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The probability of loss of something of value

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The Golf Podcast Presented by Golficity
Golf Podcast 435: “On the Tee” Co-Host John Mascari

The Golf Podcast Presented by Golficity

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 68:53


This week ESPN Radio's "On the Tee" Co-Host, John Mascari, joins the podcast to talk about everything from the PGA Tour and LIV Golf, to his role as director of golf at Alpine Country Club. https://youtu.be/xLi05GeU7tk   Listen to This Week's Show Download on iTunes here Download on Stitcher here Download on Spreaker here Download on SoundCloud here Listen on Spotify here Links from this Week's Show Get the Golficity App: Download the Free Golficity App Here Join our Private Community on Levellr: Register Your Spot Here Don't miss out on all the action this week at DraftKings! Download the DraftKings Sportsbook app today! Sign-up using https://golficity.com/draftkings or through our promo code GOLFICITY Thanks to this Week's Sponsors Titleist is committed to ensuring that every golf ball delivers superior quality and consistency.  From ball to ball, dozen to dozen we should expect our golf ball to perform exactly the same way, shot after shot. That's why Titleist owns the design, the technology and the manufacturing to make sure consistency spot on every time. They even conduct all the testing and quality checks to make sure nothing slips through the cracks.  Titleist is the #1 ball for every player and the #1 ball in golf.  Choose the best for your game and find out more at Titleist.com. Trust your golf game to FootJoy, the number one Shoe in Golf. Shop now at FootJoy.com. Thanks for tuning to The Golf Podcast! If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, crisis counseling and referral services can be accessed by calling 877-8-HOPENY/text HOPENY (467369) (NY) 1-800-GAMBLER (1-800-426-2537) (IL/IN/MI/NJ/PA/WV/WY), 1-800-NEXT STEP (AZ), 1-800-522-4700 (CO/NH), 888-789-7777/visit ccpg.org/chat (CT), 1-800-BETS OFF (IA), 1-877-770-STOP (7867) (LA), visit OPGR.org (OR), call/text TN REDLINE 1-800-889-9789 (TN), or 1-888-532-3500 (VA). 21+ (18+ NH/WY). Physically present in AZ/CO/CT/IL/IN/IA/LA/MI/NJ/PA/TN/VA/WV/WY only. N/A in OR, NH, or NY. Risk free bet paid out in the form of non-withdrawable free bet token. Min. $5 deposit. Min $5 wager. New customers only. Eligibility restrictions apply. See draftkings.com/sportsbook for full terms and conditions.

Oh Crap I Love My Toddler... But Holy F*ck
Patreon Unlock: Learning from Life with Chantel Zimmerman

Oh Crap I Love My Toddler... But Holy F*ck

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 52:51


Today, I have a treat for you guys—I'm interviewing Chantel Zimmerman, the founder and creator of Sensory Garden and Play, on her first podcast ever! Chantel lives, breathes, eats, and shits proprioception, vestibular movement, and big play, and I wanted to have her on the show to talk about her educational philosophy and the programs that she runs, including her forest school. Chantel starts the episode by telling us about her background as a public school teacher and how her post-pregnancy move into tutoring led to her setting up programs based on sensory learning and eventually opening her full-blown forest school. She then explains how important it is for parents to give serious thought to what they want from childcare before choosing a program and that we often get trapped in an outdated educational philosophy that prepares kids to work in industry rather than for the modern world they'll be living in. In her school, Chantel uses a Scandinavian model that encourages kids to learn from life and experience the outdoors rather than prioritizing academics. She also talks about how the pandemic has resulted in many parents challenging the school system and explains how she attempts to bridge public schooling, homeschooling, and unschooling to combine the best of all three systems. Next, we discuss the concept of risk in play, in which parents encourage their kids to learn to assess risk and honor their bodies. Chantel explains that taking this approach avoids teaching children helplessness and enabling them to always need a parent and instead instills them with self-esteem that they'll carry into the rest of their lives. Then, Chantel describes the Emergent Curriculum model that she uses in her forest school, which involves asking parents to report on what their children are interested in learning and then using that data to create a curriculum based on what the children want to learn, ensuring every kid is interested and engaged. This model also lets Chantel move away from the regimented structure of learning seen in public school and provide a blend between life skills and social and emotional well-being. Part of this is Chantel's focus on emotional regulation and empowerment—for kids and parents—including her focus on informal meditation as part of her educational toolset. We then talk about the benefits of multi-age learning, which Chantel employs at her forest school, and how it gives kids both the chance to feel more advanced than others and to have a model to strive for. Chantel also addresses the concerns about bullying in multi-age environments, pointing out that her school has no bullying because they try to see problematic behavior as communication and a chance to figure out the root problem rather than something to be punished with shame and humiliation. And finally, we wrap up the episode with some details about the fun stuff Chantel has coming up in the next few months, including new courses and classes parents and caregivers can come to along with their kids. The Finer Details of This Episode: Chantel started out as a public school sector teacher, working in the inner city for many years before moving to suburbia and teaching there. Then, after she had her kids, she started tutoring, which is when her plans for Sensory Garden and Play started forming. She got an influx of people asking her to tutor kindergarten, something that doesn't really happen, and became confused when she realized that the kids she was getting tutoring requests for were totally up to par, they weren't behind at all. So she decided to ask the parents to let her teach her way by bringing the kids outside and using tools like sensory bins and eventually decided to start up her own program, with fourteen families signing up right from the jump. Within a week, she had a call from another town asking if she could set up a program there too for ten parents. And another request for twelve the week after that. Eventually, the program got so big that she had to contact a nearby nature center to rent space, turning her program into a full-blown forest school. Chantel's not a fan of the coined terms that get thrown around in education, her least favorite phrase being “kindergarten readiness.” She understands that it's a seductive term, but it's a symptom of her opinion that we're pushing the academic component way too young instead of teaching kids to regulate their emotional systems. When parents are looking for childcare or daycare, Chantel says it's really important to figure out the number one thing you want from it. That could be something practical like cost or location, it could be for the kids to have a great time while they're there, or it could be somewhere that meshes with your educational philosophy (this is Chantel's priority for her own kids, that she wants them to love to learn). Back in the 1900s, we sent kids to school to prepare them for the industrial area, expecting they'd be factory workers and help produce things. But that's not our society now, so Chantel explains that we need a different educational philosophy. In her school, Chantel uses a Scandinavian model that doesn't tell kids to go inside when it's raining but instead encourages them to experience what it's like to be outside even when conditions aren't perfect. One of the things Chantel loves to do with her program is create a bridge between homeschool, unschool, and public school (because there are good things about public school, including librarians!). The COVID pandemic has led to many parents challenging the school system (not the educators, it's important to note) and realizing that there are serious flaws in it. Chantel herself has decided not to send her kids to kindergarten this year, instead letting them learn to play and figure out life on their own terms rather than on the standards. When the pandemic started, there was an immediate panic about kids falling behind, and it drove me crazy because nobody seemed to realize there was no “behind” to fall into. The entire planet was dealing with the same emergency, but parents were still caught up in the fear of their children losing the education race. Chantel's kids were premature, so she's always been very conscious of looking issues that might come up, including their muscle movements. But she says she gets kids at her school who can't sit properly because their parents taught them to walk before they could crawl properly, not realizing that crawling is a huge gross motor skill. However, she does think that it's important to get away from sitting and encourage kids to use their vestibular system and follow their exploratory instincts. Chantel advocates for risk in play, which means stop telling your kids to be careful and start telling them to assess the situation. When hiking with her own kids, she tells them that if they go up, they have to come down on their own. That doesn't mean she's going to leave them up there crying, but they do have to think about whether they can handle the hike and if they need help. Related to this, Chantel teaches kids to use the term “honor your body,” meaning being aware of the risk your body can handle and choosing to do something or not based on that. Teaching kids terminology like this allows them to walk life with intrinsic self-esteem rather than teaching them helplessness and enabling them to always need you. Chantel's goal in bringing a Scandinavian schooling model to New Jersey was to bring things back to basics and encourage and support parents. The model she uses is called Emergent Curriculum, which gets parents to report on what their kids are interested in learning and then uses that data to create the curriculum based on what they want to learn. It's hard work, but it also means that every kid is interested in what they're learning and forges a huge kinship with the forest. One of the reasons I took Pascal out of the public school system was that I saw him separating things into “work” and “fun” and that the regimented school structure was draining his love of learning. One of the biggest scams out there is that subjects like English, math, and science are all separate and can be covered in neat fifty-minute boxes. I find education happens most in places like the car, where I have no resources handy, and we get into deep discussions about whatever has engaged his curiosity. In her forest school, Chantel also tries to get away from the public-school structure of learning (though she understands why teachers dealing with huge numbers of kids in a class need to rely on it). She doesn't push academics but instead helps kids learn from real life—for example, they all go and make mud pies outside, using “recipes” that the kids need to measure out. This means the older kids, who can read a bit, help the younger kids know what they need to measure, and everyone works together to get the project done without a teacher hovering to micromanage their every move. In Chantel's opinion, there needs to be a beautiful blend between life skills and social and emotional well-being. Her kids' homework every day is to ask someone in their home how their heart is and listen and report back the next day at school. She's had parents text her and say they don't know if they've ever known how their heart feels, and Chantel's response is that they'd better find out because the kid will be asking every single day. Schools are now teaching lessons on empathy, but Chantel doesn't believe it's possible to teach empathy or social communication if we're constantly shoving our kids into a very busy life with busy things in front of them. In particular, with everybody having been masked up for the past couple of years, kids are going to have a hard time understanding emotional expression because they haven't had examples to learn from. It's important for parents to sit with themselves and consider what they need and what their kids need. Just responding that you're “fine, just tired” is bullshit, and it teaches our kids to respond with empty rhetoric rather than really checking in with themselves and being honest about their needs and feelings. Chantel is a huge fan of big loose play, which allows kids with high energy to do things like move logs around and build forts before ten o'clock, so they can funnel all their positive energy and then participate in the whole class. Whereas, if you put that same kid in a preschool or kindergarten setting, they wouldn't be able to participate. Chantel emphasizes that, as an educational organization, if you're not empowering parents to feel that you care about their kids and them as a parent, you're not doing your job. I'll never forget my history teacher in the eleventh grade, who literally said, “Fuck this” to our American history textbook that was, like, 1,200 pages long and started with George Washington and the freaking cherry tree. Instead, she pointed out that we'd been born during the Vietnam War and got us to ask our parents about that period in history. For me, this was particularly incredible, not just because I remember everything we learned but also because it was the first time I got along with my parents as a teenager. And it makes me realize how important it is for parents to be engaged with what their kids are learning at school. Meditation is a big element of Chantel's school but not necessarily in the way it looks in the mainstream. Meditation can be a child sitting for two minutes while they pet a leaf and take big breaths or tapping when they're upset. This teaches the child to regulate themselves, and it also doesn't punish the kid for having emotions the way that public school tends to do. Instead of using shame and humiliation to keep kids in line, Chantel encourages risk and play and has a set of standards for how to conduct oneself. She also points out that girls tend to be told to be quiet and don't try to be leaders, an attitude she tries to counter by letting the kids she teaches (including her daughters) feel empowered in their learning and giving parents a track to focus on. I think our kids benefit from multi-age learning because it means they're always with kids they're more advanced than and kids they can strive to become. Chantel's school is multi-age, and she agrees that it's good for the kids to have that balance where the bigger kids are responsible for the littler ones, and the little kids appreciate the good model the big kids are providing. She also points out that she doesn't have to deal with bullying in her school, and part of that is because they don't use the type of language that allows bullying to happen. For example, they don't talk about hitting but instead try to work out what any hitting that happens is trying to communicate—like when her own kids hit, it's always because one took something away from the other and they don't feel seen. One of the advantages of being a forest school is that Chantel's never had to close for COVID because they're outside and haven't had any issues. Chantel keeps a list of grounding exercises for parents who are feeling a little off and tells them to take ten minutes for themselves to do something like a walk in the mud or the leaves until they're feeling better. Chantel has lots of fun stuff coming up in the next few months, including new courses, her own school merchandise, and caregiver classes where parents and caregivers can come to classes with their kids. Quotes: “This woman lives, breathes, eats, and shits proprioception, vestibular movement, and big play. And I have never, in an Instagram feed, seen it so embodied.” “The birth of your children is also the birth of a mother, right? A mother is born the day that your children come into play.” “You're sometimes not ready, but society is ready for you. So you've got to get ready.” “If you need your child reading by three, math by five, this is not your program. I am not that person, I've been that person, I'm never gonna go back to being that person. They're too little, their brains are not fully developed till five.” “The reason we have issues that I've seen directly come up in third and fifth grade is because we stress them out too little. We try to teach them so they're kindergarten ready. But we forgot that it's really their emotional system they need to regulate.” “From three to five, they are geniuses, they want to learn everything. We forget because we're so busy.” “We call rain day, like any time it's raining, they come out of their cars, and they're like, it's worm day! They know they get to go looking for worms. So there's no thought of like, ‘Oh, it's raining, oh, my hair!' They have no concept of that.” “Well-meaning parents who trust the system are saying, ‘Hey, wait a minute, my child's less stressed being home,' or ‘Hey, my child's really upset being home.' They're tapping into sections of their own child and realizing, 'Hmm, you know, I'm not quite sure about this.'” “When the pandemic started, one thing that amazed me was the immediate, like, ‘The kids are falling behind.' And I was like, the entire fucking planet has this thing. There is no longer any behind. How can you be behind? Like, even if your eighteen-year-old is only learning their alphabet, if the rest of the eighteen-year-olds are learning their alphabet, then nobody's behind?” “I have a huge issue with learning how to write very early. I can tell you, if I could do a TED talk, it would be on that.” “One of the things that I think is important is let's get away from sitting. No child should be sitting for more than like four minutes. My daughters, if I had to put them in preschool right now, my one daughter would probably, like, go into depression because she just doesn't sit. Like she just, I've never made her sit, so she doesn't have to sit. She is an exploratory child. She uses her vestibular system constantly.” “Stop telling her to be careful, and start telling her to assess the situation.” “That's the flip side too. If you don't allow your child those opportunities to assess the risk and to honor their body, what happens is you get the YOLO kids, and I call those kids, they're like Wile E. Coyote. They are smashing against, they have no control, smashing against walls, like those are the kids that learn how to ice skate by just flinging themselves across the ice and crashing.” “There was a study that another four school educators said that the more risk you allow between three and five, the less risk they will take in their teens because they honor themselves.” “For me, education happens the most in the car, when it's like, ‘Hey, Mom, where do you think our soul goes?' And that shit always goes down in the car when I don't have Google handy. I have no resources. And I'm like, 'Alright, let's think about this.'” “During the pandemic, what was happening is, poor kids, their first school experience was Zoom meetings. And then they were making these kids stay on for six hours. Kindergarten is not six hours of sit-down work.” “If your four-year-old's measuring in inches in real life, and it's not these just department kind of settings, they're learning not only real skills, but they're learning their math and language, all in one shot.” “They taught the kids how to put on their winter gear. And I was like, that is three-year-old fucking education. You know what, in a literate society, your kid is going to read, your kid is going to learn numbers, like, that's going to happen. Teaching my kid to turn his mittens the right side out so they dry? Thank you.” “I think, from my opinion, there has to be a beautiful blend between life skills, social, and emotional well-being.” “I will say this, my opinion, we cannot teach empathy. We cannot teach a social communication, a dialogue if we don't have it, if we're constantly shoving them into a very busy life with busy things in front of them, because you're taking that away from them.” “Emergent curriculum for us means we are going to put a curriculum based on your child's interest.” “I'll never forget my history teacher in eleventh grade, she was that history teacher, and eleventh grade was American history. The book was like 1,200 pages, started with George Washington and the frickin' cherry tree. And she was like, I swear to God, she said, literally. ‘Fuck this.'” “If somebody says, my kid can't meditate, send them to me. Yes, they can. Meditation looks in the mainstream one way. But if your child can sit for two minutes and pet a leaf and take big deep breaths, that looks like meditation to me, right?” “If I lose my shit in front of my kids, and it was in front of my husband, I ask my husband to come back, and I apologize in front of my husband. You can't yell in public and then say sorry in private, right?” “Risk and play are amazing, shame is just not good.” “Well, listen, if he stops at the boundary line at school, and he's throwing dishes at your head, then you're the problem, not the kid.” “In a classroom, if your child is constantly hitting, it is not that they're bad. It is a form of communication. They're telling you something, and it's very hard.” “I think parents and educators really need to question the system and think about what kind of children they want for the next generation, to lead the world.” Links: Jamie's Homepage - www.jamieglowacki.com Oh Crap! Potty Training – https://www.amazon.com/Crap-Potty-Training-Everything-Parenting-ebook/dp/B00V3L8YSU Oh Crap! I Have A Toddler - https://www.simonandschuster.com/books/Oh-Crap!-I-Have-a-Toddler/Jamie-Glowacki/Oh-Crap-Parenting/9781982109738 Jamie's Patreon Page: www.patreon.com/join/jamieglowacki? Jamie's Instagram Page: @jamie.glowacki Sensory Garden and Play Homepage: https://www.sensorygardenandplay.com/ Chantel's Instagram Page: @sensory    garden_and_ play

The Next Big Idea
THE ESSENTIALS: Our Favorite Moments From Season 4

The Next Big Idea

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 74:05


We laughed. We cried. We learned. As our fourth season draws to a close, we thought we'd share the moments we're still talking about at Next Big Idea Club HQ. Further Listening: • REGRETS: Daniel Pink Has a Few (And So Should You) • VOICE: You Are What You Speak • EXTENDED MIND: Want to Get Smarter? Try Thinking Outside of Your Brain • FUN: How to Have More of It • FEELING & KNOWING: Unlocking the Secrets of Consciousness • REALITY+: Are We Living in a Simulation? • DRUNK: Can Alcohol Make You More Creative, Sociable, and Attractive? • DAWN OF EVERYTHING: The True History of Humanity • LAZINESS: There's No Such Thing • DOPAMINE NATION: Why the Modern World Puts Us All at Risk for Addiction • BITTERSWEET: Susan Cain on the Beauty of Sorrow and Longing • THE BOMBER MAFIA: Malcolm Gladwell on Warfare, Audiobooks, and the Future of Storytelling

Real Vision Presents...
Oil Slips Hard as Recession Risk Rises

Real Vision Presents...

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 36:02 Very Popular


Commodity prices are collapsing, the U.S. dollar is soaring, and the yield curve has inverted again: This is not an auspicious combination. Nor is the fact that a Bloomberg Economics model is now indicating a 38% chance of a recession in the next year. Real Vision's Andreas Steno Larsen welcomes Tony Greer of TG Macro to talk about recent price action in the commodities market and the longer-term supply-demand story for oil and gas – highlighted by a look-in at Tony's recent conversation with the infamous Doomberg about the complexities of hydrocarbons and their everyday use. Andreas and Tony also discuss the current condition of the global economy. Want to submit questions? Drop them right here on the Exchange: https://rvtv.io/3OGZ1ls. Watch the full interview with Doomberg and Tony Greer here: https://rvtv.io/3yh8toE. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Getting Mouthy: ONE more TREE HILL podcast
S2x08 - "What About the Risk of Never Feeling Alive Again?"

Getting Mouthy: ONE more TREE HILL podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 82:58


Annnnnnnnd we are back!!! After a few weeks away due to traveling, recovering from Covid, and generally being disorganized, we have returned to you with another episode of Getting Mouthy. This week, while Nathan and Lucas travel to Charlotte to watch some meaningless basketball footage, the ladies of "the hill" throw a slumber party complete with soiled linens and slut shaming, after Peyton and Anna catch Brooke and Felix mercilessly humping in Haley's bed while Haley was busy laying down tracks with Chris Keller across town. Meanwhile, Karen and Andy are egregiously inappropriate, when Karen hands her professor (and boy toy) Andy her all-nighter paper and he marks it with a big fat A, with absolutely no evidence of ever reading it. Across town, Jules and Keith are giggling, tickling, and drowning in each other's juices all episode long, before taking a big step forward in their relationship. Join us as we discuss every component of this episode that you can possibly imagine. And, if you like us, please leave us a review on Apple Podcasts or just think fondly of us for a few moments. Also, check out our Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/gettingmouthypod/ to see memes that we try to create with each episode in mind.

NAB Morning Call
Significant risk, still?

NAB Morning Call

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 14:44


Thursday 7th July 2022 The FOMC minutes are out, pointing to significant risk if inflation isn't nipped in the bud. Markets are taking this as a sign that the Fed will lift rates more quickly, starting with a 50-75 basis point hike at the next meeting. This has added to concerns about the Fed inducing a recession, yet equity markets continue to climb. Phil asks NAB's Ray Attrill whether the minutes are a little out of date, given the ISM read shows a fall in employment. We'll get a clear indication of the jobless rate with initial claims for the US tonight. And Australia's trade balance is the major release locally.

Daily Detroit
A day without cars on Belle Isle? + Transit in Macomb County at risk

Daily Detroit

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 17:55


Transit Guide Detroit's Dave Gifford joins us for a conversation on a couple of topical issues. First, what about a day once in awhile with no cars on Belle Isle? A petition aims to do just that. We also do some myth busting about Belle Isle's history and design. Petition: https://www.change.org/p/car-free-day-on-belle-isle Plus, Macomb County due to a procedural matter may not have SMART on the ballot this November to renew their millage if action is not taken. Without the millage, all of the communities in Macomb County would lose their service. Beyond that, it's going to be a tough fight at the ballot box to keep it. David helps us sort things out. You can help us rebuild after the studio fire: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/dailydetroit Our you can become a monthly member on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/DailyDetroit  

Real Personal Finance
159 - How Much Company Stock Ownership Is Too Much?

Real Personal Finance

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 19:17


Scott and James discuss how much company stock ownership is too much. Planning Points Discussed Utilizing Time Efficiently Capital Appreciation Purchasing Power Other issues (IRAs, Inflation, Financial Goals, etc.) Listener Question: I'm a manager at a blue chip company and they offer up to 20% of their stock in your 401K. Right now I have 8% of my 401K invested in company stock with the rest in target date funds. I'm wondering your thoughts on if 8% is too much or too little. I have another IRA with good mutual funds and a personal brokerage account where I pick my own stocks. Just wanted to add that in so you didn't think that this 401K is my only savings for retirement. Timestamps: 4:28 - Rules of Thumb 9:32 - Casting A Wide Net 13:47 - Risk v. Return 17:12 - Company Stock Summary 18:44 - Aligning Your Financial Goals With Your Life LET'S CONNECT! James Facebook LinkedIn Website Scott Facebook Twitter Website ENJOY THE SHOW? Don't miss an episode, subscribe via iTunes, Stitcher, Spotify, or Google Play. Leave us a review on iTunes. Have a money question you want us to answer? Submit one here

Gametalk
The Summer Showcases

Gametalk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 98:12


Episode 109 On today's episode, we discuss the Xbox Summer 2022 games showcase and the latest PlayStation State of Play. As always, we conclude with what we're playing (Outward, Risk of Rain 2, Vampire: The Masquerade – Bloodhunt, Switch Sports, V Rising, Generation Zero, Crusader Kings III). This episode was recorded in June 2022. Royalty free music from BenSound. Questions or comments? Tweet @PodcastGametalk Or chat us up in Discord - discord.gg/JZCj5Qn Timestamps: 0:00 - Intro 1:12 - Redfall, Silksong, and High On Life 8:20 - Riot Partnership 13:32 - Kojima Partnership 18:56 - Persona On Xbox, Forzo Motorsport, and Flight Sim Updates 22:05 - Overwatch 2 and Diablo IV 25:05 - Ara History Untold and Game Updates 29:39 - Minecraft Legends, Pentiment, Grounded, and More 37:11 - Cocoon and Wo Long: Fallen Dynasty 40:02 - Starfield 52:30 - Resident Evil 4 Remake and Street Fighter 6 57:49 - Resident Evil 8 VR, Horizon Call of the Mountain, and PSVR2 Games 59:46 - Spider-Man on PC, The Last of Us Part I, Horizon Forbidden West Updates 1:05:48 - Stray, The Callisto Protocol, Tunic, and More 1:09:15 - Final Fantasy XVI 1:11:29 - Outward, Risk of Rain 2, Vampire: The Masquerade – Bloodhunt 1:14:55 - Switch Sports 1:20:10 - V Rising 1:24:47 - Generation Zero 1:29:18 - Crusader Kings III

Facts Matter
States Risk Massive Security Breaches by Using ‘Low Cost' Chinese Computer Equipment | Facts Matter

Facts Matter

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 16:51


We had an opportunity to sit down with Roslyn Layton and discussed the national security and political implications of the United States outsourcing its manufacturing of pharmaceuticals and electronics to China. Layton informed me that state governments are using Chinese-made equipment that is banned for use at the federal government level over technology and privacy concerns. There currently is no continuity between the levels of government that states can look to for a list of potentially hazardous technical equipment that is vulnerable to cyber intrusion. Because of this, equipment is being used by state-run agencies like the Department of Elections and others that collect large amounts of personal data from their citizens that are at a high risk of being collected and handed over to the Chinese regime. ⭕️ Sign up for our NEWSLETTER and stay in touch

The Bitboy Crypto Podcast
SHOCKING Bitcoin & Crypto Stats! (BIGGEST RISK For U.S. Treasury!!)

The Bitboy Crypto Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 79:08


In this video, we will discuss the price of Bitcoin, Ethereum, and the top altcoins. We'll take a look at the cryptocurrency markets and the latest crypto news.

Jay Sekulow Live Radio Show
Mike Pompeo: This is a Risk to American Sovereignty

Jay Sekulow Live Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 50:58 Very Popular


ACLJ Senior Counsel for Global Affairs and former U.S. Secretary of State under President Donald Trump Mike Pompeo joins us in the Sekulow studio to talk about a number of urgent issues affecting the American people under the Biden Administration. Jay, Jordan, and the rest of the Sekulow team discuss. This and more today on Sekulow.

Bloomberg Businessweek
Recession Risk Growing as Inflation Stays Hot

Bloomberg Businessweek

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 28:36 Very Popular


Neil Dutta, Head of Economic Research at Renaissance Macro, explains why he is seeing a recession trade in the markets. Bloomberg Businessweek Freelance Reporter Simon van Zuylen-Wood talks about his Businessweek Magazine story Lottery Lawyer Won Their Trust, Then Lost Their Mega Millions. Bloomberg News Investigative Reporter for Legal Enforcement Team Greg Farrell shares the behind the scenes details of Bill Hwang's Archegos Capital Management. And we Drive to the Close with Sylvia Jablonski, Chief Investment Officer at Defiance ETFs. Hosts: Paul Sweeney and Kriti Gupta. Producer: Paul Brennan.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Commercial Real Estate Pro Network
BIGGEST RISK with Nobu Iguchi

Commercial Real Estate Pro Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 4:23


I'd like to ask you, Nobu, Iguchi, what is the BIGGEST RISK?   Nobu Iguchi   Yeah, this very deep question, but I think the, let me try kind of the short term and the long term, if I may, I think in the short term, so, you know, this is this is May, right, May of 2022, the world is looking, increasingly uncertain.  The economies looking increasingly after the inflation is through the roof. There's no, no indication is subsiding. And there's not a question that the Fed is going to keep raising interest rates. And even if they keep raising interest rates, which is basically I think, at this point, given, the question becomes, you know, is the interest rate? Is inflation actually going to come down? And what's the, let's say, stabilize the 4% 5%? I mean, is that acceptable to the Fed? And the likely answer is no, because they want the 2% interest rate, which is good for the economy, and that's their mandate.    So if that's not acceptable, they may have to keep bringing interest rates even further up, which is a substantial risk for the, for the asset for the assets, asset prices, in general real estate, and also public market assets and private market assets. And, and also, it's an it's a risk to the economy. So it could lead to more job losses, unfortunately, and so on. So in the, in the short term, that's, that's, to me seems like a huge risk. For many of us a different context, it could be about our jobs, let's say, from an investor standpoint, for portfolio companies, the companies that we've invested in, I think there's a huge risk, they should prepare for it. So you know, for example, having not just having six months of cash in the bank, but you know, 18 months of cash in the bank, just in case, you know, there's a substantial food, our economy, they find it challenging to raise capital, and so on, and so forth. Real Estate operators. Again, it's the same where, you know, even though COVID, you know, in the United States seems to be to a large degree, you know, not a big, big factor anymore, and people are coming back to the office, perhaps that's going to have a substantially negative impact on our company's willingness to have more office space. Right. So I think that, to me, seems like a short term, big risk of like, in as big as through what the buffer should be, in each case, in one's case, to see it to prepare for the future. In the long term, what we see is an apology I have alergies today.    But in the long term, what I would say is, even though, let's say with that sort of Outlook, technology companies, you've seen NASDAQ down a lot, you've seen venture valuation down a lot, right? And so on and so forth. But in the long term, we're very bullish still in, in, in technology, on technology, and in fact, are some of the best technology companies, including the say, Airbnb in the in the in real estate space, came out of basically a recessionary period. So even though that seems like a huge risk to have technology exposure, in the long term, there's a ton of risk in not investing in technology. So we talked about web three as one example. You don't have to necessarily invest in every single web three company or like, you know, adopt anything that comes out, but is keeping track of what's in the face. And even investing, let's say, as a real estate operator or investor and so on and so forth. And some of these, I think, actually, in a lot of ways mitigates risk. because there is a risk of obviously investing in failing in that, but also also other risks, which is you don't invest. And five years, 10 years later, you're kind of left behind. Right. So I think saying the short term there is the kind of inflation risks that could lead to potentially a recession that could lead to asset price. Coming down even further, in the long term, long term, that the risk is not investing in technology, and thereby being left behind.

Books N' Betches
Ep. 74- The Betches talk the Mindf*ck Series- "The Risk" by S.T. Abby

Books N' Betches

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 40:48


We've been talking about this book/series for a while and Erica finally convinced Maria and Kristin to read it! First, read this rock star of a series, then pop onto this episode so you can yell into the void while the Betches discuss, dissect, and ultimately spoil this book for you. As always, there will be plenty of book banter and chaos! Follow us on Instagram for previews of next week's episode and more bookish content, too! @books_n_betches --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/booksnbetches/support

The tastytrade network
Options Jive - July 5, 2022 - How Much of BPR is at Risk

The tastytrade network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 25:15


The BPR for a short option trade is how much capital the brokerage reserves to cover potential losses. But how often does it really come to that? Today, Tony and Nick dive into the data to see just how often we lose how much of the BPR, contrasting a range of underlying's and strategies.

The $100 MBA Show
MBA2084 How To Deal With Free Trial & Refund Abuse

The $100 MBA Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 22:16


Risk reversal is a must for most products and services. But inevitably, someone tries to turn a fair shake into a ploy for free stuff — at your expense. So how can you prevent someone from using your free trial offer as a way to get…more than a trial? Today, we share all the ways […] The post MBA2084 How To Deal With Free Trial & Refund Abuse appeared first on The $100 MBA.

The Audit Podcast
Ep 104: How to deliver bad news w/ Julie Thompson (Auditing Alliance)

The Audit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 33:54


This week Julie Thompson, Founder of Auditing Alliance, joins the show with special guest host Ann Butera, author and founder of The Whole Person Project. On this episode, they discuss Julie's background as a certified professional environmental auditor, the best ways to deliver bad news, and choosing your words wisely to communicate the message you wish to share.   Check out Ann's books Say What!? Communicate with Tact and Impact and Mastering the Five Tiers of Audit Competency.   Be sure to keep up with Ann and Audley on LinkedIn.   Be sure to follow us on our new social media accounts on LinkedIn, Instagram, and TikTok. Also be sure to sign up for The Audit Podcast newsletter and to check out my favorite part of the interview on The Audit Podcast YouTube channel.   *   This podcast is brought to you by Greenskies Analytics, the services firm that helps auditors leap-frog up the analytics maturity model. Their approach for launching audit analytics programs with a series of proven quick-win analytics will guarantee the results worthy of the analytics hype.  Whether your audit team needs a data strategy, methodology, governance, literacy, or anything else related to audit and analytics, schedule time with Greenskies Analytics.   *   This podcast is also brought to you by AuditBoard, the leading cloud-based platform transforming how enterprises manage risk. AuditBoard's integrated suite of easy-to-use audit, risk, and compliance solutions streamlines internal audit, SOX compliance, risk management, and security compliance. Automate processes and improve execution with AuditBoard's purpose-built solution, which is designed to address the most pressing challenges of today's practitioners.   Experience the latest in Audit, Risk, and Compliance technology. Visit AuditBoard.com to schedule your product walkthrough to see AuditBoard's award-winning platform in action today. 

The Lunar Society
32: Sam Bankman-Fried - Crypto, Altruism, and Leadership

The Lunar Society

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 46:00


I flew to the Bahamas to interview Sam Bankman-Fried, the CEO of FTX! He talks about FTX’s plan to infiltrate traditional finance, giving $100m this year to AI + pandemic risk, scaling slowly + hiring A-players, and much more.Watch on YouTube, or listen on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or any other podcast platform. Read the full transcript here. Follow me on Twitter for updates on future episodes.Timestamps(00:18) - How inefficient is the world?(01:11) - Choosing a career(04:15) - The difficulty of being a founder(06:21) - Is effective altruism too narrowminded?(09:57) - Political giving(12:55) - FTX Future Fund(16:41) - Adverse selection in philanthropy(18:06) - Correlation between different causes(22:15) - Great founders do difficult things(25:51) - Pitcher fatigue and the importance of focus(28:30) - How SBF identifies talent(31:09) - Why scaling too fast kills companies(33:51) - The future of crypto(35:46) - Risk, efficiency, and human discretion in derivatives(41:00) - Jane Street vs FTX(41:56) - Conflict of interest between broker and exchange(42:59) - Bahamas and Charter Cities(43:47) - SBF’s RAM-skewed mindUnfortunately, audio quality abruptly drops from 17:50-19:15TranscriptDwarkesh Patel 0:09Today on The Lunar Science Society Podcast, I have the pleasure of interviewing Sam Bankman-Fried, CEO of FTX. Thanks for coming on The Lunar Society.Sam Bankman-Fried 0:17Thanks for having me.How inefficient is the world?Dwarkesh Patel 0:18Alright, first question. Does the consecutive success of FTX and Alameda suggest to you that the world has all kinds of low-hanging opportunities? Or was that a property of the inefficiencies of crypto markets at one particular point in history?Sam Bankman-Fried 0:31I think it's more of the former, there are just a lot of inefficiencies.Dwarkesh Patel 0:35So then another part of the question is: if you had to restart earning to give again, what are the odds you become a billionaire, but you can't do it in crypto?Sam Bankman-Fried 0:42I think they're pretty decent. A lot of it depends on what I ended up choosing and how aggressive I end up deciding to be. There were a lot of safe and secure career paths before me that definitely would not have ended there. But if I dedicated myself to starting up some businesses, there would have been a pretty decent chance of it.Choosing a careerDwarkesh Patel 1:11So that leads to the next question—which is that you've cited Will MacAskill's lunch with you while you were at MIT as being very important in deciding your career. He suggested you earn-to-give by going to a quant firm like Jane Street. In retrospect, given the success you've had as a founder, was that maybe bad advice? And maybe you should’ve been advised to start a startup or nonprofit?Sam Bankman-Fried 1:31I don't think it was literally the best possible advice because this was in 2012. Starting a crypto exchange then would have been…. I think it was definitely helpful advice. Relative to not having gotten advice at all, I think it helps quite a bit.Dwarkesh Patel 1:50Right. But then there's a broader question: are people like you who could become founders advised to take lower variance, lower risk careers that in, expected value, are less valuable?Sam Bankman-Fried 2:02Yeah, I think that's probably true. I think people are advised too strongly to go down safe career paths. But I think it's worth noting that there's a big difference between what makes sense altruistically and personally for this. To the extent you're just thinking of personal criteria, that's going to argue heavily in favor of a safer career path because you have much more quickly declining marginal utility of money than the world does. So, this kind of path is specifically for altruistically-minded people.The other thing is that when you think about advising people, I think people will often try and reference career advice that others got. “What were some of these outward-facing factors of success that you can see?” But often the answer has something to do with them and their family, friends, or something much more personal. When we talk with people about their careers, personal considerations and the advice of people close to them weigh very heavily on the decisions they end up making.Dwarkesh Patel 3:17I didn't realize that the personal considerations were as important in your case as the advice you got.Sam Bankman-Fried 3:24Oh, I don’t think in my case. But, it is true with many people that I talked to.Dwarkesh Patel 3:29Speaking of declining marginal consumption, I'm wondering if you think the implication of this is that over the long term, all the richest people in the world will be utilitarian philanthropists because they don't have diminishing returns of consumption. They’re risk-neutral.Sam Bankman-Fried 3:40I wouldn't say all will, but I think there probably is something in that direction. People who are looking at how they can help the world are going to end up being disproportionately represented amongst the most and maybe least successful.The difficulty of being a founderDwarkesh Patel 3:54Alright, let’s talk about Effective Altruism. So in your interview with Tyler Cowen, you were asked, “What constrains the number of altruistically minded projects?” And you answered, “Probably someone who can start something.”Now, is this a property of the world in general? Or is this a property of EAs? And if it's about EAs, then is there something about the movement that drives away people who took could take leadership roles?Sam Bankman-Fried 4:15Oh, I think it's just the world in general. Even if you ignore altruistic projects and just look at profit-minded ones, we have lots of ideas for businesses that we think would probably do well, if they were run well, that we'd be excited to fund. And the missing ingredient quite frequently for them is the right person or team to take the lead on it. In general, starting something is brutal. It's brutal being a founder, and it requires a somewhat specific but extensive list of skills. Those things end up making it high in demand.Dwarkesh Patel 4:56What would it take to get more of those kinds of people to go into EA?Sam Bankman-Fried 4:59Part of it is probably just talking with them about, “Have you thought about what you can do for the world? Have you thought about how you can have an impact on the world? Have you thought about how you can maximize your impact on the world?” Many people would be excited about thinking critically and ambitiously about how they can help the world. So I think honestly, just engagement is one piece of this. And then even within people who are altruistically minded and thinking about what it would take for them to be founders, there are still things that you can do.Some of this is about empowering people and some of this is about normalizing the fact that when you start something, it might fail—and that's okay. Most startups and especially very early-stage startups should not be trying to maximize the chances of having at least a little bit of success. But that means you have to be okay with the personal fallout of failing and that we have to build a community that is okay with that. I don't think we have that right now, I think very few communities do.Is effective altruism too narrowminded?Dwarkesh Patel 6:21Now, there are many good objections to utilitarianism, as you know. You said yourself that we don't have a good account of infinite ethics—should we attribute substantial weight to the probability that utilitarianism is wrong? And how do you hedge for this moral uncertainty in your giving?Sam Bankman-Fried 6:35So I don't think it has a super large impact on my giving. Partially, because you'd need to have a concrete proposal for what else you would do that would be different actions-wise—and I don't know that that I've been compelled by many of those. I do think that there are a lot of things we don't understand right now. And one thing that you pointed to is infinite ethics. Another thing is that (I'm not sure this is moral uncertainty, this might be physical uncertainty) there are a lot of sort of chains of reasoning people will go down that are somewhat contingent on our current understanding of the universe—which might not be right. And if you look at expected-value outcomes, might not be right.Say what you will about the size of the universe and what that implies, but some of the same people make arguments based on how big the universe is and also think the simulation hypothesis has decent probability. Very few people chain through, “What would that imply?” I don't think it's clear what any of this implies. If I had to say, “How have these considerations changed my thoughts on what to do?”The honest answer is that they have changed it a little bit. And the direction that they pointed me in is things with moderately more robust impact. And what I mean by that is, I'm sure one way that you can calculate the expected value of an action is, “Here's what's going to happen. Here are the two outcomes, and here are the probabilities of them.” Another thing you can do is say - it's a little bit more hand-wavy - but, “How much better is this going to make the world? How much does it matter if the world is better in generic diffuse ways?” Typically, EA has been pretty skeptical of that second line of reasoning—and I think correctly. When you see that deployed, it's nonsense. Usually, when people are pretty hard to nail down on the specific reasoning of why they think that something might be good, it’s because they haven't thought that hard about it or don't want to think that hard about it. The much better analyzed and vetted pathways are the ones we should be paying attention to.That being said, I do think that sometimes EA gets too narrow-minded and specific about plotting out courses of impact. And this is one of the reasons why that people end up fixating on one particular understanding of the universe, of ethics, of how things are going to progress. But, all of these things have some amount of uncertainty in them. And when you jostle them, some theories of impact behave somewhat robustly and some of them completely fall apart. I’ve become a bit more sympathetic to ones that are a little robust under thoughts about what the world ends up looking like.Political givingDwarkesh Patel 9:57In the May 2022 Oregon Congressional Election, you gave 12 million dollars to Carrick Flynn, whose campaign was ultimately unsuccessful. How have you updated your beliefs about the efficacy of political giving in the aftermath?Sam Bankman-Fried 10:12It was the first time that I gave on that scale in a race. And I did it because he was, of all the candidates in the cycle, the most outspoken on the need for more pandemic preparedness and prevention. He lost—such is life. In the end, there are some updates on the efficacy of various things. But, I never thought that the odds were extremely high that he was going to win. It was always going to be an uncertain close race. There's a limit to how much you can update from a one-time occurrence. If you thought the odds were 50-50, and it turns out to be close in one direction or another, there's a maximum of a factor-of-two update that you have on that. There were a bunch of sort of micro-updates on specific factors of the race, but on a high level, it didn’t change my perspective on policy that much.Dwarkesh Patel 11:23But does it make you think there are diminishing or possibly negative marginal returns from one donor giving to a candidate? Because of the negative PR?Sam Bankman-Fried 11:30At some point, I think that's probably true.Dwarkesh Patel 11:33Continuing on the theme of politics, when is it more effective to give the marginal million dollars to a political campaign or institution to make some change at the government level (like putting in early detection)? Or when is it more effective to fund it yourself?Sam Bankman-Fried 11:47It's a good question. It's not necessarily mutually exclusive. One thing worth looking at is the scale of the things that need to happen. How much are things like international cooperation important for it? When you look at pandemic prevention, we're talking tens of billions of dollars of scale necessary to start putting this infrastructure in place. So it's a pretty big scale thing—which is hard to fund to that level individually. It’s also something where we’re going to need to have cooperation between different countries on, for example, what their surveillance for new pathogens looks like. And vaccine distribution If some countries have a great distribution of vaccines and others don't, that's not good. It's both not fair and not equitable for the countries that get hit hardest. But also, in a global pandemic, it's going to spread. You need global coverage. That's another reason that government has to be involved, at least to some extent, in the efforts.FTX Future FundDwarkesh Patel 12:55Let's talk about Future Fund. As you know, there are already many existing Effective Altruist organizations that do donations. What is the reason you thought there was more value in creating a new one? What's your edge?Sam Bankman-Fried 13:06 There's value in having multiple organizations. Every organization has its blind spots, and you can help cover those up if you have a few. If OpenPhil didn't exist, maybe we would have created an organization that looks more like OpenPhil. They are covering a lot of what we’re looking at—we're looking at overlapping, but not identical things. I think having that diversity can be valuable, but pointing to the ways in which we intentionally designed to be a little bit different from existing donors:One thing that I've been really happy about is the re-granting program. We have a number of people who are experts in various areas to who we've basically donated pots that they can re-grant. What are the reasons that we think this is valuable? One thing is giving more stakeholders a chance to voice their opinions because we can't possibly be listening to everyone in the world directly and integrating all those opinions to come up with a perfect set of answers. Distributing it and letting them act semi-autonomously can help with that. The other thing is that it helps with a large number of smaller grants. When you think about what an organization giving away $100 million in a year is thinking about, “if we divided that up into $25,000 grants, how many grants would that mean?” 4,000 grants to analyze, right? If we want to give real thought to each one of those, we can't do that.But on the flip side, sometimes the smaller grants are the most impactful per dollar and there are a lot of cases where someone really impressive has an exciting idea for a new foundation or a new organization that could do a lot of good for the world and needs $25,000 to get started. To rent out a small office, to be able to cover salaries for two employees for the first six months. Those are the kind of cases where a pretty small grant can make a huge change in the development of what might ultimately become a really impactful organization. But they're the kind of things that are really hard for our team to evaluate all of, just given the number of them—but the re-grantor program gives us a way to do that. Instead, we have 10, 50, or 100 re-grantors, who are going out and finding a lot of those opportunities close to them, they can then identify those and direct those grants—and it gives us a much wider reach. It also biases it less towards people who we happen to know, which is good.We don't want to just like overfund everyone we know and underfund everyone that we don’t. That's one initiative that I've been pretty excited about that we're going to keep doing. Another thing we've really tried to have a lot of emphasis on making the (application) process smooth and clean. There are pros and cons to this. But it drops the activation energy necessary for someone to decide to apply for a grant and fill out all of the forms. We’ve really tried to bring more people into the fold.Adverse selection in philanthropyDwarkesh Patel 16:41If you make it easy for people to fill out your application and generally fund things that other organizations wouldn't, how do you deal with the possibility of adverse selection in your philanthropic deal flow?Sam Bankman-Fried 16:52It's a really good question. It’s a worry that Bob down the street might see a great book case study that he wants and wonder if he can get funding for this bookcase as it’s going to house a lot of knowledge. Knowledge is good, right? Obviously, we would detect that pretty quickly. The basic answer is that we still vet all of these. We do have oversight of them. But, we also do a deep dive into both all of the large ones, but also into samplings of all the small ones. We do deep dives into randomly sampled subsets of them—which allows us to get a good statistical sense of whether we are facing significant adverse selection in them. So far, we haven't seen obvious signs of it, but we're going to keep doing these analyses and see if anything worrying comes out of those. But that's a way to be able to have more trusted analyses for more scaled-up numbers of grants.Correlation between different causesDwarkesh Patel 18:06A long time ago, you wrote a blog post about how EA causes are multiplicative, instead of additive. Do you still find that's the case with most of the causes you care about? Or are there cases where some of the causes you care about are negatively multiplicative? An example might be economic growth and the speed at which AI takes off.Sam Bankman-Fried 18:24Yeah, I think it’s getting more complicated. Specifically around AI, you have a lot of really complex factors that can point in the same direction or in opposite directions. Especially if what you think matters is something like the relative progress of AI safety research versus AI capabilities research, a lot of things are going to have the same impact on both of those, and thus confusing impact on safety as a whole.I do think it's more complicated now. It's not cleanly things just multiplying with each other. There are lots of cases where you see multiplicative behavior, but there are cases where you don't have that. The conclusion of this is: if you have multiplicative cases, you want to be funding each piece of it. But if you don't, then you want to be trained to identify the most impactful pieces and move those along. Our behavior should be different in those two scenarios.Dwarkesh Patel 19:23If you think of your philanthropy from a portfolio perspective, is correlation good or bad?Sam Bankman-Fried 19:29Expected value is expected value, right? Let's pretend that there is one person in Bangladesh and another one in Mexico. We have two interventions, both 50-50 on saving each of their lives. Suppose there’s some new drug that we could release to combat a neglected disease. This question is asking, “are they correlated?” “Are these two drugs correlated in their efficacy?” And my basic argument is, “it doesn't matter, right?” If you think about it from each of their perspectives, the person in Mexico isn't saying, “I only want to be saved in the cases where the person in Bangladesh is or isn't saved.” That’s not relevant. They want to live.The person in Bangladesh similarly wishes to live. You want to help both of them as much as you can. It's not super relevant whether there’s alignment or anti-alignment between the cases where you get lucky and the ones where you don't.Dwarkesh Patel 20:46What’s the most likely reason that Future Fund fails to live up to your expectations?Sam Bankman-Fried 20:51We get a little lame. We give to a lot of decent things. But all the cooler or more innovative things that we do, don't seem to work very well. We end up giving the same that everyone else is giving. We don’t turn out to be effective at starting new things, we don't turn out to be effective at thinking of new causes or executing them. Hopefully, we'll avoid that. But, it's always a risk.Dwarkesh Patel 21:21Should I think of your charitable giving, as a yearly contribution of a billion dollars? Or should I think of it as a $30 billion hedge against the possibility that there's going to be some existential risk that requires a large pool of liquid wealth?Sam Bankman-Fried 21:36It's a really good question, I'm not sure. We've given away about 100 million so far this year. We're going to start doing that because we think there are really important things to fund and to start scaling up those systems. We notice opportunities as they come and we have systems ready in place to give to them. But it's something we're really actively discussing internally—how concentrated versus diffuse we want that giving to be, and storing up for one very large opportunity versus a mixture of many.Great founders do difficult thingsDwarkesh Patel 22:15When you look at a proposal and think this project could be promising, but this is not the right person to lead it, what is the trait that's most often missing?Sam Bankman-Fried 22:22Super interesting. I am going to ignore the obvious answer which is that the guy is not very good and look at cases where it's someone pretty impressive, but not the right fit for this. There are a few things. One of them is how much are they going to want to deal with really messy s**t. This is a huge thing! When I was working at Jane Street, I had a great time there. One thing I didn’t realize was valuable until I saw the alternative—if I decided that is a good trade to buy one share of Apple stock on NASDAQ, there's a button to do that.If you as a random citizen want to buy one share of Apple stock directly on an exchange, it'll cost you tens of millions of dollars a year to get set up. You have to get a physical colo(cation) in Secaucus, New Jersey, have market data agreements with these companies, think about the sip and about the NBBO and whether you’re even allowed to list on NASDAQ, and then build the technological infrastructure to do it. But all of that comes after you get a bank account.Getting a bank account that's going to work in finance is really hard. I spent hundreds, if not thousands of hours of my life, trying to open bank accounts. One of the things at early Alameda that was really crucial to our ability to make money was having someone very senior spend hours per day in a physical bank branch, manually instructing wire transfers. If we didn't do that, we wouldn't have been able to do the trade.When you start a company, there are enormous amounts of s**t that looks like that. Things that are dumb or annoying or broken or unfair, or not how the world should work. But that’s how the world does work. The only way to be successful is to fight through that. If you're going to be like, “I'm the CEO, I don't do that stuff,” then no one's going to do that at your company. It's not going to get done. You won't have a bank account and you won't be able to operate. One of the biggest traits that are incredibly important for a founder and for an early team at a company (but not important for everything in life) is willing to do a ton of grunt work if it’s important for the company right then.Viewing it not as “low prestige” or “too easy” for you, but as, “This is the important thing. This is a valuable thing to do. So it's what I'm going to do.” That's one of the core traits. The other thing is asking if they’re excited about this idea? Will they actually put their heart and soul into it? Or are they going to be not really into it and half-ass? Those are two things that I really look for.Pitcher fatigue and the importance of focusDwarkesh Patel 25:51How have you used your insights about pitcher fatigue to allocate talent in your companies?Sam Bankman-Fried 25:58Haha. When it comes to pitchers, in baseball, there's a lot of evidence that they get worse over the course of the game. Partially, because it's hard on the arm. But, it's worth noting that the evidence seems to support the claim that it depends on the pitchers. But in general, you're better off breaking up your outings. It's not just a function of how many innings they pitch that season, but also extremely recently. If you could choose between someone throwing six innings every six days, or throwing three innings every three days, you should use the latter. That's going to get the better pitching on average, and just as many innings out of them—and baseball has since then moved very far in that direction. The average number of pitches thrown by starting pitchers has gone down a lot over the last 5-10 years.How do I use that in my company? There’s a metaphor here except this is with computer work instead of physical arm work. You don't have the same effect where your arm is getting sore, your muscles snap, and you need surgery if you pitch too hard for too long. That doesn't directly translate—but there's an equivalent of this with people getting tired and exhausted. But on the other hand, context is a huge, huge piece of being effective. Having all the context in your mind of what's going on, what you're working on, and what the company is doing makes it easier to operate effectively. For instance, if you could have either two half-time employees or one full-time employee, you're way better off with one full-time employee because they're going to have more context than either of the part-time employees would have—thus be able to work way more efficiently.In general, concentrated work is pretty valuable. If you keep breaking up your work, you're never going to do as great of work as if you truly dove into something.How SBF identifies talentDwarkesh Patel 28:30You've talked about how you weigh experience relatively little when you're deciding who to hire. But in a recent Twitter thread, you mentioned that being able to provide mentorship to all the people who you hire is one of the bottlenecks to you being able to scale. Is there a trade-off here where if you don't hire people for experience, you have to give them more mentorship and thus can't scale as fast?Sam Bankman-Fried 28:51It's a good question. To a surprising extent, we found that the experience of the people that we hire has not had much correlation with how much mentorship they need. Much more important is how they think, how good they are at understanding new and different situations, and how hard they try to integrate into their understanding of coding how FTX works. We actually have by and large found that other things are much better predictors of how much oversight and mentorship they’re going to need then.Dwarkesh Patel 29:35How do you assess that short of hiring them for a month and then seeing how they did?Sam Bankman-Fried 29:39It's tough, I don't think we're perfect at it. But things that we look at are, “Do they understand quickly what the goal of a product is? How does that inform how they build it?” When you're looking at developers, I think we want people who can understand what FTX is, how it works, and thus what the right way to architect things would be for that rather than treating it as an abstract engineering problem divorced from the ultimate product.You can ask people like, “Hey, here's a high-level customer experience or customer goal. How would you architect a system to create that?” That’s one thing that we look for. An eagerness to learn and adapt. It's not trivial to ask for that. But you can do some amount of that by giving people novel scenarios and seeing how much they break versus how much they bend. That can be super valuable. Specifically searching for developers who are willing to deal with messy scenarios rather than wanting a pristine world to work in. Our company is customer-facing and has to face some third-party tooling. All those things mean that we have to interface with things that are messy and the way the world is.Why scaling too fast kills companiesDwarkesh Patel 31:09Before you launched FTX, you gave detailed instructions to the existing exchanges about how to improve their system, how to remove clawbacks, and so on. Looking back, they left billions of dollars of value on the table. Why didn't they just fix what you told them to fix?Sam Bankman-Fried 31:22My sense is that it’s part of a larger phenomenon. One piece of this is that they didn't have a lot of market structure experts. They did not have the talent in-house to think really deeply about risk engines. Also, there are cultural barriers between myself and some of them, which meant that they were less inclined than they otherwise would have been to take it very seriously. Ignoring those factors, there's something much bigger at play there. Many of these exchanges had hired a lot of people and they got in very large. You might think they were more capable of doing things with more horsepower. But in practice, most of the time that we see a company grow really fast, really quickly, and get really big in terms of people, it becomes an absolute mess.Internally, there's huge diffusion of responsibility issues. No one's really taking charge. You can't figure out who's supposed to do what. In the end, nothing gets done. You actually start hitting the negative marginal utility of employees pretty quickly. The more people you have, the less total you get done. That happened to a number of them to the point where I sent them these proposals. Where did they go internally? Who knows. The Vice President of Exchange Risk Operations (but not the real one—the fake one operating under some department with an unclear goal and mission) had no idea what to do with it. Eventually, she passes it off to a random friend of hers that was the developer for the mobile app and was like, “You're a computer person, is this right?” They likely said, “I don’t know, I'm not a risk person,” and that's how it died. I’m not saying that’s literally what happened but sounds kinda like that’s probably happened. It's not like they had people who took responsibility and thought, “Wow, this is scary. I should make sure that the best person in the company gets this,” and pass it to the person who thinks about their risk modeling. I don't think that's what happened.The future of cryptoDwarkesh Patel 33:51There're two ways of thinking about the impact of crypto on financial innovation. One is the crypto maximalist view that crypto subsumes tradfi. The other is that you're basically stress-testing some ideas in a volatile, fairly unregulated market that you're actually going to bring to tradfi, but this is not going to lead to some sort of decentralized utopia. Which of these models is more correct? Or is there a third model that you think is the correct one?Sam Bankman-Fried 34:18Who knows exactly what's going to happen? It's going to be path-dependent. If I had to guess I would say that a lot of properties of what is happening crypto today will make their way into Trad Fi to some extent. I think blockchain settlement has a lot of value and can clean up a lot of areas of traditional market structure. Composable applications are super valuable and are going to get more important over time. In some areas of this, it's not clear what's going to happen. When you think about how decentralized ecosystems and regulation intersect, it's a little TBD exactly where that ends up.I don't want to state with extreme confidence exactly what will or won't happen. Stablecoins becoming an important settlement mechanism is pretty likely. Blockchains in general becoming a settlement mechanism, collateral clearing mechanism, and more assets getting tokenized seem likely. There being programs written on blockchains that people can add to that can compose with each other seems pretty likely to me. A lot of other areas of it could go either way.Risk, efficiency, and human discretion in derivativesDwarkesh Patel 35:46Let's talk about your proposal to the CFTC to replace Futures Commission Merchants with algorithmic real-time risk management. There's a worry that without human discretion, you have algorithms that will cause liquidation cascades when they were not necessary. Is there some role for human discretion in these kinds of situations?Sam Bankman-Fried 36:06There is! The way that traditional future market structure works is you have a clearinghouse with a decent amount of manual discretion in it connected to FCMs. Some of which use human discretion, and some of which use automated risk management algorithms with their clients. The smaller the client, the more automated it is. We are inverting that where at the center, you have an automated clearing house. Then, you connect it to FCM, which could use discretionary systems when managing their clients.The key difference here is that one way or another, the initial margin has to end up at the clearinghouse. A programmatic amount of it and the clearinghouse acts in a clear way. The goal of this is to prevent contagion between different intermediaries. Whatever credit decisions one intermediary makes, with respect to their customers, doesn't pose risk to other intermediaries. This is because someone has to post the collateral to the clearinghouse in the end—whether it's the FCM, their customer, or someone else. It gives clear rules of the road and lack of systemic risk spreading throughout the system and contains risk to the parties that choose to take that risk on - to the FCMs that choose to make credit decisions there.There is a potential role for manual judgment. Manual judgment can be valuable and add a lot of economic value. But it can also be very risky when done poorly. In the current system, each FCM is exposed to all of the manual bespoke decisions that each other FCM is making. That's a really scary place to be in, we've seen it blow up. We saw it blow up with LME nickel contracts and with a few very large traders who had positions at a number of different banks that ended up blowing out. So, this provides a level of clarity, oversight, and transparency to this system, so people know what risk they are, or are not taking on.Dwarkesh Patel 38:29Are you replacing that risk with another risk? If there's one exchange that has the most liquidity om futures and there’s one exchange where you're posting all your collateral (across all your positions), then the risk is that that single algorithm the exchange is using will determine when and if liquidation cascades happen?Sam Bankman-Fried 38:47It’s already the case that if you put all of your collateral with a prime broker, whatever that prime broker decides (whether it's an algorithm or a human or something in between) is what happens with all of your collateral. If you're not comfortable with that, you could choose to spread it out between different venues. You could choose to use one venue for some products and another venue for other products. If you don't want to cross-collateralized cross-margin your positions, you get capital efficiency for cross-margining them—for putting them in the same place. But, the downside of that is the risk of one can affect the other. There's a balance there, and I don't think it's a binary thing.Dwarkesh Patel 39:28Given the benefits of cross-margining and the fact that less capital has to be locked up as collateral, is the long-run equilibrium that the single exchange will win? And if that's the case, then, in the long run, there won't be that much competition in derivatives?Sam Bankman-Fried 39:40I don't think we're going to have a single exchange winning. Among other things, there are going to be different decisions made by different exchanges—which will be better or worse for particular situations. One thing that people have brought up is, “How about physical commodities?” Like corn or soy? What would our risk model say about that? It's not super helpful for those commodities right now because it doesn't know how to understand a warehouse. So, you might want to use a different exchange, which had a more bespoke risk model that tried to understand how the human would understand what physical positions someone had on. That would totally make sense. That can cause a split between different exchanges.In addition, we've been talking about the clearing house here, but many exchanges can connect to the same clearinghouse. We're already, as a clearing house, connected to a number of different DCMs and excited for that to grow. In general, there are going to be a lot of people who have different preferences over different details of the system and choose different products based on that. That's how it should work. People should be allowed to choose the option that makes the most sense for them.Jane Street vs FTXDwarkesh Patel 41:00What are the biggest differences in culture between Jane Street and FTX?Sam Bankman-Fried 41:05FTX has much more of a culture of like morphing and taking out a lot of random new s**t. I don’t want to say Jane Street is an ossified place or anything, it’s somewhat nimble. But it is more of a culture of, “We're going to be very good at this particular thing on a timescale of a decade.” There are some cases where that's true of FTX because some things are clearly part of our core business for a decade. But there are other things that we knew nothing about a year ago, and now have to get good at. There's been more adaptation and it's also a much more public-facing and customer-facing business than Jane Street is—which means that there are lots of things like PR that are much more central to what we're doing.Conflict of interest between broker and exchangeDwarkesh Patel 41:56Now in crypto, you're combining the exchange and the broker—they seem to have different incentives. The exchange wants to increase volume, and the broker wants to better manage risk, maybe with less leverage. Do you feel that in the long run, these two can stay in the same entity given the potential conflict of interest?Sam Bankman-Fried 42:13I think so. There's some extent to which they differ, but more that they actually want the same thing—and harmonizing them can be really valuable. One is to provide a great customer experience. When you have two different entities with two completely different businesses but have to go from one to the other, you're going to end up getting the least common denominator of the two as a customer. Everything is going to be supported as poorly as whichever of the two entities support what you're doing most poorly - and that makes it harder. Whereas synchronizing them gives us more ability to provide a great experience.Bahamas and Charter CitiesDwarkesh Patel 42:59How has living in the Bahamas impacted your opinion about the possibility of successful charter cities?Sam Bankman-Fried 43:06It's a good question. It's the first time and it’s updated positively. We've built out a lot of things here that have been impactful. It's made me feel like it is more doable than I previously would have thought. But it's a lot of work. It's a large-scale project if you want to build out a full city—and we haven’t built out a full city yet. We built out some specific pieces of infrastructure that we needed and we've gotten a ton of support from the country. They've been very welcoming, and there are a lot of great things here. This is way less of a project than taking a giant, empty plot of land, and creating a city in it. That's way harder.SBF’s RAM-skewed mindDwarkesh Patel 43:47How has having a RAM-skewed mind influence the culture of FTX and its growth?Sam Bankman-Fried 43:52On the upside, we've been pretty good at adapting and understanding what the important things are at any time. Training ourselves quickly to be good at those even if it looks very different than what we were doing. That's allowed us to focus a lot on the product, regulation, licensing, customer experience, branding, and a bunch of other things. Hopefully, it means that we're able to take whatever situations come up and provide reasonable feedback about them and reasonable thoughts on what to do rather than thinking more rigidly in terms of how previous situations were. On the flip side, I need to have a lot of people around me who will try and remember long-term important things that might get lost day-to-day. As we focus on things that pop up, it's important for me to take time periodically to step back and clear my mind and remember the big picture. What are the most important things for us to be focusing on? This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.dwarkeshpatel.com

The tastytrade network
Options Jive - July 5, 2022 - How Much of BPR is at Risk

The tastytrade network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 24:24


The BPR for a short option trade is how much capital the brokerage reserves to cover potential losses. But how often does it really come to that? Today, Tony and Nick dive into the data to see just how often we lose how much of the BPR, contrasting a range of underlying's and strategies.

Sound Money Management
An Oreo's Take on Risk Re-Run 2022

Sound Money Management

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 24:59


Radio Boston
How a community program in Lowell works to stem violence with outreach to at-risk teens

Radio Boston

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 18:10


In Lowell, UTEC is a youth empowerment services agency that connects with at-risk youth to help prevent violence. We speak with the group's CEO about its mission, as well as a former gang member who now works with UTEC.

UNL BeefWatch
Weighing Risk and Rewards of Annual Forages

UNL BeefWatch

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 27:20


Rob's Reliability Project
MD Vault - Asset Management, Risk & Business Processes with Suzane Greeman

Rob's Reliability Project

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 46:13


This week I'm joined by Suzane Greeman to discuss asset management and why your business processes are holding you back from achieving your reliability goals. Thank you for listening and if you enjoy the show, please subscribe to Rob's Reliability Project on your favourite podcast platform and share it with your colleagues. You can also follow Rob's Reliability Project on LinkedIn and Facebook and check out robsreliability.com as well. If you're looking for a shorter tip, subscribe to Rob's Reliability Tip of the Day on your favorite podcast platform or on your Amazon Alexa as a Flash Briefing. Finally, if there are any topics, guests you'd like to hear from, questions you want answered, or if you'd like to appear on the podcast, email me at robsreliabilityproject@gmail.com Follow Rob's Reliability Project on LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/company/robsreliabilityproject/ Follow Rob's Reliability Project on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/robsreliabilityproject/ Music by XTaKeRuX, Song: White Crow is licensed under a Creative Commons 4.0 Attribution License.

Darin Batchelder’s Real Estate Investing Show
Inflation Risk Results In Valuable Benefits To Asset Owners With Devin Elder [DB108]

Darin Batchelder’s Real Estate Investing Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 65:09


Do you want to protect your assets from inflation? Inflation is a silent killer. It can slowly erode the value of your money, savings, and investments without you even realizing it's happening. That's why it's so important to have a plan in place to protect yourself from inflation risk. Devin believes the inflation risk in the economy provides valuable benefits to asset owners. He and his team have purchased over 5,000 multifamily units over the years and he's seen it all. Listen and learn! For links and resources discussed in this episode, please visit our show notes at https://darinbatchelder.com/inflation-risk  

Zero To 5000
Count Your Soul Points - Gregg Cohen, JWB Real Estate Capital

Zero To 5000

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 59:18


Another inspiring conversation on the Zero to 5000 Podcast today.   We were joined by Gregg Cohen, Co-Founder of JWB Real Estate Capital   We discussed: - Risk of being miserable versus risk of failure which is worse? - The balance of the 80 - 20 rule and what it truly means - Soul points, and leaning into what is working - Not getting distracted by the next shiny new thing.... idea Thanks for Listening. Be sure to join our monthly email. One life-changing email to help you with your mindset, your methods, and your mission each month. https://zeroto5000.com/botw

DRONERESPONDERS
Episode 025: Part 107 Training with Wayne Bailey

DRONERESPONDERS

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 38:24 Very Popular


Charles Werner, your host, welcomes Wayne Bailey to today's episode, Wayne is an experienced Real Estate Investor, who has worked in the government administration industry. He graduated from Asheville Buncombe Technical CC in Fire Protection, National Fire Academy as an Executive Fire Officer (EFO) and designed as a Chief Training Officer (CTO) by the Center for Public Safety Excellence.   In February 2018, he became a Part 107 sUAS Remote licensed pilot and now flies for Blue Ridge Mountain Drones as their Chief Pilot. His flight duties include flight instruction, search and rescue, storm damage assessment, real estate aerial video, and photography. He also teaches students to take the FAA part 107 exam to become a commercial or government sUAS pilot.   Key Takeaways: [1:09] Wayne talks about his professional career that started over four decades ago. [3:18] Wayne shares when he received his first drone in 2018. [5:26] Wayne got his license as a Part 107 sUAS Remote licensed pilot in 2018. [5:57] Wayne does teaching for Part 107 to high school students. [7:52] Wayne shares how first-timers struggle and how they end up mastering the skills with practice and dedication. [8:58] Are they using simulators in the course? [10:03] Wayne speaks about who receives the Part 107 classes and how the course is structured. [14:22] Wayne talks about camaraderie in this field. [17:40] Wayne shares the inclusion of Drones as First Responders in the classes he teaches. [18:05] Wayne speaks about the many changes he has seen in the public safety field and the uses of drones since he first got into drones. [19:45] Which are the main disciplines that are using drones? [22:25] Wayne talks about the search and rescue use of drones in his practice. [23:43] Wayne shares the HAZMAT incident he was recently involved in. [25:12] Risk managing is a fundamental aspect of the Part 107 course. [26:27] Drones UAS are a game-changer for public safety. [28:40] Is there regional cooperation in North Carolina? [30:38] What does Wayne see on the horizon for drones? [36:13] Charles speaks about how “Everybody is using drones.”   Mentioned in this episode: Airborne International Response Team AIRT is the leading 501(c)(3) non-profit organization supporting Drones For Good and Public Safety UAS Become a member of Drone Responders for free. AIRT and DRONERESPONDERS 2020 Drones in Public Safety Survey Drone Responders Events  

RISK!
Fight the Power

RISK!

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 66:15 Very Popular


Nibs Stroupe and DJ Crystal Clear share stories about confronting anti-Black racism in decades past, and again today.Support RISK! on Patreon at Patreon.com/RISKMake a one-time donation to RISK! at PayPal.me/RISKshowGet tickets to RISK! live shows at RISK-show.com/tourGet the RISK! book at TheRISKBook.comTake our storytelling classes at TheStoryStudio.orgHire Kevin Allison to make a personalized video at Cameo.com/TheKevinAllisonHire Kevin Allison as a coach at KevinAllison.com

Dishing Up Nutrition
Blood Pressure Risk: Salt or Sugar

Dishing Up Nutrition

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 43:43 Very Popular


Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death in the US with hypertension or high blood pressure implicated as the primary cause. Controlling hypertension is and has been a major focus of public health initiatives. Often the advice for blood pressure issues is to reduce your salt intake. How does salt cause high levels of blood pressure? What does sugar have to do with hypertension? What are you eating that may be containing too much sodium or sugar and negatively effecting your blood pressure? As nutritionists and dietitians, we'll be talking about this food connection to your blood pressure and what you can do about it.

Open Source Security Podcast
Episode 330 - The sliding scale of risk: seeing the forest for the trees

Open Source Security Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 38:22


Josh and Kurt talk about the challenge of dealing with vulnerabilities at a large scale. We tend to treat every vulnerability equally when they are not equal at all. Some are trees we have to pay very close attention to, and some are part of a larger forest that can't be treated as individual vulnerabilities. We often treat risk as a binary measurement instead of a sliding scale. Show Notes gsd.id The Register OpenSSL story OpenSSL bug

RNZ: Morning Report
Waka Kotahi planning $50m spend to tackle technology risk

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 4:19


The Transport Agency plans to spend more than $50 million tackling risks to its outdated technology that have been rated "critical" for years. Internal reports show it has so far managed to overhaul its advanced traffic management system that helps keep roads safe. However, it has had to go looking for other projects to pause or defer and one result is a national ticketing system for public transport that has been in the works for six years has been delayed yet again. RNZ reporter Phil Pennington spoke to Susie Ferguson.

Leaders and Legends
Historian Stephen Moore on General George S. Patton

Leaders and Legends

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 68:45


As we celebrate our Fourth of July holiday, the “Leaders and Legends” podcast present a discussion with the author of a terrific book on General George S. Patton. Historian Stephen Moore's book “Patton's Payback” details the American Army's victories in North Africa and their impact on the future conquest of Europe. Happy Independence Day! Sponsors Veteran Strategies Girl Scouts of Central Indiana MacAllister Machinery Garmong Construction Crowne Plaza Downtown Indianapolis Historic Union Station About Veteran Strategies ‘Leaders and Legends' is brought to you by Veteran Strategies—your local veteran business enterprise specializing in media relations, crisis communications, public outreach, and digital photography. Learn more at www.veteranstrategies.com. About Girl Scouts of Central Indiana We're 2.5 million strong—more than 1.7 million girls and 750,000 adults who believe in the power of every G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker, Leader)™ to change the world. Our extraordinary journey began more than 100 years ago with the original G.I.R.L., Juliette Gordon “Daisy” Low. On March 12, 1912, in Savannah, Georgia, she organized the very first Girl Scout troop, and every year since, we've honored her vision and legacy, building girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place. We're the preeminent leadership development organization for girls. And with programs from coast to coast and across the globe, Girl Scouts offers every girl a chance to practice a lifetime of leadership, adventure, and success. To volunteer, reconnect, donate, or join, visit girlscoutsindiana.org or call 317.924.6800. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Dog Cancer Answers
What Are Some Guidelines for Dog Cancer Detection? Q&A | Dr. Brooke Britton #174

Dog Cancer Answers

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 36:30


Caller Janet has found that in her breed, checking the anal glands every six months after the dog turns six years old can be really helpful for catching anal gland carcinomas early, and wonders if there are other things that owners can do for other cancers. Oncologist Brooke Britton discusses the importance of routine wellness visits with your veterinarian, as well as screening tests that can be done once in a while, such as liquid biopsies or taking x-rays. She also emphasizes what we as dog lovers can do at home to pick up any lumps or behavioral changes quickly, track lump growth, and be advocates for our dogs and seek veterinary care promptly to get tumors removed while they are small and before they can spread. Links Mentioned in Today's Show: Nationwide Diversity of Risk white paper Dog Cancer Support Related Links: Why Didn't My Vet Catch My Dog's Cancer Earlier podcast episode What Are the Symptoms of Dog Cancer? podcast episode Diagnosing Dog Cancer With a Biopsy or Fine Needle Aspirate podcast episode Exam Room Series: Perianal and Anal Sac Tumors podcast episode About Today's Guest, Dr. Brooke Britton: Brooke Britton completed her residency training in Medical Oncology at the University of Pennsylvania in 2012, and has been in clinical practice in the NYC and Jersey Shore area since that time. She helmed the Brooklyn and Downtown arms of the Oncology Department for BluePearl Veterinary Partners in New York for the past 9 years, and was an active participant in house officer training and clinical trials during her tenure there. She currently serves as a private consultant and maintains an independent clinical practice. Dr. Britton has lectured nationally and authored several peer-reviewed articles. She has particular interest in hematologic malignancies and the metastatic cascade. LinkedIn Other Links: To join the private Facebook group for readers of Dr. Dressler's book “The Dog Cancer Survival Guide,” go to https://www.facebook.com/groups/dogcancersupport/  Dog Cancer Answers is a Maui Media production in association with Dog Podcast Network This episode is sponsored by the best-selling animal health book The Dog Cancer Survival Guide: Full Spectrum Treatments to Optimize Your Dog's Life Quality and Longevity by Dr. Demian Dressler and Dr. Susan Ettinger. Available everywhere fine books are sold. Have a guest you think would be great for our show? Contact our producers at DogCancerAnswers.com Have an inspiring True Tail about your own dog's cancer journey you think would help other dog lovers? Share your true tail with our producers. If you would like to ask a dog cancer related question for one of our expert veterinarians to answer on a future Q&A episode, call our Listener Line at 808-868-3200 www.dogcanceransers.com. Dog Cancer News is a free weekly newsletter that contains useful information designed to help your dog with cancer. To sign up, please visit: www.dogcancernews.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

EM Pulse Podcast™
Let’s talk PrEP

EM Pulse Podcast™

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 19:40


Back in our March 2020 episode, This is Hope, we spoke with Dr. Larissa May about HIV screening in the ED. Screening programs, along with education and other resources, is making a difference, but there are still tens of thousands of new HIV cases in the U.S. each year, and probably 1-2 million new infections annually worldwide. There are clinical trials in progress studying potential HIV vaccines, which is exciting, but a widely available vaccine is still many years away. Luckily, we DO have a safe and effective way to help prevent new infections and transmission - pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Dr. Michael Casner joins us to share his expertise in all things PrEP, so we can help our patients stay safe and healthy.  Do you talk to your patients about PrEP? Does your ED have a way to connect patients with resources to obtain PrEP? Share your experience with us on social media, @empulsepodcast, via email empulsepodcast@gmail.com, or through our website, ucdavisem.com. Then please head over to iTunes and leave us a review. And please pass the word along to your friends and colleagues! ***Please rate us and leave us a review on iTunes! It helps us reach more people.*** Hosts: Dr. Sarah Medeiros, Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at UC Davis Guest: Dr. Michael Casner, Emergency Physician at Mount Sinai and Holy Cross hospitals in Chicago, IL, and part-time Emergency Medicine Faculty at the University of Missouri, Kansas City, MO.  Resources: HIV.gov PrEP information and resources Ready, Set, PrEP - medication at no cost for those who qualify Preexposure Prophylaxis for the Prevention of HIV Infection in the United States—2021 Update—A Clinical Practice Guideline  Rodger AJ, Cambiano V, Bruun T, et al. Risk of HIV transmission through condomless sex in serodifferent gay couples with the HIV-positive partner taking suppressive antiretroviral therapy (PARTNER): final results of a multicentre, prospective, observational study. Lancet. 2019;393(10189):2428-2438. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(19)30418-0 Support Dr. Casner's team in the AIDS/LifeCycle! *** Thank you to the UC Davis Department of Emergency Medicine for supporting this podcast and to Orlando Magaña at OM Productions for audio production services. Dr Mike Casner

Grace Church - Houston
Big Risk, Big Faith: It Works When It Works by Dan Hunter

Grace Church - Houston

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 42:38


JACC Podcast
Secular Trends in Risk Profiles among Adults with Cardiovascular Disease in the U.S.

JACC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 21:53


The Gate 15 Podcast Channel
Risk Roundtable EP 31: A 4th of July Security Mindfulness Special

The Gate 15 Podcast Channel

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 50:02


On America's Independence Day, Andy and Dave pulled up to discuss the latest security challenges organizations face. Starting with the recent Copenhagen incident, they talked continued a previous discussion about the noise surrounding hostile events and how they distract from the real issues. Working back to the hostile events attack cycle, Andy brought up the numerous resources, many low-cost, that organizations can leverage as they continue to build out their state of preparedness. Dave and Andy also talked about drones, their continued risk, as well as the latest efforts by the U.S. government to start to address the risk. Finally, the roundtable talked about weather events and wildfires to round about the holiday special. And even though Jen was enjoying much deserved time off, Andy made sure to bring up cyber related threats and items of interest. But no episode is complete without Andy's three questions. This month, they talked about Obi Wan (and Star Wars in general), music, and 4th of July memories!  Links to items discussed in the episode include: Copenhagen shooting: Shopping mall gunman charged with murder (BBC, 4 July 2022) https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-62034089 Andy's Tweet on conspiracy theories https://twitter.com/andyjabbour/status/1543935473088925697?s=20&t=5L8OF3My0RCPxfC5ZEBibg Gate 15 White Paper: The Hostile Event Attack Cycle (HEAC), 2021 Update https://gate15.global/white-paper-the-hostile-event-attack-cycle-heac-2021-update/ Run. Hide. Fight. (FBI) https://www.fbi.gov/video-repository/run-hide-fight-092120.mp4/view Run. Hide. Tell. (UK) https://www.npcc.police.uk/StaySafeAssets/FINAL%20MPS168715%20Run%20Tell%20Hide%20A5%20Lflt%20Blk%20Eng%20v3.pdf Gate 15 Resources Pages https://gate15.global/resources/ Faith-Based ISAO Resources Pages https://faithbased-isao.org/resources/ What's YOUR Plan, by James DeMeo on Amazon https://www.amazon.com/Whats-YOUR-Plan-James-DeMeo/dp/099892864X Andy's Tweet on his time discussing Hostile Events, Active Shooter and De-escalation at Loudoun Hunger Relief/@LoudounHunger. https://twitter.com/andyjabbour/status/1542876302058946571?s=20&t=YbaxIcwp_-rArFWa2WSWRg Andy's Tweet on Outlook Rules https://twitter.com/andyjabbour/status/1543668162780139520?s=20&t=YbaxIcwp_-rArFWa2WSWRg White House, FACT SHEET: The Domestic Counter-Unmanned Aircraft Systems National Action Plan (25 April 2022) https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/statements-releases/2022/04/25/fact-sheet-the-domestic-counter-unmanned-aircraft-systems-national-action-plan/ A Drone Tried to Disrupt the Power Grid. It Won't Be the Last; An attack attempt in 2020 proves the UAS threat is real—and not enough is being done to stop it (Brian Barrett/@brbarrett in WIRED, 25 Nov 2021) https://www.wired.com/story/drone-attack-power-substation-threat/ Drone shows instead of July 4 fireworks? More Colorado communities are making the switch for fire safety (Matt Bloom, CPR News, 01 Jul 2022) https://www.cpr.org/2022/07/01/july-4-fireworks-drone-shows-wildfire-risk-colorado/ “Singles” soundtrack info on Wikipedia and listen on Spotify https://open.spotify.com/album/58BEJ01sL8wK5LV3TPyngC?si=wQzLq88lSx6iuQDurXsvhA&nd=1 “No Woman. No Cry.” From The Office via Yarn, and the legendary song by Bob Marley & The Wailers (1974) https://open.spotify.com/track/3PQLYVskjUeRmRIfECsL0X?si=5159bc1a07484b29&nd=1

The Athlete's Voice
Take The Risk | The A.I.M. 013

The Athlete's Voice

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 38:54


On today's episode I discuss my semi-final struggles, my social connections, taking a risk and failing, taking a risk and succeeding, the gift and curse of high expectations, and the benefits of informed internal decision making.

Rebranding Safety
Rebranding Safety with Sheila Lord

Rebranding Safety

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 69:54


A big thank you to Sheila for joining us on the pod this week. Sheila is the Director of BMR - Health and Wellbeing, who help to improve mental health in the workplace. We talk about getting to the route of the problem, where mental health sits within the organisation and who's responsibility it is, ISO's (how and who), behaviour and culture change and they give their thoughts on how mental health is currently being dealt with.

The Science Hour
Extreme heat death risk in Latin America

The Science Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 63:30 Very Popular


A new analysis of deaths in cities across Latin America suggests rising global temperatures could lead to large numbers of deaths in the region and elsewhere in the world. Even a 1-degree rise in extreme heat can add 6% to the risk of dying. Lead researcher Josiah Kephart at Drexel University tells Roland Pease the lessons from Latin America should apply to cities across the global south. Brazilian ecologist Andreas Meyer talks about the troubling prospects for the health of ecosystems, particularly in tropical regions, if the world does not cut its fossil fuel emissions hard and fast in the next few years. In the USA, a team of engineers and neurosurgeons are developing a radical new approach for targeted pain relief – in the first instance, for patients recovering from surgery. It's a flexible implant that wraps around a nerve and cools it to prevent it from transmitting pain signals. What's more, says bioengineer John Rogers, the implant is made of a material designed to have dissolved safely into the body by the time its pain-killing work is done. Geologist Bob Hazen has spent more than a decade producing a new classification system for the 5,700 minerals known to exist on the Earth. It improves on the pre-existing scheme by taking into account the myriad ways that many minerals have come into being. He tells Roland that this new way of categorising minerals lays bare a 4.5 billion-year history of remarkable chemical and biological creativity. And, Hair is an important part of our identities – straight, frizzy, long, not there at all – and our efforts to keep it styled and clean have created an $80 billion hair care industry. Many products offer to improve the life of the stuff on our heads, but isn't it all just dead protein? CrowdScience listener Toria wants to know what 'healthy' hair really means. To untangle the science behind hair, we zoom in to see how hair grows from the follicles in our scalp and explore how the hair growth process will change over our lifetimes. Changes in our hair and disorders affecting the scalp can often have emotional impacts on our lives, as presenter Marnie Chesterton learns from a dermatologist who specialises in hair issues. Having been on a journey with her own hair in recent years following chemotherapy, Marnie is ready for a new 'do and ventures to the hair salon to find out about the health of her own hair. Meanwhile, another CrowdScience listener, Lucy, wonders why humans lost hair (or fur) on most of our bodies when most other mammals are covered in the stuff. A biological anthropologist who studies not only why hair became concentrated on our heads, but also why there's so much diversity in hair types across humans unpacks the evolutionary benefits. With all these different hair types, we ask: does different hair need different care? And when it comes to shampoo, conditioner, washing, blowdrying and dyeing – what should we be doing to keep our hair structure sound? As we learn about this strange nonliving feature of our bodies, Marnie finds a new appreciation for the "dead strands of protein sticking out of our skin". And with listener Toria's help and advice, she also finds a new shade for her chemo-curled locks. (Image: Rio de Janeiro City. Credit: Pintai Suchachaisri/Getty Images)

Prodigal Church
LOVE NECESSITATES RISK- James 1

Prodigal Church

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 18:29


Guest Speaker Micah Foster shares from his life and from James chapter 1. DOWNLOAD the Prodigal Church app for more! FIND US ONLINE: prodigalchurchfresno.com If you're new, we would love to meet you! Fill the online connect card on our website and we will reach out to you. prodigalchurchfresno.com/connect INSTAGRAM: @prodigalchurchfresno FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/prodigalchurchfresno If you would like to Give to Prodigal Church, you can do so through our website, or through this link. Thank you so much for your generosity to Prodigal Church! prodigal.givingfire.com

The Weekly List
Democracy at Risk - Roe v. Wade Overturned

The Weekly List

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 40:31


Host Amy Siskind discusses the last few weeks of political news.

Personal Pension Radio
PPR 270 MY CPA SAID YOU ARE WRONG

Personal Pension Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 7:52


As a Paralegal and a Certified Financial Planner®, Kraig is uniquely able to assist clients with the careful preparation of asset protection and estate plans.  Kraig's team uses a financial-planning approach to ensure that each client obtains the best possible outcomes. With 120 years of combined legal and financial services experience between our team members, we can help you think defensively about protecting your wealth, investments, business intellectual property, and other assets and counsel you through choices you make to prepare for the future. Thanks to the death of private pensions, the devaluation of Social Security benefits and other undeniable retirement factors such as inflation and increased taxes, America is now in a retirement income crisis. Kraig Strom, the host of Personal Pension Radio, is focused on helping you pack your bags for both halves of the retirement journey.  Kraig's mission is help you build & protect your wealth and lifestyle today and generationally. Along the way, Kraig is ready to assist with all matters related to your financial wellbeing as well as your business and family legal needs.  Optimizing Retirement income and protecting your legacy does not happen with a product. You must have an integrated approach. DISCLAIMER: Kraig Strom is not an attorney or a certified public accountant. Kraig is a Certified Financial Planner Professional®, a Chartered Financial Consultant®, and an Investment advisor representative.  As cool as all that may sound, this video is only helpful hints, tips and education. This video is not specific tax, legal or investment advice. Before you decide to take action on anything you see in this video, please consult with your tax, legal or investment advisor first.  

London Real
TIM DRAPER - Staying Bullish on Bitcoin, the Power of Blockchain & the Future

London Real

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 52:34


Watch the Full Episode for FREE:  https://londonreal.tv/tim-draper-staying-bullish-on-bitcoin-the-power-of-blockchain-the-future/ 

Trophy Talk Podcast
Episode 62: Risk It for the Biscuit

Trophy Talk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 113:53


Hello hello everyone and welcome back to Trophy Talk! We have a pretty exciting show in store for you all today so thanks for tuning in. For starters, Summer is a time where Colin always feels drawn to playing RPGs. We begin by discussing if any other genre's of game are at home in a particular time of the year. After that and some greatly themed dad jokes from Eli, the crew gets into our Patreon submitted questions. In this we discuss trophy distribution, My Name is Mayo, potential pet names, remakes and remasters, and what game would be a fair trade for God of War from Microsoft. After that, each of us goes into detail on a trophy list of our choosing! Colin goes retro and looks at the Capcom Fighting Game Collection, Eli somehow finds another free to play multiplayer game with Arcadegeddon, and Darryl continues his examination of Supermassive Games lists with Man of Medan. Thanks for listening and we hope you enjoy!

Phoenix and Flame Podcast
The Happiness Quest: Interview with Tom Glaser

Phoenix and Flame Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 42:11


Have you wondered if happiness is actually obtainable?  Are you tired of feeling blah and humdrum?  This episode may help you!  Listen and share!!   Full Heart Living:  Conversations with the Happiest People I Know by Tom Glaser https://fullheartliving.com

Southbridge Fellowship
Able to Risk Like Abel

Southbridge Fellowship

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 52:04


Speaker: Dave Morley Date: July 3, 2022 Scripture: Hebrews 11:4 Series: Risking It All Watch the video here: vimeo.com/726544874

Be Transfigured Ministries
Episode 370 – Risk Everything to Reach Heaven

Be Transfigured Ministries

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 10:26


There are many immigrant stories of people who leave everything behind to come to America for a better life. Our ancestors risked losing everything for something better. Christ says, “Seek first the kingdom of heaven.” We must be willing to risk everything to reach heaven. Heaven is only destination worthy of risking everything because it isn't just a better life, it is the best life.

RISK!
Remembering Shashi Musso

RISK!

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 31:43 Very Popular


A Special RISK! episode. This week, we celebrate the life of a one of a kind person, Shashi Musso, a multitalented artist and queer rebel who sadly passed away this month. Here are two stories he shared on RISK! that paint a portrait of what a unique individual he was. Support RISK! on Patreon at Patreon.com/RISKMake a one-time donation to RISK! at PayPal.me/RISKshowGet tickets to RISK! live shows at RISK-show.com/tourGet the RISK! book at TheRISKBook.comTake our storytelling classes at TheStoryStudio.orgHire Kevin Allison to make a personalized video at Cameo.com/TheKevinAllisonHire Kevin Allison as a coach at KevinAllison.com