Podcasts about fda

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Copy link to clipboard

Agency of the United States Department of Health and Human Services

  • 7,061PODCASTS
  • 22,158EPISODES
  • 39mAVG DURATION
  • 10+DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jul 6, 2022LATEST
fda

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022



    Best podcasts about fda

    Show all podcasts related to fda

    Latest podcast episodes about fda

    PBS NewsHour - Segments
    News Wrap: Former White House counsel Pat Cipollone to testify before Jan. 6 panel

    PBS NewsHour - Segments

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 5:19


    In our news wrap Wednesday, former Trump White House counsel Pat Cipollone agreed to testify Friday before the Jan. 6 committee, report details how a Uvalde police officer missed his chance to shoot the gunman, the FDA says U.S. pharmacists can now prescribe Paxlovid, 2.3 billion people faced difficulty getting enough to eat in 2021, and monsoon rains killed dozens in Pakistan. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

    林氏璧孔醫師的新冠病毒討論會
    220707 FDA建議次世代疫苗要包括BA.4/BA.5 國際藥物法規主管機構聯盟立場不同?

    林氏璧孔醫師的新冠病毒討論會

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 20:37


    1.上集才剛錄完FDA專家會議解說,沒想到美國時間6月30日FDA就已經正式公告,建議10月開打的加強針要包含針對BA.4/BA.5的成份。 https://www.fda.gov/news-events/press-announcements/coronavirus-covid-19-update-fda-recommends-inclusion-omicron-ba45-component-covid-19-vaccine-booster 2.WHO和FDA的共識都是盡量增加抗體的廣度。而不是要猜中,針對哪個病毒株。因為下個病毒株實在難以預測。基本上都是選最不一樣的,希望增加廣度,但目前結論不同。這可能會讓藥廠無所適從。 3.FDA主要考慮的是BA.4/BA.5免疫逃逸最強,是目前最大的缺口。目前初步資料看來,BA.1產生的抗體不太能防BA.4/BA.5,但反過來就可以。 4.WHO則是覺得演化樹上BA.1離原始株離的很遠,用BA.1就可以接受了。 4.我的疑問是,需要規定每個公司都做一樣的事嗎?如果下一株新冠變種株難以預測,我們很難說到底是單價,雙價或是哪株Omicron會有最4好的效果。每個疫苗性質可能有所不同,像現在輝瑞似乎單價比雙價好,莫德納反之。Novavax則號稱原有疫苗對變種株效果還是有一定的效果。Sanofi和莫德納都有Beta次世代疫苗也可以引發很廣的抗體生成。每個疫苗公司不能有不一樣的研發方向嗎?我們需要把雞蛋放在同一個籃子裡嗎? 另一方面,EMA和FDA 6月30日一起主持了一個次世代疫苗研討會,看來討論比較全面,參與者包含ICMRA(國際藥物法規主管機構聯盟)的18個會員國還有WHO。 Global regulators agree on key principles on adapting vaccines to tackle virus variants https://www.ema.europa.eu/en/news/global-regulators-agree-key-principles-adapting-vaccines-tackle-virus-variants 取得的共識: 1.目前疫苗不管是基礎劑或追加劑對防重症,住院和死亡都有保護力,鼓勵繼續使用。 2.新冠病毒持續演化,減少目前疫苗對感染和輕症的保護力。 3.雖然Omicron BA.4/BA.5在世界很多地方漸成主流,但之後新的變種株有可能很快就將它取代。 4.初步資料顯示mRNA疫苗加入Omicron株作為加強針,可以增加並延長保護的時間。雙價mRNA疫苗可能可以增加免疫的廣度。 5.這樣的疫苗應該一開始只用於加強針,是否能用於基礎劑型,要等待更多資料。 6.包含其他變種株的疫苗,比方說Beta變種株,也可能可以考慮作為加強針,如果臨床資料顯示其對於Omicron和其他變種株可以產生足夠的中和抗體。 7.有許多證據還在蒐集,參與者強調要小心的檢視不斷出來的新資料來決定每個新次世代疫苗的適用性。 8.法規單位強調新疫苗開打的話,要有事先計畫好的真實世界保護效益的研究,以便即時知道其對感染,住院和死亡的保護力。 更詳細的討論內容還有結論會在幾天內在 ICMRA網站公布。 歡迎追蹤前台大感染科醫師。04b的發聲管道! 我的電子名片 https://lit.link/linshibi 希望大家當我的種子教師,推廣正確的新冠衛教。科學防疫,不要只以恐懼防疫! 歡迎贊助林氏璧孔醫師喝咖啡,讓我可以在這個紛亂的時代,繼續分享知識努力做正確新冠相關衛教。 https://pay.firstory.me/user/linshibi Powered by Firstory Hosting

    Savor
    Savor Classics: Tomato Ketchup

    Savor

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 47:21


    This popular American condiment descended from fermented fish sauce and had a hand in creating the FDA. In this classic episode, Anney and Lauren dip into the non-Newtonian science and fancy history of ketchup. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Incident Report
    Omicron Boosters, Kids' Vaccine & More (w/Dr. Paul Offit)

    Incident Report

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 53:24


    Why did Dr. Offit vote NO on Omicron-specific boosters at the FDA advisory meeting? What's up with vaccine for the youngest kids? AND MUCH MORE... Video version: zdoggmd.com/paul-offit-9 All our videos with Dr. Paul Offit: https://zdoggmd.com/tag/paul-offit/ Paul's recent op-ed on variant-specific boosting: https://www.statnews.com/2022/06/29/fda-dont-rush-to-change-covid-19-vaccine-composition/ Support our educational efforts with a PayPal donation and get a personal email reply from me: https://paypal.me/zdoggmd Video archive, audio podcast, music parodies, Supporter Tribe membership, merch, social media, and email: https://lnk.bio/zdoggmd More about Dr. Z: https://zdoggmd.com/about-z

    iilluminaughtii
    JUUL: Targeting Children and Gaslighting the FDA Since 2015 | Corporate Casket

    iilluminaughtii

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 30:20


    Go to http://hellofresh.com/casket16 and use code casket16 for up to 16 free meals AND 3 free gifts! Go to http://upstart.com/casket to find out how Upstart can lower your monthly rate. Welcome to the Corporate Casket, a semiweekly series where bad businesses go to die. We will discuss any and everything from bad charities, terrible CEOs, and businesses that have a lot to hide. At first, Juul was supposed to be a healthier alternative for smokers to migrate away from cigarettes. But the company quickly started to ruffle some feathers with their advertising strategies toward kids, and their flavored cartridges. Then, as people began to get sick, and die after being exposed to e-cigarettes everything went up in smoke. They were met with bans, and lawsuits, and forced to pay millions of dollars. Now, the FDA has announced that the company is banned from selling its product.  Connect with me: https://linktr.ee/iilluminaughtii Sources: https://justpaste.it/20qb8 Writers/Researchers: Jess This episode was edited and mixed by: G. Thomas Craig   Album cover art created by: Betsy Primes Intro Song Credits: Last to Fall- Will Van De Crommert Outro Song Credits: Sacred and Profane- Nicholas Rowe 

    Squawk Pod
    Messy Market Signals, & Morals Over Money: The New Hiring Handbook 7/6/22

    Squawk Pod

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 27:46


    A bevy of market signals have alarmed investors: oil prices slipping, a surprise Nasdaq rally, a yield curve inversion. As inflation remains elevated and recession fears loom over the markets, the Federal Reserve and the Biden administration balance their respective toolsets to mitigate pressure on the American economy. Austan Goolsbee, former CEA chairman and Booth School of Business professor, and fellow economist Michael Strain, director of economic policy at AEI, discuss whether their strategies are enough to avoid a deep recession. In other headlines, the FDA has temporarily paused the ban on Juul e-cigarettes, and senators are urging the Federal Trade Commission to investigate TikTok. Plus, many employees are willing to take a pay cut to work at companies that align with their own values; CNBC's Sharon Epperson reports on how the pandemic has shifted purpose, well-being, and values to the forefront of employee-employer relationships.  In this episode: Austan Goolsbee, @Austan_GoolsbeeMichael Strain, @MichaelRStrainJoe Kernen, @JoeSquawkMelissa Lee @MelissaLeeCNBCSharon Epperson, @Sharon_EppersonKatie Kramer, @Kramer_Katie

    WSJ Minute Briefing
    Highland Park, Ill., Shooting Suspect Charged With Murder

    WSJ Minute Briefing

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 2:22


    The Biden administration sues Arizona over a new proof-of-citizenship voting law. The FDA suspends its ban on Juul's e-cigarettes while the company appeals the agency's order. Keith Collins hosts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    The Todd Herman Show
    Do this for Dr. Zelenko: commit to telling the hard truths wrapped in grace. Episode 183 - Hour 2 Do This For Dr Zelenko

    The Todd Herman Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 49:29


    THE THESIS: Dr. Zelenko's medical practice was heroically based in good, old fashioned doctoring with evidence based approaches. His truth-telling in the face of tyranny and threats was his lasting contribution to human kind --- IF we will act likewise.  THE SCRIPTURE & SCRIPTURAL RESOURCES:  Why Did Jesus Say, “But I Tell You”? THE NEWS & COMMENT: [AUDIO] -  Dr Zelenko's Deathbed Message: Resist The WHO's Fear Campaigns, Denounce The False gods Of Technology & Science, Turn Back To Our True Creator Rest in peace [AUDIO] -  Pfizer Stopped Testing their COVID Vaccine on Animals Because they Kept Dying Pfizer Stopped Testing their COVID Vaccine on Animals Because they Kept Dying.  Here's what Reuters said in a “Fact Check” in June of 2021: Fact Check-COVID-19 vaccines did not skip animal trials because of animal deaths Posts claiming that COVID-19 vaccine producers skipped animal trials due to the animals in those trials dying are false. Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna and Johnson & Johnson, which have been granted emergency authorization use by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the United States, all conducted animal trials and had no significant safety concerns to report. FDA will not require clinical trial data to authorize redesigned COVID boosters -official “A hotline set up by Gov. Tim Walz…to monitor compliance w/his 2020 stay-at-home order generated 1000s of reports from Minnesotans who snitched on their neighbors for things like playing basketball in a park, walking their dogs, & throwing small parties.” Freedom Convoy leader Tamara Lich arrested in Alberta, accused of breaching bail conditions The same thing is happening, here. [AUDIO] -  Justin Trudeau says he's "banning the market" for firearms, before correcting himself and saying "freezing." This "will start moving us in the right direction over the medium and long term," the PM says. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    The FOX News Rundown
    How Can You Stop A Mass Shooter?

    The FOX News Rundown

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 32:43


    During a 4th of July parade in Highland Park, IL, a gunman opened fire into a crowd, killing at least 7 people and injuring more than 30. The suspect, Robert Crimo III, was arrested later that day. He had reportedly been planning the attack for weeks and had posted violent content on his social media account, leading many to wonder what can be done to prevent mass shootings before they occur. Former FBI Special Agent John Iannarelli joins the Rundown to discuss the warning signs exhibited by the gunman, the responsibility of social media companies to take action, and what families and communities can do to prevent a mass shooting.   The Food and Drug Administration had issued all products from the e-cigarette company Juul off the market after the agency found Juul had failed to provide sufficient data showing the products were safe for public health. As the company appeals the decision, it is once more throwing e-cigarette and vaping products in the limelight as many question these products' safety. Former FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb joins the podcast to break down the issues surrounding Juul products and how the FDA can balance cracking down on youth vaping issues while giving adult smokers tools to break smoking habits.   Plus, commentary by Fox News contributor Liz Peek. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Senior Housing Forum - The Podcast
    How Is Kisco Doing All This??

    Senior Housing Forum - The Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 29:53


    The story: Kisco Senior Living has this pandemic thing down to a [cutting-edge but FDA-approved] science. They've got testing most people have never heard of, transparency many communities run in fear of, and “guidance, not dictates” executive directors dream of. Hear how they're leading-by-example the industry forward.   The guest: Ed Ward, vice president of operations and care services, Kisco Senior Living.   Your host: Rachel Hill, Senior Living Foresight.   “We saw the strain on our front line. … We've really looked at, how do we address [the labor shortage]? … We've introduced a whole set of new HR benefits — associate benefits — that is pretty impressive. Things like sabbaticals for our executive directors and our community management team. After they've worked at Kisco for five years, they can take a month off, and it doesn't impact their vacation balance. They can go and explore and refresh and renew. … I've never been a part of an organization that does that. — Ed Ward ______________________________ Where to find us: Website: https://www.seniorlivingforesight.net LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/seniorforesight/ Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/SeniorForesight Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/seniorforesight/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/SeniorForesight

    The Robert Scott Bell Show
    The RSB Show 7-5-22 - Joe Wang, In Doctors We (No Longer) Trust, Tracey Stroup, Joe Messino

    The Robert Scott Bell Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 110:06


    The RSB Show 7-5-22 - FDA regulatory power, Joe Wang PhD, In Doctors We (No Longer) Trust, Jamie Dorley, Joe Messino, Nutritional Frontiers, Cardiovascular solutions

    Dr. Chapa’s Clinical Pearls.
    “Double Dose” Plan B?

    Dr. Chapa’s Clinical Pearls.

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 13:51


    There is some controversial/conflicting data on whether LNG-based emergency contraception is less effective in patients who are overweight or obese. Can giving a “double dose” of Plan B make-up for this potential short coming in these patients? What is the FDA's response to these weight-based efficacy claims? In this session we will review a recent publication from June 2022 in Obstetrics and Gynecology which helps answer this very timely question.

    The Majority Report with Sam Seder
    2874 - The Nightmarish SCOTUS Term And What's Next w/ Peter Shamshiri

    The Majority Report with Sam Seder

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 86:03


    Sam and Emma host Peter Shamshiri, or Law Boy on Twitter, co-host of the 5-4 Podcast, to discuss the recent Supreme Court term and what the big decisions mean for us going forward.    Sam and Emma first run through the terrifying updates from this weekend, including a longer conversation on the Highland Park shooting (of the multiple mass shootings), Brittany Griner's plea to Biden, Ohio successfully forcing a 10-year-old to escape the state to terminate a pregnancy resulting from rape, and updates on Russia's bombing of a mall in Ukraine. Then, Peter Shamshiri joins as dive into the West Virginia v EPA case and the conservative Court's ultimate goal of unwinding the administrative state all the way back to the Lochner Era, looking at how the case addresses the Clean Air Act, claiming the EPA only has authority to police specific facilities rather than preemptively impose standards on the energy industry as a whole, even though the policy they were addressing had already been rolled back. Next, they look into the history of Justice Roberts' “Major Questions Doctrine,” first exploring the emergence of the Chevron Doctrine towards the end of the 20th Century asking that courts defer to administration on the interpretation of statutes, followed by the beginning of its undoing in an FDA case in the 2000s (despite the same court supporting it for Bush's EPA), before getting into the accelerated takedown of the Chevron doctrine throughout the pandemic, from the CDC's eviction moratorium to OSHA's workplace vaccine mandate. They then shift to the court granting cert to a North Carolina case addressing the independent state legislature theory, another idea that came to prevalence under John Roberts and during the Bush administration, central to Bush v. Gore (a project worked on by Roberts, Kavanaugh, and Coney Barrett), with an extended conversation on the worst (and most likely) outcomes from this case and the contrast it draws in undermining state courts and putting the powerfully in their own hands. They wrap up the interview with a conversation on the Dobbs case, this Court's emphasis on religious freedom and how it can shape a world where non-fundamentalists are ostracized, the absolute meaninglessness of the abortion “exemptions” in such a society, and the constitutional right to interstate travel. And in the Fun Half: Chris from the Bay Area calls in to discuss Sam's clear violation of Saul's Second Amendment rights by refusing to purchase him a genuine Kyber-crystal-powered lightsaber and to engage Emma's discussion on the BS abortion “exemptions” being pushed by Democrats. Diving deeper into this, Sam and Emma cover the Democratic Party's complete impotence in response to Dobbs, walking through the countless millionaires whose only reaction was, “gimme money and I'll do it next time.” Kowalski discusses the tropical twister that hit his Nebraskan farm last night, Sam and Emma walk through the wonderful GOP primary debate for AZ Governor, and Jordan Peterson holds back the tears as he gets banned from Twitter for deciding that Elliot Page must be held responsible for his transphobic fears, plus, your calls and IMs!   Check out the 5-4 Podcast here: https://www.patreon.com/fivefourpod   Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com: https://fans.fm/majority/join Subscribe to the AMQuickie newsletter here:  https://madmimi.com/signups/170390/join Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store: https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ Check out today's sponsors: History Is US: “History is US”… an important 6-part documentary podcast series hosted by award-winning Princeton University professor Dr. Eddie Glaude, journeys back to face the truths about race at the heart of the American story. Listen to “History is US” a presentation of Shining City Audio, C13 Originals, and Jon Meacham studio. Available now, wherever you listen to your podcasts. Shopify: Scaling your business is a journey of endless possibility. Shopify is here to help, with tools and resources that make it easy for any business to succeed from down the street to around the globe. Shopify powers over 1.7 million businesses - from first-sale to full-scale. Shopify gives entrepreneurs the resources once reserved for big business - so upstarts, start-ups, and established businesses alike can sell everywhere, synchronize online and in-person sales, and effortlessly stay informed. Go to https://www.shopify.com/free-trial?utm_campaign=paid_audio_-_podcast_-_amer_-_united_states_-_all_-_experimential_-_english_-_awareness&utm_source=podcast&utm_medium=audio&utm_term=majority, for a FREE fourteen-day trial and get full access to Shopify's entire suite of features! Cozy Earth: One out of three Americans report being sleep deprived, and their sheets could be the problem. Luckily Cozy Earth provides the SOFTEST, MOST LUXURIOUS and BEST-TEMPERATURE REGULATING sheets. Cozy Earth has been featured on Oprah's Most Favorite Things List Four Years in a Row! Made from super soft viscose from bamboo, Cozy Earth Sheets breathe so you sleep at the perfect temperature all year round.  And for a limited time, SAVE 35% on Cozy Earth Bedding. Go to https://cozyearth.com/and enter my special promo code MAJORITY at checkout to SAVE 35% now. Support the St. Vincent Nurses today! https://action.massnurses.org/we-stand-with-st-vincents-nurses/ Check out Matt's show, Left Reckoning, on Youtube, and subscribe on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/leftreckoning Subscribe to Matt's other show Literary Hangover on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/literaryhangover Check out The Nomiki Show on YouTube. https://www.patreon.com/thenomikishow Check out Matt Binder's YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/mattbinder Subscribe to Brandon's show The Discourse on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/ExpandTheDiscourse Check out The Letterhack's upcoming Kickstarter project for his new graphic novel! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/milagrocomic/milagro-heroe-de-las-calles Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Subscribe to AM Quickie writer Corey Pein's podcast News from Nowhere. https://www.patreon.com/newsfromnowhere  Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn @BradKAlsop Check out AidAccess here: https://aidaccess.org/ The Majority Report with Sam Seder - https://majorityreportradio.com/

    Global Medical Device Podcast powered by Greenlight Guru
    Shifting Sands of SaMD Cybersecurity Regulations

    Global Medical Device Podcast powered by Greenlight Guru

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 33:51


    FDA has issued new draft guidance on cybersecurity for software as a medical device (SaMD). If the FDA releases that draft guidance ‘as is,' it will massively and negatively impact the SaMD industry and it's imperative that manufacturers understand how to prepare. In this episode of the Global Medical Device Podcast, Etienne Nichols talks to Chris Gates, director of product security at Velentium, about the shifting sands of medical device cybersecurity regulations for SaMD. Some of the highlights of this episode include:Chris views the FDA's recent activity around cybersecurity requirements, regulations, and laws for SaMD as a necessity because manufacturers cannot seem to self-regulate. The Protecting and Transforming Cyber Health Care Act (PATCH) will give the FDA a direct mandate to manage the cybersecurity of medical devices.However, a clause in the PATCH Act allows for cybersecurity to extend to all existing legacy medical devices—not just new devices entering the market.As medical device manufacturers (MDMs) become aware of the clause, it'll have a huge impact. MDMs will likely end support for device lines due to high costs. The biggest issue with the new guidance consensus vs. regulatory standards is alignment with software bill of materials (SBOM) tools.The most effort-intensive part of the new draft guidance is ongoing testing of anomalies to determine if they can be turned into vulnerabilities. The industry will be unable to keep up with additional testing because of resources and demand.All this added burden will be placed on MDMs at the cost of marginal improvements in cybersecurity. So, there's no real benefit to the manufacturer.Structure a standard by not creating something brand new that is ill/undefined but align best practices to create secure medical devices.Memorable quotes from Chris Gates:“Legally-backed cybersecurity requirements by a regulatory agency are necessary to ensure secure devices are entering the marketplace and hopefully replacing the insecure legacy devices.”“This clause is going to have a huge impact on medical device manufacturers (MDMs) and I find it amazing how many MDMs are completely unaware of this.”“An SBOM is a software bill of materials. It's an ingredients list for your application.”“This isn't just one-and-done testing in your life cycle.”“You're going to have a lot of extra work coming your way.”Links:Medical Device Cybersecurity for Engineers and ManufacturersRegulations (Submit comments to the FDA)Cybersecurity in Medical Devices: Quality System Considerations and Content of Premarket SubmissionsPATCH ActInternational Electrotechnical Commission (IEC)ISO (International Organization for Standardization)International Medical Device Regulators Forum (IMDRF)Chris Gates on LinkedInChris Gates EmailGreenlight Guru YouTube ChannelMedTech True Quality Stories PodcastGreenlight Guru AcademyGreenlight Guru CommunityGreenlight Guru

    Empowered Patient Podcast
    Improving Diversity Inclusion in Clinical Trial Recruitment and Participation with Dr. Jennifer Jones-McMeans Abbott Vascular TRANSCRIPT

    Empowered Patient Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022


    Dr. Jennifer Jones-McMeans is a Divisional Vice President of Global Clinical Affairs at Abbott Vascular Business and she sheds light on the FDA guidance to encourage sponsors of clinical trials to include all genders, ethnicities, and under-represented patients to participate. New guidelines are more organized and provide better guidance for what sponsors of clinical trials should consider during their submissions to the FDA. Jennifer explains, "If you think about where clinical trials sit, clinical trials are part of the overall healthcare ecosystem. And if we consider that the healthcare ecosystem is to be inclusive, it is to make sure that there are appropriate treatments for women and different ethnic groups. Also understanding that possibly there could be differences in maybe therapeutic responses, or even considering access too. Clinical trials have to then move forward as the medical ecosystem is moving forward to ensure that there's treatment available for all patients. And so this is where again, this guidance is just a guideline to help support that pathway for clinical trials." "We do know that there are specific populations that, based on their access to health and lack of trust that can occur with the healthcare system, when it comes to clinical trials, they may actually not know and have an awareness of the clinical trial. But they also may not be connected with the appropriate medical system or within a medical system to even have that access. So that's some of the work that we know that the sponsors can do in reaching out." @AbbottCardio #ClinicalTrials #FDAGuidance #UnderservedPatients #UnderrepresentedPatients #MinorityPatients abbott.com Listen to the podcast here

    Empowered Patient Podcast
    Improving Diversity Inclusion in Clinical Trial Recruitment and Participation with Dr. Jennifer Jones-McMeans Abbott Vascular

    Empowered Patient Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 17:08


    Dr. Jennifer Jones-McMeans is a Divisional Vice President of Global Clinical Affairs at Abbott Vascular Business and she sheds light on the FDA guidance to encourage sponsors of clinical trials to include all genders, ethnicities, and under-represented patients to participate. New guidelines are more organized and provide better guidance for what sponsors of clinical trials should consider during their submissions to the FDA. Jennifer explains, "If you think about where clinical trials sit, clinical trials are part of the overall healthcare ecosystem. And if we consider that the healthcare ecosystem is to be inclusive, it is to make sure that there are appropriate treatments for women and different ethnic groups. Also understanding that possibly there could be differences in maybe therapeutic responses, or even considering access too. Clinical trials have to then move forward as the medical ecosystem is moving forward to ensure that there's treatment available for all patients. And so this is where again, this guidance is just a guideline to help support that pathway for clinical trials." "We do know that there are specific populations that, based on their access to health and lack of trust that can occur with the healthcare system, when it comes to clinical trials, they may actually not know and have an awareness of the clinical trial. But they also may not be connected with the appropriate medical system or within a medical system to even have that access. So that's some of the work that we know that the sponsors can do in reaching out." @AbbottCardio #ClinicalTrials #FDAGuidance #UnderservedPatients #UnderrepresentedPatients #MinorityPatients abbott.com Download the transcript here

    Rich Zeoli
    Biden's Blame Game Continues As His Circle Has No Idea How Basic Economics Work

    Rich Zeoli

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 191:51


    6 - News 610 - Pain at the pump continues over the holiday, Biden tweets for gas companies to lower their prices despite the price hikes caused by his policies.  620 - A little tribute to the Billenial on his final week at WPHT. Rich touches on Roe v. Wade heading into the break. 630 - Mayor Kenney is a joke! After 2 officers were shot on the Ben Franklin Parkway, Kenney responds by saying he's looking forward to not being mayor anymore so he can “enjoy things again.”  640 - Woke media stations in Philadelphia continue to blame legal gun owners and that the criminals are not the problem.   645 - Rich then moves to the Roe v. Wade issue and how it compares to gun ownership and our freedoms. 650 - The magic of being down the shore in the summertime 7 - News Rundown w Dawn 710 - John McNesby joins the show to discuss the officers shot last night during the celebrations and how the officers are doing this morning. They also discuss the city's policies and how it's hurting Philadelphia.  720 - We have to forge alliances between kids and cops and Rich details a program that does just that 730 - An hour of non-stop talk. Rich starts with the overturning of Roe v. Wade and how it is the right thing that the states have the power to rule on such issues. Then he moves to COVID vaccinated children and how the vaccines have been largely ineffective.  740 - The FDA has overlooked trials and how the triple vaccinated are more susceptible to variants. 745 - What's on the Cutsheet? 750 -  8 - The Buzz Lightyear movie is a no-go and not because of its wokeness. It is a boring movie and Tim Allen agrees that it has nothing to do with the fictional toy hero. This contrasts with the new Top Gun which is very patriotic and was taylor-made for theaters thanks to Tom Cruise. 810 - Then we move to the new show The Terminal List which is based upon the story of a friend of the show, Jack Carr.  820 - News 825 - People all across the country are moving out of their states because of policies but then turning around and voting for the same people who drove them out in the first place. 830 - Rich discusses how air travel is a nightmare right now due to mandates and poor working conditions forcing out workers and how it affects summer plans for travelers.  840 - Rich reviews stories that have come out over the last year foreshadowing air travel problems.  850 - Joey Chestnut wrestles down a protester on stage and doesn't miss a beat scarfing down hotdogs on the way to his 15th Mustard Belt.  9 - News 910 - Gas Prices continue to rise as Biden goes after them even though they are barely getting by as is selling snacks while getting gouged by policies. 4th of July isn't being celebrated like it should due to civil unrest across the country. 920 - Mystery Movie Clip. We The People now have direct control over an issue like abortion through state voting.  930 - Kenney's complaint really resonates with Philadelphians and we're counting down the days until he gets the boot. What's coming up on The Dawn Show? 940 - What's on the Cutsheet?  950 - Who won Twitter? And Final Thoughts by Rich

    Rich Zeoli
    Power to The People! Roe v. Wade Being Overturned Allows Voters to Control Rights At The State Level

    Rich Zeoli

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 53:26


    7 - News Rundown w Dawn 710 - John McNesby joins the show to discuss the officers shot last night during the celebrations and how the officers are doing this morning. They also discuss the city's policies and how it's hurting Philadelphia.  720 - We have to forge alliances between kids and cops and Rich details a program that does just that 730 - An hour of non-stop talk. Rich starts with the overturning of Roe v. Wade and how it is the right thing that the states have the power to rule on such issues. Then he moves to COVID vaccinated children and how the vaccines have been largely ineffective.  740 - The FDA has overlooked trials and how the triple vaccinated are more susceptible to variants. 745 - What's on the Cutsheet?

    MoneyBall Medicine
    How WHOOP Uses Big Data to Optimize Your Fitness and Health

    MoneyBall Medicine

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 56:23


    Most fitness gadgets, like the Fitbit or the Apple Watch, encourage you to get out there every day and “close your rings” or “do your 10,000 steps.” But there's one activity tracker that's a little different. The WHOOP isn't designed to tell you when to work out—it's designed to tell you when to stop. Harry's guest this week is Emily Capodilupo, the senior vice president of data science and research at Boston-based WHOOP, which is based here in Boston. To explain why the company focuses on measuring what it calls strain, rather than counting steps or calories, she reaches all the way back to the beginning of the company in 2012. That's when founder and CEO Will Ahmed had just finished college at Harvard and was looking back at his experiences on the varsity squash team. Ahmed realized that had often underperformed because he had overtrained, neglecting to give his body time to recover between workouts or between matches. To this day, WHOOP designs the WHOOP band and its accompanying smartphone software around measuring the physical quantities that best predict athletic performance, and giving users feedback that can help them decide how much to push or not push on a given day.Capodilupo calls the WHOOP band “the first wearable that tells you to do less.” But it's really all about designing a safe and effective training program and helping users make smarter decisions. Meanwhile, the WHOOP band collects so many different forms of data that it can also help to detect conditions like atrial fibrillation, or even predict whether you're about to be diagnosed with Covid-19. It's not a medical device, but Capodilupo acknowledges that the line between wellness and diagnostics is shifting all the time.  And with the rise of telemedicine, which is spreading even faster thanks to the pandemic, she predicts that more patients and more doctors will want access to the kinds of health data that the WHOOP band and other trackers collect 24/7. The conversation touched on a very different way of thinking about fitness and health, and on the relationship between big data and quality of life—which is, after all, the main theme of the show.Please rate and review The Harry Glorikian Show on Apple Podcasts! Here's how to do that from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch:1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. 2. Navigate to The Harry Glorikian Show podcast. You can find it by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode.3. Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews."4. Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review."5. Next, select a star rating at the top — you have the option of choosing between one and five stars. 6. Using the text box at the top, write a title for your review. Then, in the lower text box, write your review. Your review can be up to 300 words long.7. Once you've finished, select "Send" or "Save" in the top-right corner. 8. If you've never left a podcast review before, enter a nickname. Your nickname will be displayed next to any reviews you leave from here on out. 9. After selecting a nickname, tap OK. Your review may not be immediately visible.That's it! Thanks so much.TranscriptHarry Glorikian: Hello. I'm Harry Glorikian, and this is The Harry Glorikian Show, where we explore how technology is changing everything we know about healthcare.If you're a gadget lover and data aficionado like me, you've probably tried a lot of different fitness monitors and other wearable devices, like a Fitbit, or an Oura ring, or an Apple Watch.We've talked about a lot of these devices on the show. Usually they come with a smartphone app, or they run their own apps. And the job of the apps is to track your fitness progress and encourage you to get out there every day and “close your rings” or “do your 10,000 steps.”But there's one activity tracker that's a little different. It's the WHOOP band. The WHOOP is not designed to tell you when to work out. It's designed to tell you when to stop.My guest today is Emily Capodilupo. She's the senior vice president of data science and research at WHOOP, which is based here in Boston. And to explain why the company focuses on measuring what it calls strain, rather than counting steps or calories, she reaches all the way back to the beginning of the company in 2012.That's when founder and CEO Will Ahmed had just finished college at Harvard and was looking back at his experiences on the varsity squash team.I'll let Emily tell the whole story, but basically Will realized that had often underperformed because he had overtrained, neglecting to give his body time to recover between workouts or between matches.To this day, WHOOP designs its signature WHOOP band and its accompanying smartphone software around measuring the physical quantities that best predict athletic performance, and giving users feedback that can help them decide how much to push or not push on a given day.Emily calls the WHOOP band “the first wearable that tells you to do less.”But it's really all about designing a safe and effective training program and helping users make smarter decisions.Meanwhile, the WHOOP band collects so many different forms of data that it can also help to detect conditions like atrial fibrillation, or even predict whether you're about to be diagnosed with Covid-19.But it's not a medical device.But Emily acknowledges that the line between wellness and diagnostics is shifting all the time. And with the rise of telemedicine, which is spreading even faster thanks to the pandemic, she predicts that more patients and more doctors will want access to the kinds of health data that the WHOOP band and other trackers collect 24/7. It was a fascinating conversation that touched on a very different way of thinking about fitness and health, and on the relationship between big data and quality of life, which is, after all, the main theme of this show.So I want to play the whole interview for you now.Harry Glorikian: Emily, welcome to the show.Emily Capodilupo: Thanks so much for having me.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I have to tell you, I was reading your background and I'm like, oh, my God, I'm so excited. She comes from like, you know, like real training in sleep. And we're going to talk about these devices. And it's one of the things I use them all for, as you can tell, like I'm I'm sort of geared up and I've got all of them and I and I cross correlate and I can tell when somebody has updated something and the algorithm, like I can see like all of a sudden they start moving apart from each other or being different from each other. But, you know, for those people who aren't, say, up to speed on the world of fitness monitors, I'd love for you to start, you know, by explaining you WHOOP's mission, and then maybe talk about different parts of your system, you know, like the band, the sensors, you know, the basic capabilities, that sort of stuff.Emily Capodilupo: Sure. So WHOOP's mission is to unlock human performance. And in a lot of ways it started out at the beginning. You really focus on athletic performance. Our origin story is very much in preventing overtraining. But as we started to do more and more research, we started to discover that the things that predict athletic performance at the sort of root physiological level are actually the same things that predict all kinds of performance. So we've seen them predict things like cognitive performance. We've seen them predict like emotional intelligence and, you know, like how short you are with people, stuff like that, you know, as well as like how people feel like they're performing at work or in their jobs, in their relationship, stuff like that. So while ...physical performance is, where a lot of those algorithms and sort of like our research started, we started to realize that without tweaking any of the algorithms at all, they started to be really good predictors of other elements of performance as well. So we've really broadened our mission. It's all about unlocking human performance in the broadest sense possible, and we do that with this device. Some of the things that we think are really important about our design as it compares to some of the other wearables, is that as you'll see, it's screenless. And we really think about the device just as this itty bitty little bit that slides out from the fabric.Emily Capodilupo: And so it's actually capable of being worn almost anywhere on your body. So we have clothing that totally hides it. You can wear it in your underwear, on your bra, on a t shirt, anything like that, as well as sort of the traditional wearable locations like on your wrist or bicep. And one of the reasons why we wanted that form factor is we really wanted to collect 24/7 data and be able to get this complete picture of your body. It actually charges wirelessly so you don't even have to take it off to charge it. And that allows us to get the most complete picture of what's going on. And so we don't miss like the 2 hours when you take it off to charge or you don't charge it overnight and then miss the sleep or anything like that. So it gives us this like really incredible picture. Kind of one of the other important differentiators just in the hardware itself is because we're not powering a screen, we're able to put 100% of the battery into driving the sensors and getting the most accurate signal. And so when you start with the most accurate signal, the most accurate raw data, you're then able to power better feedback, better coaching, because you're starting with something more reliable. And so we've done a lot on the coaching side and the algorithms side that other wearables just haven't been able to do.Harry Glorikian: Interesting. So Will Ahmed and John...and I'm going to try to pronounce it. Emily Capodilupo: Capodilupo.Harry Glorikian: Thank you. Started WHOOP in 2012, right? While John was at Harvard and Will had just graduated. Right. So, you know, I mean, maybe a little bit about the company's origin story or. I don't. God, that was you know, if I go back that far, the fitness monitoring market was like in its nascency.Emily Capodilupo: Yeah it was, the Jawbone Up had just come out, the original Fitbits had just come out. And not too long after that the Nike FuelBand started, which no longer exists, of course. And, you know, if you look at what wearables were doing at the time. Oh, and then, of course, there was this other class of wearables that had been around for a little bit, which were like the Garmin running watches. So it kind of GPS watches that you put on for the run or for a bike ride or whatever it is. It would capture all the GPS data, give you information about your pace, and then you take it off when the run was over. And so you kind of had those like two classes of wearables. We had these like 24-ish/7 step counters, and then you had the like more intense while you were working out data, but nobody was really bridging those things. But the sort of theme across all wearables, both of those different categories at the time, was this like push harder, more is more, faster is better, just do it, right. All of those kinds of messaging. And we weren't really seeing, at least with the like kind of step counter class of wearables, we weren't seeing any kind of adoption in like elite athletes or even like collegiate athletes because they didn't really need to be told do more.Emily Capodilupo: And actually what happened is, sort of the WHOOP origin story is, Will was captain of the Harvard squash team. And when he got named captain, he sort of committed that “I'm the captain. I should work harder than everybody else. That's what a leader does.” And he worked so, so hard that he overtrained, really burnt himself out and like did really poorly. And he had this moment of like, you know, I'm in a Division I school and I'm like the fanciest, you know, squash programs that there is. How come nobody knew I was overtraining and like, told me to stop. And like, who knew that this was a thing? Like, I always thought that if I worked harder, I'd get better. And actually, you can work too hard and working too hard is bad. And he found that like everybody on his team was really motivated to work hard and sort of motivating each other to work harder. And they didn't have that balancing voice of like, Oh, I should take a rest day and like sit out, even though like my teammates are practicing. That would have felt like very uncomfortable and like not being a team player or something like that. But he started digging into the data and it really did show that like actually when you need a rest day, you will be stronger for having taken the rest day, than you will be for like manning up and pushing through.Emily Capodilupo: And so he really set out to create the first wearable that was going to tell you to do less. It was very countercultural in that moment. But he was trying to address kind of the highly motivated market that needed almost like permission to pull back and to be told what their limits were. And so from day one, we were really focused on like, how can we create a recovery score that's going to tell you, like, you're better off resting today than you are like doing this program or that, like, a coach could use and see the data and say, okay, these four players, they're going to do an extra set or an extra drill or whatever it is. And these four players, they're actually going to stop 20 minutes early and, you know, go sit in the sauna or stretch or whatever it is. And by modulating people's training in response to their bodies, readiness to respond to that training, actually create like safer and more effective training programs. And that was where we started and then kind of evolved into the product we are right now. But a lot of that is very, very much, that philosophy is still kind of at the core of what we're doing.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I definitely have questions. We definitely have to talk about the recovery score and sleep apnea, because I have a vested interest in understanding this better. Actually, it's funny, I try to talk about this with my doctor and he's like, “Man, you know more than I do about this.” But so, you know, thinking about how the company is evolving. It's been moving forward. I've been watching it. I mean, what is the company's sort of larger philosophy about like the role of technology in fitness and health. I mean, do you feel like we're headed towards a future where everybody is going to rely on their mobile and wearable devices for health advice?Emily Capodilupo: I think so. And I think that, you know, there's a big asterisk to that answer, which is I don't think that wearables are ever going to replace doctors, and I don't think that we're trying to do that either. But we do have a lot of information that doctors don't have. And there's a really, I think, exciting opportunity if the medical community were more open to it. And they're definitely shifting in that direction. And that's been accelerated by the pandemic and the rise of telemedicine, where there really is an opportunity. I mean, if you think about it, just like the really simple basic stuff like telemedicine appointments skyrocketed during the pandemic.Harry Glorikian: Right.Emily Capodilupo: Every other in-person doctor's appointment I've ever been to, the first thing they do is they take your vital signs right, often before you even get to see the doctor. They've taken your vital signs, or if you've a telemedicine appointment, they just totally skip it, right? And so it's like, well, you know, my wearable can tell you what my resting heart rate is, could tell you not just what it was this morning, but what it's been all month and all that kind of stuff. It also can tell you what my blood oxygen level is, my temperature. And that's a lot of information that's like, you know, is a lot better than having nothing. Which is what telemedicine has right now. And so it's not like let's throw out all the EKG machines and all of that.Emily Capodilupo: But, you know, there are a lot of situations where remote monitoring can add a lot of value. And then there's other places where even if the doctor was there to take your vital signs, sometimes vital signs in context have a lot more information than an isolated reading. So like we published a paper about a little over a year ago now where we were looking at respiratory rate in response to COVID-19 infections. And what we found was about three days before or up to three days before reported symptom onset, people's respiratory rates were starting to climb. And we would see this like because daily your respiratory rate when you're healthy, it doesn't change at all from night to night, it's super flat. And so it will be like the exact same thing night after night. And then all of a sudden you'd see this spike like two, three days before COVID-19 symptom onset. It would stay up or keep climbing. And then three days later, people would say, like, Oh, I don't feel well, whatever. They go get a COVID test, and lo and behold, it would be positive. And so it was this like interesting early warning sign. But what was really, really interesting about that study is that oftentimes people's respiratory rates were only going up like one or two breaths, which didn't make them like clinically like high respiratory rates, like clinically significant.Emily Capodilupo: It was only significant in how it was compared to your baseline. And so that's a case where like if I had gone to my doctor and they measured my respiratory rate, they would have said, this is a normal human respiratory rate, you know, between 12 and 20 breaths per minute, which is sort of normal. But like my baseline is about 14. So if it went up to 18, that's a huge, huge rise for me, but it's still technically clinically normal, so they would have completely missed that. But by having a wearable that's like passively monitoring my respiratory rate every single night, you could see like something's going on, and that can be a huge red flag that something's going on with your respiratory system. Right. And of course, COVID-19 is a lower respiratory tract infection primarily. So it's going to show up there. But we would expect to see similar things with somebody who had pneumonia or certain strains of the flu. And so these kind of like early warning signs that can show up in your vital signs before symptoms. You're not going to have a fever yet. You're not going to be complaining about not feeling well or have any other indication that you might have COVID. And so I think that's like an example of where a wearable paired with a doctor can provide information that like a doctor in their office wouldn't be able to provide alone.Harry Glorikian: Well, I mean, I think, you know, if you took respiratory rate plus a slow change in temperature, right now you have two biomarkers that you can use to show something is physiologically off.Emily Capodilupo: Yeah. What we were seeing was that respiratory rate was climbing before temperature was climbing, which was interesting.Harry Glorikian: Interesting. Okay. You know, another story. It's funny because I was talking to a friend of mine and he has A-fib [atrial fibrillation] and he knew he was going into A-fib and then he got together with his doctor and his doctor was actually digging into the data from the WHOOP to sort of see like when he was going into A-fib and sort of, you know, using the technology, because he wasn't wearing a Holter monitor or anything like that. This, this sort of acted as a way for him to peer into when it started, how long it lasted and things like that. So I think when a doctor wants to, it's interesting because some of these wearables like yours have that data available for them to, you know, interrogate.Emily Capodilupo: Mm hmm. Yeah. And I think A-fib is such an interesting example there because, like, people who have paroxysmal A-fib can go into A-fib for just, like a couple of minutes a month. And so your typical like seven-day or 48-hour Holter monitor reading could easily miss it. But A-fib puts you at risk of all kinds of things like stroke that you might want to be treating, and so like having 24/7 data collection over months and months and months can give you a better picture versus I don't really know too many people who are going to be willing to like or Holter monitor for a year.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. So I mean, I'm going back to your 24/7 and the wearable and the fact that you're driving all the power to the sensors, I mean, you guys collect, I think I saw the number, 50 to 100 megabytes of data per day, per user, which is a gigantic amount of data compared to maybe like a Fitbit or an Apple Watch. I mean. Why collect that much data? I mean, what do you do with it? I mean...Emily Capodilupo: Yeah, great question. You know, we keep all of the data because it has tremendous research value in addition to being able to power the features that we're providing today. You know, there's all kinds of fascinating early research, you know, different things like the shape that your pulse makes. So if you look at not just how fast your heart is beating, but literally, you know what that raw, we called PPG, photoplethysmography signal, looks like, you can actually tell a lot about the health of a cardiovascular system. And we published a paper a couple of years ago now where we're looking at age as a function of this like cardiovascular pulse shape. And we haven't productized that research yet, but stuff that we're exploring down the road and there's just there's so much, so much you can answer with large data sets that traditional academic research just hasn't been able to answer because they haven't had access to data like this. And so by keeping it all around, we're able to do a lot of research and move the field forward as well as create really, really feature rich experiences for our members.Harry Glorikian: Can I suggest, you know, custom consulting for guys like me who actually would love to dig into the data as as a service that that people would be willing to pay for. But correct me if I'm wrong -- the WHOOP doesn't really detect when I'm exercising. Right. I've got to tell it, no, I'm exercising.Emily Capodilupo: We detect when you're working out.Harry Glorikian: Because it seems like it's more accurate when I push the button first and it starts rather than wait for it to like if I'm about to start a weightlifting session, it's more accurate when I push the button, then when I wait for it to tell I'm doing something.Emily Capodilupo: Yeah. Well, with certain activities it's hard to get the exact start times right. And different people have different attitudes about things like warm ups and downs and if they should be included. So if you do have a strong preference about whether or not you want those included, we do give people the opportunity to manually trim the bounds of their workouts or to just start and stop them manually. But we do detect any activity with a strain above an eight that lasts at least 15 minutes will get automatically detected.Harry Glorikian: Okay. And by the way, I love the fact that you guys integrated with the Apple Watch because, like, because when I go on my treadmill, it automatically connects to the watch and then tracks the whole thing and then ports the info. That's great. That is fantastic. As a as an opportunity. But, you know, how do you think about WHOOP versus any of the competitive technologies? And I'll tell you why I say that when people say, well, what do you see is the difference? I'm like, you know, the Apple Watch is more of what what I think of as a data aggregation device in a sense, because it's sort of taking all sorts of stuff. You know, the WHOOP I think of almost like a coach in a sense, as opposed to it's pulling in data and pushing it out to different apps and I can do different things with it. So I don't want to misrepresent how you might frame it, but that's sort of how I think about it.Emily Capodilupo: No, I think that's totally spot on. I think that we have a very strong stance around not showing or generating data that we can't tell you what to do with it. And so we really want to be like your coach or your trainer or at a minimum like your workout buddy kind of thing, where it's somebody that or something you can kind of look to, to understand, you know, am I reaching my goals? What are the things that are helping and hurting me and sort of how do I then make changes to go forward? I think one of the biggest examples here is, we've been very much like countercultural in not counting steps and we've been asked a lot by our members, like, why don't you count steps? It's not actually that hard. It's not because we can't figure out how to do it. It's that we actually don't think that they're valuable. Steps count the same if you run them or walk them. If you walk them upstairs or flat. You don't get any steps if you swim for a mile and you certainly don't get any steps if you're wheelchair bound. And we didn't like any of those constraints, they didn't really make sense to us as a metric. And we also really didn't like this kind of arbitrary, like everybody needs 10,000 steps. Well, is that true if I'm 90 versus 19, is that true f I ran a marathon yesterday, should I still be trying to get 10,000 steps today? Is it different if I've been sitting on the couch for three days? And so we came up with this metric of strain where instead of being an external metric, like steps are sort of something that you did and you can count them and it's objective, we wanted an internal metric where it's like, How did your body respond to that thing that you did and how much flow did you take as a function of what you're capable of? And so sort of what strain does, it's very much like in opposition to what steps does, is they're internally normalized to reflect like if I ran versus walk to those steps, if I ran versus my brother ran and he's more fit than I am, or if I do a two mile run this weekend and then I train a whole bunch and get more fit and then do the same two mile run six months from now, I should actually get a lower strain when I do it, when I'm more fit than I did when I got did it this weekend. Like all of a sudden, strain becomes this very rich thing because it has this, like, natural comparison where like a higher strain actually mean something objectively, both within and across people, than a lower strain does. Whereas that that's not really true with steps. Right? I could walk fewer steps than you, but have done them up a mountain. And so I've actually put a lot more strain on my body than if I'd done the same number as you, but like flat pacing around my kitchen, eating snacks and making dinner or something like that.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, well, actually there was an interesting paper that it was a sort of a study that brought in all sorts of studies to show that, you know, at an older age, you actually, you know, you need less steps, and it has a difference in mortality. And, you know, if you're younger, then you want a higher level of steps. And, you know, so it was a good paper. I'll actually I'll send you the reference later. But you know, the interesting thing about strain is and this is the good part about the body and the bad part about the body, in a sense, is that it optimizes itself. Right. And so if you want to get the same strain goal and if you're fit, you really have to…I mean, at some point, I'm like I look at if I had an incredible night, which is rare and it's really in the green, I'm like, I'm never going to hit that. Like, I'm going to have to run ten miles to hit that, that goal. So, I mean, I try to like get out and lift that day and maybe get a run in, then get a walk in. And I'm still you know, when you can't hit that high mark, if you're actually in shape. When you're not in shape, sort of, you can get there a little bit easier because your body is has optimized itself in a sense. Which is great, I guess. But when you're when you're holding yourself up to that number, you're like, Oh, my God, I'm never going to hit that number.Emily Capodilupo: Yeah. I mean, it's super interesting how the human body works, right? There's almost like this weird kindness in how we work where it's like easier and more fun to make progress when you're brand new and starting out and it's harder to make progress the better you are.Harry Glorikian: I mean, it's an efficient machine. It has to optimize itself. Right. So, again, you were saying no display, no interface. All the information happens on the associated device, the phone. I mean, you mentioned some of the pros and cons, but are there any other that I haven't asked or I know that at some point it pings me and says like. You need to connect because it's been some time between connections. So is there an offloading time frame that it needs to...Emily Capodilupo: No, it can store up to three days of data on the device itself.Harry Glorikian: Oh, interesting. Okay.Emily Capodilupo: Yeah. So if you like went camping for the weekend or something and didn't have internet, we would just store the data locally and then transmit it all when you got back. But it tries to transmit the data more or less consistently, constantly throughout the day. What it's pinging you about is not that you're in any way in danger of losing the data, but just that you're behind. And so you might be missing any kind of analysis or getting credit for your strains. We want to make sure you're up to date so that if you want to look at your data from the day, you would have access to it.Harry Glorikian: Here's a question. Would it ever make sense to make a WHOOP app for the Apple Watch? Or is the device sort of inextricably linked to the app?Emily Capodilupo: Yeah. I mean, there's a lot of good reasons to think about something like that, right? You can make it a lot more affordable if you didn't tie it to hardware. Right now, we believe that we have the best hardware on the market, but there's sort of valid pushback that some people are willing to settle for something less than best in order to only wear one thing. And they want to wear their Apple Watch because they like the phone call notifications and the texting and email and all that kind of stuff. There's a lot of great features that Apple has that we don't. I'm certainly not trying to hate on the competitors at all. But I think like the way we kind of think about what we've done is like if Apple Watch does a lot of little things, you know, at like a relatively shallow depth, so it's like a lot of coverage, we do a small subset of those things, but we do them very, very, very well. And so by not doing things like putting on a screen and letting you text and all of those things, we're able to have all of the power of the device drive towards getting the most accurate signal data. And so we are sampling the heart rate more frequently than Apple is, and the device is more purpose built around optimizing both internally and externally for the sensors. So there's even little things like electrical coupling on the circuit board. When you try and shove too much functionality into something small, they kind of like run into each other. And, you know, so we're not trying to make room for a GPS chip or make room for a screen or like all of those things. And so it lets us lay out the hardware very specifically for this purpose. And so we believe that in data to support that, we're getting more and more accurate like metric data.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's pause the conversation for a minute to talk about one small but important thing you can do, to help keep the podcast going. And that's leave a rating and a review for the show on Apple Podcasts.All you have to do is open the Apple Podcasts app on your smartphone, search for The Harry Glorikian Show, and scroll down to the Ratings & Reviews section. Tap the stars to rate the show, and then tap the link that says Write a Review to leave your comments. It'll only take a minute, but you'll be doing a lot to help other listeners discover the show.And one more thing. If you like the interviews we do here on the show I know you'll like my new book, The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer.It's a friendly and accessible tour of all the ways today's information technologies are helping us diagnose diseases faster, treat them more precisely, and create personalized diet and exercise programs to prevent them in the first place.The book is now available in print and ebook formats. Just go to Amazon or Barnes & Noble and search for The Future You by Harry Glorikian.And now, back to the show.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: So switching to sort of business model, because you sort of touched on that, is like it's a subscription model. You don't buy the device. If I'm not mistaken. The service starts at say 30 bucks a month and the package actually includes the WHOOP band. They'll just ship it to you like I'm wearing mine. Right. And so what was the rationale behind subscription versus just selling the device. If you have insight into, how did they pick 30 bucks? You know, I just wonder, like, you know, did they, is that something you guys felt reaches the broadest market sort of thing?Emily Capodilupo: Yeah, pretty much. So when we actually first launched, it was sold more like a traditional hardware product. So it was $500, one time fee, sort of use it as long as you want. And then we switched over to the subscription model in 2018. A nd we chose the price of $30. It was sort of designed to make the product accessible and lower the barrier of entry. $500 up front is a lot of money, especially for younger athletes. We want to make sure that people in college could afford it and stuff like that. And so we found just by market testing, that $30 was an approachable price point. And so after a couple of different market tests, that was what we landed with and more or less where we've been. We occasionally discount it and different things like that, and you can get a lower rate if you commit to more months upfront.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I think I signed up for the maximum, which then brought it down to I think it was $18. Yeah. So here's a, you know, because this show is, you know, supposed to focus on AI and health care and things like that, I'm just sort of imagining in the back of my mind with that much data, you really have the opportunity to build some really cool analytics on top of it. You know, what role, if any, like does machine learning or other forms of AI play in you know how you analyze the data and then how do you, do you actually use that to personalize it back to the individual using it.Emily Capodilupo: Yeah, I mean, that's pretty much all my team is doing is machine learning. No, it plays a huge role in what we're doing, from like very traditional ML approaches, so like if you think about how we're doing our sleep staging, we have polysomnography is like the gold standard for getting sleep truth data. So that's like the stages when we know we're in REM sleep or slow-wave sleep. So we sent thousands and thousands of people into a clinical sleep lab with two straps on and they underwent a clinical sleep study. And then we took all of the data from the sleep study, lined it up with the WHOOP data, and then used all kinds of different traditional ML approaches in order to figure out how to get from a strap the same sleep staging information that we're able to get from this gold standard approach. Obviously the sort of gold standard sleep study uses a lot of sensors that we don't have right things. EEGs, which you need to be on someone's head to use. You can't get EEG from the wrist. EOGs, which you have to measure eye movement. So you need a little sensor there. And then we were able to find good proxies from the data that we can get at the wrist for all of those different signals and reconstruct the same sleep stage information.Emily Capodilupo: So that's a super fun ML problem. We also do things like when we detect a workout, we can figure out what, which sport or exercise modality you're using. And so the ability to classify those workouts is kind of again like a traditional ML like time series classification problem where you can tell the difference just from the heart rate and accelerometer signals. Are you doing basketball or CrossFit or running or anything like that? And then so those are kind of more traditional ML approaches. And then we've also done a lot around trying to understand behavioral impacts and how your body responds to different things. And then we're doing things like much, much more personalized. So we have a feature called The Journal where every day you fill out this little diary and you answer a bunch of questions about what you've done in the last 24 hours and can self report things like when you were eating, if you did different like kind of wellness activities like, meditate, journal. You know.Harry Glorikian: How much alcohol you had. I always wonder, like how honestly somebody answers that question.Emily Capodilupo: Any of those kinds of things. And then we look at the sort of signals in your data and try and separate out which of the things are helping you, which are hurting you, so that we can then recommend the things that are good for you, and for the things that are less good for you, maybe help you quantify the cost of those things that you can deploy them strategically. We certainly don't expect everybody to become like a teetotaller and never drink again, even though we're going to tell you it's bad for you, because it's pretty much always what shows up in the data. But we do want to help people make those informed decisions because a lot of people think like, Oh, I can have two drinks and it won't affect me tomorrow. And like, okay, here's the effect. And if tomorrow's not that important, go for it. And you have that really important meeting tomorrow, maybe don't. Y rou know, we're not trying to kill all the fun by any means, but we do want to make sure that people are empowered by data to know understand what they're doing to their body and then make decisions accordingly.Harry Glorikian: So I'm throwing in sort of like something important to me, right? Which is, you know, I have sleep apnea. Right. And it's funny because my wife diagnosed me, but then, you know, all the devices at some point, my Apple Watch actually asked me once, you know, have you ever been diagnosed with sleep apnea, which was interesting. But I've noticed like, the recovery number, if don't wear my CPAP, my recovery number tends to be much higher than if I do wear my CPAP. And I always wonder, does the positive air pressure cause a difference in how much your heart actually rests or not? Because it is pushing, it is positive air pressure on you all the time. So even in between apneas, you don't really maybe not rest as much. And I'm wondering if you have any insight on that.Emily Capodilupo: Yeah, we, we haven't specifically dug into why, but we have seen that as an unexpected pattern. You're not the only person to report that. It's on the to do list to better understand what's going on there. I think your theory is a valid one. We haven't verified or ruled it out yet, but I think there's a lot to be learned there. And I think one of the things that's exciting about the data that we're collecting is that if you wear a CPAP is one of the things you can report in our journals. We do have a tremendous amount of data on that and therefore the ability to kind of tease that apart and get insights that haven't been made available yet by traditional academic research.Harry Glorikian: Oh, I didn't know I could add CPAP in there. I have to go back and and check. But yeah, because my strain score ends up, my recovery score ends up lower. So it's like, you know, then of course, I always exceed on the strain side because I'm going to go work out the next day. And you know, it is what it is. But the other thing that you guys offer is like WHOOP for teams. And I don't know if you mean sports teams. You mean organizations. I'm not 100% sure because obviously I don't use that. I'm using it as an individual. Can you explain the additional value that provides when a group of people are using it together?Emily Capodilupo: Yeah. So all the above, we do it corporate teams as well as athletic teams, and there's a couple of different layers of the added value. So sometimes it's just accountability. I'm on a team with my family and it's just kind of fun, make fun of each other when our recovery scores are poor and, you know, cheer each other on when we have particularly good strain scores. And, you know, there's a lot of data to support that when you have a workout buddy or an accountability buddy or anything like that, that you tend to stick with things longer. And so creating just like a really friendly way for people to compete and cheer for each other just helps with the accountability and motivation keeping people on track. And deeper and more importantly, we do have a lot of people who create teams around different kinds of research initiatives or trying to understand a certain life stage. Like we create teams for people based on the month that their babies are due. So pregnant women can join a team of all the women on WHOOP who are expecting a baby in June 2022 can join this team together and pregnancy is this like very foreign weird moment in your body where everything's changing all the time and it just creates, like, a way for people to connect and be, like, this weird thing that's happening to me, is it normal? Like, who else is sleeping funny? And I think it's just very comforting to know that, like, all these weird things happening to your body aren't so weird. And then with like the sports teams and different things like that, what we're seeing is that the coaches are using the information to make better training or like decisions because now they actually have information that they didn't have access to before.Emily Capodilupo: So we've done a lot of work with different like collegiate programs and professional programs where they do things like if you're red, they will have you do a lighter version of the practice or skip a section of the practice in order to give your body a chance to recover. And if you're green, they might have you push a little bit harder. And so by modulating the training to where your body is today, we've actually shown in a project we completed a little over two years ago that you can reduce injury without reducing performance gains over the course of like an eight week training period. And so by reducing your training, when you're red, so your recovery score is below 33%, you actually like you will reduce injury without reducing performance gains. We've shown this. And so there's like literally zero value for those coaches to like push the athletes to complete the program or the day's rtraining. And so we've seen a lot of coaches make those different training plans as well as game day decisions about who should start. You know, somebody might be your best player ordinarily, but if they're red, they're not all that primed on game day to perform. And so being able to make those kinds of different decisions. And then on the corporate side, people have used it in order to triage different access to supportive resources. So we've seen people offer like breaks to people who have been red for a number of different days in a row or things like that suggest that somebody might be burning out or overwhelmed or something like that.Harry Glorikian: Okay, so. Everywhere it states that it is not a medical device, is not intended to diagnose, monitor any disease or medical condition. Right. What's the line in your mind between, say, a fitness monitor and a medical device, because I think I always think that line is getting….because you guys and others like you guys have so much data, the level of insight that I've seen when I've gone into some of these is crazy. So. What what is that line in your mind?Emily Capodilupo: Yeah. I mean, I think that there's you know, it's always been the case that technology moves faster than the law. And so, like, you know, I think a lot of these things are going to shift as the technology is going to force them to shift. But, you know, like you said, we have a lot of data that's quite similar. The official line is what the FDA says is the line. And the FDA has carved out this like space that they've you know, they've called this wellness devices. They've sort of reserved the right to change their mind at any time, and we very much expect them to. But WHOOP falls into their definition of what a wellness device is, not a medical device, which is why we can say things like, this is your heart rate, but we can't say, because then you would cross into a medical device, like “Your heart rate is healthy, your heart rate is unhealthy,” right? You can't give those kinds of any kind of diagnoses or any kind of, like, you will prevent a heart attack if you do these things or something like that. So we have to keep the recommendations a bit more general, a little bit more vague in order to not cross over into that regulated health space. One of the things that we're seeing that's interesting, is that there's been a movement in wearables to get these like SAMD clearances, Software as a Medical Device, where pieces of wearables need different features or different algorithms do end up going through an FDA process and getting clearance to make certain claims in different settings.Emily Capodilupo: And I think that that's going to really accelerate over the next couple of years. These are very long processes, and then the lines are going to get more and more blurry because you're going to have this like hybrid consumer medical device, which is something that until a couple of years ago we really didn't have. There was like step counters and GPS watches and they were over here and then there was like medical stuff that didn't look cool and wasn't comfortable or easy to use and was very, very expensive. And it was all over here. And now we're seeing them kind of come into the middle where more and more the medical stuff cares about being like all the human factors like that's comfortable to use and that people want to wear it and they can get good compliance. And the wellness devices are finding more and more applications for their data in the health care space. So I think a lot of it's going to come down to what doctors end up getting trained on. If they're willing to look at this data, if they have any clue how to use it, sort of by being in the medical world and science training their whole lives, a lot of them just don't have the education and training to understand big data and to understand technology in that way. So they're not being trained on how to make use of the data or how to apply it. And I think that that's something that might change in the next couple of decades.Harry Glorikian: Well, it's interesting, right, because I always tell people I'm like, this is a medical device. Like I you know, I mean, you know, you may think it's not, but it really has certain capabilities that allow it to get FDA clearance in a particular area. Right. And they're picking their space one by one. But the amount of data that you guys pick up on all of these devices, I mean, you know, we've seen atrial fibrillation. I'm sure that tachycardia shows up on there. You know, there's different things that they, because it's 24/7, it's looking, right and it's monitoring and it's got multiple sensors which you can now cross-correlate. There's so much insight that comes from this that I would almost like love to encourage the companies to think about moving down this road because I think it would be so helpful to patients. But, you know, jumping to a different thing. So. How do you guys define success for WHOOP? If you hit all your product and sales goals and for the next, say, 2 to 5 years, what does success look like for the organization?Emily Capodilupo: Yeah. I mean, I'll let the finance team worry about the sales goals and things, but I mean, for me in my team, like what success really comes down to is like, can we help people make actually better decisions? I think like a lot of the first generation of wearables, like it was this stream of fun facts. And we're all obsessed with ourselves, right? Like humans are sort of naturally narcissists, at least to a certain extent. And so it's like fun to be like, ooh, I slept for 7 hours or like, ooh, I ran a mile. But it's like kind of you maybe already knew that, right? And I think, like, what we're trying to do and like where we see a lot of success is, can we tell you something that you don't know? And can we convince you that you should do something about it? And then can we make you, like, realize, like, oh, wow, this, like, incredible thing happened and I feel so much better. And the features that we get the most excited about are like the sort of user stories are not, like, “Wow, it's so much fun to see my sleep data” or like, “This was fun.” But like when we released our paper showing that this respiratory rate spike sort of predicted or often preceded COVID symptom onset and therefore COVID infection, the paper came out like right before Thanksgiving and we saw so many people tell us that like because they had a respiratory rate spike, they didn't go home for Thanksgiving or they didn't travel and then like they tested positive a few days later and they were like, my grandma was at Thanksgiving or like my uncle who's in his eighties or stuff like that.Emily Capodilupo: And you know, those kind of moments where it's like, we educated you, we showed you this vital sign that like, you never would have felt anything. You didn't know you were sick, you weren't feeling bad. It's not like you went to go get a test because you weren't feeling good, like you just saw this in your WHOOP data and you're like, You know what? I'm going to stay home and not risk like seeing grandma because WHOOP said so, right? And then like, who knows how many COVID infections didn't happen and like what kind of role we played there. And like, it was probably like the most meaningful thing we did that year. And we did a lot of other cool stuff, but to think that by helping people notice that pattern, potentially they saved a relative's life and all the like crappy things that would happen if you thought you were responsible for killing your grandma and how much that ruins your own life as well? I think like we just get really excited about that. And one of the features that we released is last year was we were looking at how your reproductive hormones is part of your menstrual cycle affect your ability to respond to training. And I was an athlete my whole life. I was a gymnast, like before I could walk, and like nobody asked me a single time when my last period was or anything like that. That was just totally not part of like the coach-athlete relationship. But we know that like your ability to put on muscle and your ability to recover from training is totally different during the follicular phase, the first half of your menstrual cycle, than it is during the luteal phase, which is the second half. And if we modulate your training so that you're training more during the first half of the cycle than the second half, you can way more efficiently build muscle and strength, have fewer injuries, make more efficient gains. And if we now we do coach, in our product, women to do this, and we've gotten this incredible feedback of like people saying they feel so much better and like they're, well, you know, their training is going more smoothly and they feel like their body so much less random, it feels more predictable and they kind of understand what's going on. Nobody ever told them that reproductive hormones were relevant beyond their role in reproduction, but they actually affect everything we do. Like when progesterone is elevated in the back half of our menstrual cycle during the luteal phase, we sweat more and we lose a lot of salt by doing that. And so we need to eat more salty foods and we need to be more careful about hydrating, which is really important if you're an athlete, but nobody's telling us this. And so like we can connect these by looking at big data because we are tracking your menstrual cycle around the clock or around the month.Emily Capodilupo: We can put that into the product and then we see people are making better training decisions, understanding their body, feeling like things are less random. Right. And that's so empowering. And I think like female athletes in particular have been so underrepresented in research. There's a paper that came out eight months ago that said that just 6% of athletic performance research focused on women, 6%. And it was looking at all research between 2014 and 2020. And it was trending down, not up. So it was worse in like 2018, '19 and '20 than it had been like earlier in the twenty-teens. And so it's like completely neglected. And there is all this data that like wearables and WHOOP are sitting on and we're able to create features around that and just help people understand their bodies in a way that nobody else is doing right now. And so those are the features that, like I really define as like big successes. If we made our sleep staging accuracy 1% more accurate or we caught one more workout, like those are obviously like from a pure data science perspective, they can feel like wins. But what we really care about is like, am I helping you, cheesily going back to our mission, am I helping you unlock your performance in some way by helping you understand your body and making a better decision? Like, are you better off for having been on WHOOP? That's what, internally, those are the KPIs that we track the most closely.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. And I mean I would encourage you as well as all the other companies to, you know, peer reviewed papers, get them out there. Right. I mean, just when I search the space or peer reviewed journals for things utilizing the technologies, I mean, there's not a whole lot out there. And then the other thing is, is sometimes I read the devices they're using, I'm like, whoa, what is that? I've never heard of that device. And if I haven't heard about it, it must be on the fringe sort of thing. So I would highly encourage it because, you know, people like me would love to be looking at that sort of data. Because I'm constantly investing in the space, constantly working with the different technologies, you know, constantly talking to people through the podcast or writing a book, you know. So that information is incredibly useful to someone like me as, as, as well as the average person. So if you could send a message back through time to yourself in 2013 when you joined the company, you know. What would you say? What have you learned about the wearables and fitness market that you know you wish you knew then?Emily Capodilupo: Oh, what a fun question. You know, I think, like. It's hard to know what I wish I knew earlier because like in so many ways and I feel so lucky that this is true, like the vision that Will pitched me on when I met him, like when he was like, “Come join WHOOP, this is why it's super cool,” is exactly what we're doing. And so, like, I did trust him. I guess my message in a lot of ways would be trust him that like this is for real. I think the space has been so exciting and just there's so much opportunity. I came from doing academic sleep research and I would work on these papers where we had like 14 subjects and it was like, “Oh, that's a, that's a good size sleep study. Like that'll get into a good journal.” And everyone was like excited. And then it's like, you know, I just, I'm working on a paper right now and we have 300,000 people's data in it. We're looking at like a year of data at a time. So we've got just like millions and millions of sleeps and workouts in this data set that we're combing through. When we did this project, which was published in the British Medical Journal last year, where we were looking at the menstrual cycle phases and how they affected your training, we looked at 14,000 menstrual cycles, like just the orders of magnitude more data than what you can do in traditional academic research. And that's what I got really excited about. It's why I became a data scientist because I realized that like the most interesting questions that there are to answer about how humans work are going to require larger datasets than we've had access to before.Harry Glorikian: So I'm putting in a plug for sleep apnea, man, if you get a chance, I'd love to see a study on that one.Emily Capodilupo: No, sleep apnea, it's definitely on the list. About 80% of sleep apnea is believed to be undiagnosed. And it does have tremendous effects on long term health when it goes undiagnosed, especially in later stages. And so anything we can do around helping people realize that they might have sleep apnea and then helping them treat it once they do and better understand the disease progression. And all of that has a huge quality of life implications down the road.Harry Glorikian: I will happily volunteer. So great to speak to you. Very insightful discussion. I'm going to tell my wife about the whole menstrual cycle thing and working out and this is exactly why she eats salty food like at certain times. But this is great. I'm so glad to have you on the show and I look forward to seeing the progress of the company and the technology.Emily Capodilupo: Awesome. Well, thank you so much for having me. This is such a fun conversation.Harry Glorikian: Thank you.Harry Glorikian: That's it for this week's episode. You can find a full transcript of this episode as well as the full archive of episodes of The Harry Glorikian Show and MoneyBall Medicine at our website. Just go to glorikian.com and click on the tab Podcasts.I'd like to thank our listeners for boosting The Harry Glorikian Show into the top three percent of global podcasts.If you want to be sure to get every new episode of the show automatically, be sure to open Apple Podcasts or your favorite podcast player and hit follow or subscribe. Don't forget to leave us a rating and review on Apple Podcasts. And we always love to hear from listeners on Twitter, where you can find me at hglorikian.Thanks for listening, stay healthy, and be sure to tune in two weeks from now for our next interview. 

    Healthcare Unfiltered
    Pharmacovigilance and Adherence to Oral Oncolytics

    Healthcare Unfiltered

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 55:13


    Joining Chadi on today's show is Donald Harvey, PharmD, BCOP, FCCP, FHOPA, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University. Dr. Harvey shares available career paths and how the pharmacist role has evolved over the years, how pharmacists continue to stay involved with patients after discharge, strategies he uses to help cancer patients adhere to oral oncolytics, and his “Call to Action” to improve such adherence – as co-planned by the FDA and ASCO and published in Journal of Clinical Oncology. The discussion is very detailed and enlightening; you won't want to miss it! View Dr. Harvey's publication “Call to Action for Improving Oral Anticancer Agent Adherence.” https://ascopubs.org/doi/10.1200/JCO.21.02529 Check out Chadi's website for all Healthcare Unfiltered episodes and other content. www.chadinabhan.com/ Watch all Healthcare Unfiltered episodes on Youtube. www.youtube.com/channel/UCjiJPTpIJdIiukcq0UaMFsA

    The Highwire with Del Bigtree
    US CONGRESSMAN SLAMS FDA'S ‘DYSTOPIAN EXPERIMENT

    The Highwire with Del Bigtree

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 44:48


    Congressman Louie Gohmert discusses his recent comments at the FDA's VRBPAC meeting demanding answers about the safety of Covid vaccines as well as legislation he's working on to put liability back on vaccine manufacturers.#RepLouieGohmert #VRBPAC #VaccineLiability #VICP #NoLiability

    Because Jitsu Podcast
    Big Pharma Vs. Babies

    Because Jitsu Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 126:02


    With the final age cohort (6 month old to 5 years old) finally getting FDA approval to join the rest of the American vaccinated population, what do we actually know about these shots in infants? Well, as it turns out, a LOT... It's damning, and it's coming from pharma's own studies! How did the FDA, who's supposed to shield the public from dangerous drugs, allow this to happen!? Well, as you'll see, they didn't just allow it... they aided in it.

    Jerm Warfare: The Battle Of Ideas
    Mike Donio on the corrupt pharmaceutical industry

    Jerm Warfare: The Battle Of Ideas

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 63:18


    Mike Donio is a pharmaceutical scientist who left the industry after pulling back the curtain on corruption, lies, and medical fraud. Mike Donio holds a bachelor's degree in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology with a Minor in Chemistry from the University of Massachusetts and a master's degree in Biotechnology with a concentration in Biotechnology Enterprise from Johns Hopkins. He is an accomplished scientist with 20 years of experience, including 15 years in the biotech and pharmaceutical industry. He was fired after refusing the “Covid vaccine“, which is further evidence of what David Rasnick refers to as the “Tyranny Of Dogma“. California State University's Leemon McHenry published a superb book titled The Illusion Of Evidence-Based Medicine, in which he exposes the corruption of medicine by the pharmaceutical industry, from exploiting unsuspecting people for drug testing, to manipulation of research data, to disease mongering, and marketing drugs for imaginary health issues. Del Bigtree has revealed how the American government (including the CDC and FDA) collude with Big Pharma for monetary gain, particularly where safety trials are concerned. Or rather, the lack of safety trials. Roman Bystrianyk co-authored a book called Dissolving Illusions, in which they use official data to show how, over the last century, no vaccine has worked in the way promised by the pharmaceutical industry and governments. The point is that Big Pharma is untrustworthy, and few scientists are as close to the action as Mike Donio.   PLEASE SUPPORT MY WORK.

    That Time of the WEEK with Maddy Smith
    I get all my abortion advice from Joan Didion

    That Time of the WEEK with Maddy Smith

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 72:41


    Hellorrr//Happy Fourth of July!! This week, the gworls talk their favorite healthy foods before getting into a new segment called 'Coping Cabana'. Plus we discuss: - Air Force makes the world's saddest PB&J - AirBnb permanently bans house parties - There's a tampon shortage - There's also a sriracha shortage - FDA bans Juuls - Don't trust the DIY abortion advice on TikTok Check out our sponsor Ounce of Hope and use code mad20 for 20 percent off! See Maddy + girls live Follow the pod on IG: @thattimeoftheweekpod Follow the girls: @somaddysmith @ashlynnsalzano @stewartandchill Producer: @cazzei27 Editor: Michael Kessler Socials producer: Angela Cilluffo

    This Week In Wellness
    TWIW 159: Plans to trial Glyphosate resistant GMO wheat in Australia

    This Week In Wellness

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 5:30


    This Week In Wellness as the FDA announces that genetically modified, herbicide tolerant, HB4 wheat is safe to eat the US wheat industry spokesperson revealed that they plan to seek approval to plant HB4 wheat in Australia within the next year. https://www.reuters.com/markets/commodities/exclusive-brazil-tests-genetically-modified-wheat-global-supplies-tighten-2022-06-06/ https://www.agriculture.com/news/business/in-a-key-step-developer-says-fda-finds-gmo-wheat-is-safe-to-eat The post TWIW 159: Plans to trial Glyphosate resistant GMO wheat in Australia appeared first on The Wellness Couch.

    This Week in Virology
    TWiV 915: Mouse mouth to mouse mom

    This Week in Virology

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 115:02


    TWiV discusses the recent decision by an FDA advisory committee to update COVID vaccines for the fall, the monkeypox virus outbreak, and the finding that enteric viruses infect the salivary glands and are transmitted through saliva. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Rich Condit, Kathy Spindler, and Brianne Barker. Subscribe (free): Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Postdoctoral position in the Kielian Laboratory (pdf) COVID vaccine update for fall (WaPo) Don't rush to change COVID vaccines (STAT) Materials from 28 June FDA advisory meeting (FDA) Monkeypox cases US and Global (CDC) Enteric viruses transmit via saliva (Nature) Letters read on TWiV 915 Timestamps by Jolene. Thanks! Weekly Picks Dickson – Jazz big bands #2: Maynard Ferguson: Signature song: Theme From Rocky: Signature album: Color Him Wild Brianne – Origami antibody and virus Kathy – Turbines resistant to high winds Rich – Obi-Wan Kenobi (TV Series) Vincent – The next epidemic may be here. The US isn't ready for it. Listener Picks David: DALL E 2 Douglas – Jazz Online Intro music is by Ronald Jenkees Send your virology questions and comments to twiv@microbe.tv

    The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
    Why Sulfate Defficiency Occurs With Glyphosate - Stephanie Seneff, PhD - Interview

    The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 12:46


    Why Sulfate Defficiency Occurs With Glyphosate - Stephanie Seneff, PhD - Interview Stephanie Seneff, Ph.D.  • https://people.csail.mit.edu/seneff/• Book - The Glyphosate Effect: How the World's Most Common Herbicide Is Undermining Your Health and What You Can Do About It  Stephanie Seneff is a Senior Research Scientist at the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. She received the B.S. degree in Biophysics in 1968, the M.S. and E.E. degrees in Electrical Engineering in 1980, and the Ph.D degree in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in 1985, all from MIT. For over three decades, her research interests have always been at the intersection of biology and computation: developing a computational model for the human auditory system, understanding human language so as to develop algorithms and systems for human computer interactions, as well as applying natural language processing (NLP) techniques to gene predictions. She has published over 170 refereed articles on these subjects, and has been invited to give keynote speeches at several international conferences. She has also supervised numerous Master's and PhD theses at MIT. In 2012, Dr. Seneff was elected Fellow of the International Speech and Communication Association (ISCA). # StephanieSeneff #GMOs #GeneticallyModifiedFood #GMCrops #FoodSafety#TheRealTruthAboutHealth CLICK HERE - To Checkout Our MEMBERSHIP CLUB: http://www.realtruthtalks.com • Social Media ChannelsFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConferenceInstagram : https://www.instagram.com/therealtruthabouthealth/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/RTAHealth Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-real-truth-about-health-conference/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealth    • Check out our Podcasts  Visit us on Apple Podcast and Itunes search:  The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast Amazon: https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/23a037be-99dd-4099-b9e0-1cad50774b5a/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0RZbS2BafJIEzHYyThm83J Google:https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5zaW1wbGVjYXN0LmNvbS8yM0ZqRWNTMg%3D%3DStitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastAudacy: https://go.audacy.com/partner-podcast-listen-real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastiHeartRadio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-real-truth-about-health-li-85932821/ Deezer: https://www.deezer.com/us/show/2867272 Reason: https://reason.fm/podcast/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcast • Other Video ChannelsYoutube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealthVimeo:https://vimeo.com/channels/1733189Rumble:  https://rumble.com/c/c-1111513 Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConference/videos/?ref=page_internal DailyMotion: https://www.dailymotion.com/TheRealTruthAboutHealthBitChute:https://www.bitchute.com/channel/JQryXTPDOMih/ Disclaimer:Medical and Health information changes constantly. Therefore, the information provided in this podcast should not be considered current, complete, or exhaustive. Reliance on any information provided in this podcast is solely at your own risk. The Real Truth About Health does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, products, procedures, or opinions referenced in the following podcasts, nor does it exercise any authority or editorial control over that material. The Real Truth About Health provides a forum for discussion of public health issues. The views and opinions of our panelists do not necessarily reflect those of The Real Truth About Health and are provided by those panelists in their individual capacities. The Real Truth About Health has not reviewed or evaluated those statements or claims. 

    The Highwire with Del Bigtree
    HOW DID THE COVID VACCINE GET APPROVED FOR KIDS

    The Highwire with Del Bigtree

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 27:35


    Diagnostic Pathologist, Dr. Clare Craig, shares shocking evidence on the measures used by health authorities to falsify Covid vaccine efficacy for children, as well as the real safety risks and what is yet to come.CORRECTION: Dr. Craig stated the placebo children who were unblinded and vaccinated had 6 weeks of follow-up, but in fact it was 6 months.However, the safety data presented to the FDA is based on only 6 weeks of unblinded follow-up data after the 3rd dose.#DrClareCraig #FDAApproval

    Vitality Radio Podcast with Jared St. Clair
    #242: The Vital Five How To: Your Users Guide to Filling the Gaps in Your Diet

    Vitality Radio Podcast with Jared St. Clair

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 58:43


    Jared answers the key questions you may have about his Vital 5, the 5 things almost every adult should supplement for optimal Vitality. You'll learn the What, Why, How, When, What Forms, and How Much, all in one episode. What are the Vital 5? Magnesium, Probiotics, Digestive Enzymes, Omega 3, and a great Multi-Vitamin. Come join the brand new Vitality Radio Listeners Community page on Facebook here!!Visit the podcast website here: VitalityRadio.comJust a reminder that this podcast is for educational purposes only. The FDA has not evaluated the podcast. The information within is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. The advice given is not intended to replace the advice of your medical professional.You can follow us at @vitalityradio on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. Shop the products that Jared mentions at vitalitynutrition.com. Let us know your thoughts about this episode using the hashtag #vitalityradio and please rate and review us on Apple Podcasts. If you'd like to shop our visit please visit us at vitalitynutrition.com. Thank you!

    To The Best Of Our Knowledge
    Are you ready for the psychedelic revolution?

    To The Best Of Our Knowledge

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 51:41


    The psychedelic revolution in mental health treatment is on the way, with FDA approval likely in just a few years. Which means that before long, the treatment of choice for depression and addiction could be a hallucinogen like psilocybin. And more psychedelic compounds are in the pipeline for PTSD and other disorders. Original Air Date: July 02, 2022 Guests:  Alex Sherwood — Bill Linton — Lou Lukas Interviews In This Hour:  The lab that could supply psilocybin to the world — Psilocybin, the 'God molecule,' and the quest to revolutionize mental health care — Could psychedelics erase our fear of dying? Never want to miss an episode? Subscribe to the podcast. Want to hear more from us, including extended interviews and favorites from the archive? Subscribe to our newsletter.

    Gooaye 股癌
    EP258 | ㄨㄨㄉ

    Gooaye 股癌

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 51:58


    真ㄉ怕了 本集節目由【YODEE 優迪】與【L'Ange 棉之境】贊助 你在還用不易乾、越洗越硬或是容易散發出臭臭霉味的浴巾嗎? L'Ange 棉之境 純棉紗布巾系列,尺寸多、規格多、用途廣,不只呵護嬰兒,大人也好好照顧,有包巾、浴巾、蓋毯、超萬用小方巾、枕巾、擦髮巾等品項,全家大小都適合。 ✔️ 100%天然純棉,不含人造纖維、柔軟劑、甲醛、螢光劑等物質 ✔️「抗菌包裝」使用前不需清洗,隨開即用 ✔️ 特殊織法,吸水又快乾,越洗越柔軟 ✔️ 生產工廠通過美國FDA與歐盟一類醫療用品認證 趁現在把家裡的浴巾、毛巾換一波,不只嬰幼兒必備,成人也適用,貼身用品就是需要這樣的好品質。 即日起到8/1,從資訊欄裡的連結購買,就可享有主委聽眾專屬95折優惠,把握機會喔! 主委粉絲專屬優惠

    AMERICA OUT LOUD PODCAST NETWORK
    FDA and CDC Approve Vaccines for Kids 6 Months and Q & A 28 on America Out Loud PULSE

    AMERICA OUT LOUD PODCAST NETWORK

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 58:29


    America Out Loud PULSE with Dr. Peter McCullough and Malcolm Out Loud - The outrage regarding the FDA and CDC approving and promoting the vaccines to our youngest is being heard from coast to coast. As one listener questions... "I hope Dr. McCullough covers the terrible FDA approval (and maybe soon school mandate) of the vax for kids. It's pure corruption and evil. This is where I draw the line."

    Podcast for Healing Neurology
    #69: ABORTION: SPECIAL EPISODE: Anuj Khattar, MD on the day Roe v Wade is overturned: Women's Realities of Reproductive Health in America

    Podcast for Healing Neurology

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 44:35


    Recorded on Friday, June 24, 2022, the day Roe v Wade was overturned by the United States Supreme Court, when safe full-scale reproductive health care responsibility was returned back to the states resulting in millions of women losing access to accurate information about safe reproductive care, this episode lays out the realities of abortion. We know this decision will inflict a range of dangers, even well beyond the simple forcing of women to continue undesired pregnancies with all of the physical, emotional and financial realities (the Turn Away Study shows mental health may recover but physical and financial outcomes are worse for women who wanted but had no access to abortion care). We know there is already an increasing frequency of delayed or denied miscarriage management, refusal to treat life-threatening pregnancy conditions like ectopic pregnancy, and fetal abnormalities not compatible with life that are forced to persist until their extensively painful and grueling end for both mom and fetus. Dr Anuj Khattar is a Family Practice MD who has traveled the country providing reproductive care to women. After witnessing child abuse in the emergency room during his training, he chose this specialty to prevent that by supporting women to be in charge of their bodies, including their reproductive choices. He found he loves doing this work because of the deep listening it requires. Dr Khattar has learned from his patients that abortion is never a decision taken lightly. Behind every decision is a carefully weighed thought process to go this route. He notes 90% of abortions occur in the first trimester (12-14 weeks) when the abortion pill (mifepristone and misoprostol) is safe and effective, and that the majority of abortions are women who are already mothers; these are women who are making an informed decision. In this episode, we discuss: The reason for an abortion is irrelevant; our judgment is irrelevant. Abortion care is health care. With the advent of medical abortion pills, which are available through the mail and are FDA approved through 11 weeks (with evidence & global experience showing likely safety up to 20 weeks), the post-Roe world is different than the pre-Roe world; see the documentary “The Janes” to understand more about that. The physical realities of abortion are demanding on a woman's body; beyond weight gain, fatigue, nausea/vomiting and connective tissue softening, there is a 20-30% chance of a Cesarean section (C-Section) delivering which is major abdominal surgery incurring any surgical risk and requiring recovery time that is not protected by any Federal paid parental leave program. Dr Khattar also discusses the medically unsound text he has been required to read to women in certain states during abortion counseling and busts many of the other myths out there. A conversation on contraception, which is NOT abortion, even Plan B which is available over the counter without a doctor's prescription. If the desire is truly to reduce or prevent abortions, our focus should be accurate, widely disseminated sex education, more social and financial opportunities for women, physical autonomy for women and access to contraception. It's a big show. It's a big deal. Let's stand up for ourselves & each other. Resources: Funding Abortions: https://abortionfunds.org/ Shout Your Abortion: https://shoutyourabortion.com/resources/ Abortion finder: https://www.abortionfinder.org/ Repro Legal Hotline: https://www.reprolegalhelpline.org/ Plan C Safe Home Abortion: https://www.plancpills.org/

    The Terry & Jesse Show
    01 Jul 22 – What Does the Church Say about AI?

    The Terry & Jesse Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 51:12


    Today's Topics:  1) Gospel - Mt 9:9-13 - Those who are well do not need a physician, but the sick do. Go and learn the meaning of the words, I desire mercy, not sacrifice. I did not come to call the righteous but sinners. Saint Junipero Serra, pray for us  Bishop Sheen quote of the day  2, 3) What does the Catholic Church say about artificial intelligence?  https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/251552/sentient-ai-heres-what-the-catholic-church-says-about-artificial-intelligence  3, 4) Covid doctors sue FDA over Ivermectin  https://www.emilypostnews.com/p/covid-doctors-sue-fda-over-ivermectin?utm_source=direct&s=r

    Meat + Three
    Food News Beyond the Headlines

    Meat + Three

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 25:11


    For the past two years, the news has been stark and at times, downright terrifying. War, disease, supply shortages – but these matters do not exist in a vacuum. These global concerns have trickle-down effects on industries across the board, including the food world. From food recalls to fast food worker strikes to global shortages, we look to shows across our network to uncover the history, legislation, and key issues behind headline news and how it relates to what we eat. Further Reading and Listening: Learn more about the founding of the FDA on A Taste of the Past episode 346: Poison Squad: Founding of the FDA and about the FDA's present short-comings on What Doesn't Kill You: episode: 364: Explosive Report on How the FDA is Failing Our Food System. You can read Deborah Blum's book Poison Squad here or watch the film about it here.Dig deeper into the history of, and current controversies surrounding OSHA on What Doesn't Kill You Episode 316: Where is OSHA in meatpacking?Listen to the full episode of What Doesn't Kill You episode 347: Poultry Farmer Blows the Whistle on Perdue and find out more about Rudy Howell's story and how you can support the Food Integrity Campaign at https://foodwhistleblower.org/Find out more on Why the War in Ukraine Will Affect Food Supplies Globally on episode 363 of What Doesn't Kill You Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

    Selfie
    Talking Enneagram 1's with Micky ScottBey Jones and Kendra Adachi | Selfie Podcast Episode 225

    Selfie

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 38:03


    This summer we are diving into the Enneagram! In this episode, Micky ScottBey Jones helps us make sense of the Enneagram and how it can help us in our relationships and in our work. In this episode we are talking about enneagram type 1, followed by a previously recorded interview with Kendra Adachi of The Lazy Genius about her experience as a type 1. The Enneagram Institute - RHETI Micky ScottBey Jones The Lazy Genius podcast The Lazy Genius book Micky ScottBey Jones (she/her) is a Black, queer woman with an international and intersectional understanding of social change and fierce dedication to cultivating personal transformation and resilience in leaders. Her work is grounded in facilitation of healing and transformation through practical spirituality, resource and resilience skill development and intercultural dialogue. Micky is a certified Enneagram coach & teacher, contemplative, resilience cultivator and writer that addresses spirituality, healing, burnout, collective care, transformative accountability, belonging and self-discovery. You can find Micky on the web at mickyscottbeyjones.com and her most active social media IG: @electric_lady_msj. Why deal with razor burn and wasteful disposable razors when you could be getting the best shave of your life with the Athena Club Razor Kit? Athena Club razor blades are surrounded by a water-activated serum with shea butter and hyaluronic acid, so you get a silky smooth shave that actually leaves skin soft and hydrated, not stripped dry. The Razor Kit is only $9 (with free shipping!) and comes with two blade cartridges, a magnetic hook for shower storage, and your choice of handle color. Get 20% off your first order at AthenaClub.com with promo code selfie. Our sponsor today has helped thousands of women deal with thinning hair. Nutrafol is a doctor-formulated supplement clinically shown to improve hair growth and thickness that offers two targeted formulas for women.Visit NUTRAFOL dot com and take their Hair Wellness Quiz for personalized product recommendations, and use the promo code SELFIE to save $15 off your first month's subscription at Nutrafol.com. It's a new year, and many of us are looking for ways to have better eating habits. Enter Factor. Factor makes it easy to eat clean 24/7, with fresh—never frozen—prepared meals that are so delicious, you wouldn't believe they're actually good for you. Factor saves time by delivering chef-crafted meals to your doorstep, eliminating the hassle of grocery shopping and meal prep.. Head to GO.FACTOR 75.com/PLANS and use code selfie120 to get $120 off over your first 5 weeks of meals. EveryPlate's easy-to-follow recipes and pre-portioned ingredients take the stress out of dinnertime. Great for kids learning to cook and great for parents who are stressed between work and school supervision. EveryPlate does the meal planning, shopping, and prepping for you, taking the time-consuming guesswork out of cooking. Try EveryPlate for just $1.79 by going to EveryPlate.com and entering code selfie179. Dear Brightly is on a mission to close the gap between dermatologists and everyday people. The first step in their journey was making prescription-grade retinoids more accessible via a doc consult online. Tretinoin, the active ingredient in their active ingredient in Night Shift product, is a retinoid, which is a vitamin A derivative used to improve the texture, tone, and appearance of the skin. Tretinoin is the only FDA-approved retinoid to treat photoaging. Head to DearBrightly.com and enter promo selfie to get 15% off your first order.

    Awakened Nation
    How do you Reset, Rise & Reveal Your Brilliance when Life Knocks You Down? with authors Kristin Smedley & Mary Fran Bontempo

    Awakened Nation

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 52:34


    What would you do if the doctor told you your newborn son would be blind for the rest of his life? Or as a mom, finding out that your son was a heroin addict? Kristin Smedley & Mary Fran Bontempo had to answer the big questions in life when their children forced them to change direction, and shift all hopes and dreams. "This is a parent's worst nightmare, and I was living it." If you are a parent, this is a heartwarming episode on resilience, parenting, and learning to shine despite every setback possible. How these two souls found each other to do the work they do, it a gift from above. Authors of Brilliantly Resilient: Reset, Rise & Reveal Your Brilliance! Kristin and Mary Fran will make you laugh and cry at the same time. https://brilliantlyresilient.net/ About Kristin Smedley With two of her three children born blind, Kristin Smedley was thrown into a mother's nightmare with her dreams for her sons' futures torn apart. Determined that her boys would become productive, vital individuals, Kristin dove headfirst into uncharted waters to equip her sons with the skills and tools they needed to build successful, happy lives. Kristin partnered with Comcast to encourage and promote equipment for the visually impaired, testified before the FDA for legislation for better services for the blind, founded a non-profit for genetic disease research, delivered a TEDx talk centered on setting Extraordinary Expectations, and wrote a book showing both blind and sighted readers the possibilities that exist with imagination and determination. Kristin's boundless energy and generous spirit allow her to carry her message of empowerment and hope to audiences beyond the blind community through her motivational speaking and programs. Find her at: www.kristinsmedley.com. About Mary Fran Bontempo Mary Fran Bontempo is an award-winning 2-time TEDx speaker, author, humorist and podcast host who teaches audiences to uncover their brilliance and resilience 15 minutes at a time. A sought-after presenter, Mary Fran is author of The 15 Minute Master and The Woman's Book of Dirty Words and co-founder of the Brilliantly Resilient LIVE show and podcast. Mary Fran proves small changes can create life-altering transformations, allowing individuals to be positive and successful in a rapidly changing world. A Huffington Post, Thrive Global contributor and columnist for numerous websites, Mary Fran created a life-affirming brand of wisdom and wit after meeting the challenge of her son's heroin addiction. A frequent media guest and speaker for corporate, faith-based, and educational organizations, audiences of all ages delight in her empowering and entertaining message. Find her at: www.maryfranbontempo.com. Awakened Nation® Host: Brad Szollose: Fueled by the passion to ignite game-changing conversations, award-winning author Brad Szollose created Awakened Nation®—a podcast dedicated to deeper conversations with today's cutting edge entrepreneurs, idea makers and disruptors, bestselling authors, activists, healers, spiritual leaders, professional athletes, celebrities and rock stars...conversations that take a deep dive into the extraordinary. This podcast will challenge your beliefs and make you think. Think Art Bell meets Joe Rogan. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/awakenednation/support

    Rich Zeoli
    In Pennsvlania, Democrat Nominees Are Putting Roe v. Wade on the Ballot(Barsky Full Show 07-01-22)

    Rich Zeoli

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 199:30


    6:03-NEWS 6:10-What happened to the hitchhikers  6:35-Elon Musk's son Xavier is changing their name and gender to disassociate from Elon  6:43- The gay animal population is featured in the Washington Post  6:50-Animal psychiatric business takes off 7:03-NEWS 7:10-Is Roe v. Wade on the Pennsylvania ballot this November?  7:35-Phillies host Dead and Company night as they rout the Braves 14-4  7:40-Bob Dylan, a great songwriter, can't sing though  7:45-CUT SHEET | Former President Trump issues statement on former White House aide testimony to Jan. 6th hearing | Trump asked on the possibility of a Trump/DeSantis ticket in 2024 | President Biden mixes up countries that are joining NATO | Biden takes pre-approved questions at NATO summit | Biden immediately refutes reporters question on Americans' feelings on the direction of the country | Hillary Clinton still won't go away on the possibility of running in 2024 | Liz Cheney gets tongue-tied on corroborating the testimony of former White House aide's bombshell testimony against former President Trump | Governor Murphy doesn't think he's spending too much money in New Jersey  8:13-Rumors of Donald Trump announcing his 2024 run for President   8:28-NEWS 8:40-FDA issues guidance on having relations with someone who has monkeypox  8:45-the birds and the bees talk between parents and kids  8:54-Is Pope Francis preparing to resign?  9:02-NEWS 9:11-California members boycotting the July 4th celebration over the overturning of Roe v. Wade  9:30-The new Elvis movie is a hit  9:45-CUT SHEET | A woman has decided to start identifying as a bird | Germany is apparently sending $2 billion to Russia a month | Biden advisor says they are working towards the "Liberal world order" |  9:55-Final Thoughts

    The Todd Herman Show
    What's worse? Jan 6 or Joe Biden's corruption? Hint: it's a trick question. Episode 176 - Hour 1 Whats Worse? Jan 6th Or Joe Bidens Corruption

    The Todd Herman Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 56:37


    THE THESIS: The corruption that allowed Jan 6 to become a full-blown riot is the same corruption that allowed Black Lives Matter, Inc. and Antifa to run wild. It is the same corruption that pimped the Russia hoax, the Ukraine bribe hoax, it is the same corruption that allows the so called Attorney General to announce he will not respect the Supreme Court's ruling on Roe Vs. Wade. Which is worse, Jan 6 or Joe Biden's corruption? They are one and the same.  THE SCRIPTURE & SCRIPTURAL RESOURCES:  Psalm 46:10 10 He says, “Be still, and know that I am God;     I will be exalted among the nations,     I will be exalted in the earth.” Luke 8:16-18 - A Lamp on a Stand 16 “No one lights a lamp and hides it in a clay jar or puts it under a bed. Instead, they put it on a stand, so that those who come in can see the light. 17 For there is nothing hidden that will not be disclosed, and nothing concealed that will not be known or brought out into the open. 18 Therefore consider carefully how you listen. Whoever has will be given more; whoever does not have, even what they think they have will be taken from them.” THE NEWS & COMMENT: Frightened people make terrible decisions and, on every front, The Party is purposefully terrifying people into taking insane actions.  How Trauma Became a Political Tool [AUDIO - Cassidy Hutchinson testifies that she was told that as then-President Donald Trump was being driven back to the White House after the Jan. 6 rally that he demanded to be taken to the Capitol and tried to grab the steering wheel from a Secret Service agent.  Multiple Reporters: Secret Service to Dispute J6 Committee Star Witness; Maybe you shouldn't rely on hearsay. [AUDIO] -  Plenty of videos of Alex Jones and Ali Alexander urging the crowd *away* from the Capitol Building. They had a permit for speeches in front of the Supreme Court. Pay attention to who leaves this all out Now, we need retired FBI to do the same! Ray Epps was apparently talking about a “plan” and was worried that the crowd would “screw it up.” But, good ole Ray is not in jail and not being prosecuted. Gee . . . I wonder why that is?  EXCLUSIVE: Ray Epps Was Worried Fast-Moving January 6 Crowd Might Interfere With ‘The Plan,' Kentucky Man Claims [AUDIO] - Michael Stenger testified that there [MAY HAVE BEEN] paid professional agitators on January 6th. Now he's dead… Julie Kelly on how the FBI went after John Eastman's phone: “American Gestapo.”  [AUDIO] - Voicemail from Joe Biden to Hunter saying he wants to discuss their China business deals.  CONTEXT: NEW: In 2018, Joe Biden left a voicemail for Hunter saying he wanted to talk to him about a New York Times report on Hunter's business deals in China.  Biden repeatedly said he “never discussed” business with Hunter. [AUDIO] -  Hunter pleading with a Russian escort after paying her with $10,000 that appears to have come from Joe Biden The two men who were arrested with 150,000 fentanyl pills in Tulare, CA on Friday have been released from custody on their own recognizance as a result of a court order from a judge following a "risk assessment". The Sheriff "strongly disagrees" with their release. - Bill Melugin, FOX News, LA It's not “just” CRT and the false idea of “transgenderism” that is being used to destroy the military, it's the prepping of the environment for rule by “medical” technocrats.  14,000 Army Guard Troops Could Be Axed Thursday for Refusing COVID Vax Retirees from the CDC and the FDA have got to speak truth: Pfizer, the FDA, the CDC and their supplicants in the Mockingbird Media lied about the mRNA staying in the injection site (why ANYONE believed that is beyond me).  Pfizer documents: A Tissue Distribution Study of a [3H]-Labelled Lipid Nanoparticle-mRNA (LNP) Formulation Following Intramuscular Administration in Wistar Han Rats; dramatic increases in ovaries; Table 1, page 23 shows Total Lipid Concentration at 48 hours; very ELEVATED LNP concentrations in adrenals, injection site, liver, ovaries, bone marrow; ovaries dramatic increases 0.25 min to 48 hours The injections are leading to more Covid and more deaths. Yes, this is from Canada, but American's biology is not different from that of Canadians: Uh-Oh, what is happening in Canada? Access to information (FOI) request Shows the More Covid Injections, then the More Hospitalizations and the More Deaths; supports Trudeau's 4 shots yet infection; Canadian data clearly show that the Covid-19 gene injections have a dose-response: the more doses = the more infections = the more cases = the more hospitalizations = the more deaths. And, the people in the food supply chain had better start speaking up. They are planning a man-made food crisis so Bill Gates and Monsanto can leap in to “help.” Northern Ireland's new climate act will require removal of 500K cows, 700K sheep and 5M chickens to meet net-zero for methane, CH4. But this food is grown on rough grassland where farm crops can't be grown. Looks like they will have to remove people too! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    WSJ Minute Briefing
    Russia Strikes Ukraine's Odessa Region, Killing at Least 18 People

    WSJ Minute Briefing

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 2:15


    Chinese leader Xi Jinping says Hong Kong's loyalty to Beijing will ensure a prosperous future. The FDA is devising plans to allow clinical trials testing the transplantation of pig organs into humans. Keith Collins hosts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Jacobin Radio
    Jacobin Show: Neoliberalism and Depoliticization w/ Felix Biederman & Gary Gerstle

    Jacobin Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 89:33


    This week Jen Pan sits down with professor Gary Gerstle to discuss how the neoliberal order came into being and whether or not we're witnessing its dying days. We also get Felix Biederman's thoughts on the FDA's war on Juul e-cigarettes. Also, Jen offers a solution to working class depoliticization.The Jacobin Show is a weekly YouTube show offering socialist perspectives on class and capitalism in the twenty-first century, the failures of liberalism, and the prospects of rebuilding a left labor movement in the US. This is the podcast version of the episode from June 29, 2022. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Bannon's War Room
    Episode 1,970 - By 6-3 Majority SCOTUS Deconstruction Of The Administrative State; 40 Year High Inflation; Markets Crash; Memorial For Dr. Zelenko

    Bannon's War Room

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 54:14


    We discuss the economy, FDA, Dr. Zelenko, and more.  Our Guests Are: Boris Epshteyn, Frank Gaffney, Dr. Robert Malone, Erik Prince Stay ahead of the censors - Join us warroom.org/join Aired On: 6/30/2022 Watch: On the Web: http://www.warroom.org On Gettr: @WarRoom On Podcast: http://warroom.ctcin.bio On TV: PlutoTV Channel 240, Dish Channel 219, Roku, Apple TV, FireTV or on https://AmericasVoice.news. #news #politics #realnews