Podcasts about oxycontin

Opioid medication

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Best podcasts about oxycontin

Latest podcast episodes about oxycontin

Know Thyself
Mike Majlak: It's a Miracle I'm Alive | Know Thyself EP 31

Know Thyself

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 31, 2023 124:26


Mike Majlak went from being an opioid addict to a successful author, podcast host, and content creator. Today he shares his story of overcoming 10 years of addiction, having the courage to begin recovery, and making impact his redemption.  He opens up about his biggest regrets in life and explains why he wouldn't trade his past for anything. He also shares the struggles of balancing life as a content creator and using his platform for positivity. He debunks the common misconception that more money/fame = more happiness, explaining his current struggles with anxiety and mortality. Mike and André reminisce about their time together living at the Maverick house with Logan Paul, and the journey to making Impaulsive.    ___________ Timecodes: 0:00 Intro 3:57 How Far I've Come 7:46 Addiction & Rock Bottom 23:15 Recovery & Redemption 34:14 How it Shaped me 40:29 What I Regret Most 44:24 Life as a Content Creator 51:49 Creating Impact 1:02:51 Success & Stardom 1:11:25 Will Success Make You Happy? 1:17:03 Mindfulness and Mortality 1:23:15 The Maverick House 1:33:59 Impaulsive  2:01:09 Conclusion ___________ Mike Majlak:   Mike Majlak is an author, content creator, and co-host on the popular podcast, “Impaulsive,” with Logan Paul.    Mike Majlak was a seventeen-year-old from a loving, middle-class family in Milford, Connecticut, when he got caught up in the opioid epidemic that swept the nation. For close to a decade thereafter, his life was a wasteland of darkness and despair. While his peers were graduating from college, buying homes, getting married, having kids, and leading normal lives, Mike was snorting OxyContin, climbing out of cars at gunpoint, and burying his childhood friends. Unable to escape the noose of addiction, he eventually lost the trust and support of everyone who had ever loved him. Alone, with nothing but drugs to keep him company, darkness closed in, and the light inside him--the last flicker of hope--began to dim. His dreams, potential, and future were all being devoured by a relentless addiction too powerful to fight. Despair filled him as he realized he wasn't going to survive.   Somehow, he did... He not only survived, he thrived.   Now he's a social media personality with millions of followers, and an entrepreneur, marketer, podcaster, YouTuber, and author who hopes to use his voice to shine a light for those whose own lights have grown dim.     "The Night Shift" YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/@MikeMajlakVlogs Impaulsive: https://www.youtube.com/@Impaulsive Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/heybigmike/ Mike's Book "The Fifth Vital": https://www.amazon.com/dp/B087L8DWZQ/ref=cm_sw_r_api_i_VZP4W87QW8JZQR0J8ZZ4_0   ___________   Know Thyself Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/knowthyself/ Website: https://www.knowthyself.one Clips Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJ4wglCWTJeWQC0exBalgKg   Listen to all episodes on Audio:  Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/4FSiemtvZrWesGtO2MqTZ4?si=d389c8dee8fa4026 Apple: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/know-thyself/id1633725927     André Duqum Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/andreduqum/   Meraki Media https://merakimedia.com https://www.instagram.com/merakimedia/See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Profile
Nan Goldin

Profile

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2023 14:32


Nan Goldin has been documenting her life through photography since her teens, revealing and intimate portraits exploring issues from sex and drug addition to domestic violence and parenthood. Laura Poitras's film celebrating Nan's work, 'All the Beauty and the Bloodshed' has been nominated for an Oscar. Mark Coles looks at the life of the acclaimed artist, whose addiction to prescription opioids made her determined to hold Purdue Pharma and their owners the Sackler family accountable for the US Opioid addiction crisis. The campaign resulted in galleries and museums around the world cutting financial ties with the Sacklers, because of their link to the prescription opioid OxyContin. Presenter: Mark Coles Producers: Viv Jones, Tural Ahmedzade and Ben Cooper Editor: Richard Vadon

Dr. Bond’s Life Changing Wellness
EP 275 - Former NFL Player Discusses Overcoming Drug Addiction, Mental Health, NFL Concussion Protocols and more

Dr. Bond’s Life Changing Wellness

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 41:10


Former NFL player Mike Gibson discusses the current mental health concerns of athletes and Damar Hamlin who we all saw on national television collapse on the field that led to an unprecedented cancelling of a NFL game. Does the NFL help players with substance abuse and are their concussion protocols enough?    Mike Gibson, earned a scholarship to Cal-Berkeley for football and played for 2 years before he got drafted by the Philadelphia Eagles in 2008. He played a total of 6 years in the NFL (Eagles, Seattle Seahawks, and Arizona Cardinals).    After he retired he became a sheriff's deputy, completing his credentials as class president, abusing OxyContin and adderall the entire duration. He was a deputy for under a year before getting asked to resign for his unhealthy habits. This setback turned him to becoming addicted to stronger substances such as heroin and meth. After going in and out of rehab 6 times, in his last session Mike made a breakthrough and has been sober for 5 years. He has worked in treatment centers as an addiction counselor for the entire 5 years he has been sober.

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
86% Of Clinical Trials Of Drugs Are Industry Funded

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2023 11:42


86% Of Clinical Trials Of Drugs Are Industry Funded Dr. John Abramson, M.D• https://hcp.hms.harvard.edu/people/john-david-abramson • Book – Sickening Ian Harris, MD • https://med.unsw.edu.au/our-people/ian-harris • Book - Surgery, The Ultimate Placebo: A Surgeon Cuts through the Evidence Dr. Robert Yoho • http://www.robertyohoauthor.com • Book - Butchered by “Heathcare” Dr. Robert Lustig • http://www.robertlustig.com • Book - Metabolical #BigPharma #AmericanHealthCare #HealthCarePolicy Dr. John Abramson, M.D. is an author and medical doctor and has served as a family physician for over 20 years. His recently release book Sickening  How Big Pharma Broke American Health Care and How We Can Repair It. Is about the inside story of how Big Pharma's relentless pursuit of ever-higher profits corrupts medical knowledge—misleading doctors, misdirecting American health care, and harming our health. John Abramson MD,  He was twice voted “best doctor” in his area by readers of the local newspapers and three times selected by his peers as one of a handful of best family practitioners in Massachusetts. He has been on the faculty at Harvard Medical School for over 15 years, where he has taught primary care and currently teaches health care policy. To Contact Dr John Abramson MD go to hcp.hms.harvard.edu/people/john-david-abramson Dr Ian Harris is a practicing orthopedic surgeon, university professor and an acclaimed author of several books including Hippocrasy: How doctors are betraying their oath. Professor Ian Harris is an orthopedic surgeon who works at Liverpool, St George, St George Private and Sutherland Hospitals in Sydney. His academic affiliation is with UNSW, South Western Sydney Clinical School at Liverpool Hospital, in Sydney. In addition to approximately 200 peer-reviewed publications, he also wroteSurgery, The Ultimate Placebo - an eye-opening evaluation of commonly performed surgical operations that have been tested and shown to be no more effective (and arguably worse) than placebo, or that have never even been tested. He suggests we treat new surgical procedures like new drugs, and only pay for those that are part of a trial to find out if they really work. To Contact Dr Harris go to Email: ianharris@unsw.edu.au Dr. Robert Yoho is an author and accomplished retired Los Angeles cosmetic surgeon. His Book, Butchered by “Heathcare”: What to Do About Doctors, Big Pharma, and Corrupt Government Ruining Your Health and Medical Care. Dr Robert Yoho grew up in Kent Ohio. He was an Eagle Scout and a Judo wrestler. Went to Oberlin College and Case Western Reserve Univ. Medical School. In 2019 Dr Yoho retired from his medical and surgical practice. He now is a full time writer and speaker. No longer responsible for patient care he is able to write full time without conflicts of interest. To Contact Dr Robert Yoho go to  robertyohoauthor.com  Dr. Robert Lustig is a The New York Times bestselling author and author of Metabolical: The Lure and the Lies of Processed Food, Nutrition, and Modern Medicine and a Professor of Pediatric Endocrinology at the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Robert Lustig, a pediatric neuroendocrinologist who has long been on the cutting edge of medicine and science, challenges our current healthcare paradigm which has gone off the rails under the influence of Big Food, Big Pharma, and Big Government. Dr. Lustig has authored 125 peer-reviewed articles and 73 reviews. He has mentored 20 pediatric endocrine fellows, and trained numerous other allied health professionals. He provides endocrinologic support to several protocols of the Children's Oncology Group.  He is the former Chairman of the Ad hoc Obesity Task Force of the Lawson Wilkins Pediatric Endocrine Society, a member of the Pediatric Obesity Practice Guidelines Subcommittee of The Endocrine Society, a member of the Obesity Task Force of the Endocrine Society, a member of the Pediatric Obesity Devices Committee of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, a member of the Bay Area Board of Directors of the American Heart Association, and a member of the Steering Committee of Health Foods, Healthy Kids of the Culinary Institute of America. He also consults for several childhood obesity advocacy groups. Dr. Lustig lives in San Francisco with his wife Julie and two daughters. Spare time (what little there is) is spent cooking, theater-going, and traveling. To Contact Dr Robert Lustig, M.D.  go to robertlustig.com Disclaimer:Medical and Health information changes constantly. Therefore, the information provided in this podcast should not be considered current, complete, or exhaustive. Reliance on any information provided in this podcast is solely at your own risk. The Real Truth About Health does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, products, procedures, or opinions referenced in the following podcasts, nor does it exercise any authority or editorial control over that material. The Real Truth About Health provides a forum for discussion of public health issues. The views and opinions of our panelists do not necessarily reflect those of The Real Truth About Health and are provided by those panelists in their individual capacities. The Real Truth About Health has not reviewed or evaluated those statements or claims. 

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
96% Of Medical Research In The United States Is About Drugs And Devices

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2023 9:54


96% Of Medical Research In The United States Is About Drugs And Devices Dr. John Abramson, M.D • https://hcp.hms.harvard.edu/people/john-david-abramson• Book – Sickening #JohnAbramson #BigPharma #AmericanHealthCare #HealthCarePolicy Dr. John Abramson, M.D. is an author and medical doctor and has served as a family physician for over 20 years. His recently release book Sickening  How Big Pharma Broke American Health Care and How We Can Repair It. Is about the inside story of how Big Pharma's relentless pursuit of ever-higher profits corrupts medical knowledge—misleading doctors, misdirecting American health care, and harming our health. The United States spends an excess $1.5 trillion annually on health care compared to other wealthy countries—yet the amount of time that Americans live in good health ranks a lowly 68th in the world. At the heart of the problem is Big Pharma, which funds most clinical trials and therefore controls the research agenda, withholds the real data from those trials as corporate secrets, and shapes most of the information relied upon by health care professionals. In this no-holds-barred exposé, Dr. John Abramson—one of the foremost experts on the drug industry's deceptive tactics—combines patient stories with what he learned during many years of serving as an expert in national drug litigation to reveal the tangled web of financial interests at the heart of the dysfunction in our health-care system. For example, one of pharma's best-kept secrets is that the peer reviewers charged with ensuring the accuracy and completeness of the clinical trial reports published in medical journals do not even have access to complete data and must rely on manufacturer-influenced summaries. Likewise for the experts who write the clinical practice guidelines that define our standards of care. The result of years of research and privileged access to the inner workings of the U.S. medical-industrial complex, Sickening shines a light on the dark underbelly of American health care—and presents a path toward genuine reform. John Abramson MD,  He was twice voted “best doctor” in his area by readers of the local newspapers and three times selected by his peers as one of a handful of best family practitioners in Massachusetts. He has been on the faculty at Harvard Medical School for over 15 years, where he has taught primary care and currently teaches health care policy. He currently consults as an expert in litigation involving the pharmaceutical industry and has served as an unpaid consultant to the FBI and Department of Justice. Dr. Abramson has appeared on more than 65 national television shows, including two appearances on the Today Show, and more recently on the Dr. Oz Show. He was written op-ed pieces in the New York Times LA Times and others. He is the author of the national best-selling book Overdo$ed America. To Contact Dr John Abramson MD, go to https://hcp.hms.harvard.edu/people/john-david-abramson Disclaimer:Medical and Health information changes constantly. Therefore, the information provided in this podcast should not be considered current, complete, or exhaustive. Reliance on any information provided in this podcast is solely at your own risk. The Real Truth About Health does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, products, procedures, or opinions referenced in the following podcasts, nor does it exercise any authority or editorial control over that material. The Real Truth About Health provides a forum for discussion of public health issues. The views and opinions of our panelists do not necessarily reflect those of The Real Truth About Health and are provided by those panelists in their individual capacities. The Real Truth About Health has not reviewed or evaluated those statements or claims. 

The Best Of Dr. Phil
Brandon Returns

The Best Of Dr. Phil

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 45:58


One of the most asked-about guests on Dr. Phil returns--Brandon! Plus, a desperate family turns to Dr. Phil to save their daughter who is addicted to OxyContin and heroin.  Interested in advertising: https://www.advertisecast.com/BestOfDrPhil Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Natalie Tysdal Podcast
093: How to Recover from Addiction with Mike Gibson

The Natalie Tysdal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 28:33


In this episode, Mike Gibson joins me on the podcast to talk about how to recover from drug and alcohol addiction.   We also touch on how to help our kids who may be struggling.   Mike Gibson earned a scholarship to Cal-Berkeley for football and played for two years before he got drafted by the Philadelphia Eagles in 2008. He played a total of 6 years in the NFL (Eagles, Seattle Seahawks, Arizona Cardinals).    In his third year, he suffered an injury and shortly after got addicted to prescription painkillers. He started at 5 mg of Vicodin and by the time he finished his career was taking a minimum of 300 mg of OxyContin daily.    After he retired, he became a sheriff's deputy, completing his credentials as class president, abusing OxyContin and adderall the entire duration. He was a deputy for under a year before getting asked to resign for his unhealthy habits. This setback turned him to becoming addicted to stronger substances such as heroin and meth. After going in and out of rehab 6 times, in his last session Mike made a breakthrough and has been sober for 5 years. He has worked in treatment centers as an addiction counselor for the entire 5 years he has been sober.    Listen in as we talk about: [3:30] When Mike realized he was addicted to painkillers [5:10] The phenomenon of craving [8:55] How prevalent is alcohol addiction  [12:50] The first steps in getting help [15:50] How Mike helps addicts today  [18:40] What made it possible for Mike to recover from addiction [22:50] Setting boundaries with your children who may have an addiction   Notes from Natalie: Sign Up for Natalie's Newsletter  Purchase Carla's Books   Connect with Mike Gibson Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/healthyliferecoveryinc  Website: https://healthyliferecovery.com/about/    Connect with Natalie Tysdal Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ntysdal/  YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZ2puxB_hWDNn1Qe3UzOMKg  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NatalieTysdal/  Website: https://www.natalietysdal.com 

Uma Arte Longa
Nas Garras de Morfeu: a crise dos opioides nos EUA.

Uma Arte Longa

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 20:07


Uma tragédia nos Estados Unidos da América que começou com a influência da indústria farmacêutica. Ficou curioso? Ouça o episódio. Fontes: EVANS, William N.; LIEBER, Ethan MJ; POWER, Patrick. How the reformulation of OxyContin ignited the heroin epidemic. Review of Economics and Statistics, v. 101, n. 1, p. 1-15, 2019. OLFSON, Mark et al. Trends in Intentional and Unintentional Opioid Overdose Deaths in the United States, 2000-2017. Jama, v. 322, n. 23, p. 2340-2342, 2019. PORTER, Jane; JICK, Hershel. Addiction rare in patients treated with narcotics. The New England journal of medicine, v. 302, n. 2, p. 123, 1980. QUINONES, Sam. Dreamland: The true tale of America's opiate epidemic. Bloomsbury Publishing USA, 2015. STRATTON, Timothy P. et al. Ethical dimensions of the prescription opioid abuse crisis. The Bulletin of the American Society of Hospital Pharmacists, v. 75, n. 15, p. 1145-1150, 2018. VADIVELU, Nalini et al. The opioid crisis: a comprehensive overview. Current pain and headache reports, v. 22, n. 3, p. 16, 2018. Wide-ranging online data for epidemiologic research (WONDER). Atlanta, GA: CDC, National Center for Health Statistics; 2021. Available at http://wonder.cdc.gov. Imagem: Sono (1771). Jean Bernard Restout. Óleo sobre tela, 96,5 x 129,5 cm. Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/jordanoaraujo/message

Mind Matters
The Practice of Medicine and Ongoing Issues with Opioid Addiction

Mind Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 116:48


How does our brain chemistry affect addiction? How has artificial intelligence changed medicine? Anesthesiologist Dr. Richard Hurley discusses opioid addiction from a medical perspective with host Dr. Robert J. Marks. Then, an anonymous guest details their own experience with opioids. Finally, Dr. Hurley discusses how computer algorithms have both improved and stifled the proper practice of medicine. Additional Resources Source

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
The Transformation Of Medical Knowledge From A Public Good Into A Commodity

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 13:51


The Transformation Of Medical Knowledge From A Public Good Into A Commodity Dr. John Abramson, M.D • https://hcp.hms.harvard.edu/people/john-david-abramson• Book – Sickening #JohnAbramson #BigPharma #AmericanHealthCare #HealthCarePolicy Dr. John Abramson, M.D. is an author and medical doctor and has served as a family physician for over 20 years. His recently release book Sickening  How Big Pharma Broke American Health Care and How We Can Repair It. Is about the inside story of how Big Pharma's relentless pursuit of ever-higher profits corrupts medical knowledge—misleading doctors, misdirecting American health care, and harming our health. The United States spends an excess $1.5 trillion annually on health care compared to other wealthy countries—yet the amount of time that Americans live in good health ranks a lowly 68th in the world. At the heart of the problem is Big Pharma, which funds most clinical trials and therefore controls the research agenda, withholds the real data from those trials as corporate secrets, and shapes most of the information relied upon by health care professionals. In this no-holds-barred exposé, Dr. John Abramson—one of the foremost experts on the drug industry's deceptive tactics—combines patient stories with what he learned during many years of serving as an expert in national drug litigation to reveal the tangled web of financial interests at the heart of the dysfunction in our health-care system. For example, one of pharma's best-kept secrets is that the peer reviewers charged with ensuring the accuracy and completeness of the clinical trial reports published in medical journals do not even have access to complete data and must rely on manufacturer-influenced summaries. Likewise for the experts who write the clinical practice guidelines that define our standards of care. The result of years of research and privileged access to the inner workings of the U.S. medical-industrial complex, Sickening shines a light on the dark underbelly of American health care—and presents a path toward genuine reform. John Abramson MD,  He was twice voted “best doctor” in his area by readers of the local newspapers and three times selected by his peers as one of a handful of best family practitioners in Massachusetts. He has been on the faculty at Harvard Medical School for over 15 years, where he has taught primary care and currently teaches health care policy. He currently consults as an expert in litigation involving the pharmaceutical industry and has served as an unpaid consultant to the FBI and Department of Justice. Dr. Abramson has appeared on more than 65 national television shows, including two appearances on the Today Show, and more recently on the Dr. Oz Show. He was written op-ed pieces in the New York Times LA Times and others. He is the author of the national best-selling book Overdo$ed America. To Contact Dr John Abramson MD, go to https://hcp.hms.harvard.edu/people/john-david-abramson Disclaimer:Medical and Health information changes constantly. Therefore, the information provided in this podcast should not be considered current, complete, or exhaustive. Reliance on any information provided in this podcast is solely at your own risk. The Real Truth About Health does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, products, procedures, or opinions referenced in the following podcasts, nor does it exercise any authority or editorial control over that material. The Real Truth About Health provides a forum for discussion of public health issues. The views and opinions of our panelists do not necessarily reflect those of The Real Truth About Health and are provided by those panelists in their individual capacities. The Real Truth About Health has not reviewed or evaluated those statements or claims. 

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
What Is The Accuracy Of Clinical Trials And How Much Do Doctors Rely On Them To Treat Patients?

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 13:04


What Is The Accuracy Of Clinical Trials And How Much Do Doctors Rely On Them To Treat Patients? Dr. John Abramson, M.D• https://hcp.hms.harvard.edu/people/john-david-abramson • Book – Sickening Ian Harris, MD • https://med.unsw.edu.au/our-people/ian-harris • Book - Surgery, The Ultimate Placebo: A Surgeon Cuts through the Evidence Dr. Robert Yoho • http://www.robertyohoauthor.com • Book - Butchered by “Heathcare” Dr. Robert Lustig • http://www.robertlustig.com • Book - Metabolical #BigPharma #AmericanHealthCare #HealthCarePolicy Dr. John Abramson, M.D. is an author and medical doctor and has served as a family physician for over 20 years. His recently release book Sickening  How Big Pharma Broke American Health Care and How We Can Repair It. Is about the inside story of how Big Pharma's relentless pursuit of ever-higher profits corrupts medical knowledge—misleading doctors, misdirecting American health care, and harming our health. John Abramson MD,  He was twice voted “best doctor” in his area by readers of the local newspapers and three times selected by his peers as one of a handful of best family practitioners in Massachusetts. He has been on the faculty at Harvard Medical School for over 15 years, where he has taught primary care and currently teaches health care policy. To Contact Dr John Abramson MD go to hcp.hms.harvard.edu/people/john-david-abramson Dr Ian Harris is a practicing orthopedic surgeon, university professor and an acclaimed author of several books including Hippocrasy: How doctors are betraying their oath. Professor Ian Harris is an orthopedic surgeon who works at Liverpool, St George, St George Private and Sutherland Hospitals in Sydney. His academic affiliation is with UNSW, South Western Sydney Clinical School at Liverpool Hospital, in Sydney. In addition to approximately 200 peer-reviewed publications, he also wroteSurgery, The Ultimate Placebo - an eye-opening evaluation of commonly performed surgical operations that have been tested and shown to be no more effective (and arguably worse) than placebo, or that have never even been tested. He suggests we treat new surgical procedures like new drugs, and only pay for those that are part of a trial to find out if they really work. To Contact Dr Harris go to Email: ianharris@unsw.edu.au Dr. Robert Yoho is an author and accomplished retired Los Angeles cosmetic surgeon. His Book, Butchered by “Heathcare”: What to Do About Doctors, Big Pharma, and Corrupt Government Ruining Your Health and Medical Care. Dr Robert Yoho grew up in Kent Ohio. He was an Eagle Scout and a Judo wrestler. Went to Oberlin College and Case Western Reserve Univ. Medical School. In 2019 Dr Yoho retired from his medical and surgical practice. He now is a full time writer and speaker. No longer responsible for patient care he is able to write full time without conflicts of interest. To Contact Dr Robert Yoho go to  robertyohoauthor.com  Dr. Robert Lustig is a The New York Times bestselling author and author of Metabolical: The Lure and the Lies of Processed Food, Nutrition, and Modern Medicine and a Professor of Pediatric Endocrinology at the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Robert Lustig, a pediatric neuroendocrinologist who has long been on the cutting edge of medicine and science, challenges our current healthcare paradigm which has gone off the rails under the influence of Big Food, Big Pharma, and Big Government. Dr. Lustig has authored 125 peer-reviewed articles and 73 reviews. He has mentored 20 pediatric endocrine fellows, and trained numerous other allied health professionals. He provides endocrinologic support to several protocols of the Children's Oncology Group.  He is the former Chairman of the Ad hoc Obesity Task Force of the Lawson Wilkins Pediatric Endocrine Society, a member of the Pediatric Obesity Practice Guidelines Subcommittee of The Endocrine Society, a member of the Obesity Task Force of the Endocrine Society, a member of the Pediatric Obesity Devices Committee of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, a member of the Bay Area Board of Directors of the American Heart Association, and a member of the Steering Committee of Health Foods, Healthy Kids of the Culinary Institute of America. He also consults for several childhood obesity advocacy groups. Dr. Lustig lives in San Francisco with his wife Julie and two daughters. Spare time (what little there is) is spent cooking, theater-going, and traveling. To Contact Dr Robert Lustig, M.D.  go to robertlustig.com Disclaimer:Medical and Health information changes constantly. Therefore, the information provided in this podcast should not be considered current, complete, or exhaustive. Reliance on any information provided in this podcast is solely at your own risk. The Real Truth About Health does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, products, procedures, or opinions referenced in the following podcasts, nor does it exercise any authority or editorial control over that material. The Real Truth About Health provides a forum for discussion of public health issues. The views and opinions of our panelists do not necessarily reflect those of The Real Truth About Health and are provided by those panelists in their individual capacities. The Real Truth About Health has not reviewed or evaluated those statements or claims. 

The Safety Doc Podcast
Opioid Emergencies in K-12 Schools | Community and Legal Considerations | SDP199

The Safety Doc Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 162:34


On September 7, 2022, Wisconsin Senator Tammy Baldwin introduced bill S.4794 - Naloxone Education and Access Act (NEAA). This bill reauthorizes through FY2027, expands eligibility for, and otherwise makes changes to a grant program that supports access to medications that reverse opioid overdoses (e.g., naloxone). What might this mean for K-12 schools? WHAT IS AN OPIOID? Opioids are a class of drug prescribed by doctors to treat moderate to severe pain. Common types of opioids are oxycodone (Oxycontin), hydrocodone (Vicodin), morphine, and methadone (REMS, 2022). OPIOID USE DATA. According to the 2017 Final Report of the President's Commission on Combating Drug Addiction and Opioid Crisis: In 2016, an estimated 239,000 adolescents aged 12 to 17 were current misusers of pain relievers (1.0% of adolescents), and 631,000 young adults aged 18 to 25 misused pain relievers in the past month (1.8% of young adults) … Among adolescents aged 12 to 17, 152,000 (0.6%) had a pain reliever use disorder in the past year, and 291,000 young adults aged 18 to 25 (0.8%) and 1.3 million adults aged 26 or older in 2016 (0.6%) had a pain reliever use disorder in the past year (p. 24). OPIOIDS IN SCHOOLS. Opioid use and overdoses are increasing in schools. In addition to user-exposure, second-hand exposure also poses risks, especially with fentanyl, a synthetic opioid, which is 50 to 100 times more potent than morphine (REMS, 2022). Per EducationWeek, “Citing concerns about student opioid use—and fentanyl specifically—a growing number of districts have equipped schools with naloxone, a drug that temporarily reduces the harmful effects of overdoses. The Los Angeles Unified School District became the latest to do so last month when it said it would stock the drug, and train qualified staff to use it, as part of a multiprong response to a “devastating epidemic of overdoses that are all too common in Los Angeles. [Other] districts—from Des Moines, Iowa, to Denver— have also stocked naloxone in recent years, some empowered by changes in state laws that make it easier to do so.” (Blad, 2022). SENATOR BALDWIN'S BILL. The bill would amend Section 545 of the Public Health Service Act and bring federal-level clarity and guidance to states regarding who can dispense reversal medication, where it can be placed, training, and immunity for using it in an attempt to benefit a suspected overdose person. Specifically, the NEAA would strike “for pharmacists to dispense a drug or device approved and cleared” and insert “that increase access to drugs and devices approved, cleared, or otherwise legally-marketed.” In other words, reversal drugs would be available to community-based distribution programs and there would be some type of “standing order” allowing for non-medical personnel to administer the reversal drug. CONSIDERATIONS FOR SCHOOLS. For some educators and community members, Naloxone on campus will signal a defeat against the invasiveness of opioids. Once Naloxone is stashed in AED cabinets - it's there forever. Others will have more favorable perceptions that might center on saving lives. How will schools integrate opioid awareness and overdose prevention along with other alcohol and other drug (AOD) programs? Naloxone availability has been impacted by supply chain disruptions, but it's typically about $25 per dose and there's little incentive for someone to steal or misuse it. Naloxone could be placed in the AED cabinet, for example. A top concern for school officials will be legal ramifications of administering Naloxone. Would a student be permitted to administer it to another student? Who has discretion to use it? A guidance document from REMS (2022) states, “Identify, with general counsel, and inform the campus community about state Good Samaritan laws that provide immunity from arrest, charge, or prosecution for certain drug offenses for a person experiencing an overdose — or witnessing another person experiencing an overdose — who seeks medical attention.” So, it's ultimately placing the risk upon the local board of education and the school's insurer. Hopefully, Senator Baldwin's proposed bill, or others like it, will align Naloxone with the standard for a non-trained person to be able to use a publicly-available AED to attempt to benefit a person encountering a heart attack. SOURCES: Blad, E. (2022, October 10). Why Districts Are Stocking Naloxone in Response to the Opioid Crisis. Education Week.; Preparing for Opioid-Related Emergencies for K-12 Schools and Institutions of Higher Education. Readiness and Emergency Management for Schools (REMS) Technical Assistance (TA). (Retrieved 2022) SAFETY DOC WEBSITE, BLOG & BOOKS: www.safetyphd.com. The Safety Doc Podcast is hosted & produced by David P. Perrodin, PhD. This podcast and blog post represent the opinions of David P. Perrodin and his guests to the show. This is episode 199 of The Safety Doc Podcast published on 12-20-2022. Purchase Dr. Perrodin's Books: School of Errors – Rethinking School Safety in America. www.schooloferrors.com Velocity of Information - Human Thinking During Chaotic Times. www.velocityofinformation.com

Beat the Big Guys
Channel Your Pain or Grief to Improve Your Community - Marianne Skolek Perez

Beat the Big Guys

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 24:28


Marianne Skolek Perez channeled her grief over losing her daughter to Oxycontin into sounding the alarm that the FDA is the problem, not the pharmaceutical companies.Beat the Big GuysHost: Sandy Rosenthalhttps://www.sandyrosenthal.netConnect with Sandy on Instagram: @beatthebigguysProducer: Jess Branashttps://www.branasenterprises.com

The Temple Law 10-Q & A
10-Q&A Episode 16: Bankruptcy for Billionaires: Purdue Pharma

The Temple Law 10-Q & A

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 56:18


Professor Jonathan Lipson and Charlotte Bismuth, author of Bad Medicine, discuss the Purdue Pharma bankruptcy and the challenges it presents for both the legal system and people who were harmed by OxyContin. Interviewer: Professor Jonathan Lipson, Harold E. Kohn Chair Guests: Charlotte Bismuth, author of Bad Medicine and former prosecutor for the New York County District Attorney.

Write About Now
How the New Meth and Fentanyl Triggered a Deadly Epidemic

Write About Now

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 49:30


Award-winning journalist Sam Quinones tells the terrifying story of how the deadly new synthetic drugs plaguing the country have lead to mental illness and a surge in homelessness across the United States. Quinones has a fascinating book out on the subject called The Least of Us, which chronicles how designer drugs such as methamphetamine and fentanyl took the place of opiates such as OxyContin and heroin. The powerful drugs are more addictive and lethal than anything we've seen before. Quinones also offers stories of hope as communities come together to combat addiction. 

FilmWeek
FilmWeek: ‘Empire Of Light,' ‘Emancipation,' ‘The Whale' And More

FilmWeek

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 49:36


Larry Mantle and KPCC film critics Claudia Puig and Lael Loewenstein review this weekend's new movie releases in theaters, streaming, and on demand platforms. FilmWeek: ‘Empire Of Light,' ‘Emancipation,' ‘The Whale' And More (0:15) “Empire Of Light,” Wide Release “Emancipation,” Wide Release & Streaming on Apple TV+ “The Whale,” AMC Burbank, AMC The Grove & AMC Century City “One Fine Morning,” Laemmle Royal[West LA] “Second Chance,” AMC Burbank & Alamo Drafthouse[DTLA] “Blanquita,” Laemmle Glendale “I Am DB Cooper,” Cinelounge Sunset December 11[Sunday] & VOD “Loudmouth,” Laemmle NoHo{North Hollywood], AMC Burbank Town Center & Regal Theater in South Gate   John Horn's Interview with actor Anna Diop from ‘Nanny' (31:48) The new film Nanny follows Aisha, an undocumented immigrant from Senegal, who is hired by a wealthy couple to care for their young daughter. The couple makes no attempt to learn about Aisha's personal life, treating her simply as ‘the help,' even demanding she work overtime with no pay. The film is directed by Nikyatu Jusu, and the character Aisha is portrayed by Sengalese-American actor Anna Diop who spoke with KPCC's John Horn about the thriller and the issue of representation in Hollywood.    John Horn's Interview With Director Laura Poitras of ‘All The Beauty And The Bloodshed' (43:51) The Sackler family is known for their pharmaceutical company Purdue Pharma and their contribution to the opioid crisis, in which they created and heavily marketed the painkiller OxyContin knowing it was highly addictive. Possibly far less known, however, is photographer and activist Nan Goldin, who staged public protests at museums bearing the Sackler name as they tried to artwash their image through generous donations. The new documentary ‘All The Beauty And The Bloodshed' tells the story of Goldin and her quest to take down the Sacklers. KPCC's John Horn spoke with the film's director Laura Poitras about bringing Nan Goldin's life and career to the screen. 

MedMaster Show (Nursing Podcast: Pharmacology and Medications for Nurses and Nursing Students by NRSNG)

Download the cheat: https://bit.ly/50-meds  View the lesson:     Generic Name oxycodone Trade Name Oxycontin Indication pain Action binds to opiate receptors in CNS altering the perception and sensation of pain Therapeutic Class Opioid Analgesic Pharmacologic Class opioid agonists, opioid agonists/nonopioid, analgesic combinations Nursing Considerations • may cause respiratory depression, constipation, confusion , sedation, hallucinations, urinary retention • use caution with increased intracranial pressure • don't use with MAOIs • assess hemodynamics • assess pain • may elevate pancreatic enzymes • can cause physical dependence • assess bowel function

The Last Thing I Saw
Ep. 150: Laura Poitras on All the Beauty and the Bloodshed

The Last Thing I Saw

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 22:23


Ep. 150: Laura Poitras on All the Beauty and the Bloodshed Welcome to The Last Thing I Saw. I'm Nicolas Rapold. One of the year's best films is All the Beauty and the Bloodshed, directed by Laura Poitras. It's about the life and work of photographer Nan Goldin, and her successful activism against the Sackler Family, whose company PurduePharma produced Oxycontin. Poitras and Goldin were collaborators on the film, which is a deeply moving work of art itself, featuring Goldin's candid photography and her tough and evocative voiceover. Goldin speaks openly of traumas in her past, including the tragic story of her sister, Barbara. I'm a huge admirer of Poitras's films, and as she generously pointed out, I first interviewed her in 2010 about her film The Oath, which was followed by her features Risk and Citizenfour, winner of the Academy Award for Best Documentary. It was an honor to talk with her again about All the Beauty and the Bloodshed, winner of the Golden Lion in Venice and more recently Best Documentary from the New York Film Critics Circle. Please support the production of this podcast by signing up at: rapold.substack.com Music: “Tomorrow's Forecast” by The Minarets, courtesy of The Minarets Photo by Steve Snodgrass

The Fact Hunter
Episode 127: The Sackler Family & The Opioid Crisis

The Fact Hunter

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 71:47


The Sackler family is an American family who founded and owned the pharmaceutical companies Purdue Pharma and Mundipharma Purdue Pharma, and some members of the family, have faced lawsuits regarding overprescription of addictive pharmaceutical drugs, including OxyContin. Purdue Pharma has been criticized for its role in the opioid epidemic in the United States. They have been described as the "most evil family in America","drug dealers" and "the worst drug dealers in history". The Sackler family has been profiled in various media, including the documentary Crime of the Century on HBO, the book Empire of Pain by Patrick Radden Keefe, and the 2021 Hulu mini-series Dopesick.

PB & Slay
Ep. 14 Oxycontin

PB & Slay

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022


Tommy wears a beret, this is a religion podcast, and New Girl is rough. Insta - @pb_slay Twitter - @pb_slay TikTok - @pb_slayYou can find every episode of this show on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or YouTube. Prime Members can listen ad-free on Amazon Music. For more, visit barstool.link/pbandslay

The Lunar Society
Edward Glaeser - Cities, Terrorism, Housing, & Remote Work

The Lunar Society

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 57:08


Edward Glaeser is the chair of the Harvard department of economics, and the author of the best books and papers about cities (including Survival of the City and Triumph of the City).He explains why:* Cities are resilient to terrorism, remote work, & pandemics,* Silicon Valley may collapse but the Sunbelt will prosper, * Opioids show UBI is not a solution to AI* & much more!Watch on YouTube. Listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or any other podcast platform. Read the full transcript here.Follow me on Twitter for updates on future episodes.If you enjoy this episode, I would be super grateful if you shared it. Post it on Twitter, send it to your friends & group chats, and throw it up wherever else people might find it. Can't exaggerate how much it helps a small podcast like mine.A huge thanks to Graham Bessellieu for editing this podcast and Mia Aiyana for producing its transcript.Timestamps(0:00:00) - Mars, Terrorism, & Capitals (0:06:32) - Decline, Population Collapse, & Young Men (0:14:44) - Urban Education (0:18:35) - Georgism, Robert Moses, & Too Much Democracy? (0:25:29) - Opioids, Automation, & UBI (0:29:57) - Remote Work, Taxation, & Metaverse (0:42:29) - Past & Future of Silicon Valley (0:48:56) - Housing Reform (0:52:32) - Europe's Stagnation, Mumbai's Safety, & Climate ChangeTranscriptMars, Terrorism, & CapitalsDwarkesh Patel 0:00:00Okay, today, I have the pleasure of speaking with Professor Edward Glaeser, who is the chair of the Harvard Department of Economics, and author of some of the best books and papers about cities. Professor Glazer, thanks for coming on The Lunar Society.Edward Glaeser 0:00:25Oh, thank you so much for having me on! Especially given that The Lunar Society pays homage to one of my favorite moments in urban innovation in Birmingham during the 18th century.Dwarkesh Patel 0:00:26Oh wow, I didn't even catch that theme, but that's a great title. My first question is, What advice would you give to Elon Musk about building the first cities on Mars?Edward Glaeser 0:00:35[laughs] That's a great question. I think that demand for urbanism in Mars is going to be relatively limited. Cities are always shaped by the transportation costs that are dominant in the era in which they're created. That both determines the micro-shape of the city and determines its macro future. So cities on Mars are, of course, going to be limited by the likely prohibitive cost of traveling back and forth to the mother planet. But we also have to understand what cars people are going to be using on Mars. I assume these are all going to be Teslas, and everyone is going to be driving around in some appropriate Tesla on Mars. So it's going to be a very car-oriented living experience. I think the best strategy would be to create a fairly flexible plan, much like the 1811 grid plan in New York, that allows entrepreneurs to change land use over time and put a few bets on what's necessary for infrastructure and then just let the city evolve organically. Usually, the best way is to put more trust in individual initiative than central planning–– at least in terms of micromanaging what goes where. Dwarkesh Patel 0:01:58Gotcha. Now, since 9/11, many terrorist groups have obviously intended to cause harm to cities. But by and large, at least in Western countries, they haven't managed to kill off thousands of people like they were able to do during 9/11. What explains this? Do you think cities are just more resilient to these kinds of attacks than we would have otherwise thought? Or are the terrorists just not being creative enough?Edward Glaeser 0:02:20I don't know. There's also the question of what the objectives are. Even for the 9/11 terrorists, their end game was not to kill urbanites in America. It was to effect change in Saudi Arabia or in the Middle East more generally. We've also protected our cities better. If you think about it, two things go on simultaneously when you collect economic activity in one place in terms of defense: one of which is they become targets–– and of course, that's what we saw on 9/11; it's hard to think of a symbol that's clearer than those twin towers. But at the same time, they're also a defensible space. The origin of the urban agglomeration and use for cities and towns was the fact that they could be walled settlements. Those walls that brought together people collectively for defense are the ultimate reason why these towns came about. The walls provided protection.I think the same thing has been playing out with cities over the past 20 years. Just as New York was a target, it was also a place where post-2001, the city ramped up its anti-terrorism efforts. They put together a massive group as London had previously done. The cameras that implemented congestion pricing in London were the same cameras that used against the Irish terrorists. So both effects went on. I think we've been fortunate and that we've shown the strength of cities in terms of protecting themselves.Dwarkesh Patel 0:03:52If you look throughout ancient world history, there are so many examples of empires that are basically synonymous with their capital cities (ex. Rome or Athens, or Sparta). But today, you would never think of America as the ‘Washingtonian Empire.' What is the explanation for why the capital city has become much less salient in terms of the overall nation? Is there a Coasian answer here?Edward Glaeser 0:04:20There are specific things that went on with English offshoot colonies where in many cases, because they recognized the tendency of the capital city to attract lots of excess goodies that had been taken from elsewhere in the country, they located the capital city in a remote place. It's actually part of the story of the Hamilton musical in The Room Where it Happens. Part of the deal was about moving the capital of the US to a relatively remote Virginia location rather than having it be in Philadelphia, New York. That was partially to reflect the fact that the South needed to be protected against all of the extra assets going to New York and Philadelphia.So, whether or not this is Canberra or Ottawa, you see all of these English offshoot places without their capitals in the big metropoles. Whereas traditionally, what's happened in these places that have been around for centuries, is that even if the capital didn't start off as the largest city, it became the largest city because centuries of French leaders thought their business was to take wealth from elsewhere in France and make Paris great. I think the French Empire was as synonymous with Paris as most of those ancient empires were with their capital city. I guess the question I could throw back to you is, what are places where this is not true? Moscow, St. Peter's, and Beijing are examples. Do we think that Beijing is less synonymous with China than the Roman Empire is with Rome? Maybe a little–– possibly just because China is so big and Beijing is a relatively small share of the overall population of China. But it's more so certainly than Washington, D.C. is with the U.S. Decline, Population Collapse, & Young MenDwarkesh Patel 0:06:32That's a really interesting answer. Once a city goes through a period of decline (maybe an important industry moved out, or maybe it's had a sequence of bad governance), are you inclined to bet that there will be some sort of renewal, or do you think that things will continue to get worse? In other words, are you a momentum trader, or are you a reversion to the mean trader when it comes to cities?Edward Glaeser 0:06:54I can tell you different answers for different outcomes. For housing prices, I can tell you exactly what we know statistically about this, which is at higher frequencies, let's say one year, housing prices show wickedly large levels of momentum. For five years or more, they show very significant levels of mean reversion. It's a short-term cycle in housing prices followed by decline. Population just shows enormous persistence on the downside. So what happens is you typically will have an economic shock. Detroit used to be the most productive place on the planet in 1950, but a bunch of shocks occurred in transportation technology which made it no longer such a great place to make cars for the world. It takes a century for the city to respond in terms of its population because the housing is sticky. The housing remains there. So between the 50s and 60s, the population declines a little bit, and prices drop. They drop sufficiently far that you're not going to build a lot of new housing, but people are going to still stay in the houses. They're not going to become vacant. So, the people are still there because the houses are still there. During the 60s to 70s, the population drops a  little bit further and prices kind of stay constant, but still it's not enough to build new housing. So the declines are incredibly persistent, and growth is less so. So on the boom side, you have a boom over a 10-year period that's likely to mean revert and it's not nearly as persistent because it doesn't have this sticky housing element to it. In terms of GDP per capita, it's much more of a random walk there in terms of the straight income stuff. It's the population that's really persistent, which is, in fact, the reality of a persistent economy.Dwarkesh Patel 0:08:44Interesting. Why don't Americans move as much as they used to a century ago? So you have a paper from 2018 titled Jobs in the Heartland, where you talk about how there's increasing divergence between the unemployment rates between different parts of America. Why don't Americans just move to places where there are better economic circumstances? Edward Glaeser 0:09:04I want to highlight one point here, which is that you said “unemployment rate”, and I want to replace that with non-employment rate. That's partially what we're seeing now. It looks like America's labor force couldn't be better in terms of the low levels of unemployment, but what's happened over the last 50 years is there has been a very large rise in the share of prime-age men who are not in the labor force. So they've stopped looking for work, and those guys are miserable. It's not that those guys are somehow rather productive and happy,–– this is a very bad outcome for prime-age men. I'm separating men from women, not to say that the female labor markets aren't just as important, just as fascinating, just as critical. But labor force participation means something different for many women than it does for men. There are many women who are not in the labor force who are doing things that are enormously productive socially, like caring for their children and caring for their families.I wish it were symmetric across the genders. It just isn't true. I mean, there just are very few men not in the labor force who are doing anything much other than watching television. It's just a very different thing. So yes, there are big differences in the non-employment rate. There are some parts of America where, for much of the past decade, one in four prime-age men have been jobless. It's an enormous gap. The question is, why don't they get out?I think the answer is really twofold: one of which is the nature of how housing markets have frozen up. Historically, the differences in housing costs in the US weren't that huge across places. Most parts of America had some kind of affordable housing, and it was relatively easy to put up. At the dawn of the 20th century, these were kit helms sold by Sears and Roebuck that sprung up by the thousand. You bought the kit from Sears and Roebuck, and you just built it yourself. After World War II, it was mass-produced homes in places like Levittown.For most of the last 50 years, in places like coastal California or the East Coast, building has just become far more difficult. With the decline of mass-produced housing, it's become far more expensive, and it becomes harder and harder for relatively low-income people to find opportunities in places that have high levels of income, and high levels of opportunity. That's partially why there's not just a general decline in mobility, there's a decline in directed mobility for the poor. Historically, poor people moved from poor areas to rich areas. That's pretty much stopped. In part, that's because rich areas just have very, very expensive housing. The other thing is the rising importance of the informal safety net.So if you think about most particularly prime-aged men, they're not receiving significant handouts from the government except if they're on disability. But they will typically have some form of income, some form of housing that's being provided for them by someone other than themselves. A third of them are living in their parent's homes. That informal safety net is usually very place dependent. Let's say you're living in Eastern Kentucky; it's not like your parents were going to buy you a condo in San Francisco. You can still have your own bedroom, but you can't go anywhere else and still get that level of support. And so that's, I think, another reason why we're increasingly stuck in place.The third you mentioned, is that a third of the non-employed population of young men or is that a third of all young men? Non-employed is a third of non-employed prime aged men. So that's 25 to 54. There are a lot of 45 year olds who are living on their parents' couches or in their old bedroom. It's a fairly remarkable thing.Dwarkesh Patel 0:12:49Now, we'll get to housing in just a second, but first, I want to ask you: If the fertility trends in East Asia and many other places continue, what will the impact on cities be if the average age gets much older and the possible eventuality of depopulation?Edward Glaeser 0:12:53That's a really interesting question.The basic age fact on cities is that within the bracket of the sort of high-income or middle-income, for prime-aged parents, cities tend to be relatively bad for them. Once you're in the sort of high end of the upper middle class, the distrust of our public school systems, merited or not, means that that group tends to leave. You have plenty of parents with kids who are lower income, and then you have groups who are part of a demographic barbell that like cities. So this is partially about people who don't feel like they need the extra space and partially because if they're young, they're looking to find prospective mates of various forms.Cities are good for that. Urban proximity works well in the dating market. And they've got time on their hands to enjoy the tremendous amenities and consumption advantages that cities have. For older people, it's less about finding a mate typically, but the urban consumption amenity still has value. The ability to go to museums, the ability to go to concerts, and those sorts of activities continue to draw people in.Going forward, I would have continued to expect the barbell dimension to persist until we actually get around to solving our urban schools and declining population levels. If anything, I would have thought that COVID skews you a bit younger because older people are more anxious and remember that cities can also bring pandemics. They remember that it can be a nice thing to have a suburban home if you have to shelter in place. So that might lead some people who would have otherwise relocated to a dense urban core to move out, to stay out.Urban EducationDwarkesh Patel 0:14:44You just mentioned urban schools, and I'm curious because you've written about how urban schools are one of the reasons people who have children might not want to stay in cities. I'm curious why it's the case that American cities have some of the best colleges in the world, but for some reason, their K-to-12 is significantly worse, or it can be worse than the K-to-12 in other parts of the country. Why is it that the colleges are much better in cities, but K to 12 is worse? Edward Glaeser 0:15:19So it's interesting. It's not as if, I don't think there's ever been an Englishman who felt like they had to leave London to get better schools for the kids, or a Frenchman who thought they needed to leave Paris. It's not like there's something that's intrinsic to cities, but I've always thought it's a reflection of the fact that instead of allowing all of the competition and entrepreneurship that thrives in cities and that makes cities great, in the case of K to 12 public education, that's vanished.And your example of colleges is exactly right. I'm in this industry; I'm a participant in this industry and let me tell you, this industry is pretty competitive. Whether or not we're competing for the best students, at our level we go through an annual exercise of trying to make sure we get Ph.D. students to come to our program instead of our competitors, whether it's by hiring faculty members or attracting undergraduates, we occupy a highly competitive industry where we are constantly aware of what we need to do to make ourselves better. It doesn't mean that we're great along every dimension, but at least we're trying. K through 12 education has a local monopoly.So it's like you take the great urban food, leisure and hospitality, and food industries, and instead of having in New York City by a hyper-competitive world where you constantly have entry, you say, “You know what? We're going to have one publicly managed canteen and it's going to provide all the food in New York City and we're not going to allow any competitors or the competitors are going to have to pay a totally different thing.” That canteen is probably going to serve pretty crappy food. That's in some sense what happens when you have a large-scale public monopoly that replaces private competition.Dwarkesh Patel 0:16:50But isn't that also true of rural schools? Why are urban schools often worse? Edward Glaeser 0:17:46There's much more competition in suburban schools. So in terms of the suburban schools, typically there are lots of suburbs, and people are competing amongst them. The other thing that's actually important is (I don't want to over exaggerate this, but I think it is something that we need to think a little bit about) the role of public sector unions and particularly teachers unions in these cases. In the case of a suburban school district, the teachers union is no more empowered on the management side than they would be in the private sector.Dwarkesh Patel 0:17:30So in a normal private sector, you've got a large company, you've got a union, and they're arguing with each other. It's a level playing field. It's all kind of reasonable. I'm not saying management has done awful things, and that unions have done foolish things. I'm not saying that either are perfect, but it's kind of well-matched. It's matched that way in the suburbs as well. You've got highly empowered parents who are highly focused on their kids and they're not dominated.It's not like the teachers union dominates elections in Westchester County. Whereas if you go into a big city school district, you have two things going on. One of which is the teachers tend to be highly involved politically and quite capable of influencing management essentially, because they are an electoral force to be reckoned with, not just by the direct votes, but also with their campaign spending. On top of this, you're talking about a larger group of disparate parents, many of whom have lots of challenges to face and it becomes much harder for them to organize effectively on the other side. So for those reasons, big urban schools can do great things and many individual teachers can be fantastic, but it's an ongoing challenge. Georgism, Robert Moses, & Too Much Democracy?Dwarkesh Patel 0:18:35What is your opinion on Georgism? Do cities need a land value tax? Would it be better if all the other taxes are replaced by one?Edward Glaeser 0:18:41Okay. So Henry George, I don't know any economist who doesn't think that a land value tax is an attractive idea. The basic idea is we're going to tax land rather than taxing real estate values. And you would probably implement this in practice by evaluating the real estate and then subtracting the cost of construction, (at least for anything that was built up, meaning you'd form some value of the structures and you just subtract it).The attractive thing from most of our perspectives is it doesn't create the same disincentive to build that a real estate tax does. Real estate tax says, “Oh, you know what? I might want to keep this thing as a parking lot for a couple of years so I don't have to pay taxes on it.”If it were a land value tax, you're going to pay the same tax, whether or not it's a parking lot or whether or not you're going to put a high rise on it, so you might as well put the high rise on it and we could use the space. So I think by and large, that's a perfectly sensible idea. I'd like to see more places using land value taxes or using land value taxes in exchange for property taxes.Where George got it wrong is the idea that a land value tax is going to solve all the problems of society or all the problems of cities. That is ludicrously not true.One could make an argument that in those places that just have a property tax, you could replace it with a land value tax with little loss, but at the national level, it's not a particularly progressive tax in lots of ways. It would be hard to figure out how to fund all the things you want to fund, especially since there are lots of things that we do that are not very land intensive. I think George was imagining a world in which pretty much all value-creating enterprises had a lot of land engaged. So it's a good idea, yes. A panacea, no. Dwarkesh Patel 0:20:20No, that's a good point. I mean, Google's offices in San Francisco are probably generating more value than you would surmise just from the quantity of land they have there. Do American cities need more great builders like Robert Moses?Edward Glaeser 0:20:36Robert Caro's The Power Broker is one of the great biographies of the past 100 years, unquestionably. The only biography that I think is clearly better is Robert Caro's biography of Lyndon Baines Johnson, right? I mean, it's Caro is truly amazing. That being said, I would not exactly call it a fair and balanced view of Robert. I mean, it is true that Robert Moses was high handed, and it is true that there are things that he did that were terrible, that you never want to do again. But on the other hand, the man got stuff built. I mean, I think of myself as a child growing up in New York City, and whether or not it was the public pool that I swam in or the parks that I played in, or the roads that I traveled on, they were all delivered by Robert Moses. There's got to be a middle ground, which is, no, we're not going to run roughshod over the neighborhood as Robert Moses did, but we're still going to build stuff. We're still going to deliver new infrastructure and we're not going to do it for 10 times more than every other country in the world does it.Dwarkesh Patel 0:21:37We're actually going to have sensible procurement policies that bring in things at a reasonable cost, and I think we need to balance a little bit back towards Robert Moses in order to have slightly more empowered builders who actually are able to deliver American cities the infrastructure they need at an affordable cost. Dwarkesh Patel 0:21:57Do we have too much democracy at the local level? You wrote a paper in 2017 titled The Political Economy of Transportation Investments and one of the points you make there is that the local costs are much more salient to people for new construction than the public benefits, and the benefits to newcomers would be. Does that mean we have too much federalism? Should we just have far less power at the city level and not universally? There are lots of good things that local control does.Edward Glaeser 0:22:25I do think we have too much local ability to say no to new housing projects. So that's a particular case that I'm focused on. I think it's exactly right that the near neighbors to a project internalize all of the extra noise and perhaps extra traffic that they're going to have due to this project. They probably overestimate it because they are engaging in a bit of status quo bias and they think the present is great and can't imagine any change.By contrast, none of the people who would benefit from the new project are able to vote. All of the families that would love to move into this neighborhood are being zoned out by the insiders who get a say. I think the goal is to make sure that we have more ability to speak for outsiders. Cities at their best, are places where outsiders can find opportunities. That's part of what's so great about them. It's a tragic thing that we make that so hard. Now I'm not sure exactly that I'm claiming that I want less democracy, but I do want more limitations on how much regulations localities can do. So I think there are certain limitations on local power that I think are fine.I would prefer to call this not a limitation on local democracy, but an increase in the protection of individual rights or the individual rights of landowners to do what they want with their land. Which in effect, is a limit on democracy. But the Bill of Rights is a limit on democracy! The Bill of Rights says that they don't care if 51% of your voters want to take away your right to free assembly. They're not allowed to do that. So in some sense, what I'm just arguing for is more property owners' rights so that they can actually allow more housing in their building.In terms of transportation projects, it's a little bit dicier because here the builder is the government itself. I think the question is you want everyone to have a voice. You don't want every neighborhood to have a veto over every potential housing project or potential transportation project. So you need something that is done more at the state level with representation from the locality, but without the localities getting the ultimate sayDwarkesh Patel 0:24:33I wonder if that paper implies that I should be shorting highly educated areas, at least in terms of real estate. One of the things you mentioned in the paper was that highly educated areas that had much higher opposition were able to foment much more opposition. Edward Glaeser  0:24:49Okay. So here's the real estate strategy, which I have heard that actually there are buyers who do this. You take an area that has historically been very pro-housing. So it's got lots of housing, and it's affordable right now because supply is good. But lots of educated people have moved in. Which means that going forward, they're going to build much less, which means that going forward, they're likely to become much more expensive. So you should, in fact, buy options on that stuff rather than shorting it. You should short if you have a security that is related to the population level in that community. You should short that because the population growth is going to go down, but the prices are likely to go up. Opioids, Automation, & UBIDwarkesh Patel 0:25:29So you wrote a paper last year on the opioid epidemic. One of the points that you made there was that the opioid epidemic could be explained just by the demand side stuff about social isolation and joblessness. I wonder how this analysis makes you think about mass-scale automation in the future. What impact do you think that would have? Assume it's paired with universal basic income or something like that. Do you think it would cause a tremendous increase in opioid abuse?Edward Glaeser 0:26:03I would have phrased it slightly differently–– which is as opposed to the work of two amazing economists, Anne Case and Angus Deaton, who really emphasized the role of deaths of despair; we are much more focused on the supply side. WIth the demand side, meaning just the way that we handled the distribution of large-scale pain relieving medicines, we tell a story where every 30 to 50 years, someone comes up with the same sort of idea, which is we know that human beings love opioids in different forms. We also know they're highly addicted and lead to a terrible cycle. So all of a sudden comes along this innovator says, you know what? I've got a new opioid and it's safe. You don't have to worry about getting addicted to this one. It's magical.It won't work. 100 years ago, that thing was called heroin. 200 years ago, that thing was called morphine. 300 years ago, that thing was called Meldonium. We have these new drugs which have come in, and they've never been safe. But in our case, it was OxyContin and the magic of the time relief was supposed to make it safe, and it wasn't safe.Dwarkesh Patel 0:27:30There's a lot of great work that just shows that the patterns of opioid use was related to the places that just had a lot of pain 30 years ago. Those places came with a lot of tendency to prescribe various things for pain. So when opioids came in, when OxyContin came in, those were the places that got addicted most. Now it's also true that there are links between these economic issues. There are links with joblessness, and I basically do believe that things that create joblessness are pretty terrible and are actually much worse than income inequality. I push back against the universal basic income advocates who I think are basically engaging in a materialist fallacy of thinking that a human being's life is shaped by their take home pay or their unearned pay. I think for most people, a job is much more than that. A job is a sense of purpose. A job is a sense of social connection. When you look at human misery and opioid use, you look at the difference between high-income earners, mid-income earners. There are differences, but they're small. You then look at the difference between low-income earners and the jobless, then unhappiness spikes enormously, misery spikes enormously, family breakups spike enormously. So things like universal basic income, which the negative income tax experimented on in the 1970s, are the closest thing we have for its large-scale experiments in this area, which had very large effects on joblessness by just giving people money. They feel quite dangerous to me because they feel like they're going to play into rising joblessness in America, which feels like a path for its misery. I want to just quickly deviate and some of the UBI advocates have brought together UBI in the US and UBI in the developing world. So UBI in the developing world, basically means that you give poor farmers in Sub-Saharan Africa fairly modest amounts of money. This is a totally sensible strategy.These people are not about to live life permanently not working. They're darn poor. It's very efficient relative to other ways of giving.  I am in no sense pushing back on UBI with modest amounts of money in the poorest parts of the world. By all means, it's been deemed to be effective. It's just a very different thing if you're saying I'm going to give $100 to a poor Congolese farmer, or I'm going to give $10,000 to a long-term jobless person in Eastern Kentucky. You're not buying a PS5 for $100 in Congo.Remote Work, Taxation, & MetaverseDwarkesh Patel 0:29:57I want to ask you about remote work. You write in The Survival of the City, that improvements in information technology can lead to more demand for face-to-face contact because FaceTime complements time spent communicating electronically. I'm curious, what distinguishes situations where FaceTime substitutes for in-person contact from situations where it complements FaceTime complements virtual contact?Edward Glaeser 0:30:25So there's not a universal rule on this. I wrote a paper based on this in the 1990s about face-to-face contact complements or substitutes for electronic contacts. It was really based on a lot of anxiety in the 1970s that the information technology of their day, the fax machine, the personal computer was going to make face-to-face contact in the cities that enable that contact obsolete. That discussion has reappeared amazingly in the past two and a half years because of Zoom, and all of those questions still resonate. I think in the short run, typically these things are substitutes.Typically you don't necessarily need to meet some person who's your long-term contact. You can actually just telephone them, or you can connect with them electronically. In the long run, they seem to be much more likely to be complements, in part because these technologies change our world. The story that I tell over the last 40 years is that, yes, there were some face-to-face contacts that were made unnecessary because of electronic interactions. But it's not just that cities did well over the past 40 years–– business travel went through the roof over the past 40 years. You'd think that that would have been made unnecessary by all these electronic interactions, but I think what just happened was that these new technologies and globalization created a more interconnected world, a world in which knowledge was more important, and we become smart by interacting with people face-to-face. This world became more knowledge and information intensive and more complicated, and as things get more complicated, it's easier for ideas to get lost in translation. So we have these wonderful cues for communicating comprehension or confusion that are lost when we're not in the same room with one another. So I think over the longer time, they tend to complements, and over the shorter term, they tend to be substitutes.One of the things I think was helpful in my earlier work on this was looking at the history of information technology innovations. I think probably the first one is the book. It's hard to imagine an innovation that did more to flatten distance. Now you can read stuff that people are saying hundreds of miles away. Yet there's not a shred of evidence that the book led to less urbanization in Europe or to less connection. It helped create a totally different world in which people were passionate about ideas and wanted to talk to each other. They wanted to talk to each other about their books.Flash forward 350 years when we have the telephone. Telephones started being used more in cities, and they were used mostly by people who were going to meet face-to-face. There's no evidence that this has created a decline in the demand for face-to-face contact or a decline in the demand for cities. So I think if we look at Zoom, which unquestionably has allowed a certain amount of long-distance contact, that's very, very useful. In the short run, it certainly poses a threat to urban office markets. My guess is in the long run; it's probably going to be likely to be neutral at worst for face-to-face contact in the cities that enable that contact. Dwarkesh Patel 0:33:37I think that my podcast has been a great example for me about this. I mean, right now we're talking virtually. So maybe, in a way it's substituted, and perhaps I would have interviewed in person without the podcast. However, in another way, I've also met so many people that I've interviewed on the podcast or who have just connected with me because of the podcast in person. The amount of in-person interactions I've had because of a virtual podcast is a great anecdote to what you're talking about, so that makes total sense.Edward Glaeser 0:34:05Absolutely.Dwarkesh Patel 0:34:06Why do even the best software engineers in India or in Europe make so much less when they're working remotely from those locations than remote engineers working in America make? I mean, why don't employers just pay them more until the price discrepancy goes away?Edward Glaeser 0:34:23That's interesting. I don't fully know the answer to that question. I would suspect some of it just has to do with the nature of supply and demand. There are some things that are just very hard to be done remotely. Either because you have very precise informational needs that you have that are easier to communicate to people who are nearby or the person who's nearby has evolved in ways in terms of their mind that they actually know exactly what you want and they have exactly the product that you need. So even though the remote call center worker and the local one may be totally equivalent on raw programming talent, you may still end up in equilibrium and be willing to pay a lot more to the local one just because, right?So there's a slightly differentiated skill the local one has, and look, there's just a lot of competition for the remote ones, so the price is going to be pretty low. There's not that much supply of the one guy who's down the hall and knows exactly what you're looking for. So that guy gets much higher wages, just because he can offer you something that no one else can exactly reproduce.Dwarkesh Patel 0:35:27Let me clarify my question. Even remote engineers in America will make more than remote engineers in Europe or in India. If somebody is working remotely but he just happens to live in the US, is that just because they can communicate in English in the same way? Edward Glaeser 0:35:54I would take the same stance. I would say that they're likely to have just skills that are somewhat idiosyncratic and are valued in the US context.Dwarkesh Patel 0:35:56Are you optimistic about the ability of the metaverse and VR to be able to better puncture whatever makes in-person contact so valuable?Edward Glaeser 0:36:19No, I do not think the metaverse is going to change very much. I do think that there will be a lot of hours spent on various forms of gaming over the next 20 years, but I don't think it ultimately poses much of a threat to real-world interactions. In some sense, we saw this with the teenage world over the last three years. We saw a lot of America spend an awful lot of time, 15, 16-year-olds, 17-year-olds, gaming and connecting entirely virtually during the whole time of the pandemic lockdowns.Every single person that I've seen in that cohort, when you allowed them to interact with real members of their group live, leaped at the opportunity. They leaped at the opportunity of meeting and actually hanging out with real people until three o'clock in the morning and arguing over whatever it is–– whether or not it's football or Kant. I think particularly for the young, living life live just beats the alternative.Dwarkesh Patel 0:37:05That sounds like a very Harvard scenario, having to argue over football or Kant, those two topics. [laughs] Are you predicting lower taxes over the coming decades in places like California and New York, specifically because of how remote work sets a sort of maximum bar of how much you can tax highly productive people before they will just leave? Edward Glaeser 0:37:29This is a great question. It's a central issue of our day. Here's how I think about it. In part, it's why I wrote my recent book, Survival of the City. It's because I was worried about this. Two things happened simultaneously. One, as you correctly say, Zoom has made it easier to connect anywhere. I don't think that Zoom is going to cause our tech startup currently in Silicon Valley to say, oh, you know what? We're just going to go home to our Orange County suburban homes and never meet live again. I think that's a low-probability event.But what seems to be a perfectly high probability event is saying, “Oh, we can Zoom with our VCs, we can Zoom with our lawyers. Why don't we just relocate to Austin, Texas, not pay taxes, or relocate to Boulder, Colorado, so we can have beautiful scenery, or relocate to Honolulu so we can surf?” That seems like we've made the ability for smart people to relocate much easier, even if they're going to keep on seeing each other in the office three or four days a week. That collides with this very fervent desire to deal with festering social inequities at the local level. Be this limited upward mobility for poorer people, be this high housing costs, be this the rise of mass incarceration and police brutality towards particularly minority groups. There's this progressive urge which runs up against the fact that the rich guys can run away.If your model, which says, “Oh, the local governments are going to realize the rich guys can run away, so they will seamlessly lower tax rates in order to make sure that they attract those people,” that's running up against the fact that there's a whole lot of energy on the progressive side, which says, “No! Massachusetts just passed a millionaire's tax. For the first time ever, we have the possibility to have a progressive tax, which feels extraordinarily dangerous given this time period.”I think we may need to see a bunch of errors in this area before we start getting things right. We went through a lot of pain in the 1970s as cities first tried to deal with their progressive goals and rich people and companies ran away, and it wasn't until the 1980s that people started realizing this was the path to local bankruptcy and that we had real city limits on what the locality could do.Dwarkesh Patel 0:39:44You cited research on the survival of the city, which said that firms like Microsoft were much less willing to hire new people once they went online because of the pandemic. What do you make of the theory that this is similar to when industrialization first hit and we hadn't figured out exactly how to make the most use of it to be most productive, but over the long run, somebody will do to remote work what Henry Ford did to the factory floor and in fact, just make it much more effective and efficient than in-person contact just because we'll have better ways of interacting with people through remote work, since we'll have better systems?Dwarkesh Patel 0:40:17It's entirely possible. I never like betting against the ingenuity of humanity. On the other hand, you need a lot of technology to override 5 million years of evolution. We have evolved to be an in-person species, not just because we're productive and learn a lot face-to-face, but also because we just like it. A world of hyper-efficient remote work where you basically are puttering around your apartment doing things very quickly and getting things done, doesn't sound particularly joyful to me.Workplaces are not just places of productivity; they're also places of pleasure, particularly at the high end. Remember in 2019 and earlier, Google, and Yahoo, the companies that should have had the biggest capacity to do remote stuff, weren't sending their workers home; they were building these paradises for high-skilled workers, stuffed with foosball tables and free snacks and whatever else they had in these giant campuses in the Google lex. So they were certainly betting on the power of face-to-face and creativity rather than on the ability of remote work to make everything work. I think the most reasonable view, let's say that of Nick Bloom of Stanford, is that for those types of workers, 20% of your week being hybrid, maybe 40%, seems quite possible.That seems like a thing, particularly for workers who have families who really value that degree of flexibility. But fully remote, I guess that's a pretty niche thing. There's some jobs like call center workers where you could imagine it being the norm, but in part, that's just because it's just hard to learn the same amount remotely that you do face-to-face. This came out both in the earlier Bloom study on remote call center workers in China and on more recent work by Natalia Emmanuel and Emma Harrington. Both studies found the same thing, which is in these call centers, are plenty productive when they're remote, but the probability of being promoted drops by 50%.The entrepreneur may make it very efficient to do things in the short run remotely, but they're going to turn off this tendency that we have to be able to learn things from people around us, which is just much harder to duplicate remotely.Past & Future of Silicon ValleyDwarkesh Patel 0:42:29Now, I'm curious why Silicon Valley became the hub of technology. You wrote a paper in 2018 about where pioneer and non-pioneer firms locate. So, I was hoping you had insight on this. Does it stand for it? Is it where Fairchild Semiconductor is located? What is the explanation?Edward Glaeser 0:42:48So, we take it as being earlier. It is Stanford. I traced through this, I think in Triumph. Yeah, it was a company called Federal Telegraph Company that was founded by a guy called Cyril Frank Elwell, who was a radio pioneer, and he was tapped by his teacher to head this radio company. The story was, as I remember it, there'd been this local genius in San Francisco who had attracted all these investors and was going to do this wireless telegraphy company. Then he died in a freak carriage accident.These investors wanted to find someone else, and they went to Stanford's nearby factory and asked, who should we hire? It was this guy Elwell who founded Federal Telegraph. Federal Telegraph then licensed, I think Danish technology which was originally the Poulsen Telegraph Company. They then hired some fairly bright people like Lee DeForest and they did incredibly well in World War I off of federal Navy contracts, off of Navy contracts. They then did things like providing jobs for people like the young Fred Terman, whose father was a Stanford scientist. Now, Fred Terman then plays an outsized role in this story because he goes to MIT, studies engineering there, and then comes back to become Dean of Stanford's engineering program.He really played an outsized role in setting up the Stanford Industrial Park which attracting Fairchild Semiconductor. Then there's this sort of random thing about how the Fairchild Semiconductor attracts these people and then repels them because you have this brilliant guy Shockley, right? He's both brilliant and sort of personally abhorrent and manages to attract brilliant people and then repel all of them. So they all end up dispersing themselves into different companies, and they create this incredibly creative ecosystem that is the heart of Silicon Valley.In its day, it had this combination of really smart people and really entrepreneurial ethos, which just made it very, very healthy. I think the thing that many of us worry about is that Silicon Valley more recently, feels much more like it's a one-industry town, which is dangerous. It feels more like it's a bunch of industrial behemoths rather than a bunch of smart and scrappy startups. That's a recipe that feels much more like Detroit in the 1950s than it does like Silicon Valley in the 1960s.Dwarkesh Patel 0:45:52Speaking of startups, what does your study of cities imply about where tech startups should locate and what kind of organization in person or otherwise they should have? I think there's a lot to like about in person, certainly. Relying too much on remote feels quite dangerous if you're a scrappy startup. But I like a lot the Sunbelt smart cities.I sort of have a two-factor model of economic growth, which is it's about education, and it's about having governments that are pro-business. If you think about sort of the US, there's a lot of heterogeneity in this. If you think about the US versus other countries, it's heterogeneity. So the US has historically been better at being pro-business than, let's say, the Northern European social democracies, but the Northern European social democracies are great on the education front.So places like Sweden and the Netherlands, and Germany are also very successful places because they have enough education to counter the fact that they may not necessarily be as pro-business as the US is. Within the US, you also have this balance, whereas places like Massachusetts, and California are certainly much less pro-business, but they're pretty well-educated. Other parts of the country may be more pro-business, but they're less so. The real secret sauce is finding those places that are both highly educated and pro-business.So those are places like Charlotte and Austin and even Atlanta, places in the Sun Belt that have attracted lots of skilled people. They've done very, very well during COVID. I mean, Austin, by most dimensions, is the superstar of the COVID era in terms of just attracting people. So I think you had to wait for the real estate prices to come down a bit in Austin, but those are the places that I would be looking at. Dwarkesh Patel 0:47:46I don't know if you know, but I live in Austin, actually.Edward Glaeser 0:47:50I did not know that. [laughs]Dwarkesh Patel 0:47:54Well, actually, I'm surprised about what you said about education because you write in the paper, “general knowledge measured as average years of schooling is not a strong determinant of the survival of a pioneer firm, but relatedness of knowledge between past and present activities is.” So I'm surprised that you think education is a strong determinant for pioneer firms.Edward Glaeser 0:48:15No, I'm a big human capital determinist. So I tend to believe that individuals, cities, and nations rise and fall based on their skill levels. Certainly, if you look over the last 40 or 50 years, skills are very predictive of which cities (particularly colder cities) manage to do well versus poorly. If you ask yourself why Detroit and Seattle look different, more than 50% of Seattle's adults have college degrees, and maybe 14, 15% of Detroit's adults do.That's just a huge, huge gap. Certainly, when we think about your punitive startup, you're going to be looking for talent, right? You're going to be looking to hire talent, and having lots of educated people around you is going to be helpful for that.Housing ReformDwarkesh Patel 0:48:56Let's talk about housing. Houston has basically very little to no zoning. Why is it not more of interesting today? Nobody goes to Houston for tourism.Edward Glaeser 0:49:07I have. [laughs] I have, in fact, gone to Houston for tourism. Although part of it, I admit, was to look at the housing and to go to the woodlands and look at that. Interesting has a lot to do with age in this country. So the more that a city has… Boston is good for tourism just because it's been around for a long time, and it hasn't changed all that much. So it has this sort of historical thing. Houston's a new place, not just in the sense that the chronological age is lower but also in the sense that it's just grown so much, and it's dominated by new stuff, right?That new stuff tends to be more homogenous. It tends to have less history on it. I think those are things that make new cities typically less interesting than older cities. As witnessed by the fact that Rome, Jerusalem, London, are great tourist capitals of the world because they've just accreted all this interesting stuff over the millennium. So I think that's part of it. I'm not sure that if we look at more highly zoned new cities, we're so confident that they're all that more interesting.I don't want to be particularly disparaging any one city. So I'm not going to choose that, but there's actually a bunch that's pretty interesting in Houston, and I'm not sure that I would say that it's any less interesting than any comparably aged city in the country.Dwarkesh Patel 0:50:35Yeah. I'm visiting Houston later this month. I asked my friend there, should I stay here longer? I mean, is there anything interesting to do here? And then he responds, “Well, it's the fourth biggest city in the country, so no.”Dwarkesh Patel 0:50:47Many people, including many economists, have said that we should drastically increase US population through immigration to a figure like 1 billion. Do you think that our cities could accommodate that? We have the infrastructure, and I mean, let's say we reformed housing over a decade or so. Could we accommodate such a large influx of people? Edward Glaeser 0:51:24A billion people in a decade? I love the vision. Basically, in my heart, I'm an open borders person, right? I mean, it's a moral thing. I don't really like the idea that I get to enjoy the privileges of being an American and think that I'm going to deny that opportunity to anyone else. So I love this vision. A billion people over 10 years is an unimaginably large amount of people over a relatively short period of time. I'd love to give it a shot. I mean, it's certainly not as if there's any long-term reason why you couldn't do it.I mean, goodness knows we've got more than enough space in this country. It would be exciting to do that. But it would require a lot of reform in the housing space and require a fair amount of reform in the infrastructure space as well to be able to do this at some kind of large scale affordability.Dwarkesh Patel 0:52:05What does the evidence show about public libraries? Do they matter?Dwarkesh Patel 0:52:09My friend Eric Kleinberg has written a great book about… I think it's called Palaces for the People about all the different functions that libraries have played. I've never seen anything statistically or systematically about this, but you're not going to get a scholar to speak against books. It's not a possible thing.Europe's Stagnation, Mumbai's Safety, & Climate Change Dwarkesh Patel 0:52:32Why do European cities seem so much more similar to what they look like decades or even centuries ago than American cities, even American cities that are old, obviously not as old as European cities, but they seem to change much more over time. Edward Glaeser 0:52:46Lower population growth, much tougher zoning, much tougher historic preservation. All three of these things are going on. So it's very difficult to build in European cities. There's a lot of attention to caring about history. It's often part of the nationalist narrative. You often have huge amounts of national dollars going to preserve local stuff and relatively lower levels of population growth.An extreme example of this is Warsaw, where central Warsaw is completely destroyed during World War II, and they built it up to look exactly like it looked before the bombing. So this is a national choice, which is unlikely that we would necessarily make here in the US. Dwarkesh Patel 0:53:27Yeah. I was in Mumbai earlier this year, and I visited Dharavi, which is the biggest slum in Asia. And it's a pretty safe place for a slum. Why are slums in different countries? Why do they often have different levels of how safe they are? What is the reason?Edward Glaeser 0:53:45I, too, have been in Dharavi and felt perfectly safe. It's like walking around Belgravia and London in terms of it. I think my model of Dharavi is the same model as Jane Jacobs's model of Greenwich Village in 1960, which is this is just a well-functioning community.People have eyes on the street. If you're a stranger in these areas, they're going to be looking at you, and it's a community that just functions. There are lots of low-income communities throughout the world that have this. It requires a certain amount of permanence. So if the community is too much in flux, it becomes hard to enforce these norms and hard to enforce these sort of community rules. It's really helpful if there aren't either a massive number of guns floating around or an unbelievably lucrative narcotics trade, which is in the area. Those are both things that make things incredibly hard. Furthermore, US drug policy has partially been responsible for creating violence in some of the poor parts of Latin American cities.Dwarkesh Patel 0:54:43Maybe you don't play video games enough to know the answer to this question. But I'm curious, is there any video game, any strategic video game like Civilization or Europa that you feel does a good job representing the economics of cities? Edward Glaeser 0:55:07No, I will say that when I was in graduate school, I spent a few hours playing something called Sim City. I did think that was very fun. But I'm not going to claim that I think that it got it right. That was probably my largest engagement with city-building video games.Dwarkesh Patel 0:55:12What would you say we understand least about how cities work? Edward Glaeser 0:55:18I'm going to say the largest unsolved problem in cities is what the heck we're going to do about climate change and the cities of the developing world. This is the thing I do not feel like I have any answer for in terms of how it is that we're going to stop Manila or Mumbai from being leveled by some water-related climate event that we haven't yet foreseen.We think that we're going to spend tens of billions of dollars to protect New York and Miami, and that's going to happen; but the thing I don't understand and something we really need to need to invest in terms of knowledge creation is what are we going to do with the low-lying cities of the developing world to make them safe. Dwarkesh Patel 0:55:54Okay. Your most recent book is Survival of the City. And before that Triumph of the City, both of which I highly recommend to readers. Professor Glaeser, thank you so much for coming on the podcast. This was very interesting.Edward Glaeser 0:56:05I enjoyed this a lot. Thank you so much for having me on. I had a great deal of fun. This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.dwarkeshpatel.com

Beat the Big Guys
One Person Can Make a Big Difference - Dan Schneider

Beat the Big Guys

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 38:46


Sandy chats with Dan Schneider of the Netflix docuseries "The Pharmacist" which highlights the Oxycontin crisis and "pill mills." Dan (Mandeville, LA) explains how just one person really can make a difference.Beat the Big GuysHost: Sandy Rosenthalhttps://www.sandyrosenthal.netConnect with Sandy on Instagram: @beatthebigguysProducer: Jess Branashttps://www.branasenterprises.com

Top Docs:  Award-Winning Documentary Filmmakers
”All the Beauty and the Bloodshed” with Laura Poitras

Top Docs: Award-Winning Documentary Filmmakers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 35:50


“At first, I was terrified”. These are not words you expect to hear very often from Laura Poitras, one of the world's most fearless and acclaimed documentary filmmakers. Afterall, this is the filmmaker who took on the U.S. intelligence community with her Academy Award-winning film “Citizenfour” about NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden. But shortly into our “Top Docs” interview about her trenchant and luminous new documentary “All the Beauty and the Bloodshed”, Laura began to use words like “nervous”, “intimidating”, and “terrified”. Rather than experiencing a potentially dangerous physical situation or government surveillance operation, Laura, instead, found herself confronting something even more formidable, the groundbreaking visual artist Nan Goldin. Not wanting to come up short in her portrait of someone that Laura describes as a legend, hero and inspiration, Laura was driven to create a documentary that would do justice to Nan, her artwork and her activism. Laura joined Ken on “Top Docs” to talk about how she and Nan came together to collaborate on the film and form a strong creative partnership. Given Nan's frequent use of live slideshows to present her most well-known work, how did Laura and Nan figure out the best way to feature Nan's art in the film? Why and how did Nan and the activist group that she founded in response to the opioid crisis train their sights on the Sackler family, whose company created OxyContin? And in what ways do big themes like destigmatization, resistance and legacy feature prominently in the film? Join us for this lively conversation… and don't be afraid.   Hidden Gems: “Crossroads” “Perfect Film”   Follow on Twitter: @topdocspod   “All the Beauty and the Bloodshed” will be released by NEON in theaters on November 23 in New York City and December 2 in Los Angeles and San Francisco. A national release will follow. The film will premiere on HBO and HBO Max at a date to be announced   The Presenting Sponsor of "Top Docs" is Netflix.

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
How The Tail Of The Pharmaceutical Industry Wags The Dog Of American Healthcare

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 19:47


New 2022 - How The Tail Of The Pharmaceutical Industry Wags The Dog Of American Healthcare Dr. John Abramson, M.D • https://hcp.hms.harvard.edu/people/john-david-abramson• Book – Sickening #JohnAbramson #BigPharma #AmericanHealthCare #HealthCarePolicy Dr. John Abramson, M.D. is an author and medical doctor and has served as a family physician for over 20 years. His recently release book Sickening  How Big Pharma Broke American Health Care and How We Can Repair It. Is about the inside story of how Big Pharma's relentless pursuit of ever-higher profits corrupts medical knowledge—misleading doctors, misdirecting American health care, and harming our health. The United States spends an excess $1.5 trillion annually on health care compared to other wealthy countries—yet the amount of time that Americans live in good health ranks a lowly 68th in the world. At the heart of the problem is Big Pharma, which funds most clinical trials and therefore controls the research agenda, withholds the real data from those trials as corporate secrets, and shapes most of the information relied upon by health care professionals. In this no-holds-barred exposé, Dr. John Abramson—one of the foremost experts on the drug industry's deceptive tactics—combines patient stories with what he learned during many years of serving as an expert in national drug litigation to reveal the tangled web of financial interests at the heart of the dysfunction in our health-care system. For example, one of pharma's best-kept secrets is that the peer reviewers charged with ensuring the accuracy and completeness of the clinical trial reports published in medical journals do not even have access to complete data and must rely on manufacturer-influenced summaries. Likewise for the experts who write the clinical practice guidelines that define our standards of care. The result of years of research and privileged access to the inner workings of the U.S. medical-industrial complex, Sickening shines a light on the dark underbelly of American health care—and presents a path toward genuine reform. John Abramson MD,  He was twice voted “best doctor” in his area by readers of the local newspapers and three times selected by his peers as one of a handful of best family practitioners in Massachusetts. He has been on the faculty at Harvard Medical School for over 15 years, where he has taught primary care and currently teaches health care policy. He currently consults as an expert in litigation involving the pharmaceutical industry and has served as an unpaid consultant to the FBI and Department of Justice. Dr. Abramson has appeared on more than 65 national television shows, including two appearances on the Today Show, and more recently on the Dr. Oz Show. He was written op-ed pieces in the New York Times LA Times and others. He is the author of the national best-selling book Overdo$ed America.To Contact Dr John Abramson MD, go to https://hcp.hms.harvard.edu/people/john-david-abramson CLICK HERE - To Checkout Our MEMBERSHIP CLUB: http://www.realtruthtalks.com  • Social Media ChannelsFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConferenceInstagram : https://www.instagram.com/therealtruthabouthealth/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/RTAHealth Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-real-truth-about-health-conference/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealth    • Check out our Podcasts  Visit us on Apple Podcast and Itunes search:  The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast Amazon: https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/23a037be-99dd-4099-b9e0-1cad50774b5a/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0RZbS2BafJIEzHYyThm83J Google:https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5zaW1wbGVjYXN0LmNvbS8yM0ZqRWNTMg%3D%3DStitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastAudacy: https://go.audacy.com/partner-podcast-listen-real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastiHeartRadio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-real-truth-about-health-li-85932821/ Deezer: https://www.deezer.com/us/show/2867272 Reason: https://reason.fm/podcast/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcast • Other Video ChannelsYoutube:https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealthVimeo:https://vimeo.com/channels/1733189Rumble:  https://rumble.com/c/c-1111513 Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConference/videos/?ref=page_internal DailyMotion: https://www.dailymotion.com/TheRealTruthAboutHealth BitChute: https://www.bitchute.com/channel/JQryXTPDOMih/ Disclaimer:Medical and Health information changes constantly. Therefore, the information provided in this podcast should not be considered current, complete, or exhaustive. Reliance on any information provided in this podcast is solely at your own risk. The Real Truth About Health does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, products, procedures, or opinions referenced in the following podcasts, nor does it exercise any authority or editorial control over that material. The Real Truth About Health provides a forum for discussion of public health issues. The views and opinions of our panelists do not necessarily reflect those of The Real Truth About Health and are provided by those panelists in their individual capacities. The Real Truth About Health has not reviewed or evaluated those statements or claims.  

Red Pill Revolution
Trump 2024 & Biden's FTX Money Laundering | Poland Missile Crisis | Colorado Legalizes Psychedelics

Red Pill Revolution

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 75:23


In this week's episode, we discuss Trump's announcement of his 2024 bid for the presidency, Trump saying he would sentence all drug dealers to death and why I completely disagree, FTX crypto exchange being a democratic money laundering scheme, Poland blaming Russia for two dead after missle strike which seems to have been Ukrainian air defense missiles and the FBI raiding a UFO journalists house for putting out legally obtained material on Area 51.   Subscribe and leave a 5-star review! ----more---- Donate to support the show by going to https://givesendgo.com/redpillrevolution   Our website https://redpillrevolution.co/    Protect your family and support the Red Pill Revolution Podcast with Affordable Life Insurance. This is attached to my license and not a third-party ad!   Go to https://agents.ethoslife.com/invite/3504a now!   Currently available in AZ, MI, MO, LA, NC, OH, IN, TN, WV. Email austin@redpillrevolution.co if you would like to sign up in a different state   ----more---- Full Transcription   Welcome to the Revolution. Hello and welcome to Red Pill Revolution. My name is Austin Adams, and thank you so much for listening. Today, we are going to talk about some pretty interesting things that have, I mean, it's been f a way crazier week than we've had in a while, so let me walk you through what's going on. Colorado. Colorado, the, the entire state of Colorado just legalized psychedelics after the midterm elections that includes mushrooms, dmt. I began all of this stuff, so we will touch on that briefly. The FBI rated the home and seized the property of a journalist who posted legally obtained information about Area 51. Then we will also discuss Poland getting hit by a missile. What most people are assuming came from Russia. So we will discuss that. We will actually go ahead and look at all of the updates from what's going on there, as well as talking through the transcripts of Vladimir Putin in his discussion today. We are going to also discuss the recent announcement by former President Donald Trump that he is going to run in 2024, along with some crazy things that he said during that announcement that I do not agree with. So we will talk about those and why I don't agree with them. And we will also discuss the X Crypto scandal, which many people believe is actually been a front for Ukrainian money laundering back to the Biden administration and the Democratic Party. So that was all in the last. Two days , basically. It's been wild. So without further ado, let's go ahead and jump into. Welcome to Red Pill Revolution. My name is Austin Adams. Red Pill Revolution started out with me, realizing everything that I knew, everything that I believed, everything I interpret about my life is through the lens of the information I was spoonfed as a child. Religion, politics, history, conspiracies, Hollywood medicine, money, food, all of it. Everything we know was tactfully written to influence your decisions and your view on reality by those in power. Now I'm on a mission, a mission to retrain and reeducate myself to find the true reality of what is behind that curtain. And I'm taking your ass with me. Welcome to the Revolution. If you didn't know, I actually sat down and created one intro music for this podcast, the very first, uh, time. And, and by the way, it has been a year since I lost this or launched this podcast, which was October 20 19th of last year. So one year, happy one year to the Red Pill Revolution podcast. I don't know if I have. Any claps here. Oh, look at that. Woo. All right, look at that. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you guys. 50 episodes one year later. You can stop the applause. Thank you. All right. Awesome. Hey, thank you so much, guys for listening. I truly do appreciate it. This is such a blessing in my life to be able to come on here and get all of this out to you guys. I don't know who I would, I've, I've, I don't know who I'd talked to about all this stuff. I mean, I talked to a lot of people about it, , but, but, uh, it's, it's awesome to be able to talk to you guys. It's awesome to be able to engage with you guys. So, honestly, from the bottom of my heart, thank you so much for being a part about a part of this. Thank you so much for spreading the word. I do plan on this being 100% what I do with my life. So please, please spread the word as much as you can. Uh, if you can, uh, go ahead and over to Red Pill revolution.co. You can subscribe to the podcast there. Leave a five star review, hit the subscribe button, all of that good stuff, write a review if you can. That actually helps me get up in the rankings more than anything else. So please write a review, type it with your little awesome fingers right now. Hit that subscribe button ahead over it to red po revolution.co. You can subscribe to the sub stack where you get all of the articles, all of the topics, uh, topic videos, the full podcast directly in your email along with a video podcast. Some extra little goodies. Sometimes I write some stuff in there. All good stuff for. Head over to red pill revolution.coo.com is for losers. Do it right now. I would appreciate it. And while you're there, you can actually go and donate If you would like to fuel the revolution, you can go directly to Red Pill Revolution, uh, or I'm sorry, gifts and go slash red pill revolution. So give setting go.com of course, uh slash red pill revolution. Give saying go.com/red pill revolution and I would appreciate it. That's what I got. Usually I do it at the beginning, but I don't know, I guess I missed it cause I was so excited about all of the wild stuff going on, . So let's go ahead and talk about the very first thing today, which is that Colorado legalized psychedelics, not just mushrooms, not they legalized dmt, like they just, they didn't start at the bottom and just move their way up. Over the years, they just went like top to bottom psychedelics legal in Colorado from Proposition 1 22, which did get passed. I think that this is actually, I'm a hundred percent behind it. I think psychedelics, uh, have proven scientifically to have a large positive net effect on so many mental health issues. Uh, I personally have not done them surprisingly, uh, but, uh, am definitely open to the idea at some point in my life, maybe down the. I'm not interested in it at the very moment that I'm sitting here with you, but I do see so many positive effects coming out of this. I do see, you know, just from meditation and things that I've talked about in the past, I have, you know, reached those places that you can get to through psychedelics, and I've seen the positive effects in my life. Uh, and so I absolutely believe this is something that I stand behind wholeheartedly. I think it's awesome. So let's go ahead and read this article. This is coming from ABC News. Everybody's favorite, uh, news website? Not really. It says Colorado has become the second state. Second state. Oh, I was wrong. Second straight. Colorado has become the second state to decriminalize and legalize recreational psychedelics. Voters passed about initiative during last week's election, and it will make it legal for adults to purchase and used DMT or dime methyl Tripp. Dimethyltryptamine iga, mes. Uh, it actually excludes peyote. Um, they can also use psilocybin, nearly 1.2 million voters, roughly 53% of the total vote approved. Prop 1 22, according to state election results, it says, currently Oregon, Oregon, Oregon, depending if you're from Oregon or not from Oregon, you say it one way or the other. I think at least all the people that I've met from Oregon, say it's Oregon and all the people I've met, not from Oregon, say it's Oregon. So I'm not from Oregon, Oregon, Oregon. I don't know. Currently, Oregon is the only state, uh, to legalize psychedelics. In 20 22, 50 5% of Oregon, uh, voters passed initiative to legalize recreational psychedelics. Starting next year, Oregon residents can use psilocybin at licensed service centers. And not in their homes. According to the Oregon Health Authority, Colorado's ballot measure comes 10 years after it. In Washington state, voters passed ballot initiatives to legalize recreational marijuana for adult residents. Today, 21 states and the District of Columbia offered legalized cam cannabis for adult residents, five states, Maryland to Missouri, Arkansas, North Dakota and South Dakota had ballot measures in this year's election, the legalized recreational adults or recreational marijuana for adults voters in Maryland, Missouri passed the recreational, uh, measures while voters in other states rejected the referendums. Interesting, but that's wild. Colorado. Colorado is up Colorado leading the way, leading the charge on the front of this. And, and as we saw what happened with marijuana, they are just going to start a domino effect of all the other states. And again, I am wholeheartedly behind this. I a hundred percent approve. Uh, I I think if you don't, you should look at the scientific studies that talk about veterans ptsd. I think that you should look at the scientific studies that help talk about how it helps depression. Uh, I think you should look at the studies that show that you literally have to eat more than your body weight or some crazy, something like that. Not medical advice, Uh, and mushrooms to die. I'm sure it's may not even be a thing just like marijuana, uh, dmt, uh, not sure how that works, but I'm pretty sure it doesn't kill you. Like a lot of the pharmaceutical medications that were given, like Oxycontin, like, uh, you know, fentanyl, that they literally give to women in labor. Crazy. So again, I'm a hundred percent behind this. I agree with this. I, I don't see anything wrong with this. I, I do think they're gonna be setting up treatment centers. I believe that's gonna allow you to grow these in your home. Uh, as it stands right now, these are like, you get in big trouble if you're found with stuff that literally grows on shit and the farming pasture Like, why, why does that make any sense? If it's put on this earth, why should you allow a government entity to be able to tell you whether you can pluck it and throw it in your own mouth? In your own mouth? I could see if you were. Plucking it off of the cow patty and shoving somebody to the ground, forcefully opening their mouth and throwing it in there, shutting their mouth and making like shaking 'em upside down to make sure, I guess upside down probably wouldn't work. But you see the point if you are doing it to your own body, I think you should basically be free ring. I, I think you, you should, even if you don't agree with psychedelics, even if you think it's wrong, logically, philosophically, I believe you should be able to ruin your own. A hundred percent. If you want to sit all day and smoke weed and play video games, I think you should have the right to do so, and you will find that there is so, so social repercussions, sociological social repercussions to that that you probably don't like and eventually you may change what you're doing as a result of those social repercussions. People probably don't wanna hang out with you. People might think that you're a loser if that's all you're doing all day, but there's also some very high functioning people who smoke weed all day and make a bunch of money and do awesome stuff all the time and just enjoy it more while also eating snacks. So , I don't, I don't necessarily think that there should, the government, especially if we're ping out oxycont, And allowing the drug cartels to pull over fentanyl in boatloads, which I guess is coming from China. You know, I, I heard the Dr. Phil interview where he was talking about how China is manufacturing fentanyl, taking it to the cartels. The cartels are bringing it into the US through the border, which tons of people are coming over now as of the last two years. Wonder if that's a coincidence and then killing your friends and family and children with it intentionally because they want the demise of our culture. I don't know, just a theory, but it seems to make a lot of sense to me. If you were going to do something like that, why wouldn't you do it? Through drugs? Through the minds of the culture. Uh, from the inside, right. And, and utilizing the drug cartels. Why wouldn't we? You know, it just makes so much sense. Uh, I don't. But is that happening? You know, is is, is it in your kid's candy on, on October 31st? That was like the whole scare about that. I don't think that was happening. At least if we didn't hear about it, I'm pretty sure if we would, if somebody's child died from a fentanyl overdose from eating smarties while going through subdivisions on Halloween, I'm pretty sure it would've been in the news by now and it wasn't so interesting. Now, off the backs of that crazy stuff, let's talk about some other crazy stuff. The FBI raid the home and seized the property of a man who put out information that he obtained illegally about Area 51. So this journalist found photos, found information about Area 51, collected it completely legally. Did absolutely nothing wrong and still had his property seized and had his home raid by the fbi. I don't know how the FBI is still functioning right now after all of the un like crazy missteps that they've taken recently. The, the, the rating of Mar Lago, to which we heard puts nothing, absolutely nothing at all, came from that of literally kicking, like, maybe not literally kicking down the door, but metaphorically kicking down the door of a former president, which has never happened in the history of our country, of his home's, house. His is home, his domicile, right? Think that's the word, uh, rated the house of a next president, the last president, like two years removed, President and no repercussions to the fbi, and no repercussions to Trump. Nobody's even talking about it anymore. It's not even a conversation.  and here they are doing the same thing. Now to this journalist who put out information about Area 51, I can't believe we're still talking about Area 51. Honestly. Like we're literally having congressional hearings surrounding UA boos, UFOs, aliens, uh, and we're still rating the homes of people based on area 51 pictures. That makes, that makes literally no sense, no sense at all. So, Hmm. All right, let's go ahead and read this article. This is coming from Real News, No Bullshit, which always seems to kick me out of their website. Even though I am a member. Highly recommend you find several news sources that you, uh, you know, feel are unbiased and also, Not click Baie and also are reporting properly without any political bias and pay for their stuff, even if they're small. Real news. No bullshit at Real News. Not bs.com is one of them that I use and I subscribe because I wanna support good journalism. Now, I don't know if I exactly classify myself as a journalist, but if you would like to support my work here, I already told you how to do it. Red pill revolution.co or go to give and go.com/red Pill revolution. That's called a plug because I don't do ads. Nothing. Nothing at all for you guys here, so just me talking. All right, let's go ahead and pull up this article now that I have signed in and successfully talked for a minute and a half while I do so, and here it is. FBI rates home and seizes property of journalists who post legally obtained information in photos of Area 51. All right, so it says, Last week the FBI rated multiple locations in Las Vegas, in Rachel, Nevada, approximately 28 miles from the Nevada test site. Tied to journalist j Jor, J O E R G A R N U George ar new looks way more difficult than is probably pronounced of dreamland resort.com. Uh, a new our news website is a popular page that covers activities at the Nevada test site. He posts various photos and information related to the secret of site that he claims are legally obtained for his viewers to see. Posts also includes zoomed in pictures of the facility government aircraft, locations of military ground sensors outside of the base security cameras, and the notorious camo dudes who protect the military install. You mean military? Are they not military? A day before the FBI raid his own are new hinted that something could be coming writing. It has been brought to my attention that there is a concern about some of the material on the site. I do not believe that collecting or publishing that material is against the law otherwise, I guess sounds like they gave him a heads up. Um, photos taken from, uh, his website shows the camo dudes in the truck. Um, the day after approximately 35. FBI agents served search warrants at both homes and seized computers, cameras, files, cell phones, and other electronic devices. Our news said each location saw at least 15 to 20 agents rummaging through our homes in about eight vehicles. Needless to say, it was a spectacle for curious neighbors, both in Rachel and in Vegas. In the process, I lost all of my data. Medical files, financial tax records, passwords. Following the raids. Our new also raised concerns that the raids may lead to bogus charges being filed against him in order to send a message. I'm concerned that overzealous government agents may use bogus charges against me to send a message. Putting the truth out there cannot hurt. Hmm. Sounds familiar. Right. We had the FBI rating, uh, Mar Lago. Uh, we had them doing plenty of other little, uh, weird things recently that seem to be unconstitutional, including this one here. Uh, I'm, I'll be interested to see the follow up on this. Um, nothing too in depth there, but it is again, like I said, surprising that there's still these types of things happening, which maybe they just thought it would never come up. But obviously when you raid the home of somebody with 35 FBI agents, there's going to be some talks about it. 35. That's a lot of FBI agents. Hmm. All right. Now let's talk about the moer pressing issues. One of them being that NATO leaders are holding emergency meetings after. Allegedly Russian missiles land in Poland, killing two people. All right. Now this is again coming from Real News, not bs.com, and it gives a timestamp for all of the things that happened. And it, again, is making me sign in. But because I like good journalism, I will do it. Uh, so it also could be because I'm using Brave Browser. Brave Browser is a great browser. It's probably the only browser that I would recommend that you use because it hides all of your data, all of it, um, doesn't track you. Uh, you can also, there's a VPN built into it. Uh, then Brave Search. Brave Search is what I use instead of Google, cuz it doesn't curate your search results as well. So this gives a timestamp of all of the happenings that are going on here. Let's see how long it is. Um, and I'll kind of talk you through what the day looked like regarding Poland. And it's not too much, too much time here. So this says that at 4:14 PM Polish Prime Minister says the country has heightened readiness. It has been introduced for all polish services, including the, uh, police firefighters, border guards will also increase monitoring of Polish. Air, air, air, space. Uh, Polish government releases first statement officially blaming Russia for strikes on its territory. In the statement, the Polish government said that on November 15th, a massive shelling of the entire territory of reclaim and its critical infrastructure by the Russian military was observed for hours at three 40, a Russian made missile fell on the territory of the village of Presdo in Lubin Providence resulting in the death of two Polish citizens in connection with the incident, Foreign minister RA has summoned the ambassador of Russia to demand an immediate detailed explanation at 3 0 3, approximately, I don't know, three minutes before then. So are we looking at this in the wrong direction? It may appear. Hmm. Let's see. Okay, so let's start from the bottom. We started from the top. Uh, maybe they should tell you that nothing against you. All right. 10:07 AM two rockets have landed in the town of Presdo Poland on the border of Ukraine. They hit the grain dryers. Two people have died. No word on who is responsible. 10 14. Approximately seven minutes later, Polish Prime Minister has called an emergency meter meeting with top government officials reports indicating that two Russia missiles landed in Poland. 10 17 aid to Prime Minister, uh, says that he is holding a meeting with a national security team and top defense officials. The meeting is set to discuss repercussions of a missile attack by Russia Senior US Intelligence officials speaking to Associated Press confirms that two Russian missiles landed in Poland. Now, I guess that the bigger concern with this is the fact that, you know, everybody's been talking about World War. World War Three, World War ii, Everybody's been talking about world, the potential of World War ii. And if you know anything about World War ii, Poland had a little bit to do with it in the beginnings, right? Poland, I'm sure, uh, had basically got bombed and got pulled into the war, and the rest is history, right? So that's kind of some justifiable concern surrounding this action happening. Now, from what I've read elsewhere, some people are less concerned about this turning into escalated conflict. They're more concerned about it escalating NATO's response as opposed to Poland directly. But that's the concern. The concern is that Poland gets bombed. Poland gets dragged into the war. This sounds like it may have been a potentially. Didn't actually, you know, wasn't the intention to pull Poland into the war. I don't know why they would do that right now, unless they were trying to further move territories. But even then that wouldn't make much sense because they're having difficulty in Ukraine. Anyways, uh, it says 10 17 a prime Minister said there's gonna be repercussions. Senior US intelligence official confirms the two Russian missiles. Laia, as defense minister said, my condolences to our Polish brothers in arms criminal Russian regime fire two missiles, which targeted not only Ukrainian citizens, uh, but also landed on NATO territory in Poland. That's from Lafia, Hungary speaks out the Penta, The Pentagon did not confirm or deny the information. Now, what I would say is the most interesting portion of all of this, so it goes on to say that senior US official confirms to NBC news that something did happen with a Russian missile hitting Poland. They do not know whether it was deliberate or an accident. Then Russia response. Russia says at 1207 that statements by Polish media and officials about the allegedly alleged fall of Russian missiles in the area of the settlement is a deliberate provocation in order to escalate the situation. No strikes were made by Russian weapons against targets near the Ukrainian Polish State order. The wreckage published by the Polish media Hot on the heels of the incident in the Village of Pres Vidal, has nothing to do with Russian weapons of destruction. So Russia vehemently denies the claim that these were, their missiles says they did not fire any missiles towards them, so that that was, had nothing to do with them, and that they're trying to provoke this situation further by saying that it was them 1237 nato. Uh, Secretary General said that NATO is monitoring the situation. They always are closely consulting. All right, Uh, Poland says something, Poland, the White House doesn't confirm the details. That was at one o'clock. Uh, Let's see. Head of the Polish National Security says Polish. Uh, Duda currently is in talks with US President Joe Biden. Uh, now it is saying here at 1 27, Ukraine's foreign Minister said, Russia now promotes a conspiracy theory that was allegedly a missile of Ukrainian air defenses that fell on Polish territory. This is not true. No one should buy Russian propaganda or amplify its messages. So this is a he said, she said situation right? Russia. Russia denies it that this was their missile. And Russia even goes on to say that the missile was Ukrainian air defenses that fell in Polish territory. UK Ukraine's foreign Minister says that's not true and so on. Uh, two Ukrainian diplomats say that NATO ambassadors will meet tomorrow. Invoking article.  Article four allows members to bring any issue of concern, especially related to the security of member countries. Okay. Ukrainian news outlet says, uh, that the Air Defense missile landed in UK Ukraine. Hmm. Ukrainian News outlet interfaces reporting that Ukrainian KH 1 0 1 Air Defense missiles landed in Ukraine. So a Ukrainian news outlet confirmed what they were saying. Uh, the next thing that happens was at two o'clock, Ukrainian forces may have been involved in the explosion that occurred in the Eastern Poland to lure nato. That's from the Russian state. Uh, and it looks like there are some. Pictures of this. So it says, two weapons. Analysts are claiming that photos of debris from the missiles found in Poland near belong to a Ukrainian missile. The analyst note that at the end of a Ukrainian rocket motor identified as, uh, what is it, 48 N six DM Sam's rocket motor photos attached with thes. Ukrainian called these claims conspiracy theories. Of course they do. Uh, Poland has officially summoned the Russian ambassador after the missile strikes Polish media outlets reporting that government officials believe the missile debris is from. How convenient. How convenient that they're, you know, this is a, again, he said, she said, but it sounds like after that whole dirty bomb situation where the UN Security Council met about that, if you don't recall what that was, The UN Security Council was called into a meeting after Russia called them based on claims that Ukraine was building a dirty bomb to drop on from what somebody told me. I don't know if this is correct and I haven't verified it, so maybe not, was Paris and then we're going to blame Russia trying to bring other people into the war. Uh, Poland uh, releases official statements blaming Russia, and this was at, uh, five or six o'clock. Um, Polish Prime Minister says, The country is heightened readiness, right? Da da. So there you go. There's the story. Right now, we don't know who did this, who, where the missile got dropped from, who did it. Uh, it seems like it could have just as much been Ukraine as it could have been Russia at this point. Uh, but I guess time will tell and maybe it won't because again, we, we barely even have access to any of the contrarian conversations surrounding this, especially when, if I post this tomorrow, it's going to get flagged as misinformation. If you talk about the two sides of this conversation, one being that Russia claims that Ukraine air defense missiles dropped in Poland, the other being that Ukraine claims that Russia bombed Poland. Poland, obviously a NATO ally, uh, says that they believe it was Russia. Now again, all this is doing is escalating. Nobody is saying we deliberately bombed anybody. There's no, no foreseeable way. That this action gets heightened into, you know, what some people are concerned about. I don't see it. All right. Um, Polish president says Raq may have been Russian made. All right, so we already talked about that. There's a video that goes along with it. Um, now I would say, oh, here's a video where it allegedly shows that Biden says it was unlikely that it was Russian made, which means that it could have been Ukrainian. Uh, so let's see if I can get this connected here and we can listen to that, cuz I think that's a, a good one. And then we'll actually listen to what Biden's initial response to be was because it was hilarious. Hilarious and concerning on both parts, but mostly concerning because he's our president and not some random dude. Uh, so I don't know if I'm gonna be able to get this video here and let's see if I can just. What happened, Our entity simply goes out to apparently two people were killed. And, uh, and then we're gonna collectively determine our next step as we investigate and proceed. There was total unanimity among the folks at the table. We also discuss the latest series of Russian missile attacks, which are continuing the brutality in humanity that they've demonstrated throughout this war against Ukrainian cities and civilian infrastructures. And, uh, it's, they've been totally unconscionable what they're doing. Totally unconscionable. And the moment when the world came together, the G 20 to urge deescalation, Russia continues to, uh, is chosen to escalate in Ukraine while we're meeting, I mean, there were scores and scores of attack, missile attacks in the Western Ukraine. We support Ukraine fully in this moment. We have a. We have since the start, this conflict when they continue to do whatever it takes to give them the capacity to defend themselves. Mr. President, it's too early to say whether this missile was fired from Russia. There is preliminary information that contests that. I don't want to say that till we completely investigate, but it it is, uh, I, I, I, I, it's unlikely in the minds of the trajectory that it was fired from Russia, but we, we'll see. We'll, so this whole thing is still to this second being perpetuated as being Russia firing missiles at Poland and. Biden is saying that it's unlikely that the preliminary information shows that that's potentially not true, but is hesitating to say it because it doesn't fit their narrative. But they know there's gonna be so much blow back once it's confirmed that it was actually Ukraine, that they can't hype this up to be this crazy bombing like they would have loved to do because it's eventually gonna show that it was from Ukraine. At least that's what I'm taking from it. Uh, and, but let, Here's this clip. This was earlier, a little bit earlier today of Biden showing that he will not respond on this yet, which is a bit different than what he just said, but this was just. So ridiculous that this was the response of our president, and then they literally shoo everybody out of the room. So here it is. Let's see the question that's asked, and let's watch his response. Mr. President, can you tell us what we know so far about the guys right here? Thank you. Thank you so much. Okay. So what you just heard is somebody saying, Can you confirm that, you know, can you talk more about what happened, uh, in Poland with the Russian missile? And he goes, No. And just stares at them weirdly as all of his handlers swooping and go, Everybody get out. Everybody get out. That's what you hear in the background. Everybody get out. Everybody get out. Keep moving. Keep moving towards the exit. Please move. Please move everybody out. No more questions because you asked the one that we don't want to answer right now because we don't, It doesn't suit our narrative. And that's the biggest problem here is they want to escalate this war. They would've loved, loved it if Russia bombed Poland, even if by accident, and now they know there's probably probably irrefutable evidence that it was Ukrainian air defense missiles that dropped in Poland that caused these two people to die. That was the actual reason. So there you go. All right. Sorry. Had to correct something real quick. All right, so there you go. That to me is so telling of what they want out of this. They want an international conflict. That is what they want. They want to get drawn into, They wanna draw the US into the war. They want the public support surrounding it, and they're trying everything they can. They're trying to, even potentially, according to Vladimir Putin, bring them in by doing false flag dirty bombs, which is just so, so beyond concerning. All right, so there's your information on Poland. Now, Putin did come out. And have a speech today where he actually said something about how the, uh, certain countries, Well, I'll just go ahead and read it for you. Um, he says, Good afternoon colleagues. Welcome to the meeting, uh, organizing committee. Today we'll be discussing matters related to preserving the historical memory, the ongoing or organizing committee that consistently devotes priority attention to this issue, which is particularly relevant today. So what he is talking about here is that he's accusing western countries and western cultures of deleting and changing history. I'm sure a lot of that's talking about the United States of America, right? Every time he's saying western cultures, he's either talking about, you know, us or the ue, right? So attempts made by certain countries to rewrite and reshape world history are becoming increasingly aggressive ultimately, and obviously, seek can divide our society, take away our guiding lines, and eventually we can rush and influence its sovereignty, essentially, shake it sovereign. Distortion of history. Imposing of myths in the undermining of values is often, it is often with these myths that de stabilizing states, nations begins. As we can see, a similar scenario has been tested in some other countries, including Ukraine. There have been attempts to target Russia as well, but as I have said before, we took resolute in timely measures to protect our interests and stave off similar sabotage. Wow. They have a whole committee in conversations surrounding, uh, keeping history. Correct. Interesting. Um, not gonna dive too much into that, but he talks about Nuremberg. It says, I would like to note that many initiatives rela related to this topic have been launched by our organizing committee. One of them is the no Statue of Limitations project involving a systematic and scholarly collection of data on the crimes committed by the Nazis and their accomplices against the civilian population during the great patriotic war, the very crimes against humanity condemned by the Nurnberg Tribunal. The scale of those atrocities were so egregious that at the time, in the 1940s only a part of the evidence reached to the court as it was impossible to consider everything. Today we are filling those gaps and restoring justice. Interesting. Let's see if he mentions Poland at all. Cause this was today the same day. We'll see if he says anything regarding that in like questions. Uh, no. It seems like two mentions of it and they don't have to, they have to do with Auschwitz, which was in Poland. Um, Okay, so interesting. You can go read that. I found it right directly at kremlin dot slash event slash president. And then you can look at all the transcriptions of his recent conversations. Uh, but an interesting one. So now let's go ahead and discuss Donald Trump. Donald Trump announcing his 2024 bid four presidency and the live event I believe is still streaming right now, maybe over by now, but it was streaming 40 minutes ago. And here is a clip of him stating his announcement. In order to make America great and glorious again, I am tonight announcing my candidacy for President of the United States. He's pointing at people. He's super happy. He's, Yeah. You, you and you. Yeah. We're gonna do it. All right. There was Donald Trump saying that he is going to run in 2024. Now, he followed this up with some, uh, very good statements surrounding protecting children, going after sex trafficking and some things like that. And then he followed that up with some not so agreeable statements on my end, I don't agree with some of this, at least this one statement that we'll show you in just a second now. This is off the backs of the Ron Des DeSantis situation where Donald Trump was just talking a whole bunch of shit about Ron DeSantis and Ron DeSantis came out and said, Hey, when you're in the, the spotlight like I am, and you're, you're actually doing things out there. It brings on criticism, which I think was a very studious response by Ron DeSantis. Now, when it comes to this side or that side, you know, I, I tend to, this is a hard, hard one now, I, I think that in the light of where we are as a nation, we need less escalation, not more, right? I don't know. I as, as entertaining as it is, as fun as it seems to have a Donald Trump 2024 presidential run and, and win for the Republican party. I would not be opposed to Ron Desant. Being on the card either. I think that the comedy is great. I think that the energy is fun. I think the movement is, is important. But I also think in an ideal world, what we need is not more craziness right now. Again, Trump's done some great things in my mind. Uh, a lot of the legislation that he passed, obviously the economy at the time was thriving. Gas prices, uh, you know, all of it. He did a lot of great things, a lot of, a lot of tremendous things. Uh, but I do think that in an, and maybe it's not even his actions or even his words as much as it is going to be the response of the general public on the other side of things, I think we need a deescalation of tension in the United States today. I think just, just looking at it from a, a step back, Right. Looking at it from not looking at, you know, the, the movement here or the movement there. I, I think overall as a country, I would like to see more empathy. I would like to see more unification. Right. And Biden ran on unification and we know that didn't end up being the case, but I would like to see a deescalation of tension. And I don't know if we get that with Donald Trump right now. I think we get four more years equaling, Lord, a 12 year back and forth of Trump. Than Biden. Than Trump then, you know, So I, I, I don. Now the bigger question is, could Ron DeSantis even win? Does he have the movement behind him Now, I I, I think polling wise, he did fairly well against Donald Trump recently in exit polls. Now, I don't know if that would translate right. I, I haven't seen stadiums be filled by Ron DeSantis the same way they have been for Donald Trump. I don't think that he's as good at marketing himself. Personally. I don't know if he's as great at starting movements. I don't know if his slogans are as good. His jokes definitely aren't as funny. , there's some downfall to Ron DeSantis. But I think in an ideal world, I do think that it would be a net overall positive for our country to, to, to deescalate from the, the, uh, sitcom that we're in currently between Donald Trump and Ron DeSantis, or I'm sorry, Donald Trump and Joe Biden. I don't think it would be a bad thing for that, for Ron DeSantis to take office. Now that says nothing against Donald Trump. I just think as a culture, as a country, it may be in our best interest to deescalate tensions, and that could happen through Ron DeSantis. Now, there is some things that Donald Trump has said recently, recently, being an hour and a half ago that I completely disagree with, and, and this alone will likely split the party and make a lot of people who are on Donald Trump's side really question whether or not they're going to vote for him in a Desant Trump election. Right? Um, primary is the right word for what I was looking for. So, without further ado, here's that clip right after I tell you that you should go ahead and hit that subscribe button. You should go ahead and subscribe. Hit it right now. If you didn't hit it already, I for give you, but if I ask you twice, I might not. I still will, cuz you'll still listen and I love you. But I would love you even more if you hit that subscribe button. And if I love you already because you're subscribed, take it a step further and really fulfill my heart.  by, by leaving a five star review, write something in it, please. It would mean the world. That's the only way that, uh, it really builds the podcast up and spreads the word. So if you appreciate my work, I would appreciate you working on just typing something, anything, whatever, you know. Gimme your best joke. Tell me your favorite episode. I don't know, just talk about it. I would appreciate it. Honestly, it would mean a lot other than that. Go to, uh, the Red Pill revolution dot COO website. Sign up for the sub stack, uh, gifts and go.com/revolution and donate. That would be awesome. And here's the clip that I'm talking about with Donald Trump that I actually disagree with. There's not been much that Donald Trump does in his, uh, Speaking about legislation that I've actually disagreed with, and here is one that I highly, highly disagree with, highly advise against. I cannot even believe that he said this. It saddens me for the, the, the party that has been the one that has been speaking. Sensically, Sensically. I think that's a word. I know nonsensically is a word sensibly. Sensically has to be a word. Anyways, let's go ahead and listen to this. This is Donald Trump saying that he would put to death anybody who is caught dealing drugs, we will wage war upon the cartels and stop the fentanyl and deadly drugs from killing 200,000 Americans per year. Agreed. That would be nice. And I will ask Congress for legislation ensuring that drug dealers and human traffickers, these are. Terrible, terrible, horrible people who are responsible for death, carnage, and crime all over our country. Every drug dealer during his or her life on average, will kill 500 people with the drugs they sell. Not to mention the destruction of families, but we're going to be asking everyone who sells drugs gets caught selling drugs to receive the death penalty for their heinous acts. Cause it's the only way. We don't need any more blue ribbon committees. We don't need, I don't like to say this. Highly, highly, highly disagree with that statement. It is absolutely not the only way to stop the deaths from fentanyl. To stop the overdose. Overdose deaths. Overdose deaths. That's a fun one. It is not the only way. And if you understand what's going on and the people who are dealing these drugs, yeah, maybe if you're ta and, and even then again, I think that it, it's such a wrong way to move this. You're going to divide the party right there with that one statement. Trump just divided the party. He's going to lose all of his younger base. You're gonna have 10 80 year olds in the audience clapping for that. And you're gonna find that every single person under the age of 50 at this point, does not think that every drug dealer should get the death penalty because you know, who are the drug dealers? You know, your guy on the street corner are the ones doing the drugs. And you know, the ones who are doing the drugs, they're the ones who are highly affected in low socioeconomic classes. That statement made no sense. And it's a, a poison to the party that he just did that. And I really hope he finds some way to draw that, bring that back in before 2024. And if he doubles down on that, I think he's gonna have some issues because that's not the way, that doesn't make any sense. It's not going to, You really think that taking somebody who's dealing a schedule one drug, marijuana should get the death penalty. You know, how many 16 year old dummies are out there dealing marijuana in the 26 Remainings or however many? 30, What is it? 29 states? I don't know however many states there. Our left 29 states that are not legal. Why? Because they like to smoke weed. And that's okay. And even if it's a, a. Different drug than that. I just don't think that's the way you don't kill, You don't sentence them to the death penalty. How many people a year are caught with drugs? How many people a year are caught dealing drugs and you're just gonna take the single mom in the trailer park or, or in the hood who's selling weed, selling psychedelics like shrooms and DMT and all of these things that are literally the whole movement. And you see that with Colorado, the movement is moving away from the war on drugs and Trump is doubling down on it. And that's not what the people want. And they've spoken over and over and over and over again. We do not want the, what was it, Truman, the war on drugs. Right? We, that is not what we want. And so I, I really do hope that he finds a way to pull that back. I, I, I don't think that that was the right way to go about it. I, I don't know why he would even include that in what he was saying. Nixon, not Truman, Sorry, I'm stupid. Nixon Nixon's speech of the war on drugs. That's not what anybody wants right now. Culture is moving away from that. Younger generations are moving away from that. We don't wanna kill every drug dealer. You know what they need? They need a good economic structure. They need, they need good education. You know what, And, and maybe you're stupid and you deal drugs, but that doesn't mean that you should be put to death even if you're dealing like fentanyl, Right? And, and again, that's, it's horrible. I hope nobody, nobody's dealing fentanyl. I think it's wrong. I don't think that you should be put to death for, if anything, put to death as sex traffickers put to death to human traffickers. Put, put them to death. Don't talk about the drug dealers. How about, how about put them in rehab and, and help find them jobs? Give them a, a counselor, because I guarantee you 50 to 70% of people, maybe not. I would say it's probably close, at least not more than this, of people who are actively dealing drugs are either a poor as can be and can barely afford food or b, are have severe mental health issues or a combination of both. The way of combating that is not by putting them to death and especially just saying drugs in general. Like I, I, I just think that's how I, I'm so a, like I have never heard him say that before and I'm honestly like that really just shakes. The, the movement to its core, even if he lost 25%, because that's, that's really close to, to a big enough. If he actually runs on that and actually plans on doing that, you've lost me. I'm not voting for you If you want to put every drug dealer to death. Now, again, I'm against don't, don't go. But again, drugs are so, the classifications are so stupid. How many pharmacists are you gonna put to death? Trump, how you gonna stop, stop Oxycontin, because that kills way more than almost every recreational drug combined. How you gonna do it? It doesn't make any sense. And for you to just spout off and say that in your speech, it was written for sure that was written into it, and you just think that was gonna be applauded into the election cycle. Like it just made no sense. And, and again, especially when you're, you're dealing with somebody who like DeSantis, who is going to run on, you know, logic. Reason and not these big, crazy statements. You know, it's, it's gonna be a hard, it's gonna be a hard time that he, that he finds himself in trying to run on. That if he, if he doubles down on that, even if he says it again, this is going to be the thing that spreads like wildfire tomorrow. This is going to spread like wildfire. Even more so than the fact that he's running, because that was a crazy statement that was so like, you know, how many like redneck trucks you like kill your local drug dealer on the back of their shitty truck, and that's who you're playing to. How many people have that sticker, like six guys with, you know, I don't know. I, I just, I disagree with it. I, I don't think that that's the way to go. And, and again, it makes me not even just from a marketing standpoint, even just from a, uh, political party standpoint, it was untactful. Highly untactful because this announcement was huge. It was huge. It was a huge announcement. And uh, and now it's tainted. It's tainted by the singular statement that he made that at least, I would say at least 50% of the people. And even if 50%, I would say it's less, it's less than that. Who think they should all be put to death, Even if we're talking about fentanyl, because again, the people you're doing that to are low income, uh, generally uneducated mental health issues. Americans, not the cartels, not the Chinese who are making it. You're talking about killing every day of mothers and fathers for getting caught up in the machine that gets them to eventually deal drugs because they feel like they have no other way to feed their children. That's who we're gonna put to death. That's who we're gonna put to. Not that gal, Elaine Maxwell's. Donald Trump isn't calling on Gal Maxwell to be put to death for all the horrific things that her and Jeffrey Epstein did to people. He's calling on people who sell weed. I don't know. That's my thoughts on that. I, I, I highly disagree with that, as you can tell. It makes me sad that that was even stated. I think it's really gonna throw a wrench in the party if he runs on that. And, uh, I guess time will tell, right? As always, time will tell. But I really think that that was highly detrimental to his speech today to what should have been a celebration turned into a mockery and a negative mark on Trump's record by him saying that singular statement. And again, I voted for Trump. Voted for Trump twice. And obviously in light of Joe Biden and, you know, the, the Hillary Clinton, like what are you gonna do in a society that's trying to turn your children into trans kitty cat, uh, litter box using  students and I guess Joe or, uh, Joe Rogan, different Joe than Joe Biden talking about that, I talked about that a few episodes ago, how Joe Rogan talked about the, the kitty litter, uh, situation in a, in a student's bathroom. And, uh, he, he didn't exactly like, apologize and say that I was wrong. He was like, Nope, this dude actually told me that. And he called to like, verify with him and all that type of thing, but he kind of walked it back a little bit. But I have family too that said the same thing. And, and I don't know, maybe it's just this weird wildfire, like, you know, but thing, but I have people that I know in my family that said that this same situation happened in North Carolina. So if I was wrong for perpetuating that, Ben, shame on me. Um, but it wouldn't surprise me and that's sad enough, right? That is sad enough. All right, so the last thing that we're gonna close out on here is going to be FTX FTX filed for bankruptcy. If you don't know what FTX is, it was a cryptocurrency and cryptocurrency exchange that recently filed for bankruptcy, and now where they get gets really squirrly is the fact that the CEO of FTX do was the number five donor to Joe Biden's campaign donating $50 million to Joe Biden during his running for president, the number five donor. Do you know who number one was, by the way? Take a guess. Take a guess who the number one donor was to Joe Biden's political campaign. Just one teeny little guess. If you started hearing Star Wars in the background, it was George Soros. Yes, it was George Soros. George Soros was the number one donor, and if that tells you anything about the number five donor was this weirdo who started ftx, and now there is all of these situations. Even Elon Musk came out and said it's a little bit fishy that Ukraine invested billions of dollars of your tax dollars into ftx. Which then allegedly was siphoned off back to the Democratic Party. So when we're talking about these, these, uh, the, the shuffling of money by the Biden administration, the, the, I don't know how, like hundreds of billions of dollars that we've were at, at this point, uh, of the money that we've sent over to Ukraine. I don't know what the exact figure is, but I'm sure we can find it out. Let's read this article. Okay. Now, this is not coming from one that I'm familiar with, but it did seem to have some good information and it kind of conglomerated all of the tweets and everything on that. So, uh, verify some of this for yourself and we'll actually listen to some of this video here, if I can get it connected. But, uh, we'll read this together. I do think that you should, um, do your own work on this, because I, I, I'm honestly, it's, it's so crazy that I want you to go study it yourself. I, I don't wanna be the only purveyor of information here because this could literally be the one thing that takes down. The, the money laundering scheme, that is the Biden administration and the Democratic Party because they donated so much money, so much money, and then all of a sudden they file for bankruptcy out of nowhere. And then, you know, meanwhile, all of this money was being shuffled back through FTX from Ukraine, who invested the money that you gave them to fight this war against Russia, into this cryptocurrency that eventually went completely bankrupt this exchange, which went completely bankrupt and for no reason, which didn't make any sense. So let's, let's read through this. A lot of people lost a lot of money. Like billions of dollars of Americans' money was lost during this weird little shuffling of, of money here. Uh, so while this connects to my Bluetooth, And there it is. Look at that on the fly. That's how good I am after 51 episodes. Um, we will go ahead and read through this. So this is coming from Breaking Digest. Again, I don't claim this to be the most, uh, you know, scientific of articles. Um, so do the work on yourself, but I thought they did a good job conglomerating all of the information on this in the way that you would not see from the traditional media. Um, so again, this is coming from breaking digest.com and it says you've likely heard about the company called FTX recently. And its founder Sam Bankman, Freed who goes by sbf ftx seemingly rose up out of nowhere to become a crypto, uh, cryptocurrency behemoth. Last week, FTX went bankrupt with no warning at all. Shocking everybody. The crypto market tanked. Bloomberg called the FTX collapse, one of history's greatest ever destructions of. Now as we're putting together the pieces, we're learning that this might actually have been the biggest money laundering operation of all time. Remember all those billions upon billions that were going to Ukraine? Some of us suspected it all long, but didn't know exactly how it was being done. Now we're starting to connect the dots. Here's how it could have been done. The US takes billions of dollars of taxpayer dollars and funnels it over to Ukraine. Ukraine then puts those billions into ftx, which is owned by S bf Sam Bankman. Freed Sbf then takes the billions and donates them back to the Democratic party. This is not speculation. Sbf was the number two largest donor, uh, from what I read, he was the number five, but this says he was the number two largest donor to the Democrats next to George Soros. The Democratic party then funnels the money to people like Joe Biden and uses it to run elections. End result. Key Democrats end up with millions. Races are stolen. If this all ends up being true or even partially true, um, Potentially trees in this. All right. Now Elon Musk himself posted this and it's a little bit of an infographic, which in which he commented on, and this was two days ago, says SBF was a major democratic donor, so no investigation, and it's a kind of a quadrant of a picture of the CEO of Ftx, S B F, Gosh, that's confusing and stupid, who's a MIT graduate. Showing that from him went to Gary Gensler, who's the head of the F or the s e former president at mit, which then went to, let's see if I can actually open up this tweet here. Uh, which then went to the professor of Economics at mit, former boss of Gary Gensler, which then went to the CEO of Almeda. And Almeda was the, uh, basically a funding venture for the FTX company, which did market research and invested money, which then went back to. Sam Bankman Fried. Right? Uh, so that is your theory. Now let's go ahead and move through this and see about this article a little bit further. Right. Some other people said, while Biden Gang has been harassing and threatening Elon Musk and this company is one of the worst scams in modern finance, was being perpetuated under the nose by a regular, uh, while he'll investor and the second biggest Democratic donor. So yeah, this was Tom Fitten who said that second biggest donor, not the fifth busiest donor, Jack pob said it is increasingly looking at the Democrat. Uh, Democrats 2022 campaigns were funded by kickbacks from Ukraine funding using FTX as the pass through vehicle. No wonder this guy is scared for his life after ripping these people apart off. Wow. So that's the idea. The idea is that, and then let's go ahead and here's a good video on it that we'll read. Um, Sam Bankman Fried spent 40 million on Democratic candidates. He also donated 10 million directly to then candidate Joe Biden. Wow. And it basically explained how FTX is basically just a Ponzi scheme. Uh, and here's a video that says FTX 90 seconds, 99 seconds. Here is your explanation. Bankman freed people. Call him sbf. He's the founder of ftx. He also controlled the crypto hedge fund called Alameda Research, but that's all gone now. He wants you to think he's a sweet guy. He even bought in a famous YouTuber who called him the most generous man in the world. Yep. That happened through this. Sam Bank. Fried is a liar in a crook. His personal crypto FTX token was basically a Ponzi scheme hidden below layers of moon bro jargon. He even went on Bloomberg's podcast and bragged about it. Yep. That happened. He used his Ponzi token as collateral to borrow billions of real dollars that he couldn't pay back. He then used those real dollars to build an empire out of dying companies like Voyager and Blocky. This led Jim Kramer to call him the new JP Morgan. That's weird. It's not like Jim Kramer to promote a billionaire con artist. Sbf sold people cryptos like Bitcoin or so they thought what they really bought from SBF was an I. But as long as everyone didn't cash in their IOU at the same time, the scheme worked until it didn't. This other, A-hole who hates SPF came along and engineered a bank run with some passive aggressive tweets. It worked. SPF didn't have enough money to repay everyone at once, and now his customers have lost everything. He'll be happy to know that this is exactly how every bank in the world operates. So where did all the money go? He misappropriated 4 billion trying to save his failing hedge fund. Whoops, that's a felony. He spent 21 million on Super Bowl commercials, 5 million for the big guy, 40 million in campaign donations. I wonder what he wanted in return, and everyone who's pointing at this story and saying, This is exactly why we need to regulate crypto. Remember that SBF stole billions. That's already a crime, and he spent a lot of it on bribing politicians also a crime in order to create a crypto monopoly for himself. Government regulations don't protect the customers. They protect the crooks. That's exactly what SPF was trying to do there. You go if you caught all of that . So, um, there was also something in the balance sheet of FTX that literally was an investment titled Trump Lose. That's what we're dealing with here, is somebody who, that's, that's the direction that he went with his financing and spent $10 million directly to Joe Biden. Directly to Joe Biden. Um, so there was one more thing here that I wanted to see on this. Oh, the World Economic Forum. Let me go ahead and just pull up this article. The World Economic Forum scrubbed the FTX crypto story from its website. So they had a full page dedicated to FTX on the World Economic Forum website and. Gone now. Gone. Completely gone. You can't find it. Right? And this is again, coming from, they, there's good verifiable screenshots and all the tweets and everything of, of where this came from. Um, but this was coming from, uh, somebody who had a good screenshot of it on the World Economic Forum website, which talked about FTX and said, FTX is a cryptocurrency exchange built by traders for traders. FTX offers innovative products including industry first derivatives options, volatility products, and leverage tokens. It strives to develop a platform robust enough for professional trading firms, and intuitive enough for first time users as well. Good sales pitch so that you can fund money to Joe Biden. And just like that, it's gone. That portion of their website is gone. The day this happened, yesterday that, or two days ago, this was now gone, took. Got the money, the from Ukraine over to Joe Biden, over to all of the little minions of the Democratic party, and then scrubbed it from their website, used their website to build legitimacy. Show that, you know, and here's, here's an interesting thing about this, is like, there's another person who ties this to like pedophilia in some weird way. Um, I don't exactly know if I agree with all of that. Um, it literally just had to do with like the logos and symbolism, and it definitely lines up with the symbolism surrounding pedophilia that the FBI and the CIA themselves came out with showing the symbolism that talks about that and, and being the, uh, I think it was the logo for Al Meda, the scientific research and, and investment firm that was an offshoot that, uh, Sam Bankman Freed was also the CEO of. Uh, but that's a another story that maybe look into. Now here's another one that we'll talk about on this, which is that the FTX founder Sam Bankman, freed funneled max donations to Nancy Pelosi's likely successor. Hmm. FTX founder, and this is coming from Fox Business ftx, founder and ceo, Sam Bankman Freeman donated the maximum allowable amount to an individual can give to the candidate to house Speaker Pelosi's likely successor bankman Free made a contribution of $5,800 to rep Hakeem Jeffries in 2021. According to the federal election, uh, commission data, while the amounts was relatively tiny compared to the roughly 38 million, the crypto entrepreneur funneled to candidates and political action committees ahead of the midterm elections. It represented the maximum contribution in individuals allowed to donate to a single candidate under federal campaign finance loss. Now, if you have to, if you have to understand the kind of the business model of how this worked, FTX was not a. Uh, it was not a, all of the billions of dollars that people put into this were never actually sitting in crypto. It was IOUs. It was all blank. It was all fabricated. And he took those billions of dollars. 10, it was like $10 billion or something crazy that it was worth, um, FTX confirms unauthorized transactions as 1 billion in crypto, reportedly vanishes. There's another headline for you. Um, but he took that money and did what he pleased with it. And, and then what has happened was that the Ukraine and put that money into the FTX exchange, the cryptocurrency exchange, gave this guy, you know, Sam freed whatever, gave back IUs as a result, Then sent the actual money to the Democratic Party, to Joe Biden, 38 million of what they received. At least. At least. And that's just what we know here. Two days after what's gonna come out in two weeks. Two months. So, Let's go ahead and, but, but you have to understand how that business model works. The, the, the money that people were putting into this, the people that were buying cryptocurrency only worked if they were liquid and they weren't liquid in any of their assets. They put the money into the cryptocurrency exchange and then he said, Okay, sure, yeah, you got 12 of, of FU coin or whatever, . And then it didn't, they didn't actually hold any of it. They had IOUs that said, Okay, if it goes up and you pull out and we're liquid enough to pay you, then we will, But it didn't actually hold the value of the coin, which is kind of weird when it comes to crypto because there should be some verifiable transaction when it comes to that. But I guess when it comes to these exchanges, it doesn't work that way. Uh, so, or maybe I'm wrong there too, but that's how, how I understand this now, it goes on to say that according to the fec, individual contributors are only permitted to give 2,900 per candidate per election. Individuals may combine two maximum contributions into a single donation of 5,800. Since primaries and general elections count as two separate elections. Wow. $5,800. That's what we're writing this whole article on Jeffries was the only house candidate who Bankman free gave $5,800 to. He donated the same amount to various Democratic and Republican senators in 20 21, 22. Jeffries who is currently the fifth highest ranked Democrat in the House, is considered a likely successor to Pelosi when she steps down from her role as leader of the House. Democrats. Politico reported the New York Democrat is expected to have more behind the scenes support from the Democratic leaders compared to Adam Schiff. Hmm. Yeah. I don't know if I care about $5,800. Bankman Free's donation than Jeffries, though it was a just a small place of his over slice of his overall political givings. During the midterm election cycles, the majority of his 38 million donations were sent to a Protect our Future Pack in house majority pack, both of which were exclusively supported Democratic Can. . Now, here is the bigger issue with all this is Super pacs. Never have to talk about where their com, where their money came from or where it went to. That's a huge issue that nobody's talking about while we're sitting here sifting through this. One individual's 38 million, A super PAC could have donated 38 billion. Just doesn't have the the laundering scheme that was set up through ftx. It says Bankman Free's donations made him the second largest donor to the Democrats in the cycle behind only George Soros, who donated nearly 127 million. So to correct myself, he was the number

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The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
Pharma Only Treats The Symptoms Of Disease, Not The Disease Itself

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 15:11


New 2022 - Pharma Only Treats The Symptoms Of  Disease, Not The Disease Itself Dr. John Abramson, M.D• https://hcp.hms.harvard.edu/people/john-david-abramson • Book – Sickening Ian Harris, MD • https://med.unsw.edu.au/our-people/ian-harris • Book - Surgery, The Ultimate Placebo: A Surgeon Cuts through the Evidence Dr. Robert Yoho • http://www.robertyohoauthor.com • Book - Butchered by “Heathcare” Dr. Robert Lustig • http://www.robertlustig.com • Book - Metabolical #BigPharma #AmericanHealthCare #HealthCarePolicy Dr. John Abramson, M.D. is an author and medical doctor and has served as a family physician for over 20 years. His recently release book Sickening  How Big Pharma Broke American Health Care and How We Can Repair It. Is about the inside story of how Big Pharma's relentless pursuit of ever-higher profits corrupts medical knowledge—misleading doctors, misdirecting American health care, and harming our health. John Abramson MD,  He was twice voted “best doctor” in his area by readers of the local newspapers and three times selected by his peers as one of a handful of best family practitioners in Massachusetts. He has been on the faculty at Harvard Medical School for over 15 years, where he has taught primary care and currently teaches health care policy. To Contact Dr John Abramson MD go to hcp.hms.harvard.edu/people/john-david-abramson Dr Ian Harris is a practicing orthopedic surgeon, university professor and an acclaimed author of several books including Hippocrasy: How doctors are betraying their oath. Professor Ian Harris is an orthopedic surgeon who works at Liverpool, St George, St George Private and Sutherland Hospitals in Sydney. His academic affiliation is with UNSW, South Western Sydney Clinical School at Liverpool Hospital, in Sydney. In addition to approximately 200 peer-reviewed publications, he also wroteSurgery, The Ultimate Placebo - an eye-opening evaluation of commonly performed surgical operations that have been tested and shown to be no more effective (and arguably worse) than placebo, or that have never even been tested. He suggests we treat new surgical procedures like new drugs, and only pay for those that are part of a trial to find out if they really work. To Contact Dr Harris go to Email: ianharris@unsw.edu.au Dr. Robert Yoho is an author and accomplished retired Los Angeles cosmetic surgeon. His Book, Butchered by “Heathcare”: What to Do About Doctors, Big Pharma, and Corrupt Government Ruining Your Health and Medical Care. Dr Robert Yoho grew up in Kent Ohio. He was an Eagle Scout and a Judo wrestler. Went to Oberlin College and Case Western Reserve Univ. Medical School. In 2019 Dr Yoho retired from his medical and surgical practice. He now is a full time writer and speaker. No longer responsible for patient care he is able to write full time without conflicts of interest. To Contact Dr Robert Yoho go to  robertyohoauthor.com  Dr. Robert Lustig is a The New York Times bestselling author and author of Metabolical: The Lure and the Lies of Processed Food, Nutrition, and Modern Medicine and a Professor of Pediatric Endocrinology at the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Robert Lustig, a pediatric neuroendocrinologist who has long been on the cutting edge of medicine and science, challenges our current healthcare paradigm which has gone off the rails under the influence of Big Food, Big Pharma, and Big Government. Dr. Lustig has authored 125 peer-reviewed articles and 73 reviews. He has mentored 20 pediatric endocrine fellows, and trained numerous other allied health professionals. He provides endocrinologic support to several protocols of the Children's Oncology Group. He is the former Chairman of the Ad hoc Obesity Task Force of the Lawson Wilkins Pediatric Endocrine Society, a member of the Pediatric Obesity Practice Guidelines Subcommittee of The Endocrine Society, a member of the Obesity Task Force of the Endocrine Society, a member of the Pediatric Obesity Devices Committee of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, a member of the Bay Area Board of Directors of the American Heart Association, and a member of the Steering Committee of Health Foods, Healthy Kids of the Culinary Institute of America. He also consults for several childhood obesity advocacy groups. Dr. Lustig lives in San Francisco with his wife Julie and two daughters. Spare time (what little there is) is spent cooking, theater-going, and traveling. To Contact Dr Robert Lustig, M.D.  go to robertlustig.com CLICK HERE - To Checkout Our MEMBERSHIP CLUB: http://www.realtruthtalks.com  • Social Media ChannelsFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConferenceInstagram : https://www.instagram.com/therealtruthabouthealth/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/RTAHealth Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-real-truth-about-health-conference/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealth    • Check out our Podcasts  Visit us on Apple Podcast and Itunes search:  The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast Amazon: https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/23a037be-99dd-4099-b9e0-1cad50774b5a/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0RZbS2BafJIEzHYyThm83J Google:https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5zaW1wbGVjYXN0LmNvbS8yM0ZqRWNTMg%3D%3DStitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastAudacy: https://go.audacy.com/partner-podcast-listen-real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastiHeartRadio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-real-truth-about-health-li-85932821/ Deezer: https://www.deezer.com/us/show/2867272 Reason: https://reason.fm/podcast/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcast • Other Video ChannelsYoutube:https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealthVimeo:https://vimeo.com/channels/1733189Rumble:  https://rumble.com/c/c-1111513 Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConference/videos/?ref=page_internal DailyMotion: https://www.dailymotion.com/TheRealTruthAboutHealth BitChute: https://www.bitchute.com/channel/JQryXTPDOMih/ Disclaimer:Medical and Health information changes constantly. 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