to make cash available for digital spending. Visa has been doing this for years for prepaid card holders by allowing them to make cash deposits at retailers and ATMs through its ReadyLink Network. Now, the company has expanded that access to debit programs, providing an opportunity for neobanks, other fintechs, and even traditional financial institutions potentially to offer deposit capabilities at a broad range of locations. In this episode, Lauren Fulmer, the director of U.S. Prepaid Product at Visa, talks about how the network works and what the future might hold now that it has expanded beyond prepaid cards.

Pharma Intelligence Podcasts
Speaking Of Medtech, Ep. 4: FDA's Regulation Of Digital Devices

Pharma Intelligence Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 19:18


In this episode of Speaking Of Medtech we discuss the regulatory side of digital health – that is, the US FDA side of digital – and some of the more important related policies and activities that are going on at the agency right now. Medtech Insight articles addressing topics discussed in this episode: • What Does ‘Digital' Mean For FDA's Device Center? - https://medtech.pharmaintelligence.informa.com/MT144553/What-Does-Digital-Mean-For-FDAs-Device-Center

New Ordinance Presents Regulation

Embark on this melodic, progressive journey with New Ordinance, a production and performance act from New York, featuring multi-talented instrumentalist, vocalist and producer, Gray Devio. Every week, the best new music in Progressive House and Progressive Trance is curated and presented by New Ordinance. This is Regulation. 1. GIZV - Ignition (Original Mix) [Airis Recordings]2. Frederik Wiesener - Polaris (Original Mix) [Aftertech Records]3. Franco Leonardini, Gonzalo Sacc & Rodrigo Lapena - Medicine (Original Day Mix) [Songspire Records]4. Frederik Wiesener - Altair (Original Mix) [Aftertech Records]5. Santiago Luna & Maywell - Like You [Sommersville Records]6. Johan Gielen - Sunflowers (Extended Mix) [Black Hole Recordings]7. Dave Neven presents Ocata - Above the Clouds (Extended Mix) [Coldharbour Recordings]8. Boundless & R3cycle - Unified Fields (Weekend Heroes Remix) [IbogaTech Records]9. Farius & Sue McLaren - Love Is Love (Protoculture Extended Remix) [Enhanced Progressive]10. Scorz & Diana Miro - Shadow (Extended Mix) [Armada Electronic Elements]11. Above & Beyond and Justine Suissa - Almost Home (Above & Beyond Extended Deep Mix) [Anjunabeats]

my millennial money
445c cryptocurrency & regulation

my millennial money

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 44:29


Bonus ep for ya! Glen chats with Senator Andrew Bragg, who Chaired the Select Senate committee: Australia as a Finance and Tech Centre. They touch on the committee's recommendations for regulating crypto and also get into some discussions around BNPL, finfluencers and the environment.Register here for Glen's Introduction to Crypto webinar: https://bit.ly/3cy6ZvDGrab a copy of Glen's book, Sort Your Money Out & Get Invested: https://www.sortyourmoneyout.com/sort-your-money-out-get-investedGet $20 off The Glen James Spending Plan using the code "MAGIC": https://www.mymillennial.money/spending-planSend us your questions! Use #mymillennialmoney in the m3 Facebook group: facebook.com/groups/mymillennialmoneyFor podcast resources, links to our stuff, disclaimers & warnings about this episode + more... check out: mymillennial.money/shownotes

CFR On the Record
State and Local Officials Webinar on Artificial Intelligence: Uses and Regulation By Local Government

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021


FedSoc Events
Opening and a Conversation on Regulation as Opportunity

FedSoc Events

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 55:50


ConvocationEugene B. Meyer, President and CEO, The Federalist SocietyA Conversation on Regulation as OpportunitySalen Churi, General Partner, Trust VenturesMiles Jennings, General Counsel, a16z CryptoModerator: Ann McDonald, Stanford Law School '23* * * * * As always, the Federalist Society takes no position on particular legal or public policy issues; all expressions of opinion are those of the speaker.

Motherhood in ADHD
E119: Teaching your ADHD Child Chores and Responsibilities as an ADHD Parent… how on earth do I teach my child skills I don't even have??? Q+A Session

Motherhood in ADHD

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 9:14


How am I going to teach my kid to be good at stuff that even I'm not good at? Today's episode is an ADHD Q&A session focused on helping you find ways to teach your child the important life skills they need to be responsible adults. Okay, so maybe you aren't great at being on time or keeping up with laundry or remembering someone's name...but there are lots of things that you ARE GOOD at. Let's focus on the good stuff, shall we? Listen and learn how you can use what you ARE good at to create a path that helps your kiddo learn those life skills and reminds you that you ARE a Successful Mama. One quick tip - keep things simple and positive. I hope this episode helps you realize teaching responsibility to your child doesn't have to feel overwhelming or scary. You got this! Oh, and since you're here I want to remind you I have some free resources to help you, parent, as a mom with ADHD. There are LOTS of goodies for you so head over to the resource page on my website and grab them up. patriciasung.com/resources   Click here for transcription.

Thinking Crypto Interviews & News
HUGE CRYPTO REGULATION NEWS! - Ripple XRP, SEC, Congress Crypto Taxes, India Crypto ETF & NYDIG

Thinking Crypto Interviews & News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 26:29


In US Crypto regulation news today we had Ripple (XRP) releasing a framework titled 'A Real Approach to Cryptocurrency Regulation'. 10 congress members send a letter to Nancy Pelosi stating that the current crypto taxes stifle crypto innovation. SEC Gary Gensler has not released his public calendar in months. Invesco is giving Indian investors exposure to blockchain technology companies, such as Coinbase and MicroStrategy, through a new pooled fund that invests in several sub-funds. NYDIG and NBA Houston Rockets partner to grow the Bitcoin network through access, educational programs, and community support initiatives. FTX exchange inks deal with MLB Star Shohei Ohtani. Brave browser now has a built-in crypto wallet.

That's All I Have To Say About That
America's Cryptocoin/Stablecoin Regulation Debate, Explained

That's All I Have To Say About That

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 10:52


Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/thatsall The SEC is looking into asset backed “stable coins”, because they might not be as stable as advertised. Here is what stablecoins are and why the SEC is looking into regulating them.

NAMIC Insurance Uncovered
Insurance Uncovered: Regulatory Advocacy

NAMIC Insurance Uncovered

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 27:31


Episode 423: NAMIC CEO Neil Alldredge talks with State Farm Associate General Counsel Richard Bates about his service as a regulatory advocate and how he foresees the insurance industry navigating today's most pressing regulatory issues.

The Bitcoin Podcast
The Bitcoin Podcast #374- No Background

The Bitcoin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 73:27


On this roundtable only Ep : Jessie, Dee, and Corey are joined by Collin Cusce and discuss NFTs, Regulation, L2, and the best blockchain right now. Social Media Of Collin CusceTwitter https://twitter.com/CollinCusceThe Bitcoin Podcast Social MediaJoin-Slack: https://launchpass.com/thebitcoinpodcastPatreon:https://www.patreon.com/TheBitcoinPodcastNetworkWebsite: http://thebitcoinpodcast.com/Twitter: https://twitter.com/thebtcpodcast

Special Education Advocacy with Ashley Barlow

Sensory Integration is what makes the world go ‘round in the Barlow household.  You know that shirt from the 80's that said, “If Mama ain't happy, ain't nobody happy.”  At our house the phrase, starts, “If Jack is dysregulated, …!”  In today's episode I'm sharing sensory strategies that work for us and how we use them.  I'm also explaining sensory regulation – from the perspective of a parent and a special education attorney (I'm for sure not an OT!) and giving a round up of additional strategies that may be useful in your house or community.  

USArabRadio
Social Media Controversies: Shutdowns, Regulation, Cyber Security and Cyber Warfare

USArabRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 59:25


Social media giants, such as Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, TikTok and others have been at the center of many controversies lately. These include the recent social media outages which shocked the world on October 5th, 2021, raising many questions about how and why they happened, and their broad implications, as well as the recent congressional hearings around the dangers posed by many of these social media platforms, especially for children and teens. Dr. Sahar Khamis discussed this important topic with her guests Mr. Mike Sexton and Ms. Eliza Campbell Mr. Mike Sexton is a DC-based cyber policy and Middle East expert. Mike previously served as Fellow and Cyber Program Director at the Middle East Institute (MEI); Senior Fellow and Associate Director of the Qatar-America Institute; Senior Analyst at the Chertoff Group; and Data Manager at the Chicago Project on Security and Threats. Mike has published articles and reports on cyber attacks, cryptography, and their implications for national security, human security, and international norms. He also serves as Managing Editor for Charged Affairs, the official journal of Young Professionals in Foreign Policy. Ms. Eliza Campbell is the Director of the Middle East Institute (MEI) Cyber Program. She was previously a researcher in technology and human rights at the Center for Contemporary Arab Studies at Georgetown University, and she was a 2017-2018 Fulbright researcher in Bulgaria. She has worked in the humanitarian field in Jordan. She holds a bachelor's degree in political science and Arabic and a Masters degree in Arab Studies from Georgetown University. She co-edited with Mike Sexton the MEI-published book, Cyber War & Cyber Peace in the Middle East (October 2020). The episode was broadcast: 29/10/2021 US Arab Radio can be heard on wnzk 690 AM, WDMV 700 AM, and WPAT 930 AM. Please visit: www.facebook.com/USArabRadio/ Web site : arabradio.us/ Online Radio: www.radio.net/s/usarabradio Twitter : twitter.com/USArabRadio Instagram : www.instagram.com/usarabradio/ Youtube : US Arab Radio Show less

Coffee & Regs
PRIIPs Delay, But Not Implementation Delays

Coffee & Regs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 8:06


In this episode, CSS's SVP of Business Development Ashley Smith joins Chief Product Officer Ronan Brennan to discuss the latest on the PRIIPs RTS, UK/EU divergence, data management complexities of the UCITS to PRIIPs transition and operational best practices to implement now. 

Optimal Health Daily
1542: Is Your Hunger Real or Habituated? by Laure Carter on Appetite Suppression & Regulation

Optimal Health Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 10:55


Laure Carter asks if your hunger is real or habituated. Episode 1542: Is Your Hunger Real or Habituated? by Laure Carter on Appetite Suppression & Regulation Laure Carter is on a mission to bring the perennial wisdom of Ayurveda to women, especially women of color around the world. Her multi-cultural upbringing in both the US, Paris and Martinique as well as practicing Yoga and meditation at a young age uniquely prepared her for this calling. She helps women shift from a restrictive diet approach to a health and balance approach to weight loss and wellness. The original post is located here: https://www.laurecarter.com/is-your-hunger-real-or-habituated/ InsideTracker's patented algorithm analyzes your biometric data and offers you a clearer picture than you've ever had before of what's going on inside your body. For a limited time, get 25 percent OFF the entire InsideTracker store! Go to InsideTracker.com/OHD to get your discount code and to start using InsideTracker today. Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com  Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalHealthDailyDietNutritionFitness Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Fried. The Burnout Podcast
Erika Ferszt: Eyesight Issues, Mood Regulation, and Burning Out When You're 'Happy'

Fried. The Burnout Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 56:07


“I lost my vision working for a company that provides vision,” says Erika Ferszt, Founder of Moodally and former Media & Digital Director at Ray-Ban. During her ten years at Ray Ban, Erica loved her job, loved the people she was working with and for, and loved her life...or so she thought. Then, one morning Erika woke up with no vision in her right eye, and the immense stress of her work life began to catch up with her. While Erika thought she was “happy,” her body was telling her otherwise.    After doctors concluded that her vision loss was stress-related and due to her working lifestyle, Erika decided to quit her job and re-evaluate her priorities. She returned to school to study the effects of stress on the mind, body and brain and learned about mood induction, the scientific process of altering participants' mood states. This inspired Erika to create Moodally, a company that brings this approach beyond the bounds of scientific studies and offers innovative, science-backed mood management solutions for the workplace.   Tune into this week's episode of FRIED. The Burnout Podcast to hear more about how Erika's burnout story led to the founding of her company. Learn about the science behind Erika's vision loss, how our thoughts (whether conscious or subconscious) dramatically impact our bodily reactions, and how our mood informs just about every aspect of our day.   Quotes • “I lost my vision working for a company that provides vision.” (13:13-13:17)  • “I think one of the things that's probably most misunderstood about burnout is that . . the assumption is that it's a psychological breakdown. And that can be one of the ways that it manifests, but it is a physiological issue.” (18:09-18:25) • “One of the first things that I learned to do [after quitting my job] was to acknowledge what I needed and not feel guilty about giving it to me.” (20:25-20:32) • “Who are you when the title goes away, when the employees go away, when the money goes away?” (23:48-23:58) • “When you don't know where you're going, you don't have to see the final destination...you just have to see enough road in front of you to get you to the next step.” (29:10-29:25) • “Where everything ladders up to is your thoughts. The thoughts are sort of the command center for the reactions in your body. There is a cognitive element to stress: you subconsciously and automatically decide that whatever is coming at you is greater than your capacity to handle.” (35:02-35:25) • “Music is the easiest gimme I can give you ....Outside of laughter, it's the fastest technique to shift you into a better mood.” (52:08-52:20)    Links www.moodally.com  https://www.instagram.com/moodally.wellness/  https://www.linkedin.com/in/erikaferszt/    XOXO, C   If you know that it's time to actually DO something about the burnout cycle you've been in for too long - book your free consult today: bit.ly/callcait   Podcast production and show notes provided by HiveCast.fm

F**kface
Cosmic Crisp Review - Official Regulation Season 2 Supplemental Episode 1

F**kface

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 29:06


Join Geoff, Gavin, Producer Eric, and Sound Engineer Nick as they taste test the Cosmic Crisp apple! Andrew is also here but he did not taste test the apple and believes this is all a prank being pulled on him. It's not, it's a Cosmic Crisp apple tasting and it's real. Is it a good? How'd they like them apples?

Marketplace Tech
The tech industry says it wants regulation. What would that look like?

Marketplace Tech

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 7:21


All this week, we've been talking about what it will take to update our laws and regulations to address some of the thorniest issues in tech and society. Today, Marketplace’s Kimberly Adams reports on the tech industry perspective.

Marketplace All-in-One
The tech industry says it wants regulation. What would that look like?

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 7:21


All this week, we've been talking about what it will take to update our laws and regulations to address some of the thorniest issues in tech and society. Today, Marketplace’s Kimberly Adams reports on the tech industry perspective.

New Ordinance Presents Regulation

Embark on this melodic, progressive journey with New Ordinance, a production and performance act from New York, featuring multi-talented instrumentalist, vocalist and producer, Gray Devio. Every week, the best new music in Progressive House and Progressive Trance is curated and presented by New Ordinance. This is Regulation. 1. Airdraw & Jo.E - A Través del Tiempo Naranja [Monstercat Silk]2. Andrew Rayel & Takis Ft. Zagata - Closer (Extended Mix) [Armada Music]3. Juno Mamba - Rainbow Infinity [Anjunadeep]4. Haen, Banaati & Lewyn - Chasing Shadows [Monstercat Silk]5. Wolkengrau - Orange Skies (Cosmaks Remix) [Soluna Music]6. Sound Quelle - RAI (Club Mix) [Hathōr]7. Nora En Pure - Luscious Rain (Extended Mix) [Enormous Tunes]8. Christian Burns - Breathing Fire (Extended Mix) [Black Hole Recordings]9. Palmer Banks - Alive [Big Toys Production]10. Johan Gielen - Sunflowers (Extended Mix) [Black Hole Recordings]11. Farius & Sue McLaren - Love Is Love (Protoculture Extended Remix) [Enhanced Progressive]12. Lumïsade - Open Water (Extended Mix) [A State Of Trance]

The Milk Minute Podcast- Breastfeeding/Chestfeeding/Lactating/Pumping
Ep. 83- Up-Regulating and Down-Regulating Supply

The Milk Minute Podcast- Breastfeeding/Chestfeeding/Lactating/Pumping

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 53:29


There are so many recommendations on the internet about how to "fix" your supply issues. How do you know which will work for you? Also... WHY do they work?Power pumping, bra/no bra, pump before feeds, pump between feeds, block feed... ahhhhh!During this episode, Heather and Maureen dive into regulating supply; how it works, the steps to take to successfully regulate, as well as guidance for parents on how to do it safely and efficiently. This is a must listen for anyone experiencing an Oversupply or Undersupply!THANK YOU TO THIS EPISODE'S SPONSORSGet your hydration on with Liquid IV! You'll get 25% off and free shipping by clicking HERE!Become an online teacher with VIP Kid! Apply by clicking HERE! Listener Question: Any recommendations on night weaning a 17-month-old?Become a Milk Minute VIP- Click here to get behind-the-scenes-access and exclusive merch!Contact us- To send us feedback, personal stories, or just to chat you can send us an email at milkminutepodcast@gmail.comGet Community Support- Click Here to Join our Free Facebook Community!Stay up to Date - Find us on INSTAGRAM @milk_minute_podcastPrefer to read the transcript?- Click Here to read the edited version of this episode!Previous episodes of The Milk Minute Podcast mentioned in this episode:Milk Minute Episode 14: Breastfeeding Supply Boost?Milk Minute Episode 68: A Milk Expression MeditationRESOURCESLauren Garmon, SleepEatGrow.com: Sleep. Eat. Grow. Helping Parents with Gentle Sleep CoachingSupport the show!- Click here to make a small donation to keep the Milk Minute Podcast alive and thriving!Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/milkminutepodcast)

Design Mind frogcast
The Magic of Storytelling

Design Mind frogcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 22:30


There is always a little magic behind every great design.  On this episode of the Design Mind frogcast, we're joined by Dave Lankford, VP of Product for Global Consumer Engagement at Disney Streaming (Disney+, Hulu, ESPN+ and Star+) to talk about what it means to design products that tell stories. Designing streaming platforms for a brand with as large a footprint as Disney is no small feat, but luckily Dave and his global team are well-prepared for the task. At Disney Streaming, human empathy and machine intelligence play a critical role in the mission of storytelling. Dave discusses the importance of empowering creative, collaborative teams, how the improvisation technique “Yes, and” leads to innovative ideas, and what it takes to connect users with stories across vastly different regions, cultures and languages.Brought to you by frog, a global creative consultancy. frog is part of Capgemini Invent. (https://www.frogdesign.com)Find episode transcripts and relevant info (https://www.frogdesign.com/designmind/design-mind-frogcast-ep-17-the-magic-of-storytelling/)Download the frog report 'Convergent Transformation' (https://www.frogdesign.com/designmind/real-transformation-and-disruption-takes-convergent-design)Audio Production: Richard Canham, Lizard Media (https://www.lizardmedia.co.uk/)

The Steve Gruber Show
Derrick Hollie, Assessing the Racial Cost of Regulation

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 7:30


Derrick Hollie is the president of Reaching America and member of Proj. 21. Assessing the Racial Cost of Regulation

Motherhood in ADHD
E118: How to Help & Equip Your ADHD Child with Katelyn Mabry

Motherhood in ADHD

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 29:19


Showing our kids success with ADHD is 100% obtainable for them is NOT impossible. Today is Part 2 of a conversation I was lucky enough to have with my friend Katelyn Mabry. (If you missed us last week go check out Episode 117 and hurry back!) Katelyn's a special education teacher and author who grew up having an ADHD diagnosis and that led her to want to help others like her through teaching. During this episode, Katelyn gets deeper into her professional opinions about: - How to explain to your child that they have ADHD - What to do to teach them new responsibilities and skills - How to help our ADHD children move forward when they are feeling stuck - And what we can do to connect with our kids on a deeper level to form solid safe foundations. If you're feeling a little overwhelmed by a potential ADHD diagnosis for your kiddo or if you're already there and still working out how to talk with your child about their ADHD THIS is the episode for you, Successful Mama! Check out Katlyn's book, “Hi, It's Me! I have ADHD!” and her podcast for kids titled “Journey With Me Through ADHD." Special thanks to Katelyn for hanging out with me and sharing her empathy-inducing knowledge with us! Learn more about Katelyn on her website here and check out her book “Hi, It's Me! I Have ADHD” on Amazon. You can listen to her podcast, Journey With Me Through ADHD: A Podcast for Kids and follow her on Facebook and Instagram. REMINDER: There's a place where you can get your calendar and to-do list organized one step at a time, so you enjoy more time with your kids while feeling confident + capable in your day... even when your ADHD hijacks your plan. Sign-ups for Daily Planning for ADHD Moms are open! Click here to sign up --> bit.ly/adhdplan Listen to full episodes at www.motherhoodwithadhd.com or find us on your favorite podcast listening app. Click here for transcription.

Sounds True: Insights at the Edge
Becoming an Active Operator of Your Nervous System

Sounds True: Insights at the Edge

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 64:22


Deb Dana, LCSW, is a clinician and consultant specializing in using the lens of Polyvagal Theory to understand and resolve the impact of trauma and create ways of working that honor the role of the autonomic nervous system. Her clinical publications include The Polyvagal Theory in Therapy: Engaging the Rhythm of Regulation and The Polyvagal Flip Chart: Understanding the Science of Safety, and her Sounds True publications include the audio program, Befriending Your Nervous System: Looking Through the Lens of Polyvagal Theory, and her new book Anchored: How to Befriend Your Nervous System Using Polyvagal Theory. In this podcast, Tami Simon converses with Deb Dana to offer listeners a practical understanding of Polyvagal Theory and how we can begin to decode the language of our body for better health and better relationships. Tami and Deb also discuss the dorsal, sympathetic, and ventral states of our nervous system; the gifts of becoming "anchored in ventral"; neuroception, your nervous system's way of taking in information to assess your safety; curiosity and the capacity for self-reflection; the importance of self-care; co-regulation as a biological imperative; why self-regulation is especially critical for therapists and other helping professionals; music and nature as healing resources; the practice of self-compassion as a means of "getting our anchor back"; and more.

Channel Your Enthusiasm
Chapter Six: Effects of Hormones on Renal Function

Channel Your Enthusiasm

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 110:43


Chapter 6 part 1In this review of vasopressin, you can find an excellent discussion of basic stimuli and vasopressin receptors: Vasopressin V1a and V1b Receptors: From Molecules to Physiological Systems | Physiological ReviewsX-Linked Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is very rare and there was theory that all patients originated from the same family and traveled to the US on the Hopewell ship JCI - X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus mutations in North America and the Hopewell hypothesis. This report describes another family from the Netherlands with nephrogenic DI including the finding that the urine osmolarity never exceeds 200 mOsm/kg. Hereditary Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus - GeneReviews® (and here's a family with central diabetes insipidus https://academic.oup.com/jcem/article/81/1/192/2649423?login=true )Although we have all learned that thiazides should be used with diabetes insipidus, to induce mild volume depletion, several case reports and animal data have found that acetazolamide might be the best diuretic for the job. Clinicians from Boston Medical Center tried it out in this report: ​​Acetazolamide in Lithium-Induced Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus | NEJM based on exciting data in mice! https://jasn.asnjournals.org/content/27/7/2082.shortADH appears to have an effect on potassium excretion. This was investigated by Giebesch who found, with clearance and micropuncture studies in rats plus isolated perfused tubules, ADH increased potassium secretion Influence of ADH on renal potassium handling: A micropuncture and microperfusion study A corollary should be that inhibition of ADH would increase the risk of hyperkalemia but this was not observed in the SALT-1 and SALT-2 trials. 5% of patients developed hyperkalemia in both the tolvaptan group and the placebo group Tolvaptan, a Selective Oral Vasopressin V2-Receptor Antagonist, for Hyponatremia | NEJMV1 vasopressin as a pressor Exogenous Vasopressin-Induced Hyponatremia in Patients With Vasodilatory Shock: Two Case Reports and Literature ReviewWe wondered/debated on our observation that hyponatremia is not reliably seen in patients receiving vasopressin in the ICU. In the VASST trial, Vasopressin versus Norepinephrine Infusion in Patients with Septic Shock, 1 patient in each study arm of nearly 400 patients developed hyponatremia. Note that patients with hyponatremia (

Marketplace All-in-One
Tech regulation is inconsistent and outdated. What will it take for that to change?

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 4:37


This week, Kimberly Adams talks with two U.S. Senators and other Washington and Silicon Valley leaders as “Marketplace Tech” examines the different ways the federal government is trying to regulate the tech industry, and what it will take to actually make it happen. In this episode, advocates discuss what future legislation could look like.

Marketplace Tech
Tech regulation is inconsistent and outdated. What will it take for that to change?

Marketplace Tech

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 4:37


This week, Kimberly Adams talks with two U.S. Senators and other Washington and Silicon Valley leaders as “Marketplace Tech” examines the different ways the federal government is trying to regulate the tech industry, and what it will take to actually make it happen. In this episode, advocates discuss what future legislation could look like.

Bankless
91 - Brian Armstrong and The Future of Coinbase

Bankless

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 98:56


Brian Armstrong is the Founder and CEO of Coinbase. As a pillar of innovation and adoption in crypto, Brian is playing a pivotal role in determining the kind of future we'll see in the space. The Crypto movement is a battle for hearts and minds, and Coinbase is fighting on the front lines. Building bridges between the legacy world and the Metaverse is a daunting task, but Brian has been a headstrong leader with a powerful vision. Coinbase finds itself in a position to maximize a user's choice for what they do with their assets. With new features on the way like their NFT platform, Coinbase is steadily opening the doors for composability, decentralization, and ultimately… sovereignty. ✨ EPISODE DEBRIEF ✨ https://shows.banklesshq.com/p/exclusive-debrief-brian-armstrong  ------