Podcasts about MF

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  • 966PODCASTS
  • 4,606EPISODES
  • 47mAVG DURATION
  • 3DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Dec 2, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about MF

Show all podcasts related to mf

Latest podcast episodes about MF

The Eddie Trunk Podcast
Remembering Eric Carr w/Ace Frehley & Bruce Kulick

The Eddie Trunk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 40:45


This week on The Eddie Trunk Podcast, Eddie brings you his interviews with Ace Frehley and Bruce Kulick on the 30th anniversary of Eric Carr's passing where they share stories and celebrate his life.Catch Eddie Trunk every M-F from 2:00-4:00pm ET on Trunk Nation on SiriusXM Volume Channel 106.And don't forget to follow Eddie on  Twitter  and Instagram!

We Build Great Apartment Communities
065: Mitigating Risks with Reliable Multifamily Insurance - With Bryan Shimeall

We Build Great Apartment Communities

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 39:43


The insurance industry is probably one of the most spread out and least appealing thing that operators and investors deal with - which then often leads to having challenges in looking for the right total protection that they need. Fortunately today in our episode, Bryan Shimeall of Multifamily Risk Advisors talks about solutions for these habitation risks and expert-level ways on how to mitigate and manage it. Bryan Shimeall is the Vice President of Multifamily Risk Advisrors, a division of Tanner, Ballew and Maloof formed to leverage the firm's 20-plus years of experience handling insurance for the multifamily industry. Come on and let us dive deep into the world of multifamily insurance including risk financing, pricing premiums to even the importance of getting inspections reports early. Another golden nuggets-jammed packed episode that will help us all build great community apartments. Episode Highlights: Habitational risks at this time of pandemic How operators can better price their property prior to opening an escrow Common losses in the market that we are in today Being proactive about risks issues through inspection reports Changes at how insured values are being approached. Connect With Bryan: Email LinkedIn About Our Guest: My name is Bryan Shimeall and I am with Tanner, Ballew and Maloof's Multifamily Risk Advisors (MRA). I, on a national, provides insurance and risk services for apartment investors, managers and developers. As one of the few multifamily specific insurance specialists in the country, MRA understands the mechanics of the MF industry and we support our clients in a variety of ways that are unique to our industry. Our service platform allows MRA to operate as an “outsourced risk manager” and a true partner focused on mitigating risk while reducing per door insurance cost. Over our 20 years, we have gained an in-depth understanding of the apartment industry and its needs. As such, we have developed numerous innovative solutions to meet those needs by leveraging our relationships throughout the insurance world. We excel in the the proper placement of resources, products, and services while supporting the overall growth of a portfolio. --- Did you enjoy today's episode? Please click here to leave a review for The We Build Great Apartment Communities. Be sure to subscribe on your favorite podcast app to get notified when a new episode comes out! Do you know someone who might enjoy this episode? Share this episode to inspire and empower! Connect with John Brackett and We Build Great Apartment Communities Instagram @webuildgreatcommunities Facebook @buildingreatcommunities LinkedIn @brackettjohn Website www.fidelitybps.com Subscribe to The We Build Great Apartment Communities Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Do you think you would be a great fit for the show? Apply to be a guest by clicking . Fidelity Business Partners, Inc. 6965 El Camino Real Suite 105-190 Carlsbad, CA 92009 D: 760-301-5311 F: 760-987-6065

Two Smart Assets
Managing Your Real Estate Portfolio Like a Business with Whitney Elkins-Hutten

Two Smart Assets

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 31:49


Join Daniel Nickles with his guest Whitney Elkins-Hutten as she talks about the questions you need to ask yourself before investing in rentals, the mindset that helps you elevate yourself as an investor, and whether or not you can run a portfolio of passive investments like a business. For both Whitney and Daniel, letting go of control as an investor truly is a challenge. Although for Whitney, no matter how hard it is, what will help you invest passively with sound and informed decisions is the level of due diligence you're willing to take. In this episode you will learn: Whitney Elkins-Hutten – on discovering cash flow from rentals Three questions to get started on real estate investing What are strengths, and what are gifts? What a business owner essentially earns Can you manage passive investments like a business? About Whitney Elkins-Hutten: The beginning of Whitney's real estate career went better than most—her first-ever rental in 2002 was a huge success. It was on her second deal that she almost lost it all. Those two experiences shaped Whitney's real estate journey into what it is today. Knowing there had to be a right way and that success always leaves clues, she studied the greatest real estate juggernauts and replicated the personal finance and wealth creation strategies that they used to create financial freedom. Since that first rental, Whitney partnered in over $700M+ of real estate — including over 5000+ residential units (MF, MHP, SFR, and assisted living) and more than 1400+ self-storage units across 7 states — and experienced flipping over $3M in residential real estate. Still, reaping the rewards of her hard work isn't enough for her. Whitney wants to help people discover what she did—the real estate knowledge that will give them financial freedom. That's why Whitney started ASH Wealth (ashwealth.com) in 2018 and launched her real estate mentorship program, the Investor Accelerator Mentorship Program. Through the IAMP, she helps budding real estate investors develop a clear, workable plan that gives them the results they dream of, solves their startup or scaling issues, and drives massive progress towards not only their real estate and financial goals… but their lifestyle goals. Connect with Whitney Elkins-Hutten on: Website:              https://ashwealth.com/ LinkedIn:             https://www.linkedin.com/in/whitneyelkinshutten/ Instagram:          https://www.passiveinvesting.com/whitney/ Connect with Two Smart Assets on: Website:              https://twosmartassets.com/ Facebook:           https://www.facebook.com/TwoSmartAssets/ Instagram:          https://www.instagram.com/twosmartassets/ YouTube:             https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5b8x2o3ByaPBcz5Lkev7uw   ✅Check out our free apartment syndication sample deal: https://twosmartassets.com/sample-deal-form  

Ground Zero Media
Show sample for 11/30/21: WAITING FOR THE PI VARIANT W/ RONNIE MCMULLEN

Ground Zero Media

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 10:25


Ground Zero with Clyde Lewis is live M-F from 7-10pm, pacific time and streamed on aftermath.fm. You can also download the aftermath.fm app for android and Apple phones. There is a delayed broadcast on our local Portland affiliate station, KPAM 860, from 9pm-12am, pacific time. For radio affiliates near you, go to talkstreamlive.com. To listen by phone: 717-734-6922. To call in to the show: 503-225-0860. To read the show monologue, go to groundzeromedia.org. In order to access the entire archived shows/podcasts, you must sign up on our secured server at aftermath.media. If you want access to the entire online Ground Zero library, which includes videos, audio clips, e-books, e-magazines, documents, a news aggregator, a social media platform, plus the archived shows/podcasts, it's $10 a month. Check out the yearly specials!

Lou Kang Kickin it
Episode 34 - Into the thick of it

Lou Kang Kickin it

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 53:53


today sean asks lou an array of questions thus outlining what it is to be a real a$$ MF

Par Jupiter !
MF Robots

Par Jupiter !

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 9:36


durée : 00:09:36 - La chronique d'Aline Afanoukoé - par : Aline AFANOUKOE - Aujourd'hui, Aline Afanoukoé va présenter MF Robots, duo composé de Jan Kincaid et Dawn Joseph, mélange de hard funk, d'électro, d'acid jazz, de nu soul et de pop.

Bipolar Bicoastal
Rebroadcast - Disclosing

Bipolar Bicoastal

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 46:57


Anna and Maria get into the who, what, where, when, and why of disclosing your bipolar diagnosis, with a brief detour into some not so hot Janis Joplin takes. Welcome to anyone joining us from Mental Illness Happy Hour! This is a rebroadcast of our first episode and a good way for us to introduce ourselves! Enjoy, stick around for a while! For our older listeners, go check out our interview on Mental Illness Happy Hour! We talk about the difficulties of being sisters going through bipolar crises and being the lord sister supporting the other through them, Paul is an incredible interviewer so hopefully we didn't embarrass ourselves any more than we usually do!  Anyone looking for support after today's episode can reach out to: NAMI (The National Alliance on Mental Illness) available via hotline M-F from 10 AM - 6 PM at 800-950-NAMI or via their crisis text line by texting NAMI to 741741. The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: a free, 24/7 resource that you can call at 1-800-273-8255 or via chat at https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/chat/ For therapist searches: https://www.psychologytoday.com/us  https://www.goodtherapy.org/ Patreon: www.patreon.com/bipolarbicoastal Facebook: www.facebook.com/BipolarBicoastal Instagram: www.instagram.com/bipolarbicoastal/ Secret Facebook Group: facebook.com/groups/bipolarbicoastalsecret

Radio Free Tote Bag
#181 Walk A Mile In That Titty's Shoes feat. Mark Adkins

Radio Free Tote Bag

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 77:00


My good baggers, I present to you a turkey day treat. It's the return of our beloved friend Mark Adkins! We discuss medical kink, what happens when an animal is hogtied, tiddies, depression, ass, and what being called a 4 by your friends does to an MF. Happy Thanksgiving! Big thanks to Manscaped for sponsoring our program this week. Head on over to Manscaped.com and enter promo code RFTB at checkout for 20% off and free worldwide shipping!

The Eddie Trunk Podcast
Tesla & Cheap Trick

The Eddie Trunk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 93:20


This week on The Eddie Trunk Podcast, Eddie brings you his interviews from 80's In The Sand with Tesla's Frank Hannon and Jeff Keith alongside Volume's own Mark Goodman, and then Cheap Trick's Rick Nielsen and Robin Zander.Catch Eddie Trunk every M-F from 2:00-4:00pm ET on Trunk Nation on SiriusXM Volume Channel 106.And don't forget to follow Eddie on  Twitter  and Instagram!

Moe Factz with Adam Curry

Moe Factz with Adam Curry for November 23d 2021, Episode number 71 Description Adam and Moe deconstruct the operation being played out before our very eyes Download the mp3 Big Baller kenneth degel Executive Producers: kenneth degel PHILLIP BROWN David Keyes Silvana Gentile Mike Bryan Colin Preston Associate Executive Producers: Ogfomk Arts Tyler Boyd Anthony DeLuca Jonathan Peckham Raymond Berry Genevate Corporation Steven Schnelker Eric P Zack Welch Darrell Cook Douglas Mook Terri Kobialka Ryan Sommer James Carter Episode 71 Club Members Anthony DeLuca Jonathan Peckham Raymond Berry Genevate Corporation Steven Schnelker Check out the show on Podcasting 2.0! Boost us with Value 4 Value on: ShowNotes Clips Music in this Episode Intro: Public Enemy - 50 Cent - Esham 5 seconds Outro: The Intruders - Cowboys to Girls 6 seconds ShowNotes Archive Donate to the show at moefundme.com Search for us in your podcast directory or use this link to subscribe to the feed Podcast Feed For more information: MoeFactz.com Last Modified 11/24/2021 06:49:13 by Freedom Controller  

Loving Liberty Radio Network
11-23-2021 CSC Talk Radio with Beth Ann

Loving Liberty Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 50:48


"WE'VE BEEN TOLERANT, SO NOW THEY WANT CAPITULATION" (audio muted during breaks) CSCTalkRadio.com is a nationally syndicated LIVE RADIO talk show heard around the world M-F @ 10:06 AM CT and streamed 24/7. Watch us LIVE or LATER on FB. CSC Talk Radio, PO Box 73, California, MO 65018 573-796-2166 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/loving-liberty/support

Loving Liberty Radio Network
11-22-2021 CSC Talk Radio with Beth Ann

Loving Liberty Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 50:50


November 22, 2021 – JUSTICE – (audio muted during commercial breaks) Kyle Rittenhouse experienced justice, with no help from the MSM. It was a good thing to televise the trial, except for the attempts to expose the jurors. We now pray for justice of a different kind for the driver of the SUV that ran down the people in the Christmas parade. CSCTalkRadio.com is a nationally syndicated LIVE RADIO talk show heard around the world M-F @ 10:06 AM CT and streamed 24/7. Watch us LIVE on FB. CSC Talk Radio, PO Box 73, California, MO 65018 573-796-2166 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/loving-liberty/support

The Full-Time FBA Show - Amazon Reseller Strategies & Stories
111 - Should you Merchant Fulfill in Q4

The Full-Time FBA Show - Amazon Reseller Strategies & Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 11:08


Today we're going to be talking (rather uncharacteristically) about FBM, Fulfillment By Merchant, and whether you should merchant fulfill some of your inventory via Amazon in Q4. Although FBA is generally a better option than merchant fulfilling, there are times during the year, especially during Q4, where merchant fulfilling might be a good option. In this episode, we discuss the difference between FBA and FBM, why Q4 is a good time to consider merchant fulfillment, and which items are suitable to sell via FBM. We fill you in on the important things to consider and ensure before jumping into merchant fulfillment, and the specs of the best and easiest items to merchant fulfill. Tune in today for all things FBM, so you can make an informed choice about how to approach selling on Amazon this upcoming holiday season.

The Seireitei (A Bleach Podcast)
Episode 39 Aizens Tea Party!! (Anime Episodes 145 & 146)

The Seireitei (A Bleach Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 89:02


In this weeks episode, Del & Lethan talk about important stuff, like GrimmIchi, Byakuya being a sassy MF and then... Blackpool, Ao3 Popular Ships & Divorces... really... this episode is pure chaos and we're only 22% sorry. Socials: The Seireitei Discord Server: discord.gg/drgmaf8 Twitter: @TSeireitei Tumblr: TheSeireitei Instagram: TheSeireitei Facebook: The Seireitei Del: Tumblr: @sonnets-and-snowdrops AO3: sonnets_and_snowdrops LethanWolf: Fanfiction net & Ao3: @LethanWolf Texts from Hueco Mundo / Del's recommendation: https://textsfromhuecomundo.tumblr.com/post/61881515733/714-we-are-watching-a-video-on-ethics-because Grimmjow - The King by FireBoyAMV / Lethan's recommendation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=whzmQYBwzes&ab_channel=FireBoyAMV

Loving Liberty Radio Network
11-19-2021 CSC Talk Radio with Beth Ann

Loving Liberty Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 50:50


November 19, 2021 – AND SO IT WAS, IN THE DAYS OF BIDEN – “IF YOU KEEP THEM BUSY WITH BASIC NEEDS, THEY WILL FORGET ABOUT THE FREEDOM THEY LOST” – Daniel Turner of Power the Future updates us on the disaster that is DC. Then we are joined By Amy Wertheim of RGW Candy. (audio may be muted during commercial breaks) CSCTalkRadio.com is a nationally syndicated LIVE RADIO talk show heard around the world M-F @ 10:06 AM CT and streamed 24/7 CSC Talk Radio, PO Box 73, California, MO 65018 573-796-2166 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/loving-liberty/support

The Eddie Trunk Podcast
Michael Wagener

The Eddie Trunk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 92:56


This week on The Eddie Trunk Podcast, Eddie brings you his next Producer Spotlight Special; this time he talks to producer Michael Wagener about his long career working with the likes of ACCEPT, Alice Cooper, Skid Row and many more and how he's enjoying retirement. Catch Eddie Trunk every M-F from 2:00-4:00pm ET on Trunk Nation on SiriusXM Volume Channel 106.And don't forget to follow Eddie on Twitter  and Instagram!

Loving Liberty Radio Network
11-16-2021 CSC Talk Radio with Beth Ann

Loving Liberty Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 50:51


"PROCLAIM LIBERTY THROUGHOUT THE LAND" LTC (Ret) Darin Gaub of Restore Liberty joins us today. (audio may be muted during commercial breaks) CSCTalkRadio.com is a nationally syndicated LIVE Radio talk show heard around the world M-F @ 10:06 AM CT and streamed 24/7 CSC Talk Radio, PO Box 73, California, MO 65018 573-796-2166 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/loving-liberty/support

Complex Trauma Recovery; We Are Traumatized M***********s

I know, therapy probably hasn't been a walk in the park so far. If you're here, you're probably looking for more information, more help, or more reassurance that you're not the only one looking for a way out. But there's no real substitute to having a professional to keep you grounded, processing the right materials, and creating personalized progress goals in line with your individual struggles. As someone who did NOT want to go to therapy, after two very bad experiences with people who didn't know what the hell they were doing, I can tell you, my trauma brain completely changed the day I found a qualified trauma therapist. And I want everyone to have that experience. Today, let's talk about the challenges of finding effective help and the caveats of safely turning to prescription meds. Because trauma requires trauma-trained therapy, and there's a lot to choose from. For more help finding a practitioner who matches your personal preferences, go to https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/therapists. For help affording therapy, check out https://openpathcollective.org/ Hit up t-mfrs.com to see some gnar-graphics that accompany these chats via the Blog. To talk with other MFs about the challenges and triumphs of this MF life, hit up patreon.com/traumatizedmotherfuckers to join the private support community. See you there. Cheers y'all Jess --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/complextrauma/message

Ground Zero Media
Show sample for 11/16/21:TRUE BELIEVERS – OWN NOTHING BE HAPPY

Ground Zero Media

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 10:59


Ground Zero with Clyde Lewis is live M-F from 7-10pm, pacific time and streamed on aftermath.fm. You can also download the aftermath.fm app for android and Apple phones. There is a delayed broadcast on our local Portland affiliate station, KPAM 860, from 9pm-12am, pacific time. For radio affiliates near you, go to talkstreamlive.com. To listen by phone: 717-734-6922. To call in to the show: 503-225-0860.

Loving Liberty Radio Network
11-15-2021 CSC Talk Radio with Beth Ann

Loving Liberty Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 50:51


November 15, 2021 – POLITICAL PRISONERS – If you live in fear of the government you live in tyranny. Beth Ann presents a poem from a 1/6 political prisoner. His crime? “Parading in the Capital.” (audio may be muted during commercial breaks) CSCTalkRadio.com is a nationally syndicated LIVE RADIO talk show heard around the world M-F @ 10:06 AM CT and streamed 24/7 CSC Talk Radio, PO Box 73, California, MO 65018 573-796-2166 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/loving-liberty/support

Loving Liberty Radio Network
11-12-2021 CSC Talk Radio with Beth Ann

Loving Liberty Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 50:51


"DON'T SPIT INTO THE WIND" (audio may be muted during commercial breaks) Watch LIVE on our FB page. CSCTalkRadio.com is a nationally syndicated LIVE RADIO talk show heard around the world M-F @ 10:06 AM CT and streamed 24/7 CSC Talk Radio, PO Box 73, California, MO 65018 573-796-2166 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/loving-liberty/support

Loving Liberty Radio Network
11-11-2021 CSC Talk Radio with Beth Ann

Loving Liberty Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 109:38


Show #2729 – November 11, 2021 – DEFEND THE AMERICAN DREAM – A Veterans Day Tribute and Prayer. MO State Rep. Sara Walsh joins us in studio to discuss the politics of the day and her campaign for the U.S. Senate. (audio may be muted during commercials) CSCTalkRadio.com is a nationally syndicated LIVE RADIO talk show heard around the world M-F @ 10:06 AM CT and streamed 24/7. CSC Talk Radio, PO Box 73, California, MO 65018 573-796-2166 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/loving-liberty/support

Ash Said It® Daily
Beyond The Beauty: Tiffany Danielle XO

Ash Said It® Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 20:30


Ash Brown recently sat down with the multifaceted Tiffany Danielle. The founder/CEO of Tiffany Danielle XO opens up about her transition to entrepreneurship, quitting her 9-5 to follow her passion and the underlining theme of her business. Tiffany holds NOTHING BACK! Web: https://www.tiffanydaniellexo.com Follow: @TiffanyDanielleXO From Tiffany Danielle: I'm a native Georgian, flower child, and the voice behind TDXO. I have to admit straight-away, I'm a recovering perfectionist, and have retyped this same sentence 12 times. Which IS significant progress, so that tells you where we started :P ​ In an era of hustle, I'm a free spirit with a fiercely determined and creative soul seeking to empower, encourage, educate, and embrace my community. I've always been an entrepreneur in some capacity, even when I was working the typical 9-5 grind, because I thought that's what you had to DO: work a “normal” job with “normal hours'' and quickly realized I was never, ever going to fit into this rigid box of what “normal” looked like! ​ As a result, I learned early in life that this concept of ‘normal' is a trick!!! To keep the majority of us (mostly, females) trapped in the cycle of supporting someone else's dream and not your own. Because, honestly it's nearly impossible to break out of that mold if you feel like you're a slave to your career. Let me just tell you, no one is going to admit that you are actually capable of more, if they feel like it will negatively impact their business. ​ Boom. I said it. *queue Beyonce* I ain't sorry. ​ This is where I've found this extension of myself where I get to help people understand that you get to live whatever f'in type of life you want to live with ABUNDANCE. You just have to get out of your own freaking way. *elitists everywhere are cringing and crying* ​ This is not me hating! I'm just totally aware of what oppression looks like in society and once you “see,” it's impossible to “unsee.” It's my blessed gift to be able to help my sisters discover their unique balance to expedite their path to an abundant life of health, wealth, beauty and next level fun on their journey. I've spent many years building a community of followers and friends (yes, friends!) who I have connected with through lifestyle, beauty, selfcare, and motherhood advice. I find a great deal of pride in my relationship with all of you and I'm constantly seeking out new ways to best serve and embrace you. I enjoy being your friend who you can turn to for everything from the best Dorito impos-tah's to what eye cream gets rid of dark circles to what your spirit needs to find synchronicity. Whether it's podcasts to listen to, my favorite athleisure, better ways to communicate with your partner or kiddos, or how to be the baddest babe in the game, I want to inspire you, encourage you, and challenge you to become the best version of yourself – and I love that you all do that for me. ​​ And that's what you can expect to find here and from me. Real, honest, raw and empowering content that will constantly champion you along the way - no matter what phase of life you're in! Teaching you how to be the HERO of your own MF'n story. Starting NOW :) ​ About the show: ► Website: http://www.ashsaidit.com ► Got Goli Gummies? https://go.goli.com/1loveash5 ► For $5 in ride credit, download the Lyft app using my referral link: https://www.lyft.com/ici/ASH584216 ► Want the ‘coldest' water? https://thecoldestwater.com/?ref=ashleybrown12 ► Become A Podcast Legend: http://ashsaidit.podcastersmastery.zaxaa.com/s/6543767021305 ► Review Us: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/ash-said-it/id1144197789 ► SUBSCRIBE HERE: https://www.youtube.com/c/AshSaidItSuwanee ► Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/1loveash ► Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ashsaidit ► Twitter: https://twitter.com/1loveAsh ► Blog: http://www.ashsaidit.com/blog ► Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/1LoveAsh/ #atlanta #ashsaidit #ashsaidthat #ashblogsit #ashsaidit® Ash Brown is a gifted American producer, blogger, speaker, media personality and event emcee. The blog on AshSaidit.com showcases exclusive event invites, product reviews and so much more. Her motivational podcast "Ash Said It Daily" is available on major media platforms such as iTunes, Spotify, iHeart Radio & Google Podcasts. This program has over half a million streams worldwide. She uses these mediums to motivate & encourage her audience in the most powerful way. She keeps it real!

Jeff Styles America
Chattanooga Drive In Show - S1E29 - 11/12/21

Jeff Styles America

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 78:33


IT'S FRIDAY....YAY!! New episodes are posted: Mornings, M-F, at 5am eastern. Don't forget, you can call or text us with comments, concerns, funny things, argumentative things.. we love it all.... 423-301-9229. This is not a live line... it's for messages and texts only..thanks! We are a daily podcast delivering entertaining information and informative entertainment with a focus on our beautiful home town, Chattanooga!! We are the Tri-State Region's Drive-In Theater...of the mind... featuring the voice of our city's morning commute for 3 decades, "The Commuticator", Jeff Styles Co-Hosts: Jen Lambert, Russell Stroud, Dave Hooker Producer: Bryan Stone Contributors: Jeff Greenspan & Taft Sibley In one hour you'll be informed, warned, entertained and brain-sprained. Streaming on: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, RadioCast, Stitcher, Facebook, Spotify, Anchor, Breaker, CastBox, OverCast, Pocket Casts, Radio Public - wherever you go for quality podcasts. Membership has privileges: Sponsor, advertise, subscribe and get MUCH more. Investment opportunities available! Please email chattaoogadriveinshow@gmail.com for information.

Loving Liberty Radio Network
11-10-2021 CSC Talk Radio with Beth Ann

Loving Liberty Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 50:52


"RIGGING BY REDISTRICTING" (audio may be muted during commercial breaks) CSCTalkRadio.com is a nationally syndicated LIVE RADIO talk show heard around the world M-F @ 10:06 AM CT and streamed 24/7 CSC Talk Radio, PO Box 73, California, MO 65018 573-796-2166 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/loving-liberty/support

The Eddie Trunk Podcast
Frank Bello & Jay Jay French

The Eddie Trunk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 76:33


This week on The Eddie Trunk Podcast, Eddie brings you his interviews with both Frank Bello & Jay Jay French who came in to the NY studios to talk to Eddie about their new books; Frank's "Fathers, Brothers, and Sons: Surviving Anguish, Abandonment, and Anthrax" and Jay Jay's "Twisted Business: Lessons from My Life in Rock 'n Roll".Catch Eddie Trunk every M-F from 2:00-4:00pm ET on Trunk Nation on SiriusXM Volume Channel 106.And don't forget to follow Eddie on Twitter  and Instagram!

Moe Factz with Adam Curry

Moe Factz with Adam Curry for November 11th 2021, Episode number 70 "Four Freedoms" Description Adam and Moe say No to Mandates Download the mp3 Big Baller Jennifer Dorney Executive Producers: Jennifer Dorney Steve Marchi judy sigsbey Associate Executive Producers: Chris Bailey Gergana Yankova Jon Cornforth Kyle Stefano Benjamin Naidus Phillip B. Brown Zack Welch Graham mann-gagne megan emery David T Vargas David Fox Episode 70 Club Members Chris Bailey Gergana Yankova Jon Cornforth Kyle Stefano Benjamin Naidus Phillip B. Brown Check out the show on Podcasting 2.0! Boost us with Value 4 Value on: Music in this Episode Intro: Public Enemy - Fight the Power - 8 Seconds Outro: Towiko - Lose me - 11 Seconds ShowNotes Archive Donate to the show at moefundme.com Search for us in your podcast directory or use this link to subscribe to the feed Podcast Feed For more information: MoeFactz.com Last Modified 11/10/2021 20:45:20 by Freedom Controller  

Loving Liberty Radio Network
11-09-2021 CSC Talk Radio with Beth Ann

Loving Liberty Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 50:51


"YOU CAN'T TOUCH THIS" I'M STILL PROUD TO BE AN AMERICAN, BUT I HATE THE CURRENT GOVERNMENT – and even some of our past government that won't go away….OBAMA! Don't you love it when the super rich lecture you on what you need to give up for the good of this country? Obama is actually arrogant enough to say (not in these exact words) "You Can't Touch This!" … Oh that we could… (audio may be muted during commercial breaks) CSCTalkRadio.com is a nationally syndicated LIVE RADIO talk show heard M-F @ 10:06 AM CT and streamed 24/7 CSC Talk Radio, PO Box 73, California, MO 65018. 573-796-2166 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/loving-liberty/support

Jeff Styles America
Chattanooga Drive In Show - S1E28 - 11/10/21

Jeff Styles America

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 64:38


Happy Hump Day! New episodes are posted: Mornings, M-F, at 5am eastern. Don't forget, you can call or text us with comments, concerns, funny things, argumentative things.. we love it all.... 423-301-9229. This is not a live line... it's for messages and texts only..thanks! We are a daily podcast delivering entertaining information and informative entertainment with a focus on our beautiful home town, Chattanooga!! We are the Tri-State Region's Drive-In Theater...of the mind... featuring the voice of our city's morning commute for 3 decades, "The Commuticator", Jeff Styles Co-Hosts: Jen Lambert, Russell Stroud, Dave Hooker Producer: Bryan Stone Contributors: Jeff Greenspan & Taft Sibley In one hour you'll be informed, warned, entertained and brain-sprained. Streaming on: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, RadioCast, Stitcher, Facebook, Spotify, Anchor, Breaker, CastBox, OverCast, Pocket Casts, Radio Public - wherever you go for quality podcasts. Membership has privileges: Sponsor, advertise, subscribe and get MUCH more. Investment opportunities available! Please email chattaoogadriveinshow@gmail.com for information.

Loving Liberty Radio Network
11-08-2021 CSC Talk Radio with Beth Ann

Loving Liberty Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 50:50


"IT'S TIME TO GET SERIOUS" (audio may be muted during commercial breaks) CSCTalkRadio.com is a nationally syndicated LIVE RADIO talk show heard around the world M-F @ 10:06 AM CT and streamed 24/7 CSC Talk Radio, PO Box 73, California, MO 65018 573-796-2166 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/loving-liberty/support

Jeff Styles America
Chattanooga Drive In Show - S1E27 - 11/9/21

Jeff Styles America

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 70:48


It's Tuesday! New episodes are posted: Mornings, M-F, at 5am eastern. Don't forget, you can call or text us with comments, concerns, funny things, argumentative things.. we love it all.... 423-301-9229. This is not a live line... it's for messages and texts only..thanks! We are a daily podcast delivering entertaining information and informative entertainment with a focus on our beautiful home town, Chattanooga!! We are the Tri-State Region's Drive-In Theater...of the mind... featuring the voice of our city's morning commute for 3 decades, "The Commuticator", Jeff Styles Co-Hosts: Jen Lambert, Russell Stroud, Dave Hooker Producer: Bryan Stone Contributors: Jeff Greenspan & Taft Sibley In one hour you'll be informed, warned, entertained and brain-sprained. Streaming on: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, RadioCast, Stitcher, Facebook, Spotify, Anchor, Breaker, CastBox, OverCast, Pocket Casts, Radio Public - wherever you go for quality podcasts. Membership has privileges: Sponsor, advertise, subscribe and get MUCH more. Investment opportunities available! Please email chattaoogadriveinshow@gmail.com for information.

I Survived Theatre School
Molly Smith Metzler

I Survived Theatre School

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 62:10


Intro: Gina is co-hostless and doing her best. PLEASE SUBSCRIBE, RATE, and REVIEW you beautiful Survivors!Interview: SUNY Geneseo, Boston University, Tisch, Juilliard, Playwriting MFAs, competition in writing programs, Marsha Norman, Cry It Out, MAID on Netflix, Hollywood sea changes, female-centered shows, domestic violence, emotional abuse, Hulu, theatre is behind, denial, making mistakes, bad reviews.COMPLETE TRANSCRIPT (unedited):1 (10s):And I'm Gina Polizzi. We went to theater school2 (12s):Together. We survived it.1 (14s):We didn't quite understand it. 20 years later, we're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense of it all2 (21s):Survived theater school. And you will too. Are we famous yet?1 (34s):Hello? Hello. Hello survivors. This is Gina. This week. We are sons' cohost, just one host today. I'm missing my better half BAAs. His boss is actually attending to a friend who got terrible health news this week. And she is in her very boss like way being there for her friend and being the amazing person and friend that she is, which is why everybody loves buzz. Anyway, she'll be back next week if you're not. But today we have, honestly, you guys, this is the interview I have been waiting for.1 (1m 19s):Molly Smith. Metzler is a writer extraordinaire. You may have heard of her latest project made number three on Netflix entering its 28th day online, which has some very special meaning for Netflix that I hope to know more about one day and previous to me being the showrunner for maid, she also worked on shameless and several other successful television shows. And before that she was a playwright. And actually I got to know her work because I directed a play of hers called cry it out.1 (1m 59s):And it was a fantastic experience. And I started communicating with her over email when I was directing. And I was so impressed with the way that she responded to me. I mean, a that she responded to me at all that she was available to me at all. And not something you always get with a playwright and B that she really took her time with her responses and see that her responses ended up being pretty impactful for me, just not necessarily related to the play, but as a person. And I'm a little embarrassed that when I talked to her and I told her the way that she had impacted me, I just started seriously just crying, crying, crying.1 (2m 45s):And I was having this thought like, I, this is not a moment I want to be crying. And I'm generally in life. I, I welcomed here as, as a person who struggles to access their emotions. I do. I welcome a good cry, but it not want to be crying to Molly Smith Metzler in this great interview. But you know, it is what it is. If I'm going to be honest, I have to be honest. I can't be choicy about when I'm being myself. That's my, that's my mantra. Recently you have to be yourself in all the ways. Some of those ways are ugly and disgusting and you know, unsavory, and some of them are fine and some of them are be even beautiful.1 (3m 31s):So I'm working on embracing the, a mess that I am, but I really think you're going to enjoy this interview with Molly. She's fantastic. Even without the always wonderful presidents, presidents presence, maybe she should be president even without the always wonderful presence of BAAs. We still managed to have a great conversation and actually that whole experience of her at the last minute, not being able to do this and this being the first time we're doing this with one host, turns out to have been a good thing for us to go through, to learn that.1 (4m 14s):Yeah, sometimes we're not both going to be available and sometimes when I'm not available, she'll be doing an episode on her own. So, you know, whatever we're growing, changing learning, Hey, we're in 22 countries. Now, if you have a, not a subscribed to this podcast, please do. If you have not rated this podcast or given it a review, please, please, please, please, please, please do it seriously. Please do it, please. I'm begging you. Please do it, but okay. Anyway, here's Molly Smith message.0 (4m 53s):Well,1 (5m 0s):No problem whatsoever. Fortunately, my partner is Jen. Her very good friend just got diagnosed with cancer yesterday and she's with her right now helping. So she's not going to be able to join us. This is actually the first time we're doing an interview with just me. So we'll see how it goes.3 (5m 23s):Yeah,1 (5m 24s):It is. And she just, she has a lot of experience with, with cancer. So she's sort of like the first people, first person people call, which is like,3 (5m 38s):Yeah,1 (5m 38s):Exactly, exactly. But anyway, congratulations, Molly Smith. Metso you survived theater school and you're going to have to clarify for me because it looks like you went to four schools, but you didn't go to four theater schools. Did you?3 (5m 52s):I went to four schools. I did. They're not all theater schools, but I went to undergrad, SUNY Geneseo in Western New York and I was an English major. And then I went to Boston university and got a master's in creative writing with a concentration in playwriting. And then I went to Tisch and got an MFA in playwriting dramatic writing. And then I went to Juilliard, which is, you don't really get a degree there. It's called an artist diploma, but it's just finishing school basically.1 (6m 20s):Oh, okay. So the decision to, to do the MFA, were you thinking at that time that you, maybe you were going to be a teacher, I'm always curious about MFA's and writing because you know, if you learned what you needed to know and you know, why not just put yourself out there and be a writer?3 (6m 40s):I think it's very scary to take that jump. The thing about school that I got addicted to is that I'm actually way too social to be a writer. I like being around other writers and every, and every time you get a graduate program, you're with a bunch of writers and you have deadlines and you kind of, you know, it's a really public way to study writing versus alone in your apartment while way to say, you know, and I kept getting academic support to attend the programs. And so that was part of it. I'm not sure I would have gone deep into debt to get all those degrees, but I think giving me aid, I kept going. Yeah.1 (7m 16s):Okay, fantastic. And did you always know from day one that you, I mean, since you were in high school anyway, that you wanted to be a writer that you wanted to write dramatically?3 (7m 26s):I always loved writing. I had journals and I'm from a very young age. I love to write, but I had a sort of more academic feeling about it. I thought I was going to get a PhD in English and join the academy and be a professor. And I didn't know, I was creative in the sense of dramatic writing until my senior year of college. When I took a playwriting class, I didn't know I was a playwright. And I also didn't know. I was funny. Those two things emerged at the same time. Wow.1 (7m 54s):Oh, so you didn't have experience with theater before then?3 (7m 58s):Well, I grew up a ballerina, so I had a great sense of the stage and the relationship between an audience and someone onstage. I really like, I understood light and the power of an audience, but I, no, I didn't grow up a theater nerd at all. I grew up a nerd nerd, like an actual,1 (8m 18s):So that must've been like just a whole new, exciting world. Did you decide pretty much right away that you were going to be getting your MFA when you discovered that you liked to play with?3 (8m 27s):Yeah, I did. I took this introduction to play right in class and it was one of those things. People talk about this, like in a romantic relationship where you're just like, it changes your whole life. And I didn't have that in a romantic relationship, but I had that with playwriting. One-on-one where, you know, I just, I, it came, I don't want to say easily to me cause it was really easy to play it, but it came, it was like a big release in my life that I arrived at playwriting and loved doing it. And it's like a big jigsaw and you can stay up all night doing it. And I knew from the very first, basically from the first act of a play that I wrote that it's what I wanted to do. I'm very lucky. It was very clear.1 (9m 5s):Yeah. Yeah. That is really lucky. So we have talked to almost 60 people now, the majority of them have been actors. So we've really delved deep into like everything about being an actor, especially at the age of undergrad and what that's like to be growing up, you know, just growing up and then trying to figure out yourself well enough to be an actor and all the stuff that comes along with that, including, you know, the competitive best with your cohort. But I imagine that's what it, well, I don't want to imagine what it's like, what is it like with your cohort when you're all writers and you're presumably reading each other's work critiquing each other's work, does it get really competitive?3 (9m 55s):I suspect that it can, you know, I feel very lucky cause I have never experienced that directly in a graduate program situation. Part of it is I think I went to really great places where everyone had gotten in was incredibly talented and brought such a unique point of view and voice that none of us were trying to raise the same place. So it was really easy to just support each other. And also it's fun, you know, you're reading it aloud. So if something's in the south, you're trying an accent and it's super bad cause you're a playwright. So I found it, you know, I became close with the other writers and I mean, I'm married. One of them, I call him my husband, he and I were in the same graduate program at Tisch. And there is something beautiful about meeting someone in a writing workshop because you're just sort of naked.3 (10m 41s):It's all, you know, I imagine it's like, I understand my actors fall in love too. It's like, you're just so vulnerable and you know, each other in a deep way. But my experience has been that writers are pretty, pretty darn supportive of each other. And if you're not, you kind of don't fit in, like if you're a jerk, if you're competitive jerk, like you're not meant to be a playwright, playwrights need to love people. Cause that's what we do, you know? Yeah.1 (11m 1s):Yeah. That's a very good point. Actually, we talked to CISA Hutchinson yesterday and basically said, yeah, isn't she awesome?3 (11m 8s):She's in a beautiful inside and out like just, but yeah.1 (11m 12s):Yeah. She, and she echoed the same thing in what you're saying. So I guess we're going to stop asking this question about competition. It's just that it's so much of a part of like the act. And I think it's part of just how the program is structured. I mean, you're literally up for the same parts against each other and they PO posted on a wall and everybody shows up to3 (11m 35s):Absolutely. And you know, I was at Juilliard where they still cut people. You know, that system has changed a little bit, but I was at the, the version of Juilliard that was structured to drop 10% of the class out. And I feel like you don't get, I don't know. I learned a lot about that cause they cut playwrights as well. And I feel like that doesn't, that doesn't bring forth good creative work from anybody that pressure of, you know, is Sally going to get cut instead of me that's that's, that's not good skills. I don't think1 (12m 5s):It's true. And at the same time, like a lot of the people who were cut from our program went on to have better careers than the majority of us. So it's just like not a lot of rhyme or reason to it.3 (12m 15s):It's like SNL. Yeah. I mean, yes. It's not a predictor. You got it. Right.1 (12m 20s):Exactly. Okay. So you graduated or you've finally finished school with Julliard after doing it for, for a number of years then what happened next? You were, you were married or you're in a relationship and w how did, how do two writers figure out what their next steps are going to be when school's over?3 (12m 40s):Well, I don't know how to writers in general would do, but I can tell you how Colin and I did it, which is that we we've never been competitive because we write really different plays. Like I am talking to, you know, especially as a playwright, my, my work tends to, I mean, I've written Boulevard, comedy. It's like, I really like to laugh. My husband's play is everyone's on meth and they're an Appalachian. It's like, we are, we are really young and yang. And, but I think being, I really recommend being married to, or spending your life with another writer, if you are a writer because they get it and they get you in like a deep, deep way. So if you have to stay up to four o'clock in the morning, cause you're inspired and you have to finish the scene, you know, there's, there's just a, there's no jealousy about that.3 (13m 25s):There's an acceptance. And our, it really, I think I often say, I don't think I'd be a playwright. Certainly won't be any of the things that I am a mother, you know, like everything is because it's all. And I, I had someone who believed in me more than I believed in myself and at points that is everything because, you know, your play opens in New York, you get just the worst reviews in the world and you take, you know, you'd take to the bed and you don't think you're ever going to write again. And it's so important who you decided to spend your life with because, you know, con only saw me as a writer first and foremost. And you know, it's like at the same goes for him. So we, yeah, but just technically do we have money? You know, we lived in a apartment in Brooklyn that we got to kind of like a hookup.3 (14m 9s):My husband was, he managed the bar downstairs, so he knew the guy. And so we got this apartment that we could actually afford, but we both worked full time waiting tables and bartending. And then if I get into the O'Neil, for instance, he would do extra bartending support me being at the O'Neil. And you know, he went up to LA for a few months and did a bunch of meetings and screenwriting stuff. And I supported him with the Juilliard money. Like we just have always worked it out. And for the last handful of years, when we finally don't have to, we can both be working in. It's great.1 (14m 39s):Yeah. That's nice that, by the way, that makes so much sense about the difference in your writing because in watching made, you know, I remember getting to the end of the first episode that he wrote and not, not having known throughout the episode that he wrote it and being like, wow, this is really, really different than Molly's writing. And of course it, it was his, and I kind of tend towards that darker stuff too. So yeah. And by the way, the series is fantastic. It is so good. And how you were having such a moment, you're getting great reviews. People are loving. I saw even today, it's number three on Netflix. How are you doing with success? Because people assume that it's all great, but I'm guessing it's not.1 (15m 23s):And I'm guessing it's kind of scary too.3 (15m 27s):Oh, well this is all pretty, just great. You know, like I think there's probably two things that are tricky about it, which I'll tell you in a second, but the fact is, it's just, it's great. Especially because it's made, you know, made is the closest to play writing. I've done for the screen. I see the show as 10 individual plays and it's really just about cleaning and feelings. It's the most character driven thing I've seen on TV in a long time. There's no murder. There's no cool accents. We're not in Hawaii. It's just about one woman's cleaning and feelings. And every time we turned in an episode, I thought Netflix would call and be like, you know, this is too weird.3 (16m 9s):Like the couch can't eat her. That's just too weird, you know, but they let me make this like, you know, artistic, I think like they're beautiful thing. And I didn't really believe that they were going to air it. And then I didn't really believe that people were going, gonna watch it. And so the fact that the fact that it is exactly what I wanted it to be and people love it. It's very, I don't really, I think it's really exciting just as a writer, it's exciting. It's like, oh, maybe we can return to doing harder things on the screen and on the stage again, you know, I think audiences weren't deterred by the fact that it was difficult, you know, they leaned in. And so I feel like it's really, it's mostly just fantastic.3 (16m 49s):I am surprised that people love it this much, but no, I'm just, I'm so proud of it. So it feels great. That's all there is. Do it.1 (16m 57s):What were the, you said there you'll tell me about the two things that have been challenging.3 (17m 1s):Yes, it is challenging. I, and I know you'll relate to this, but coming up in the theater, there are so many of us that, that are just working hard and waiting tables and waiting for a break. And that was me as well. And you want to help every single one of those people and you want to help every single one of those people whose cousin is also in LA. So like, that's the part that's really hard for me is that I can't, I can't do for everyone. And I want to, and especially theater people, like if you, if someone sends me a cold email that the subject is like a MF playwright, like I read it and then I, you know, I, I can't help it.3 (17m 42s):So that's a little hard cause I want to be good to everyone. And, and can't so that's, that's hard for me. And the other thing that's just hard is, you know, I spend my life in sweatpants and now suddenly have to do a bunch of stuff where I look, I have to look very, you know, Like, you know, writers or writers were writers for a reason. And so, so suddenly I have to like I to buy lipstick. And so that part of it is a little being articulate. Like next to Margot, Robbie is very difficult for me, but1 (18m 14s):I didn't realize until just today that she was the producer. So she's, she's the person who optioned the book.3 (18m 20s):So she and John Wells got the book together. John Wells is a very famous producer. He did west wing ER, and shameless, which is how I know him. I worked in my last four seasons of shameless is a writer on the show. So when he and Margo got the book, LA had just done cry it out, it was cried out, was up like, like had just closed when they got the book and it's a play about moms. And I think they were like, oh, we know a person who writes about moms and they handed me the book. It was so kismet.1 (18m 49s):Wow. That's fantastic. And, but you had to, I mean, I read the book too. You had to create a whole narrative. That's not in the book. So how does that, I'm curious about that process and how it works. Is it that you kind of sit down as the show runner and hatch a basic idea that you, that you then have some writers help you with or do you have to outline all of the stories and everybody else just writes them? Or how does it work?3 (19m 20s):Well, it's a, it's a little bit different with every project. Oh, I'm with a story like made, you know, whenever the memoir I learned so much, like it was, it's really an educational tool and I didn't want to sacrifice any of that. On the other hand, when you go and sit down with your husband or wife and Saturday night to watch Netflix, you don't want to lecture and you don't want to like TV, shouldn't taste like TV, shouldn't taste like broccoli, right. It should taste like it should be a sneak attack. Kind of like my plate is like, I like to sneak people into learning something. So I knew kind of off the bat that that made was an incredible engine, the memoir, and that I wanted all the takeaway to be the same. But I also knew that we were going to have to create a lot of story to do that.3 (20m 1s):So to answer your question, when I first said I would do the book and when we were taking out and pitching it to Netflix, pitching it to HBO, you know, all the places I would have to say, this is what I'm going to do. You know, we're gonna, we're going to do 10 episodes. Her mom's going to be a huge character. Her dad's got a huge character. We're going to really build up. Sean. We're going to get to know some of the people in the houses we're going to get to know Regina, she's an invented character, but this is how she'll structure in the plot. And you really have to know the nuts and bolts of what you're going to do. And the tone of it, like it's kinda like giving a 45 minute presentation on what the show will be. And then hopefully someone like Netflix is like, okay, great. Here's, here's a green light and get your writer's room. So then you hire a handful.3 (20m 42s):If you're lucky, you know, I could, I didn't have any, no one told me what to do. I got to hire whoever I wanted. And I hired only four writers, three of whom are playwrights, three of whom. I'm sure. You know, cause it's Colin, Becca bronzer, Marcus Garley so really accomplished playwrights. And then Michelle, Denise Jackson, who is not a playwright, but should be like, she's an honorary playwright, you know? And so w and then the five of us sit down and we take what I've said, you know, about the show, the 45 minute presentation, and we flush it out. What are we doing in every episode? What does this look like? And that, that process in the writer's room is the closest, you'll get to a table read in the theater, you know, where you're just at the table, you're reading that play.3 (21m 24s):And then you talk about it for, you know, nine days. That's a writer's room is that every day. So it's very, very, very cool experience and everyone's sharing secrets and, and we disagree sometimes and we do puzzles and there's a lot of talk about lunch.1 (21m 43s):That's what everybody says.3 (21m 47s):But also what was cool that mean is that these five, these four writers and me, the five of us, we all really connected to different things in the memoir. And we also, all of us come from all of us can relate to the memoir in different ways. And so you get five different perspectives on something. And I think, you know, Becca brown center did so much of the writing of Regina, and I think she could really connect to Regina. And, you know, that character would not feel quite as beautifully drawn if Becca weren't in the writers room. Like, so, so much of it is it's a dinner party. And the result of that dinner party is character. You know? So it's really, it's the most important thing you do is those writers.1 (22m 26s):That is okay. So I also just learned that today that you didn't write that Regina monologue, because, and this is about my own projection that when I'm watching it, I'm going, oh my God, this is so similar to Claire, Claire. Is that the name of the character and cry it out. That lives up high, up on the hill.3 (22m 45s):Oh, Adrian. Adrian.1 (22m 47s):Yeah. Thank you. Sorry. I was thinking, I was thinking, it sounded like an Adrian, my likes. So that's fascinating that, that,3 (22m 53s):Well, let me explain one further thing, which is, so that's how the show gets written. And yes, Becca brown said, I wrote that monologue, but the other thing that the show runner does is it is my job to then go through all 10 episodes and make sure it sounds like one person wrote them. And, and so the showroom, so you kind of divide the writing in the room and then all funnels back to me and I rewrite it or fix things. Or sometimes, you know, sometimes you're doing a major rewrite sometimes you're just like with Regina monologue, it was so beautiful. You know, we, we had to cut a couple of things for production, but like, it's, it's back as work. And, but it's, that's what TV writing is. It's like, there'll be stuff that Becca wrote in episode seven that she didn't write, or, you know, like TV is very collaborative and then it all funnels through the showrunner who does a pass to make sure it's, it's up to the standard that I want.3 (23m 44s):It's totally what I want. You know, it is, it is a writing job as a group, and then it is ultimately one person's writing job it's book. Does that make sense?1 (23m 51s):Yeah, it does. And thank you so much for answering that question because I have always wondered. And also even on television shows that have, have a different director, every episode, I'm always thinking, how are they keeping true to the tone, but not now, now I understand it. Well, I have so many things to ask you. I want to talk to you about just one thing is that you have said that you love writing about class, which is a big part of made and your, and your place. But, so I want to talk a little bit about that, but I also kind of want to talk maybe first about the thing that you said you were surprised that people like to made, and I've heard a lot of female writers express, something like that.1 (24m 36s):I'm surprised. And maybe people just say it in a way as, as you know, not, not trying to try to be humble. Right. Okay. But I believe that you are surprised by it because it does seem like a kind of recent thing that the universe is allowing us to tell women's stories and having them at the forefront. I mean, it seems really pretty recent. And so are you, do you feel like this is you're part of a big sea change in terms of what's being represented on screen?3 (25m 7s):You know, absolutely. I was talking to Netflix yesterday and they said last year it was Bridgford, you know, these are a lot of things, but they were saying last year, people, the surprise was everyone loved Britain and love Queens gambit. And this year one loves squid game and loves made, which cracks me up. But, but they think to be in the same sentence as Queens gambit as the limited series. I mean, I think that's so exciting as a female writer, because she was an alcoholic kind of like piece of crap who was amazing at chess and went on this like beautiful arc that was not traditionally feminine. It was usually that's a man, like that's usually a male going through that and were riveted by his addiction and his dysfunction and made his, you know, I think we're continuing what Queens gambit did as well.3 (25m 50s):Like it's, you know, Alex has a lot of things, but she's not a woman. She is a character going through an arc and she makes a ton of mistakes and she, you know, is a product of where she comes from. And that is enough to carry a show. And I feel like that is it you're right. It's so recent. And I therefore assumed it would be treated like a, you know, like a niche, you know, maybe 500,000 people will watch it kind of like, cause we don't show up for those shows, but all of a sudden we really show up for those shows and we want to see a multidimensional and rich and layered woman at the story of her own dance story. It's really like exciting.3 (26m 31s):It's exciting.1 (26m 33s):That's what I think about stuff like this. I just imagine, you know, the people who are traditionally in charge of these things, I just mentioned it, but I imagine a bunch of guys sitting around being like, can you imagine people really want to hear about these dang? I mean, I feel like it must be a surprise to, to sort of the old guard that, you know, because of course everything does have to be motivated about what's going to be a return on your investment. And that, that that's understandable. It's I'm not saying anybody's bad for that, but it is curious to me that there was just this, there was an assumption that if you made a female centered show, nobody would want to watch it.1 (27m 16s):Except for every time they make a female centered, anything people want to watch it. Why is this keep being a surprise?3 (27m 24s):I think it's going to stopping a surprise pretty soon because this cracked me up. But my friend was doing a pitch yesterday at Hulu. And I guess like the conversation kind of organically came up with like, well, what's our main, you know, like what's the, you know, the producer was in it, but like, you know, people are starting to look for the, the queen scam, but you know, trying to look for the female, you know, the unconventional sort of what's the would be a surprising female story. We're starting to like, not only are we starting to have it at the table, that the market is the, market's starting to recognize that we're going to get eyes on the screen and it's, you know, I shouldn't be so surprised by made.1 (28m 5s):Right. Right. And it helps that we have people like Margot, Robbie and Reese Witherspoon and females who are having more of a say about what gets produced, you know, with what, what books get optioned and then what gets produced.3 (28m 17s):Absolutely. And, and more and more women are taking those jobs and taking those positions. And it's a good, it's a sea change. I also dare say, I think TV and film has ahead of it than theater. I have to say, I think1 (28m 29s):Girl, that's another thing I was going to say. Cause you had a quote in something I read theater is behind theater is so behind and this is, unfortunately it came as a surprise to me. Like when I woke up to the fact that theater is so behind, it was sad and it also doesn't make sense. It also, you know, it should be it's, it was 40 years ago. It was the most progressive part of art, I think.3 (28m 55s):Yeah. Well the theater doesn't treat women as, as minority voices and they have, and like that's, what's so crazy is we've, you know, I think we've carved out space for there's so much equality and, and like, it's exciting to see the programming in theaters change. And like it's not just white men anymore. That's all, that's very, very exciting. But heterosexual women stories that mother's stories about our struggles stories about, you know, me and my friends, there's no space for us on the New York stage. There's no space for my friends and I on the New York stage. And I feel like, and then, you know, you don't go up in New York, then you don't go all across the regions.3 (29m 36s):And I think a great example is actually cried out because that had a huge regional presence because I think people are starved for players like that, that are about women and just, you know, and not women on Mars and not, not necessarily, you know, like it just normal women, women having, you know, the Wendy Wasserstein plays of today are not produced in New York. And it's, it's a, it's a huge issue I think.1 (30m 0s):Yeah, yeah, it is. So, okay. So the other thing is that you love to write about class, which I find fascinating. I love to read about it in any case, what is your personal connection to your fascination with that issue?3 (30m 17s):Well, I think I grew a group of the Hudson valley, the daughter of two teachers. So, you know, I, I, I can't relate to made, for instance, in the sense of, I always had food and I always had a certain amount of like structure and S and security, but I, my parents were incredibly well educated and they kind of like my dad went to Cornell and it was sort of something we heard a lot about, even though we didn't kind of grow up in a moneyed area or money to house, there was a sense of, there was a sense of you could scholarship your way into the next strata. And I think that I find that fascinating because it's just not true. I, it's almost impossible.3 (30m 59s):It's almost impossible to change your class in America. And it's, it's, I feel like those walls are getting higher, not lower. And I watch people through everything they have at, at, at those chances to change, you know, change their stripes. And I just think the way we, we work in this country is we it's, we've made that harder and harder. There is no bootstrap narrative there. It does. There's no bootstraps it doesn't, it's not a thing in this country. So I find that fascinating because I felt very jipped. You know, I felt like I worked very, very hard and like I was always getting A's and being sophisticated and like, I couldn't graduate and get a, you know, a little studio in New York and intern at a publishing house.3 (31m 42s):You know, like a lot of my friends who came from money could, and there's just, it's so ingrained in our culture and it makes me mad and it's not, you know, it's not fair. Especially when I had a child and started thinking about cried out and just the way we treat that money directly affects maternity leave in this country too. And like, I can't compete with somebody who has a trust fund, you know, I had to put queer where I could afford her. And it's just bullshit that you can claw your way out of the class that you're born into. It's it's extremely rare. So I love that1 (32m 16s):It's bullshit and it's really dangerous cause it makes people feel so inadequate when they can't, you know, and that, that's also a great scene. I think it's in the first episode. Yeah. It's in the first episode when she goes and she's talking to the social worker and she's saying, so I can't get a job because I don't have a daycare and I can't get daycare cause I don't have a job. So I have to get a dog to prove that I didn't deserve daycare. I mean, it's, it's also3 (32m 40s):Backwards. Yeah. You're at a humongous disadvantage. If you are born into, you know, if you're born into poverty, you're at a humongous disadvantage in this country and it's like getting worse. That's the other thing is it's not, I mean, I have to leave. That's part of why made is, is touching so many people's sense of justice too. It's like, oh yeah, it's getting worse. Like, why aren't we talking about this? It's you know, Alex and I are, are not facing the same problems. And it's just by where I was born and where she was born and you know, you what family, your brand and who dictates so much of your struggle.1 (33m 17s):Yeah. And, and that, that the sort of historical narratives would have you believe that it's, it's the opposite of that and that, and that everybody left England to get away from that. But then yeah, just creative things I think here. So another thing that I heard or read that you said that really took my breath away is you said that when you became a mother, your, you didn't say your resolve for your career. You, the phrase that I that's sticking out to me, as you said, I went from being the secretary of my own company to the CEO. And it just, that just really like hit me in the center of my chest.1 (33m 58s):Can you just say a little bit more about it? What, what you meant by that?3 (34m 3s):Sure. I think that we'll probably like probably like many women when they become moms. I, I was frustrated that I had, I had this thing that I was good at, that I had studied for so many years that I've given so much time and love to my playwriting career and that it did not love me back in the sense that I could not afford to take core to a music class, you know? And it made me very, it made me very frustrated that, you know, I, I had devoted my, my self to this, this field that I had a passive relationship with. Like I was waiting for someone to call and tell me they were going to do a reading or, you know, or I was waiting for my career to start.3 (34m 50s):And I think what happened when I had, when I had Cora was I, I wanted to provide for her. And I also wanted to, I wanted to show her that you could be tough and you could be an active participant in your career like that. I didn't have to wait for it to happen. And so part of it was, I was, I just kind of said the things we all want to say out loud as a women, but I actually said them, which was like, Hey agents, what the F I am funny and talented. I want to work in TV. I want to take a music class with my daughter. What do I have to do to do that? And I you'd be shocked. I think how freeing and wonderful it is to just stand up for yourself and to make demands. And, you know, and I wanted to, I wanted to take an expensive music class with my daughter and I wanted to have a career.3 (35m 32s):And I was like, I'm not going to wait for it to happen because I know if someone gives me a chance I'm going to do, I'm going to go far in this field. Like, cause I don't know. Does that make sense? So I kind of like, wait, I said, waiting for the phone to ring and started making the calls.1 (35m 45s):Yeah. And also what I'm hearing is you stopped just blindly participating in the myth that everything can only work a certain way, which I feel like is something that we can all relate. I mean, it's something that boss and I talk a lot on this podcast about like just making so many assumptions about what, what we're definitely not entitled to have and what we're, you know, let's definitely for other people and not for us without ever once actually saying that out loud or asking for what we want. And actually yesterday chiefs have said the exact same thing. She said she, she was trying to be humble and say it's because she doesn't know how the system works. So she didn't know, she couldn't ask which you know. Okay. Maybe, but it's very inspiring to hear that.1 (36m 29s):Now you could just decide what you want to do with your life and your career. You could decide that you want to have a work-life balance and then have it.3 (36m 37s):Yeah. And you know, I think actors have this too. We are always waiting for the phone to ring. And at a certain point, I think that's a really tough way to be a mom because you can't count on anything and you're spread so thin. And I'm just kinda like, no, I'm going to generate, I'm going to generate this. And I can't really define the moment, but I will say for me it was emotional. I, I stopped, I stopped letting theater. Tell me how to feel about myself a little bit theater. I mean, it's a little bit like the terrible boyfriend that you just can't leave. Right. Like I would be like, I would be like, here's my new play. Do you love it? And they'd be like, maybe, you know, maybe we'll do a reading of it.3 (37m 19s):And I'd be like, let's my full heart. And I love you. And then, you know, and I finally like kind of broke up with that boyfriend in the sense that like, no, I'm really good at this. And like, I'm going to go where the love is. And I'm going to figure out how to pay my bills doing this and maybe you'll miss me and come back. You know, you know, it's hard as an artist, you can't let someone else tell you what your worth is. And theater is very conducive to that.1 (37m 40s):Yeah. Oh my God. That's so true. And that's, by the way, like a big part of the character of Alex, she does that too. I mean, she, with not that much to leverage did still find a way to just be very active about asking for what she wants. And I can see what you're saying about how, how having a kid makes that very clear. Whereas maybe you don't feel so I'm entitled to ask for what you want when it's just you, but when you know that it's somebody else who's depending on you, then it's that it doesn't feel like you're asking for yourself. It feels like you're asking for your family.3 (38m 15s):Yeah. And you see injustice with fresh eyes when you have a child, you know, because I don't know. I feel, I feel like certainly in my case, I w I would, I was so focused on being a good collaborator, being polite, being like, you know, you know, being grateful for the breadcrumbs that I got, you know, in my life. And I mean, honestly, it was a professional change, but it was primarily an emotional change. I was like, yeah, I don't want breadcrumbs anymore because my daughter deserves better than breadcrumbs. And so it just sort of filtered across all the fields, but yeah, another had does that.1 (38m 50s):Yeah, it does. It does well. So I don't know if I ever told you this, the reason I was looking through our emails earlier, as I wanted to see if I, I was sure I had said this thing to you, that I can not find in my email. So I'm going to say it to you now, which is that when I was directing your play, I wrote to you just about some things that I wondered if we could change. And you gave me the most thoughtful responses, which was, is to say you didn't invalidate that I was asking you, but you still stood up for what you, for the integrity of the play. I feel like I'm going to cry. I never saw anybody do that before.1 (39m 36s):And it was a really great, I wish I wasn't crying as I started to say this to you, but it was a great thing to, it was a, you were a great role model for me in that moment. And I always appreciate that. So thank you.3 (39m 52s):Oh, Tina, thank you. Well, you know what, thank you for wanting to have a conversation with me about it. Cause like I also think that's the sign of a fantastic director that you let me into your process and your thoughts about it. And I know you did a fantastic job with the play cause I had Scouts in that area who saw it and you know, so whatever you were, whatever you were working with, you artistically, you certainly landed that ship for you. You know, landed that plan beautifully.1 (40m 15s):Thank you. I had, and I had so much fun doing it. So tell me about some of your mentors. We had a nice discussion the other day about the power of mentors and some people go kind of through their whole training and never really feel like they connect with a mentor. Did you have mentors along the way?3 (40m 35s):Yes. I'm very lucky. Actually. I'm very lucky. I'm sure most people who go to Julliard and say this, but I, in my case, it's, it's really, really true that Marsha Norman was a wonderful mentor to me. I met her at Tisch and Tisha's a funny place because it's a larger program. You know, you don't have that. One-on-one with your professors that you do with Juilliard where there's just a handful of you, but, and I didn't stand out at Tisch. I sort of, my husband was, you know, my husband's sort of the star over player at, in class and I hadn't found my voice and I was sort of, I just wasn't like the star student and she was, she saw something in me and I don't think she saw like a Polish playwright yet, but she saw, I think there's just, she saw a way to help me find my voice.3 (41m 18s):And she hired me as her assistant coming out of that MFA program. And I always think like it was sort of charity work because she didn't need an assistant. She was so on top of her life. But I think she wanted to let me hang out with her and see how she conducted her business. So she was working on law and criminal intent. Yeah. Yeah. And so I was on set with her. I get to do research with her, for the scripts. She was doing the color purple and I got to go to rehearsal usually just to bring a coffee that I could watch. And it was, you know, she's also a mother and I don't know it was really, it, it was so generous of her because I got, I just got to see that you, what a woman in power looks like and, and a woman on her voice.3 (41m 59s):And she also says no a lot. And I grew to really respect that. Especially later when I became a mom, but you don't F with Marsha. I mean, she'll shut stuff down. She's really, I mean, she's such a generous person here. She did this thing for me, I'm a total stranger, but she's also like she knows her worth. So I was very grateful. It's been those years with her. And then, and then she invited me to Julliard. And then when I was ready really gave me, I mean, Juilliard is so much pressure. And the thing about Julia is you have to know what your voice is to go there. And so it's almost like she was helping me find my voice. And then when I found it gave me this incredible opportunity to go to Julliard. So sh honestly like very, very good to me in such a mentor in a very lucky.3 (42m 41s):And then on the west coast, I've had a wonderful mentor in John Wells because he, he's just one of the most terrific showrunners and producers, but it's funny cause I, everybody knows that that's not a secret in LA, but to work for him as a writer and to be in his writer's room. I learned so much from him about how to empower the people around you. How did it become like, you know, there's so many toxic writing rooms and toxic jobs with my friends, tell me, and it sounds terrible, but everyone at a John Wells show is thrilled to be there and very lucky to have that job. And they know it and like just that there's a way to do things gracefully. So he, and, and then he got this book and handed it to me and gave me my first chance to be a show runner.3 (43m 23s):So I had a, I've been very lucky to have him as a mentor on this coast1 (43m 28s):And the toxic. I've heard a lot of stories too, about toxic writers' rooms. And maybe that's also something that's going to get phased out because like so many of these things, you just, you just need more samples. You need, you know, you need more samples in your dataset so that, you know, I mean, if 99% of everything is run in one certain way, then there's little, there's little chance that it's going to change. But when, when the tide starts to shift, maybe there's a little, few more samples in your dataset that show, well, you can just be a regular nice person and still get the same, you know, get the same job done. That's that's nice to hear.3 (44m 9s):Yeah. Yeah.1 (44m 12s):So dah, dah, dah, oh, one, another favorite line from made is when Alex is talking to her dad about, I think this is, might be at the last episode or near then. And she says, she's trying to tell him that her or her, whatever boyfriend abused her and her, father's not taking it in. And she says, do you hear the words that are coming out of my mouth right now? That was another thing that really hit me because, you know, denial is really not a passive thing. Like you have to work pretty hard at defending your denial on something.1 (44m 56s):And I'm really familiar with saying something that feels, you know, that's a truth for me to people who, I mean, act as if you're, you know, like you're invisible and that turns out to be a really shaping force in a lot of people's lives. And you know, so anyway, I'm just curious about your own relationship and experience with denial.3 (45m 22s):Well, I love that you love that moment because I remember with that scene feeling like something was missing. And I remember, you know, I know a lot of it denial, but what I really know a lot about is gaslighting and denial is a form of gaslighting where you're just like, I'm, I'm not going to acknowledge a reality. And you know, I learned this tool a few years ago from a fantastic therapist that like, it's okay to just pause and be like, but you actually are hearing me, right? Like this is English. And you understand these words like, and I've, I've actually tried that tool in my life and steal at someone, not, not like, not be able to confirm that they're hearing the words.3 (46m 3s):And so it was when I, and then when I put it in the scene that it felt like, oh, that's what was missing is just this, like, how far are you going to take this denial? And he still can't write. I mean, I think Billy might nod, but he doesn't say anything. Like, I think gaslighting in denial and emotional abuse, I mean, I could write 40 Marsha was about this. I am fascinated by it. And the thing we don't talk about it as a form of abuse. And we should, it's like weirdly I think as well as violent, if not more violent than physical abuse, because you don't realize it's happening like Alex in the pilot, she doesn't know she's a victim of abuse and she is such an, a victim of abuse, which I hope we demonstrate in the show that you have to go on that ride with her, but you know, it's so corrosive and there's nothing worse than having someone tell you what what's real is not real day after day, year after year.3 (46m 56s):Like this is an area that I know a lot about I sent you do to1 (47m 1s):Yes. And actually my kind of where I put my energy in terms of recovery is with codependency and denial and codependency, or just, I mean, that's, that's the it's denial is the perfume of codependency. It's just, it's everywhere. And what I think really gets triggered for people who want to keep pretending, like they hear the words you're saying is because I find this in my family, like the way that denial really shows up in my family is if I acknowledge a truth, that's too true. I think what happens to other people is they feel that if they even just validate that that's my truth, that that somehow means that they have to acknowledge it for their own selves and their own lives.1 (47m 51s):And that's really like the forbidden thing that, you know, that people who don't want to go there can't do, they can't, it's like the Pandora's box. If I start to look at, you know, if I acknowledge that, what you're saying about this is true, then I can't help, but start to acknowledge all of the other things as well.3 (48m 9s):I think what you just said is, is brilliant because I think people think denial is just inactive, but it's aggressive. It's so aggressive. It's really violent, you know, intense denial that gaslighting of like, I will not even acknowledge. I hear the words you're saying it's, it's, it's so active. It's I mean, it's so aggressive. What you said was really, really smart really. Right. Yeah. And I love the people. I love the people are flipping out about Hank with me. Like how does he just sit there and let Sean treat her like that? And like, you know, and that's what I mean, I think she's mistreated throughout the show, but I think what Hank does to her in that moment with the denial is, is I think a lot of us recognize that.1 (48m 49s):Yeah. And I really appreciate the w the way you rolled out this whole concept of emotional abuse, because even I who feel like I've spent so much time working on this stuff, and I was a therapist, even I was found myself being like, oh, he didn't hit her. You know, she left, he didn't hit her. Hmm. I really had to check that in myself. And I was because one of the things that denial, I mean, in the absence of act, you know, saying you're wrong or whatever, and it's just, I don't hear you. You just assume that what you're saying, isn't valid, it's it becomes this thing that you do to yourself where you, you know, if somebody invalidates you enough, you start to invalidate yourself.1 (49m 38s):So I loved how you rolled that out in the series that are people talking to you a lot about that.3 (49m 45s):Yes they are. And how about in episode eight, where you are like, oh, Sean's changed and he's turned around and he's going to be a carpenter, you know? And like you it's in you, you find yourself. Or at least I did. And I assume it seems like audiences to just kind of like, oh, maybe this is a happy, love story. Like maybe he like, you know, and, and that, you know, that is all by calculated manipulative writing that I like my secret agenda with me. It was, you know, and I claimed 10 hours cause I wanted, I wanted the audience to go on the actual experience of that cycle and to get thrown off by it and caught up in it like, oh my gosh, I'm back, I'm back. And I'm in the pit, how did this happen?3 (50m 26s):And I wanted to show you how it happened. I also was like, I dare you to wash made and tell me that that's not domestic violence because it is emotional abuse is violent. It, what happens to her is violent. So that was like my secret mustache totally goal with the show.1 (50m 43s):Yeah, no, it, it hit, it totally played. And, and I think the other thing that's great about that is that when we have seen depictions of violence against women in film, I mean the best we could entail television, the best we could have hoped for is some woman who's abused who isn't a total idiot, because mostly what it is, how it's portrayed is some dumb person who doesn't, who's too dumb to know she's being abused. So therefore she goes back and also the various, the subtle, wow. I don't know if it's settled, but the, the subplot with the first roommate that she has when she goes to the, not roommate, but you know, the woman who lives in the shelter with her who introduces her to, you know, how, how to do life there.1 (51m 31s):I love I, that was heartbreaking her story of, because it is that you, you, you, yes, in the audience were saying, yeah, maybe sh maybe Sean is a good guy. Maybe, maybe all he really needed was to sober up and become the good person he was meant to team.3 (51m 50s):Yep. I mean, it's funny. I did an interview yesterday where this gentleman was like, is Sean okay? Like, does he end up okay. In life? And, and I, and I found myself sort of being like, I've never really thought of that cause he, you know, he's fictional, but I, I don't know. I'm not sure that that guy is ever going to make it out of that trailer, you know? And I'm not sure that he's going to get sober and be a great dad. I'm not. But I do feel like when he says at the end, I'm going to get sober and come see her all the time. I don't believe him. And, and I think that's his TV show, right? That's his cycle that he has to break. But my goal was to show that he's caught in his own cycle too.3 (52m 29s):Like, we are all kind of caught in our own cycles and it's so hard to break, you know, an Alex barely makes it out. And most women and men in her situation, the show ends in episode eight under the, in the pit. Most people don't get out of the pit and she is so smart and driven that she can, but she's the exception and not, she's a great exception. Yeah.1 (52m 53s):Yeah. Yeah. So we're, I want to be honoring your time. I told you we're only going to talk for an hour, but, but before we begin to wrap up, I just want to ask you, so since we've spent a lot of time talking about your success, let's hear about some of your failures. What have been some mistakes that you've made, maybe, maybe you maybe even like when you, when you made first, the transition from playwriting to writing and Hollywood, what were some of the mistakes that you made along the way?3 (53m 23s):Well, I, I think the, one of the great learning opportunities I've had as a human being, not just as a writer, was my first big production as a playwright in New York. And it was, you know, I was barely out of school and I felt I'm just so grateful for the opportunity. You know, it was a big production with stars in it and fancy director and everyone there was fancy except me and the process I have to say kind of went that way, like, like, huh, there's this element of it's actually, it's when I play close up space is about a dad and a daughter. It's about grief and pain and there's a lot of magical realism and I'm sure it's far from the perfect play, but it got obliterated by the press and squarely blamed on me the most inexperienced person in the production.3 (54m 11s):But what I learned from it is that I knew things about it were wrong. I knew immediately things about the production were wrong and I didn't use my voice. I didn't, you know, what happened with the play is my fault. I didn't, I didn't ring the bell. I didn't say, well, I didn't refuse the rewrites. Like I, you know, and everybody there had good intentions. Everybody wants to have a hit play, but people saw it a different way than I did. And, and it was wonderful people. There was no reason why I couldn't have said, Hey, yo, this isn't what I wrote. And I really, it was a crushing blow to have that play go so badly and to, to get such her, I mean, if you went for that and just Google it, it's the worst reviews. It's like, one of the, one of the reviews was like, is she sleeping with the director?3 (54m 53s):Like, why did she even get this product? You know, it's just straight on misogyny. I mean, it was, it was so mean, but what it taught me was I, since that moment I've really listened to my gut. And if my gut says this isn't right, I say it, and I don't worry about how it's going to come across. It sounds like I did that with you, but I have my sense of like, no, and, and it, and I learned the hard way in that moment that nothing is more important than your own gut. And so, and, you know, kind of re I had like a, kind of, a lot of momentum as a playwright really stop that momentum. It sent me into a deep depression. I mean, the, I lost so much because I didn't listen to my voice.3 (55m 36s):So that was my big theater lesson, which is applied to everything. But the big mistake I've made in TV to film, I've actually been really, really, really lucky and worked with fantastic people. But I think that stuff can go sideways here. It's a, it's a funny town, you know, and I've worked with wonderful people, but once in a while, you know, something's happening and then it just disappears. And so, you know, like that, you're gonna, you know, I, right before me and I came so close to having another job that I really wanted and was passionate about, it would have been my first time kosher running something, show running something, and, you know, we were all but celebrating.3 (56m 21s):And then the whole thing fell apart because the actress wanted her friend to write it and like bull, bull, crap. Like that happens all the time in LA. And so it's a hard time. It's a hard lesson the first time, you know, where I was like, oh, people don't, you know, like my agent sent me champagne. Like it was, it was happening. And then it very suddenly wasn't. And so I think it made me realize that don't pop the champagne until the contract is signed1 (56m 51s):And put that on a t-shirt.3 (56m 57s):That was a tough lesson to learn though, because I was like, wait, oh my God. Like, I went from like sky high to, and you know, nobody really, nobody apart, it was just very sobering. So,1 (57m 7s):And writing is so personal that it's really hard not to take both the criticisms to heart and then the, the opposite of the criticisms. And, you know, it's, it's hard not to make it. It's hard to stop making it about personal validation. You know, when, when somebody likes or doesn't like your stuff. Yeah. That's the journey I'm on right now. Not making it about, you know, like if somebody didn't like my play doesn't mean they don't, it doesn't have anything to do with whether or not they like me.3 (57m 40s):Yeah. You know, that's, I'm glad you're learning that because I also can tell you, I just staffed a writing room for the first time. And so that experience was really opening because I read unbelievably fantastic things and I didn't meet with them because, you know, you're designing a dinner party with five people and you kind of have to, and like you, the truth is, like I said, I passed on a lot of wonderful writers whose work I freaking loved. And like, can't wait to read for the next thing and have mentioned and recommended to other people. And that's part of it is like, you don't know how people are experiencing your work and the fans that you're building along the way. And I think we quickly assume the worst. Right? I know I do. But like, but the fact is like, you don't, you don't know how close you got it.3 (58m 24s):My guess is you're getting close to stuff and you don't know. And aren't able to know that1 (58m 29s):At the end of the day, the only thing you have control over is whether or not you go back to your computer later that day and just keep writing.3 (58m 36s):Yeah. You got to run, run your own race, which is so hard to do. I mean, listen, it really, really is. But yeah. The only thing you, the only thing you can control is your output true. Which is horrible. I mean, I, I, for the first time, in two years that don't have anyone calling me today to be like, where are the pages? You know? Like, I mean, part of it too is it's, it's helpful when you have deadlines and pressure. That's why I love to grad school because I'm the second Monday of October, I was reading my play out loud. And so I had to go right. You know, make sure I write it. So I also feel like that's, without that, it's also, that's a hard thing about feeling like you're not moving forward too, is that lack of deadlines.3 (59m 19s):But again, you don't, you don't, you don't know how far your work is going and how who's reading it and what it will lead to the next time. And I mean, I've gotten, I've gotten rejected on so many things that have led to a meeting later, you know, like so many things that, so many jobs I wanted that I didn't get, but then later someone's like, oh, we read her for that. We should meet her for this. And I didn't get that job either, but, but it's like, it's just funny. So yeah,1 (59m 48s):Like leaving a whole blanket of your career and you never know, you know, w where this, where the threads are going to end up.3 (59m 55s):Absolutely. And every time I get bummed out, which is a lot, because I'm a writer, all writers gets on debt. I, I try to think about and visualize the stack of things. I'm going to write in my life. And when I get terrible notes or when I get clobbered with notes and I feel depressed, I also think about the stack of work that I'm going to do in my life and how this piece that I'm writing right now is just one of them, you know? And that, that's my, that's my real tombstone like that pile, you know?1 (1h 0m 22s):Oh, I love that. What a great image and what a great note to end on.4 (1h 0m 37s):If you liked what you heard today, please give us a positive five star review and subscribe and tell your friends. I survived. Theater school is an undeniable Inc production. Jen Bosworth, Ramirez, and Gina plegia are the co-hosts. This episode was produced, edited, and sound mixed by Gina for more information about this podcast or other goings on of undeniable, Inc. Please visit our website@undeniablewriters.com. You can also follow us on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. Thank you.

Loving Liberty Radio Network
11-05-2021 CSC Talk Radio with Beth Ann

Loving Liberty Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 50:50


"WHO'S EVOLVED? WE ARE, SO STOP SLAPPING THE MONKEYS" (audio may be muted during the commercials) CSCTalkRadio.com is a nationally syndicated LIVE RADIO talk show heard around the world M-F @ 10:06 AM CT and streamed 24/7 CSC Talk Radio, PO Box 73, California MO 65018 573-796-2166 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/loving-liberty/support

Jeff Styles America
Chattanooga Drive In Show - S1E26 - 11/8/21

Jeff Styles America

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 57:06


Good Monday Morning! New episodes are posted: Mornings, M-F, at 5am eastern. Don't forget, you can call or text us with comments, concerns, funny things, argumentative things.. we love it all.... 423-301-9229. This is not a live line... it's for messages and texts only..thanks! We are a daily podcast delivering entertaining information and informative entertainment with a focus on our beautiful home town, Chattanooga!! We are the Tri-State Region's Drive-In Theater...of the mind... featuring the voice of our city's morning commute for 3 decades, "The Commuticator", Jeff Styles Co-Hosts: Jen Lambert, Russell Stroud, Dave Hooker Producer: Bryan Stone Contributors: Jeff Greenspan & Taft Sibley In one hour you'll be informed, warned, entertained and brain-sprained. Streaming on: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, RadioCast, Stitcher, Facebook, Spotify, Anchor, Breaker, CastBox, OverCast, Pocket Casts, Radio Public - wherever you go for quality podcasts. Membership has privileges: Sponsor, advertise, subscribe and get MUCH more. Investment opportunities available! Please email chattaoogadriveinshow@gmail.com for information.

SBS Korean - SBS 한국어 프로그램
[컬처 IN] 미국, 남·녀 아닌 'X' 성별 표기 여권 첫 발급

SBS Korean - SBS 한국어 프로그램

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 13:21


미국에서 남녀가 아닌 제3의 성별을 의미하는 ‘X'를 표기한 첫 번째 여권이 발급됐다. 호주는 2011년부터 여권에 남(M)·여(F) 외에 제3의 성(X) 표기를 허용하고 있다.

Facts & Cap Podcast
Take Da Charge

Facts & Cap Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 93:41


Ep. Mf 68

Loving Liberty Radio Network
11-04-2021 CSC Talk Radio with Beth Ann

Loving Liberty Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 48:37


"THAT WHICH IS MADE IN AMERICA SAVES AMERICA" (audio may be muted during commercial breaks) CSCTalkRadio.com is a nationally syndicated LIVE RADIO talk show heard around the world M-F @ 10:06 AM CT and streamed 24/7 CSC Talk Radio, PO Box 73, California, MO 65018 573-796-2166 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/loving-liberty/support

Jeff Styles America
Chattanooga Drive In Show - S1E25-2 - 11/5/21

Jeff Styles America

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 72:11


Happy Friday! - Be sure to check out our SPECIAL REPORT - HOT OFF THE PRESS podcast, too! New episodes are posted: Mornings, M-F, at 5am eastern. Don't forget, you can call or text us with comments, concerns, funny things, argumentative things.. we love it all.... 423-301-9229. This is not a live line... it's for messages and texts only..thanks! We are a daily podcast delivering entertaining information and informative entertainment with a focus on our beautiful home town, Chattanooga!! We are the Tri-State Region's Drive-In Theater...of the mind... featuring the voice of our city's morning commute for 3 decades, "The Commuticator", Jeff Styles Co-Hosts: Jen Lambert, Russell Stroud, Dave Hooker Producer: Bryan Stone Contributors: Jeff Greenspan & Taft Sibley In one hour you'll be informed, warned, entertained and brain-sprained. Streaming on: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, RadioCast, Stitcher, Facebook, Spotify, Anchor, Breaker, CastBox, OverCast, Pocket Casts, Radio Public - wherever you go for quality podcasts. Membership has privileges: Sponsor, advertise, subscribe and get MUCH more. Investment opportunities available! Please email chattaoogadriveinshow@gmail.com for information.

Apartment Investing Journey
AIJ134: From Stay-at-Home Mom to Successful Multifamily Investor - with Jennifer Barner

Apartment Investing Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 34:49


Jennifer is a stay-at-home mom of four that turned real estate investor as her kids were heading off to college.  After doing eleven transactions her first year, she now is a GP of 202 doors, invested as an LP in another 533, and has a mix of single-family and small MF that she self manages.  She is eager to continue to grow her business with a goal of reaching 1000 doors within the next couple of years. Jennifer has a passion for teaching others and encourages you to reach out should you need assistance getting started or simply wish to connect.Join Our Passive Investor NetworkDownload Our Passive Investor Guide to Multifamily SyndicationsWE DISCUSS:Where she first learned about real estate.The challenges she faced early on.How she got her 72-unit multifamily deal.If she brings capital partners to her single-family flips.The details of her 130-unit deal in North Carolina.The debt structure of the deal.Her biggest challenge.Her biggest win.Her best advice for someone just starting.KEY QUOTE:“It's better to invest in your education than lose it on your first deal."CONNECT WITH OUR GUEST:Email jennifer@lighthouse-ventures.comCONNECT WITH US! Visit our Website: https://www.canovocapital.com/podcastConnect with us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/apartmentinvestingjourney/?modal=admin_todo_tourFollow us on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCpmNIzpEzxGn5ZuNgjAVV-w/featuredFollow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/apartmentinvestingjourney/Listen on Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/apartment-investing-journey/id1464256464LOVE THE SHOW? PLEASE SUBSCRIBE, RATE, REVIEW & SHARE

Loving Liberty Radio Network
11-03-2021 CSC Talk Radio with Beth Ann

Loving Liberty Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 50:49


"DID YOU HEAR THE NOISE, NOISE, NOISE?" (audio may be muted during commercial breaks) CSCTalkRadio.com is a nationally syndicated LIVE RADIO talk show heard around the world M-F @ 10:06 AM CT and streamed 24/7 CSC Talk Radio, PO Box 73, California, MO 65018 573-796-2166 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/loving-liberty/support

Jeff Styles America
Chattanooga Drive In Show - S1E24 - 11/4/21

Jeff Styles America

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 80:09


In case you haven't made any plans for the weekend yet, it's Thursday! Start planning! New episodes posted: Mornings, M-F, at 5am eastern. Don't forget, you can call or text us with comments, concerns, funny things, argumentative things.. we love it all.... 423-301-9229 (this is not a live line... it's for messages and texts only..thanks!) We are a daily podcast delivering entertaining information and informative entertainment with a focus on our beautiful home town, Chattanooga!! We are the Tri-State Region's Drive-In Theater...of the mind... featuring the voice of our city's morning commute for 3 decades, "The Commuticator", Jeff Styles Co-Hosts: Jen Lambert, Russell Stroud, Dave Hooker Producer: Bryan Stone Contributors: Jeff Greenspan & Taft Sibley In one hour you'll be informed, warned, entertained and brain-sprained. Streaming on: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, RadioCast, Stitcher, Facebook, Spotify, Anchor, Breaker, CastBox, OverCast, Pocket Casts, Radio Public - wherever you go for quality podcasts. Membership has privileges: Sponsor, advertise, subscribe and get MUCH more. Investment opportunities available! Please email chattaoogadriveinshow@gmail.com for information.

The Eddie Trunk Podcast
Kevin Shirley

The Eddie Trunk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 90:26


This week on The Eddie Trunk Podcast, Eddie brings you his interview with producer Kevin Shirley  to discuss his career and working with a number of bands including Journey, Iron Maiden, RUSH, Joe Bonamassa and a whole lot more! Catch Eddie Trunk every M-F from 2:00-4:00pm ET on Trunk Nation on SiriusXM Volume Channel 106.And don't forget to follow Eddie on Twitter  and Instagram!

Jeff Styles America
Chattanooga Drive In Show - S1E23 - 11/3/21

Jeff Styles America

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 75:27


We are a daily podcast delivering entertaining information and informative entertainment with a focus on our beautiful home town, Chattanooga!! We are the Tri-State Region's Drive-In Theater...of the mind... featuring the voice of our city's morning commute for 3 decades, "The Commuticator", Jeff Styles Co-Hosts: Jen Lambert, Russell Stroud, Dave Hooker Producer: Bryan Stone Contributors: Jeff Greenspan & Taft Sibley In one hour you'll be informed, warned, entertained and brain-sprained. Streaming on: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, RadioCast, Stitcher, Facebook, Spotify, Anchor, Breaker, CastBox, OverCast, Pocket Casts, Radio Public - wherever you go for quality podcasts. Mornings, M-F, starting at 5am EST. Membership has privileges: Sponsor, advertise, subscribe and get MUCH more. Investment opportunities available! Please email chattaoogadriveinshow@gmail.com for information.

Jeff Styles America
Chattanooga Drive In Show - S1E22 - 11/2/21

Jeff Styles America

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 79:16


Happy Tuesday! We are a daily podcast delivering entertaining information and informative entertainment with a focus on our beautiful home town, Chattanooga!! We are the Tri-State Region's Drive-In Theater...of the mind... featuring the voice of our city's morning commute for 3 decades, "The Commuticator", Jeff Styles Co-Hosts: Jen Lambert, Russell Stroud, Dave Hooker Producer: Bryan Stone Contributors: Jeff Greenspan & Taft Sibley In one hour you'll be informed, warned, entertained and brain-sprained. Streaming on: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, RadioCast, Stitcher, Facebook, Spotify, Anchor, Breaker, CastBox, OverCast, Pocket Casts, Radio Public - wherever you go for quality podcasts. Mornings, M-F, starting at 5am EST. Membership has privileges: Sponsor, advertise, subscribe and get MUCH more. Investment opportunities available! Please email chattaoogadriveinshow@gmail.com for information.

My Amazon Guy
How to Combat Inflation, COGs Going ⬆️, Amazon FBA Q&A with My Amazon Guy, Ask Any Question

My Amazon Guy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 70:55


00:00 Intro11:22 A+ content is down12:01 My own Walmart account was suspended12:37 Did you guys see my rant12:59 Amazon Aggregators: Boosted13:46 One of our clients, Casely - Voted as No.17 Fastest Growing Company14:39 Restock Limits - FBA has caught up17:27 My Amazon Guy is hiring18:25 Would a good time raise price a few days prior to black Friday - the leave it raised till the New Year19:27 Launched our 14th product a month ago. Enrolled in Vine but 0 claims. Zero views on product heavy ad cost. The product will flop w/o at least 1 positive review21:23 Testimonial: We used MAG a year ago to help w/ a seller support nightmare. Your team resolved the problem in 72hours. Worth every penny. Thanks21:35 What do you think about having one campaign w/ the same KW w/ Up & Down and another that is Down only22:55 Been changing my pics. Can you please take a look and assess the order and relevance. ASIN: B09B4RSDMD27:46 Where do you see in 3-5 years from now, AMZ 3rd party sellers be? Do you think it'll explode, or be much harder to sell31:22 In the Brand Catalog Manager, we are listed in Office ProductsB09G4LSGQN, STUDIO ELEVE22, Office Products but in the Regular Catalog of AMZ we are in Arts Crafts & Sewing34:03 In Ads Manager, how do you delete portfolios34:53 For the verbiage in A+ content, do you have to use exact phrases, or just a word salad, to index35:50 Any recommendations  for product insurance36:35 What happens if you just straight up put in KWs or phrases in your A+ content and not even make them into cogent sentences38:10 We are brand registered, have access to A+ but the brand baseboard section w/ analytics is missing39:05 How did you grow and gain clients when you started your agency44:11 Not seeing the new brand catalog manager like your recent video showed, do we need to ticket for access44:28 Even if we have a lot of stock in AMZ FBA, do you suggest doing MF also till the new year45:04 We can't connect/link our seller central to our brand registry45:30 Given that AMZ recognizes plurals, is there any benefit to putting both words in your title or listing if each word has a high search volume46:46 Other than Helium10, where do you go for product ideas48:22 All the components of my product come from the US and CA. That being the case, do you still think ordering a year supply of inventory is necessary48:55 Can you explain the AMZ vs Walmart graph49:20 How do I set up to make sure the returned products are not going back to the inventory again50:29 If AMZ lose my inventory, how do they decide on how much to reimburse50:54 ASIN review: B082XGW8CJ52:14 Do video ads usually have the highest ROAS for you52:36 Do you have any supplement clients? If yes, what is their ad spend54:32 Our DE account was suspended because we haven't successfully registered VAT number this July, and our US account was related to DE account and got suspended too55:04 I can't add videos to my listings in France1:01:06 What is a normal return rate for hair tool products like hair dryers or curling irons1:01:30 I have my UPC in my logo on my product, can I send in inventory just like that or do I have to sticker it w/ the FNSKU1:01:56 Who should I call to set up full service? Do your team handle the A+ photos and content if I send you products1:02:35 Do I need my own personal documents ready such as a passport or bank statement for AMZ when opening multiple Seller Central Accounts w/ multiple LLCs in Wyoming1:03:14 How do I get in touch w/ your company? And are you AMZ approved1:04:04 I can't load up UPCs in our EU account because our UPCs are shared by both our EU and US accountsSupport the show (https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/myamazonguy)

Jeff Styles America
Chattanooga Drive In Show - S1E21 - 11/1/21

Jeff Styles America

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 41:55


Happy Monday!! WE HAVE A VERY SPECIAL GUEST TODAY: MR. STAN SEWELL, CHATTANOOGA'S INTERNAL CITY AUDITOR. We are a daily podcast delivering entertaining information and informative entertainment with a focus on our beautiful home town, Chattanooga!! We are the Tri-State Region's Drive-In Theater...of the mind... featuring the voice of our city's morning commute for 3 decades, "The Commuticator", Jeff Styles Co-Hosts: Jen Lambert, Russell Stroud, Dave Hooker Producer: Bryan Stone Contributors: Jeff Greenspan & Taft Sibley In one hour you'll be informed, warned, entertained and brain-sprained. Streaming on: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, RadioCast, Stitcher, Facebook, Spotify, Anchor, Breaker, CastBox, OverCast, Pocket Casts, Radio Public - wherever you go for quality podcasts. Mornings, M-F, starting at 5am EST. Membership has privileges: Sponsor, advertise, subscribe and get MUCH more. Investment opportunities available! Please email chattaoogadriveinshow@gmail.com for information.

Man Overseas Podcast
Everyday I'm Raking: Business, Leadership, Relationships with Kurt Kristynik

Man Overseas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 123:28


I've wanted Kurt Kristynik as a guest on the podcast for a long time. Interestingly, as Vice President of Buffaloe Floors, Kurt runs a 3rd generation family business—a bit of a black swan considering America's startup craze.Thinking back. I've respected Kurt's business acumen since the day I invited him to speak at our real estate organization almost 20 years ago. A presentation he nailed, by the way, due to his effective communication skills, humility and relatability.Kurt is also Director of Rake City Cypress Baseball, an organization he started from scratch in Spring 2017. The program, located in Cypress, Texas, is where he and wife, Marti, raise their son, Cole, and daughter, Chance.In his spare time, Kurt likes to deer hunt, fish and bar-b-que with friends & fam. In addition to his role as Director of Rake City Cypress Baseball, he operates three high school travel teams every fall and summer.Yet none of that is why I wanted Kurt on the podcast. Don't get me wrong. Operating & growing a family business is no small feat. Nor is building an elite baseball program or raising a beautiful family.But for me, you sit beside Kurt, talking baseball, drinking beers—with or without respect for an arbitrary twenty-one number—or have him pull you "under his giant wing" to remind you the importance of where you came from.Of tradition.Of why relationships don't die, they deepen.Of keeping in contact—regardless where you happen to be in the world.Most importantly, it's Kurt's presence. His way of being that elevates those around him.It's a presence that's always conveyed to me: "You go be you, 'lil bro,' I trust you. Together, we'll get this thing figured out."By the way, Rake City isn't a place, although Alex Bregman may beg to differ. He and several teammates started calling Albuquerque, New Mexico, "Rake City," due to the amount of hitters his hometown produced.For the uninitiated, "rake," in baseball parlance, means frequently barreling that MF! If you need help there, this episode isn't for you. Rake City "prided themselves on playing the game the right way, producing great teammates and young men who are going to be ready for the next levels of baseball and life."

Moms Freedom Maker
081: Why Living For The Weekend Is A Huge Red Flag {and how to avoid it}

Moms Freedom Maker

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 23:28


Be honest, are you living for the weekend more often than not? What if I told you that you're not alone, but that if this trajectory continues, you're doing yourself and the world a huge disservice. Here's why it's a red flag and how you can start embracing M-F, like it's the weekend. 

The Todd Herman Show
Hour 3: Don't Question the New gods

The Todd Herman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 38:31


Rutgers professor Brittany Cooper says “White people are committed to being villains”, “We gotta take these MF'ers out.” // TEXTS & WRAP // PERSONAL NOTE See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Eddie Trunk Podcast

This week on The Eddie Trunk Podcast, Eddie brings you his interview with Motley Crue's and Sixx:AM's Nikki Sixx where they discussed his new book, The First 21: How I Became Nikki Sixx, and much more!Catch Eddie Trunk every M-F from 2:00-4:00pm ET on Trunk Nation on SiriusXM Volume Channel 106.And don't forget to follow Eddie on Twitter  and Instagram!