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BiggerPockets Money Podcast
378: Billion-Dollar Jackpots and the Bright Side of Buying a Lottery Ticket

BiggerPockets Money Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 56:37


“What to do if you win the lottery." This question is getting more online searches than ever before. But what would you do? The wheels start turning as soon as those lucky numbers get picked. You stare down at your ticket in disbelief. Then, you make sure to match the ticket in your hand to the numbers on the screen. You could be staring at a million or billion-dollar prize, and for a second, most of your financial worries start to slip away, soon to be replaced by a new set of challenges. How will you manage it? How much will you owe back in taxes? Should you take the annual payouts or the lump sum? A better question is, “how do I redeem this thing!?”The lottery is played by millions across the United States, hoping to get their hands on the winning prize. But how does the lottery work? Where does the money you spend on a ticket go? And do you really have a chance of ever winning? Carolyn Becker from the California State Lottery knows more than most. She's been working with lottery agencies for years, making sure that winners are genuine players and ensuring that a percentage of the lottery profits go to good causes within the Golden State.She outlines exactly how the lottery works, how the winning numbers are chosen, the philanthropic side of buying a ticket, and what to do when you win millions or billions of dollars at once. She also drops some tips on better ways to play the lottery and why there's a higher chance of you winning than you think. So, if you're buying a ticket in hopes of a billion-dollar jackpot, Carolyn's advice could help!In This Episode We CoverThe history of the lottery and using ticket sales to fund philanthropic causes Why Mega Millions and Powerball jackpots are hitting the billion-dollar mark The actual odds of winning the lottery and the chance of you getting a cash prizeInterest rates and the Federal Reserve's effect on lottery jackpots What to do if you win the lottery and why a financial advisor should be your first hireThe “lottery curse” and why so many winners blow their money after hitting a big winAnd So Much More!Links from the ShowBiggerPockets Money Facebook GroupBiggerPockets ForumsFinance Review Guest OnboardingScott's InstagramMindy's TwitterListen to All Your Favorite BiggerPockets Podcasts in One PlaceApply to Be a Guest on The Money ShowPodcast Talent Search!Subscribe to The “On The Market” YouTube ChannelListen to The “On The Market” Podcast: Spotify, Apple Podcasts, BiggerPocketsCheck Out Mindy's 2022 Live Spending Tracker and BudgetMegamillionsClick here to check the full show notes: https://www.biggerpockets.com/blog/money-378Interested in learning more about today's sponsors or becoming a BiggerPockets partner yourself? Check out our sponsor page!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Chills at Will Podcast
Episode 161 with Matthew Salesses, the Brilliant and Versatile Writer and Educator, and Author of Among Others, The Sense of Wonder, and the Paradigm-Shifting Craft in the Real World

The Chills at Will Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 64:46


Episode 161 Notes and Links to Matthew Salesses' Work       On Episode 161 of The Chills at Will Podcast, Pete welcomes Matthew Salesses, and the two discuss, among other things, his early relationships with writing and language, his latest book (out January 17!), The Sense of Wonder, its connection to real-life events and Korean dramas, its background and themes and implications, and his processes in writing the book and his 2021 smash, Craft in the Real World and its ideas that shift the paradigms of teaching writing in workshops and reevaluating ideas of “relatability,” bias, and audience.    Matthew Salesses is the author of The Sense of Wonder, national bestseller Craft in the Real World, the 2021 finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction Disappear Doppelgänger Disappear, and two other novels. Adopted from Korea, he has written about adoption, race, and Asian American masculinity in The Best American Essays 2020, NPR's Code Switch, the New York Times blog Motherlode, and The Guardian, among other media outlets. BuzzFeed has named him one of 32 Essential Asian American Writers. He lives in New York City, where he is an Assistant Professor of Writing at Columbia University.            Buy Craft in the Real World   Matthew Salesses' Website   The Washington Post Review of The Sense of Wonder-by Ron Charles   New York Times Discussion of Craft in the Real World: Rethinking Fiction Writing and Workshopping by Laila Lalami   At about 7:20, Matt shouts out his launch party on publication day (January 17) for The Sense of Wonder, an event at with “BFF” Kirstin Chen at Books are Magic in Brooklyn at 7pm EST: in-person and on YouTube Live   At about 8:40, Matt describes his relationship with language and books as a kid and ideas of agency and reading fantasy    At about 11:00, Matt describes the scant examples of representation that was available   At about 12:45, Matt describes what he read at school   At about 13:40, Matt traces early moments in his writing career, as well as the omnipresence of books in his house   At about 14:55, Matt responds to Pete's question about who/what his students are reading, and he highlights the resonance of Katie Kiramura's writing   At about 16:20, Matt gives background on the beginnings of The Sense of Wonder, including connections to Jeremy Lin    At about 19:20, Pete and Matt lay out the book's main characters, and Matt explains the cool name for the star basketball player,    At about 20:45, Pete cites the book's epigraph and how the book opens   At about 21:45, Matt explains how Robert Sung and Won Lee, two of the book's main characters, are similar and dissimilar    At about 23:40, Matt and Pete discuss the connections between Powerball! and Robert Sung and their distinct and shared trajectories, including how a woman loved by both, Brit Young, is a dynamic character    At about 26:00, Pete outlines the hysteria that surrounds Won's standout play and Matthew details Won's coach's behavior    At about 28:30, Matthew expands upon how a “scarcity model” plays out in the book with Sung and Won, and how it manifested in Matthew's own life   At about 30:50, Matthew describes the significance of a scene that Pete compliments as “icky,” including   At about 33:00, Carrie Kang is described and her and Won's backstories are laid out as Pete brings up connections to agency as seen in both of Matt's recent books   At about 35:15, Matt describes the “living funeral” done in the book, and how this storyline with Carrie's sister K having Stage IV Cancer mirrors the story of Matt's own wife    At about 37:50, Pete dates himself with a ridiculous movie reference and Matthew talks about the sections in which Carrie lays out basics of K Dramas; his answer touches upon ideas of “audience”   At about 40:30, Pete asks Matthew to define “wonder,” especially as used in the book   At about 41:50, the two discuss the second half of the book, including Matthew's skillful usage of timing and connections to K Drama storylines   At about 44:35, Pete compliments the ending, including the clever and intriguing last sentence of the book   At about 45:00, Pete highlights a profound quote about wonder from K at her “living funeral”   At about 46:25, Matthew responds to Pete's questions about Craft in the Real World and ideas of “unlearning” after Pete's notes the book's immediate appeal to all readers, including its special place among educators   At about 47:35, Pete asks Matthew about the significant example he uses in the book about “query” versus “ask” with dialogue   At about 49:30, Pete notes the book's two-half structure and notes the emphasis on craft as necessarily cultural; Matt speaks to ideas of writing as apolitical or “outside   At about 51:40, Matt and Pete discuss ideas of “know[ing] your audience” and its connection to craft   At about 53:10, Matt describes short-sighted criticisms from Western readers/writers   At about 54:35, Matt and Pete discuss the importance of Gish Jen pointing out a survey/experiment that fleshes out differences in types of literature types, and how Western critics often limit and unfairly criticize Asian and American-writing; Matt also refers to ideas of “hybridity” as stated by Lisa Lowe   At about 56:55, Pete asks about how Matthew runs his workshops and responds to Pete's question about ways in which to keep workshops balanced and    At about 59:00, Matthew shares positive feedback that comes from readers of his book, and Pete shares a quote from the book that sums up its greatness      You can now subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts, and leave me a five-star review. You can also ask for the podcast by name using Alexa, and find the pod on Stitcher, Spotify, and on Amazon Music. Follow me on IG, where I'm @chillsatwillpodcast, or on Twitter, where I'm @chillsatwillpo1. You can watch other episodes on YouTube-watch and subscribe to The Chills at Will Podcast Channel. Please subscribe to both my YouTube Channel and my podcast while you're checking out this episode.    Sign up now for The Chills at Will Podcast Patreon: it can be found at patreon.com/chillsatwillpodcastpeterriehl     Check out the page that describes the benefits of a Patreon membership, including cool swag and bonus episodes. Thanks in advance for supporting my one-man show, my DIY podcast and my extensive reading, research, editing, and promoting to keep this independent podcast pumping out high-quality content!    This is a passion project of mine, a DIY operation, and I'd love for your help in promoting what I'm convinced is a unique and spirited look at an often-ignored art form.    The intro song for The Chills at Will Podcast is “Wind Down” (Instrumental Version), and the other song played on this episode was “Hoops” (Instrumental)” by Matt Weidauer, and both songs are used through ArchesAudio.com.    Please tune in for Episode 162 with Erin Keane, whose RUNAWAY: Notes on the Myths that Made Me, her debut full-length nonfiction book, is a memoir in essays about her parents/pop culture/gender. Erin is also Editor in Chief at Salon Magazine and the author of three collections of poetry.       The episode will air on January 24.  

The Bobby Bones Show
(Mon Full Show) Lunchbox Shares An Update About His Roof + When Have You Been So Close To Winning Something Huge? + Never Gonna Get It: Two-thirds Of Americans Keep One Of These In Their Cars...

The Bobby Bones Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 64:12


Lunchbox shares an update about his roof! Find out if he finally got it fixed...Then, we hear from a listener who was two numbers away from winning the Powerball jackpot. We started to discuss times when we were so close to winning something huge. Hear what they were! Plus, we play 'Never Gonna Get It.' Find out what two-thirds of Americans keep in their cars. Can you guess it correctly?See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KMJ's Afternoon Drive
Friday 1/13 - Election Fraud, Alex Jones & Mega Millions

KMJ's Afternoon Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2023 37:00


Amanda Fleming, who ran for state Assembly last year, then won an election for Firebaugh city clerk in November, has been charged with election fraud.  The Fresno County District Attorney's Office said Fleming, also known as Amanda Speakes, “is alleged to have submitted, under penalty of perjury, a candidate application that represented her Firebaugh business address to be her residential address when she ran for Firebaugh City Clerk in 2022. Fleming's true residential address is outside the City of Firebaugh, which would have disqualified her from running for the City Clerk position.”  Piers Morgan Has A Heated Interview With Rambling Alex Jones 10 Years After Viral CNN Argument  With the risk of fentanyl overdoses on the rise among teens, one Valley school district is aiming to prevent a tragedy on-campus.  If you like to daydream about what you'd do with a billion-dollar payday, Powerball and Mega Millions lotteries are giving you more chances than ever: for several reasons, eye-popping jackpots are much more likely to happen now than they were in recent years.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Live Like the World is Dying
S1E56 - This Year in the Apocalypse 2022

Live Like the World is Dying

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 59:05


Episode Summary Brooke and Margaret recap the passed year of horrifying events, from climate collapse, to inflation economics, to developments with Covid, mass shooting, why the police continue to suck, culture wars, bodily autonomy, why capitalism ruins everything, as well as a glimpse of what could be coming this next year both hopeful and dreadful in This Year in the Apocalypse. Host Info Margaret can be found on twitter @magpiekilljoy or instagram at @margaretkilljoy. Brooke is just great and can be found at Strangers helping up keep our finances intact and on Twitter or Mastodon @ogemakweBrooke Publisher Info This show is published by Strangers in A Tangled Wilderness. We can be found at www.tangledwilderness.org, or on Twitter @TangledWild and Instagram @Tangled_Wilderness. You can support the show on Patreon at www.patreon.com/strangersinatangledwilderness. Next Episode Hopefully will come out Friday, Jan. 31st. Transcript This Year in the Apocalypse 2022 Brooke 00:15 Hello and welcome to Live Like the World is Dying, your podcast for what feels like the end times. I'm Brooke Jackson, your co-host for this episode, along with the indomitable Margaret killjoy. Margaret 00:27 Hiiii Brooke 00:28 We have something extra special for you. Hi, Margaret. You might be familiar with the monthly segment we started in 2022: This Month in the Apocalypse, and today we will take that into a sub segment: This Year in the Apocalypse. But, first we have to shout out to another member of the Channel Zero network of anarchists podcasts, but playing a little jingle from one of our comrades, Boo doo doo doo, doo doo. Brooke 01:18 And we're back. So, before I tell people about this extra special episode, I want to officially say "Hello," to my co host, Margaret. Hi, Margaret. Margaret 01:36 Hello, how are you? Brooke 01:38 I'm doing okay. How are you doing? Margaret 01:42 I'm doing terrible, and I'm not going to talk about it. Brooke 01:45 Okay, that's fair. That sounds like me most of the time. Okay, well, speaking of terrible, how did the last year treat you now that we've flipped the calendar? Is there anything you would like to say to the year 2022? Margaret 01:59 You know, it's fine. It's just the year 2020 part three. As far as the other parts of the year 2020, it's been...it was chiller, then parts one and two. Not from a climate point of view, but from a fascism point of view. Brooke 02:21 Oh, okay. That's a good point. Well, I feel like 2022 as with most years....Sorry. What, Margaret? Margaret 02:30 Everything's fine. Nothing bad happened. That's the end of the episode. Brooke 02:33 Always. Margaret 02:34 Everything's good. Brooke 02:35 Okay, cool. Well, this has been a fun recording. Yeah. Well, as with most years, in the last decade, I say, "Fuck you to 2022," and would like to burn it all down. So, we have that going for us. Margaret 02:51 Alright, fuck you, 2022. I do that when I leave a state. Brooke 02:58 You say, "Fuck you," to the State behind you? Margaret 02:59 Yeah, yeah. Brooke 03:01 Even even Oregon, even when you came to visit us out here? Margaret 03:05 Why would I? Why would Oregon be any different? Brooke 03:08 Because some of the people you love are in Oregon. Margaret 03:16 Whatever, fuck you too....I mean, many of the people I love were also in the year 2022. Brooke 03:21 Okay, all right. You got me. Margaret 03:24 Okay. Brooke 03:24 One point: Margaret , zero points: Brooke. Margaret 03:26 Yep, that's what I was saying. Brooke 03:27 Yeah. So. So, I was thinking about how we do this extra fun, special episode of This Year in the Apocalypse. And being typical Brooke, I was like, let's come up with a very orderly fashion in which to do this. I shall take all of the months and pick one thing per month, and we shall be organized. And spoiler alert for the audience. Margaret and I came up with separate lists. We haven't seen each other's lists. We don't know what each other shittiest things are. Margaret 03:53 Wait, I didn't pick the shittiest things. I just picked stuff. Brooke 03:56 Oh, damn, I pick the shitty stuff. Margaret 04:00 Okay, well, I tried to go with a little bit of, there's not a lot of hope in here. There's a little bit of hope in here. Brooke 04:08 It's funny, because when I was thinking about this, I was like, oh, Margaret should do the happy stuff, because Margaret does Cool People. And I can be the the Roberts Evans, everything's bastards side of the simulation. Margaret 04:20 Okay, well, it's a good thing we're figuring this out right now, on air. Brooke 04:23 Right? Margaret 04:24 Okay. So, we'll start with your month by month and then I'll interject? Margaret 04:28 That's fine. Brooke 04:28 Super fun. Yeah. And like a disclaimer on the month by month is that not all months were created equal. So, it's like, whatever the shittiest thing in one month, maybe, you know, way shittier than next month. That's annoying to like, try and compare them in that way. It was a silly way for me to do it, but.. here we are. Brooke 04:30 All right. flashing back 12 months to January, 2022: America hit a million COVID cases with Omicron surging, so Good job America. COVID ongoing and bad. Margaret 05:04 We're number one. Brooke 05:06 Yeah. The other the other real shitty, horrible thing in January was inflation, which technically was pretty crappy in 2021, as well. But we started feeling it more in January like that's when it started hitting and then was kind of ongoing throughout this year as businesses responded to the inflation, had to start raising prices and stuff. Well, had to...some had to, some chose to because they could get away with it. Margaret 05:34 Should I? I wrote down all the inflation numbers for the end of the year. Brooke 05:39 Yeah, baby. Margaret 05:41 The OECD, which stands for something something something, it's a group of 38 countries that sit around and talk about how great they are, or whatever economic something, something. You think I would have written it down. They do. They calculate inflation for their member countries, based on the Consumer Price index. It averaged. This is as of October, the report in December, talks about it as of October, it averaged about 10.7% overall inflation across these 38 countries in the last year. Food averaged at...I wrote down 6.1%. But, I actually think it was slightly higher than that. I think I typo-ed that. Brooke 06:22 In the US was closer to 8%. Margaret 06:26 Yeah, and then, okay. More developed nations saw this all a little bit lower the G7, which is the Group of Seven, it's the seven countries who have the elite cool kids club, and try and tell everyone what to do. Their overall inflation was 7.8%, as compared to the 10.7%. Inflation in the US actually tapered off most than most other countries, probably because we fuck everyone else over, but I couldn't specifically tell you. Inflation is a bit of a black box that even the people who know what inflation is don't really understand. And, energy inflation in general was the most brutal. Italy saw 70% energy inflation in the last year. It was 58%. In the UK, it was 17% in the US. So energy, inflation is actually outpacing even food inflation. And most of the food inflation, as we've talked about, at different times on this is caused by rising costs of fertilizer and like diesel and things like that. Yeah, that's what I got about inflation. There was a lot of it. It's technically tapering off a little bit in the United States. Just this moment. Brooke 07:41 Yeah, I was actually listening to a economics report about that yesterday about how it's tapering off a little bit. The extra shitty thing that happened in February, which added to the drastically increasing fuel prices and food prices, was that fucking Russia invaded Ukraine,and started bombing shit there. Margaret 08:04 Boo. Brooke 08:06 And that that might win as...if we're taking a poll here of all of the worst things that happened in the last year, I kind of feel like that, you know, that's got to be one of the top three. Margaret 08:16 It's, it's up there. Yeah. Even in terms of its effects on the rest of the world, even like, if you're like, on a, well, what do I care about what two European countries are doing? Because, but it affects the shit out of the global south. Ukraine in particular, and also Russia providing a very large percentage of the grain and wheat that goes to, especially Africa. So, yeah, a lot of the energy inflation in the rest of Europe is also a direct result of Russian imperialism. Brooke 08:47 Yeah, it's pretty...it's fucked up a lot of stuff. There was another shitty thing that happened before that happened in February, which is what the Olympics began. And you know, Boo the Olympics. Yeah. So then we then we moved into March and there was this thing called COVID. And then there was this bad inflation happening and then this war over in Ukraine, but then we also, in Florida decided to pass a bill, the nicknamed 'Don't Say Gay' bill. Margaret 09:18 Yeah. I can't believe that was less than a year ago. That was like eight culture wars ago. Brooke 09:26 I know, because I got some of the other ones coming up here. And it was like, oh, fuck, that's still a thing. And then moving into April, so, there was like this war going on, and inflation was bad, and people were dying of this pandemic that we were living in, and then also, the Johnny Depp vs Amber Heard trial began. And that might not seem like one of the shittiest things, but for like anyone who's been a survivor of domestic violence, and the way that trial it seemed like you know, every social media platform like you were getting like ads for it. Right? I know, other people talked about this, like everyone was seeing all these ads for news reports on it. It was like way at the top of the list. And, you know, again, domestic abuse survivor, like, I don't, I don't need to be reminded about, you know, this awful ongoing domestic abuse trial. Margaret 10:19 Yeah, yeah, that was, um, I like try to avoid everything that has to do with celebrities, but realizing how much that that like, ties into, I don't know, how we all talk about all of this shit. I have nothing really clever to say besides like, oh, my God, it's so fucked up. And I don't trust mainstream discourse around any of it. Yeah, Brooke 10:39 For sure. We also saw because of climate issues, Lake Mead was dropping to dangerously low levels, starting all the way in April. And I feel like we could have done this whole episode on climate catastrophes that happened in the last year, like This Year in the Apocalypse could have just been climate change. It was a lot. Margaret 11:00 Yes, well, fortunately that will start overriding everything else over the next couple of years. So, you know....One or the other just to Lake thing on my note, Lake Powell, which provides power to 4.5 million people could reach minimum power pool status by July [2023]. So that's a that's an upcoming thing to look forward to. Brooke 11:29 Yay, for the year ahead. Yeah, I don't even know what the status of Lake Mead is right now. I'm sure it's not doing great. And we'll probably start hearing about it again in the spring as it's at dangerously low levels, find more bodies and boats and whatever else. Margaret 11:46 And they're both. Both are on the Colorado River. Yeah, they're both on the Colorado River. Brooke 11:51 Yeah. And if you're not familiar with why Lake Mead matters, John Oliver actually did a really good piece on it on his show that talks about the water rights and stuff. I think it was John Oliver. Maybe it was John Stewart. Margaret 12:07 And if you want to read a terrible...a very good, although misogynist dystopia about what's coming in terms of water rights, there's a book called "The Water Knife" by Paulo [Bacigalupi], whose name last name I don't know how to pronounce. It's an Italian name. I think yeah, Brooke 12:21 I actually have that on my to-read-shelf. Margaret 12:23 Yeah, it's, um, that man should not be allowed to write sex worker characters ever again. Brooke 12:29 Thank you for the notice there on what to expect on that aspect. Margaret 12:34 But other than that, other than that, it's very interesting book. Brooke 12:40 Okay. May brought us a couple of big bad shootings, which is, you know, not again, not to diminish any other school shootings or shootings that happened or the fact that they're going on, you know, all the time in schools, but they were the ones that like, hit the news, really big. There was the Buffalo, New York supermarket shooting that happened. And then the towards the end of the month was that just God awful Robb Elementary School shooting in Texas, that I don't know how everyone else experienced it. But I, as a parent, you know, whose child who's only slightly older than that. It was absolutely horrifying for me and enraging, and I had a lot of feelings about it. And you know, school shootings are always hard to see, but that one in particular... Margaret 13:29 This is the coward cops one, where they kept parents out who were the parents who were trying to like save kids? Brooke 13:33 Yeah, for like 72 minutes or something like that, more than that they were outside the door where the guy was actively shooting on children. Margaret 13:41 This is...the character of American law enforcement was laid bare on that day, is how I feel. I mean, I have many feelings on all of it, but... Brooke 13:53 And that was in Uvalde, Texas, where they have two separate police systems. There is a police system just for the schools there in addition to the town's police. Margaret 14:07 There was that, uh, there was that lawsuit 10,15,20 years ago, something, where a man who was like, I think it was someone who's like stabbing people on the train, you know, just like, just just doing that thing. And, and a man stopped him, stopped the stabby guy while the cops cowered in behind, like they went into, like the driver's compartment of the train, and they just hid from the stabby guy. And the the guy stopped the stabby guy sued...I might have the details of this wrong. Sued and was like, the police have a duty to protect people. And it came back, the judge is like, "Actually they don't, it is literally not the jobs. The police's job is not to protect you. That is not their job." And, the sooner we all realize that the safer we'll be, because the more people will realize that safety is something that we're going to have to build without the infrastructure that pretends to offer a safety, but absolutely does not. And legally is not required to. Brooke 14:21 Yeah, I didn't know all the backstory of that. But, I know that that one went to the Supreme Court. And that became, you know, the national standard, because I remember reading about that part of it that, yeah, they don't, they don't have they don't have a duty to protect. Margaret 15:27 I think it was the stabby guy on the train. But I, you know, I'm not like a classic thing rememberer, it's not like my skill set. I didn't put my points in character creation in memory. Brooke 15:41 Well important thing there is was the the outcome of that. The other big bad shooting I remember making the news pretty loudly this year was also the Highland Park Parade shooting that actually happened in July. So that was a couple of months later. But yeah, good times. Guns. Margaret 15:58 Hurray. [sadly] Brooke 15:59 All right. So, we moved into June. And a couple of things are going on, on the global stage. Flooding began in Pakistan. And that flooding continued for a couple of months. We talked about this on one of our This Month, episodes, and even to right now, there is still flooding. And that flooding that did occur, you know, has displaced 1000s, if not millions of people. And it's really, really fucked things up and continues to fuck things up in Pakistan. Margaret 16:25 And I would say that flooding in general, is one of the things that we're seeing more and more of all over the world. And it's one of the things that like...I think a lot of people and maybe I'm just projecting, but you know, I grew up thinking of floods as sort of a distant thing. And then actually where I lived, most recently, we all had to leave because of constant flooding as climate changed. And I think that floods need to be something....It's the opposite of quicksand. When you're a kid you think about quicksand is like this thing to like, worry about, and then you grow up and realize that like quicksand is like not...don't worry about quicksand. That's not part of your threat modeling. And, so I think that flooding is something that whether or not it was on something that you were really worried about, wherever you live, it is something that you should pay attention to. It's not like, a run out and worry, right. But, it's a thing to be like more aware of, you know, there was recent...New Years in San Francisco and Oakland, there was really bad flooding. And then again, a couple of days later, might still be going on by the time people listen to this, but I'm not actually sure. And you know, there's the footage of people running out with like boogie boards or surfboards or whatever into the streets and, and playing in the flood. And, I'm not actually going to sit here on my high horse and tell people to never go into floodwater, you shouldn't, it is not a thing you should do, but it is a thing that people do. But I think people don't recognize fast moving currents, how dangerous they are, just how dangerous floods are, no matter how they look. And, if there's more than a foot of water, don't drive through it. Brooke 17:58 Yeah, if you're not experienced with floods, those are things you wouldn't know. So I have, you know, you said, that wasn't a big thing in your childhood, but because of where I live, it you know, I don't know if this is true of all the Pacific Northwest, but certainly, in my town, flooding is a big concern, we''re right on a river, and when there was bad rainstorms back in 96', like most of downtown got flooded. I mean, I was I was a kid then. I was I was a youth. And that experience, you know, kind of informed some of my youth, you know, we had a lot of lessons learned about how to manage flooding, what you do and don't do inflooding. So that's something that's been in the forefront of my mind. And yeah, as I see other people dealing with flooding for the first time in the news, it's like, oh, no, no, you don't. No. That's bad. Don't do that. Don't go in those waters. But it's their first time. They wouldn't know. Margaret 18:53 Yeah. Unless you were like, directly saving something or someone, especially someone, and then even then you have to know what you're doing. You know, they're a bigger deal, even smaller ones are a bigger deal than you realize, I guess is the thing to say about floods. Anyway, so Okay, so where are we at? Brooke 19:10 We're still in June, because there was, you know, in addition to the inflation, and the flooding, and the heat waves, and the war going on, and people dying of a pandemic, this little thing happened in the US where the Supreme Court's overturned a little a little old law called Roe v. Wade. Margaret 19:29 That was about two different ways of interacting with water? [joking] Brooke 19:33 Yes, exactly. Ties, ties, right and flooding there. Yeah. It was just a minor... Margaret 19:39 Yeah, that's my joke about people losing their capacity to control their own bodies. Just a little light hearted joke. Very appropriate. Brooke 19:48 As a person with a uterus, I genuinely can't...i can't joke about that one. Like, it's just too close to home. Margaret 19:54 Yeah, fair enough. I'm sorry. Brooke 19:57 No, it's I'm glad that you are, because it is good to laugh about these things that are actually very upsetting. It's how, it's part of our, you know, grieving process, how we deal with it as being able to laugh a little bit. Margaret 20:08 Yeah. Yeah, although and then, you know, okay, so we've had this like, fight, you know, America's polarizing really hard about a lot of very specific issues: people's ability to control the reproductive systems being a very major, one people's ability to control their hormonal systems and the way they present being another one, I'm sure I'll talk about that more. And, you know, the, the weirdly positive thing that happened this week that I started writing notes about, but didn't finish, is about how there's now...they're changing the laws about how the accessibility of abortion pills and so that they're going to be available in more types of stores for more people in the near future. This will not affect people who are in abortion ban states. So it's this polarization, it's becoming easier to access reproductive health and control in some states, and it's becoming harder and illegal to access it in other states. My other like, positive...It's not even a positive spin. It's the glint of light in the darkness is that abortion was illegal for a very long time in the United States, and people did it, and had access to it and not as well, and it is better when it is legal. Absolutely. But underground clinics existed. And people did a lot of work to maintain reproductive health. And now we have access to such better and safer tools for reproductive health, whether you know, it's access to abortion pills, or just everything about reproductive health has...we know a lot more about it as a society than at least medical and Western, you know, methods of abortion. We know a lot more about than we did a couple decades ago. And then, the other big thing that I keep thinking about...so there was the Jane Collective, right, in the US is I'm just like moving into history mode. Is that annoying? Brooke 22:06 Go for it. Margaret 22:07 Teah. It's my other fucking podcast, all history and so like there's the Jane Collective in the US. And they were really fucking cool. And they provided all these abortions to people in Chicago, and they actually pioneered a lot of methods of abortion and pushed forward a lot of important shit, right? In the 1920s, in Germany, anarchists ran more than 200 abortion clinics. Basically, if you wanted an abortion in 1920s, Germany, you went to the syndicalists, you went to the anarcho syndicalists. And because they sat there, and they were like, "Oh, a large amount of crime needs to be done on an organized fashion. And what is anarcho syndicalism? But a way to organize crime?" In this case, usually it's like class war against bosses and illegal strikes and stuff. But, "How do we organize that on a large scale?" And the anarchists were the ones who had the answer answers to, 'How do you organize crime on a large scale,' and I want to know more about that information. I haven't found that much about it in English yet. But, that kind of thing gives me hope. It gives me hope that we can, it's better when it is legal, I'm not being like, this is great, you know, it's fucked up, but we can do this. And, you know, on this very podcast, if you listen to one of the Three Thieves, Four Thieves? Some Number of Thieves Vinegar Collective, Margaret, famous remember of details, they they talk about their work, developing reverse engineering or making accessible, different abortion drugs and how to basically like, create them, and get them to where they need to be, regardless of the legality of those things. But, you might have more to say about this, too. I just wanted to go into history mode. Brooke 23:50 No, I I liked that. And yeah, you did those episodes in a few different ways about it that are super important. I mean, I don't think I need to rehash why Roe is so important. We we know that, you know, and it's not just about reproductive rights for people with uteruses, either. It's about the trends towards you know, bodily autonomy and regulation of bodies. And you know, what that signals as well, it's an issue for everybody. Margaret 24:17 Yeah. And remember, like at the very beginning, some people were like, they might be coming for birth control next, and everyone's like, Nah, they're not coming for birth control. And now you can see the same, the same right wing people who are like, "We should probably just kill the gay people." They like say it and city council meetings. They're also being like, "And birth control on my right, like, fuck that thing?" Brooke 24:36 Yeah. Frustrating. Margaret 24:39 Yeah. Get it out of someone's cold dead hands. Brooke 24:45 Yeah, this is one of those things where the months don't necessarily compare. Yeah. Margaret 24:49 There's that meme....Go ahead. I'm sorry. No, go. Brooke 24:52 We...you know there were historic heat waves going on. Continued flooding and droughts. And all kinds of climate nastiness. And then in, in Tariff Island, we saw a whole bunch of British officials resign, and then Boris Johnson resigning, which, you know, fuck the government and all of those kinds of things, and fuck that guy. But, it did also lead into this, what has been kind of a lot of turmoil in the UK as they've gone through now a couple of different prime ministers and just like, you know, just the the, the sign of the crumbles of how just overwhelmingly corrupt political leaders are, you know, at this point in so called, you know, democratic and stable democracies, that, you know, they're falling apart too. Margaret 25:39 Now, that's a good point. Um, what year did that lady I didn't like die? What day? What month? Queen? Brooke 25:48 I didn't put down the month because that's a happy thing that happened, not a shitty thing. Margaret 25:51 I know. Remember positive things about 2022. And like, stadiums full of like, Irish folks being like, "Lizzie's in a box. Lizzie's in a box." There's like some positive things. Brooke 26:08 I might rewatch some of those after this, just for a little pick me up. Margaret 26:11 Yeah. The people dancing in front of the palace, anyway. Yeah. I don't like colonialism or monarchy. I don't know if anyone knew this about me. Brooke 26:20 Yeah. No, same. I've been trying to explain to my kid about why Queen Elizabeth was bad. And she's having a hard time. Because, you know, children and fantasies and stories and kings and queens, and blah, blah, blah. Margaret 26:32 Yeah. Which is the fucking problem. Brooke 26:34 Yeah, a similar kind of thing happened in August in terms of like, you know, unstable, so supposedly stable governments, in that the the FBI had to raid Mar-a-Lago and Trump which, again, fuck Trump and the FBI and the federal government and all of that, but as a sign of, you know, our democracies actually not being very sound, and how just grossly corrupt politicians are and stuff, the only way they could get back a bunch of confidential documents and like, nuclear related stuff was to fucking invade a former president. Yeah. Also in August Yeah. monkeypox started hitting the news, which of course, speaking of culture was, right, that led into a whole bunch of stuff about, you know, a bunch of anti-gay stuff and reminders of what the AIDS epidemic was like, and just a whole bunch of fucking nonsense up in the news because of that. Margaret 27:32 God, I barely remember that. Brooke 27:34 Right, I think we did it on an episode, a This Month episode. Margaret 27:38 I mean, I remember it now. It's just there's so much. There's so much. Yeah. Yeah. Brooke 27:44 So September brought us protests starting to erupt in Iran. Finally. There was a woman, Masha Amini, who was arrested, you know, they had been doing caravans, were doing these crackdowns and the morality police and stuff. And so that was the start of a bunch of turmoil there that went on for at least three months. It's finally settled down some last month. But that was going on, and then also towards the end of the month hurricane Ian hit in Florida. So, not to make it all about the climate. But again, historic hurricanes and flooding and stuff. Margaret 28:19 Yeah. And these things are related to each other. I mean, like, as you have global insecurity caused by climate, it's going to show all of the cracks in the systems and like, it's hard, because it's like, overall, you know, I see the the attempted revolution, the uprising in Iran is an incredibly positive thing and like reminder of the beauty of the human spirit. And also, like, what happened, the end result of that, that, I don't even want to say, 'end result,' though, right? Because like, every social struggle is going to ebb and flow. And, our action is going to cause reaction. And you know, and whenever people have uprisings, they remember power. They also remember fear, right? And the system is hoping that people remember fear. And the people are hoping that they remember power, you know, and, and it seems impossible to predict which uprisings will lead to fear and which ones will lead to power in terms of even when they're crushed, right? Whether that is the fertile soil for the next rising or whether it you know, has salted the earth to try and keep my metaphor consistent. Brooke 29:43 Nah, mixed metaphors the best. Okay, yeah, it's not a bad thing that people were protesting against what was going on there. It's it's awful that they had to get to that point that the morality police were so bad that they had to start protesting and ongoing conflict and unrest in the Middle East, never ending. Margaret 30:06 And I want to know more. I haven't done enough research on this yet, but another like hopeful thing about, you know, sort of global feminist, radical politics, there's been a recent movement of men in Afghanistan, who are walking out of exams and walking out of different positions that only men are allowed to hold, you know, in schools and things like that, in protest of the fact that of women's disinclusion. Brooke 30:33 Okay, I hadn't heard anything about that. So that's, yeah, We'll have to add that to a This Month, because I want to know more about that too. That sounds really positive. Margaret 30:40 Yeah. Yeah. And I don't know whether it's, you know, happened three times, and it's caught headlines each time or I don't know enough about it to talk about it as a movement. But it matters. That kind of stuff matters. And yeah, it's hopeful. Brooke 30:57 Well, we moved into October and the fall season, and y'all might remember this little one, some South African asshole named Elon Musk, Mosh, Mosk, whatever that guy's name is, Margaret 31:10 He's named after the rodent, the muskrat. Brooke 31:13 Okay, that'll be easy to remember. That guy officially took over at the only social media platform that I don't mostly hate, which is Twitter. A lot of his fucked-up-ness...Nah, he did some of that the first week, that was still in October. And then definitely more came after that. But, he's destroying the microblogging site that we all love so much. Margaret 31:36 Yeah, I will say, my favorite meme that come out of that was basically like, you know what, I've decided that I am okay with Elon Musk being in charge of the exodus of all the rich people to Mars. [Laughs] Brooke 31:50 Yes, winning. Do that quickly. Margaret 31:53 Yeah. He'll fuck it up. Like he fucks everything up. You've seen Glass Onion? Brooke 31:58 Yes, I did. Margaret 32:00 I don't want to like spoil it for people. But, I'll just say that movie did a really good job of pointing out that Elon Musk is just a fucking...is not an intelligent person, is not doing genius things. And it was pointed out really well. Brooke 32:15 Can I point out something embarrassing? Margaret 32:17 Absolutely, it's just you and I here. Brooke 32:21 No one will ever know. I didn't realize when I watched it that that guy was supposed to be a parody of like Elon Musk specifically. I thought it was just like generic, you know, rich people are terrible. And then it wasn't till like after I watched it, and everyone else started watching it and commenting that it was Musk and I was like, "Oh, damn, obviously it is." Margaret 32:42 Yeah, it's the like, the car thing and the space thing are the main nods. I mean, it's at the same time. It could be Bezos it could be any fucking, like tech billionaire asshole. But I think it was, I think it was intentionally Musk. Brooke 32:56 Yeah, I've got to rewatch it with that in mind. I was too busy going, "Oh, it's that guy. It's that actor or actress. Someone I know that person. Enjoy the characters. Yeah. That was a thing that happened in December, but we haven't done November, so November, Powerball made some poor asshole into a billionaire. So I feel bad for that guy. Yeah. So the Powerball, nobody had won it for like three months, and the pot got up to like $2 billion. And a single a single person had the winning ticket when it was finally pulled. Which, if they take the cash payout, which I think most people do, it's actually only $1 billion. And then, probably the government takes that. So you're only half a billionaire, probably by the time all is said and done. But still, that's, you know, what a way to fuck up the rest of your existence by suddenly having that much money. Margaret 33:51 I'm like, I'd take a shot. Brooke 33:56 I like to think, you know, I have this list of all these nice things that I would do and people I would support and love, but the evidence bears out that anyone who's ever won something like that doesn't make all the great choices. Margaret 34:09 No, no. Okay. Yeah, I think you need to have a council of people who direct...I think that any anarchist who's like, possibly going to end up rich, like, whether through inheritance or becoming the next Stephen King or whatever needs to, like, seriously consider how the dealing with that money should be a collective effort and not an individual effort. Anyway. Brooke 34:35 I agree. Yeah. Margaret 34:36 I went through this when, at one point, I did not get...I did not become a millionaire. But, at one point, Hollywood was interested in one of my my books, and we had long conversations about it. I had conversations with the Hollywood director around it, about whether or not they would adapt a certain book of mine into a TV show. And it didn't work out in the end. But, I like sat there and mathed it out and was like, oh, if they make it TV show out of my book, I will become a millionaire. And like, what would that mean? And, and so that's when I started having these, like, which just totally the same as winning the Powerball and having a billion dollars, and also not just not my weird...I don't know, whatever. Now everyone knows this. Brooke 35:16 I don't think that's a unique thing. Yeah, so that happened in November. And that sucks. And it didn't make the news the way it should have. So I just wanted to highlight that horribleness. And then, also that orange clown douchebag potato that lives in Florida, said that he's going to run for president again. So, we have that to look forward to. But, then the third thing that happened, which isn't just isolated to November, but the World Cup started, and I have nothing against football, love football, the World Cup as a concept. Fine, but there are so many problems, much like the Olympics, with the way they do it. And what happens around all that. Margaret 36:00 Yeah, yeah, I love...I love that I should be able to like a lot of things. And then the way that they're done by our society precludes me from really deeply enjoying them. Brooke 36:10 Why do you have to take such a nice thing and ruing it. Margaret 36:13 All things. All things. You could name anything, and we could talk about how capitalism and fucking imperialism ruined it. Brooke 36:20 Yeah, pretty much. Down with those systems. Alright, so now we're finally getting into the end. You'll remember this one, because it was only like a month ago that there were some targeted attacks in North Carolina on power stations. 40,000 people without power for several days, in fact, it wasn't like a quick fix thing. They really fucked some shit up there. One that I didn't hear about, but that has some pretty big implications is that the country of Indonesia banned sex outside of marriage, even for foreigners living in their country, and stuff. Brooke 36:54 Yeah. So, I don't know if the ramifications for that are. I didn't dig deeper into like, what is the consequence of you doing that. But you know, Indonesia's massive. I mean, that populations huge. Margaret 36:54 I had no idea. Margaret 37:05 Yeah, Lousiana just banned, as of I think January 1, you're not allowed to access porn on the internet from Louisiana without showing a government ID to the website. Which, means that now everyone, basically they passed a law saying you have to install a VPN in order to access porn in Louisiana. Brooke 37:27 That's madness. Margaret 37:29 Yeah, and it fucks up sex workers, right? Like any of this stuff, any of this bullshit, it always just fucks sex workers. Brooke 37:39 Yeah, they become the victims of the law, even though they're not, they're not the bad guys here. And in porn, they're never the bad guys, Pro sex workers. My last horrible thing that happened in December was that China decided to just completely give up on all of its COVID protocols that it spent the whole year continuing to be super restrictive, and have lock downs and all of that. And then all of a sudden, it's just like, "No, we're not gonna do any of that anymore." Oh, just a great way to change policy is just to stop completely all of a sudden. Yeah. Margaret 38:15 I just think it's really funny, because it's like, what? Sometimes people like really talk about how they want like a multipolar world where there's like, it's like what people use to defend the USSR, right, is that they're like, well, at least, there was someone competing with the US or whatever. But, when I think about COVID response, there was always like the US response, which was absolute dogshit. And then there was the Chinese response, which was like, too authoritarian and caused a lot of suffering and all of these things, but, was not a non response. And now, that one has fallen as well. And there's just like, I mean, there's more countries than the US and China. I'm reasonably sure. I couldn't promise. So, hurray, we're in it. We're just in it. That's...this is just COVID world now. It's COVID's world. We just live in it. Brooke 39:13 Yeah, exactly. So I think you had some, like bigger overarching trends of things that happened in 2022. Margaret 39:21 A lot of the stuff I have is a little bit like what we have to look forward to. Brooke 39:26 Oh, nice. Margaret 39:27 Just some like nice, light stuff. The National Farmers Union in the UK says that the UK is on the verge of a food crisis. Brooke 39:35 Great. Margaret 39:36 Yields of tomatoes and other crops, especially energy intensive ones like cucumbers and pears are at record lows. And there's already an egg shortage in the UK, and a lot of places where there were stores are rationing sales of eggs, you can only buy so many eggs at any given time. And, it's not because there's no chickens. It's that rising costs of production have convinced more and more farmers...it's a capitalism thing in this like really brutal way. It's the markets logic, right? If it costs too much to produce a thing, don't produce it. But, when the thing you do is produce food, there's some problems here. Brooke 40:13 Are there? Margaret 40:14 And I mean, I'm a vegan. And I got to admit, when I hear things like, they're cutting back beef production, because it costs too much. I'm like, that's good. That is good for animals. And that is good for the climate. However, that's not being replaced with more of other types of foods. So it's not necessarily good. Brooke 40:33 And if Casandra were here, and she has very restrictive things on what she can eat, because of her health, she would be jumping in to say, "But protein!" because she needs to be able to have access to that. Margaret 40:45 No, totally. And I'm not trying to, I'm not like specifically pushing for a vegan world. And I recognize that everyone's bodies are different, and have different needs around a lot of things. But, I do think that data shows fairly clearly that the level of animal agriculture that we do, especially in centralized ways, across the world is a major driver of climate change. And, it is a major driving of a lot of really bad stuff. It's just a very inefficient way to produce food for a large number of people. This is different at different scales. And I am not, I'm not specifically trying to advocate for...Yeah, I don't think a vegan world is a good or just idea. I think it is perfectly natural for people to eat animals. However, I think that there's both needless suffering that can be cut back and as well as like, just specifically from a climate change point of view. So... Brooke 41:39 I hear you. Margaret 41:39 That said, UK, dealing with egg shortage. Basically, farmers might stop selling milk because of production...that it cost so much to produce the milk. Not like, I'm sure there's still farmers who are going to produce milk. But, more and more farmers are stopping. Beet farmers are considering the same. There's also just literally about 7000 fewer registered food production companies in the UK than three years ago. Brooke 42:04 Wow. Margaret 42:05 Because at least in the UK, fertilizer costs have tripled since 2019. And diesel costs are up at about...both feed and diesel costs are up about 75% from what they were before. Shortages. The infant formula shortage might last until Spring according to one major formula producer. We very narrowly avoided a major disruption as a result of a diesel shortage in the United States recently. Basically, they like brought more diesel plants...I don't know the word here, refineries? Refineries, like online kind of at the last minute, like because there was going to be like really major disruptions in the way that we move food and other things around the United States because of diesel shortages. Let's see what else... Brooke 43:00 Have...I'm super curious here, have food shortages in the UK ever caused problems of any kind? It seems like that's not a big deal. Like they're...they can deal with that. Right? That hasn't killed anyone, right? Margaret 43:10 Ireland's not part of the United Kingdom. [laughs] Yeah, yeah. No, it's okay. I mean, it's interesting, because like, modern farming has really changed the face of famine. Famine used to be a very common part of...I can actually only speak to this in a very limited context, it's like something that came up in my history research, like Napoleon, the middle one, or whatever. I can't remember. Probably the second, maybe the third I'm not sure. The Napoleon who like took over and like 1840...8? Someone is mad at me right now. In France, who modernized Paris and made it like, impossible to build barricades and shit. Brooke 43:52 We can FaceTime, Robert, real quick and find out. Margaret 43:55 Yeah, yeah, totally. And, but one of the things that he did, or rather, that happened under his reign as a part of 19th century development, is that famine had been a very major common regular part of French life. And it ceased to be, and famine is something that the modern world, developed parts of the modern world, have been better at minimizing as compared to like, some historical stuff. Obviously, a lot of this just gets pushed out into the developing world. And you know, famine is a very major part of a great number of other countries' existence. But, I think that people get really used to the idea that famine doesn't really happen. And it does, and it can again, and it's similar what you're talking about, like we have this like, kind of unshakable faith in our democracies. But, they are shakable they, they they shake. Brooke 43:56 They've been shooked. Margaret 44:48 Yeah, they're They are not stirred. They're shaken. Okay. Okay, so other stuff: Pfizer's currently working on an RSV vaccine. I consider that positive news. My news here is about a month old. It's been given the like, go ahead for further studies and shit and, and that's very promising because we're in the middle of a triple-demic or whatever. But there's actually been as a weird positive thing. I mean, obviously, we've learned that society does not know how to cope with pandemics. But, one thing is we have learned a lot more about a lot of health stuff as a result of this, you know, and the types of new vaccines that people are able to come up with now are very, they're very promising. And a fun news, as relates to the climate change thing that's happening, more and more Americans are moving to climate at risk areas. Specifically, people are leaving the Midwest. And they're moving to the Pacific Northwest and Florida. And these are two of the least climatically stable from a disaster point of view areas in the United States. Brooke 46:04 Okay. Margaret 46:05 Specifically, specifically because of wildfire in the Pacific Northwest, and hurricanes in Florida. Also earthquakes on the West Coast and things like that, but specifically wildfire. And also within those areas, a thing that causes...humans have been encroaching into less developed areas at a greater rate. And this is part of what causes, obviously the fires are getting worse out west as a result of climate change, but it's also the way in which new communities are developed out west that is causing some of the worst damages from fires. So yeah, everyone's moving to those places. That's not a good idea in mass. I'm not telling individuals who live in those places to leave. And there's actually, you know, the Pacific Northwest has some like stuff going on about fairly stable temperature wise, and for most climate models, but this is part of why disasters are impacting more and more Americans as people are leaving the places to move to places where it's greater risk. Yeah, there's this map, just showing where people are leaving and where people are going to. And it's actually, there are other places that people are going to that would have surprised me like, Georgia, North Carolina, parts of Tennessee, like kind of like Southern Appalachian kind of areas, like more and more people are moving towards, and more and more people are leaving upstate New York, which really surprised me. But, and more people are leaving North Texas and moving to Southeast Texas, or like the general eastern part of Texas is growing very rapidly. Okay, what else have I got? Taiwan has set up a set group called the Doomsday Preppers Association, which is just sick, because it's called the Doomsday Preppers Association. And it's like, not a wing nut thing. And they have a wing nut name which rules, I'm all for it. There's about 10,000 people or so who are organizing together to prepare for natural disasters, and also to prepare for the potential invasion from China. Which, China's back to threatening to, to do that. And it's but, it's like people just like getting together to like, build networks, learn radios, and just like, be preppers, but in a, like, normalized way, and it's fucking cool. And, I'd love to see it here. Okay. What else? I don't have too many notes left. Florida, is expected to have major wildfires starting in 2023 according to the National Interagency Fire Center report, as well as Georgia, New Mexico and Texas. I'm willing to bet that New Mexico and Texas in particular, and probably Georgia, that's probably...those are very big states with very different bio regions within them. And, so I couldn't point you, if you live in one of those places, you might want to look for the National Interagency Fire Center Report, and read more about it. Brooke 48:56 Speaking of moving, it's a great time to get the fuck out of Florida. With like, I could have done almost every month something just atrocious happened in Florida. Margaret 49:06 Yeah. And one of the things that, you know, we talked a little bit about the culture war stuff. One of the things that's happened in 2023, overall, is that we've started to see more political refugees from within the United States to the United States. We have seen a lot of trans families, or families of trans children, have had to leave states where their providing medical care for their children has become criminal. Obviously also with the end of Roe v. Wade, a lot of people have had to change which state they live in. Although, I don't like doing this like comparison thing, because it's just fucked for everyone, but you can you can vacation your way out of pregnancy. You know? Brooke 49:50 I don't know that I've heard it described that way, but... Margaret 49:54 But if you want to be a 13 year old on hormone blockers, or whatever that you need in order to stay safe, a lot of people are moving, and a lot of people can't move. And there's really complicated questions that we all have to ask ourselves right now about like, stay and go. And like, like stay and fight, versus get the fuck out. And everyone's gonna have to make those questions differently. Okay, another positive thing a weird, like positive tech thing... Brooke 50:20 Yay positive. Margaret 50:22 So like I own, and I recommend it to people who spend a lot of time off grid or out outside the range of cell service. I own like a Garmin satellite communicator, it's a little tiny device, it looks like a tiny walkie talkie. And it can talk to satellites. And I can like text from anywhere in the world, I can see the sky, whether or not I have cell service. And more importantly than that, I can send an SOS. And these are fairly expensive things, they cost a couple hundred dollars. And then you have to sign up for service. And they make sense for people who are like backpacking a lot or driving in areas where there's no, you know, service or whatever, right? New new phones, specifically the iPhone 14, I hate to be like, I'm not telling everyone to run out get new phone, but as a trend is very positive, that some new phones have this already built in. So you won't need to have a separate device. And I think that is a very positive thing from a prepper point of view, to have access to a way to communicate when cell service is not there. Yeah, that is really important. And I have one final thing and it's very positive. Brooke 51:29 Okay, I'm ready. Margaret 51:30 It's actually a double edged sword. On January 5, I'm cheating. This was in 2023. On January 5, 2023, this current year, like last week, yesterday, as we record this, two assholes in Bakersfield, California tried to set an Immigration Services Center on fire, like it was a center that like, um, I mean, ironically, it helped undocumented folks or like immigrant folks pay income taxes, and like helped people navigate the paperwork of being immigrants, you know, because there's actually something that people don't know, all these like, right wing pieces of shit, is that like, undocumented people, like, many of them pay taxes. I don't know. Whereas a lot of the people who like to talk all kinds of shit about undocumented people, don't pay taxes. Anyway, whatever. What were you gonna say? Sorry. Brooke 52:16 Oh, just this, that as an economist, as a group, undocumented people pay more into the system than they as a group take out of the system. Margaret 52:25 That makes a lot of sense. So, there's an Immigration Services Center. Two assholes, tried to set it on fire. They set themselves on fire, fled the scene on fire and left their cell phone at the scene. The reason it's double edged is, because one it sucks that people attack this and they actually did do damage to the center as well, mostly to some equipment used by someone who ran I believe a carwash out of that shared some space or whatever. But yeah, they like poured accelerant everywhere. And then a guy just like, knelt down over the pool of accelerant and like, lit it. And then just like, his, like, his leg was on fire. So, his friend ran over to help and like got caught on fire too. And then, they just both like, ran out of range of, because it's all caught on camera, you know? And fuck them. And I hope that their fucking wounds are horrible. And by the time you listen to this, they were probably caught because they left their fucking phone there. And fuck them. That's my light news. Brooke 53:36 I'll take it. Margaret 53:37 Okay, what are you excited for, looking forward? Go ahead. Sorry. Brooke 53:40 Well, hopefully more fascists are gonna light themselves on fire and other types of right wing assholes. I mean, I would be very happy about that happening in 2023 Margaret 53:48 Yeah. May this be the year of Nazis on fire. Brooke 53:54 Yes. Agreed. That would be lovely. I don't know about...I don't know if I have a lot of global stuff that I thought about being positive. I have. I have like personal stuff, like I am going to be doing...hosting more these podcast episodes. I've got one coming up. Maybe this month, we're releasing it? But I did it all by myself. Yeah, more lined up to come out in the next couple of months and some really cool topics and people that I get to chat with. So I'm stoked about that. Margaret 54:21 That is also something I'm excited about for 2023 is that this podcast is increasingly regular and it is because of the hard work of me...No, everyone else. Is the hard work of everyone else who works on this show are like really kind of taking the reins more and more and it is no longer, it's no longer the Margaret Killjoy Show and I'm very grateful and I believe you all will too. And if you're not grateful yet, you will be, because there'll be actual other voices, like ways of looking at things and and more of it because, you know, one person can only do so much. So I'm really grateful for that. Brooke 55:03 I'm excited about this book that's coming out next month, that... Margaret 55:06 Oh, yeah? Brooke 55:07 Some lady I know, wrote it. And, and I got to do some editing work on it. And, it's hilarious and the cover is gorgeous. Margaret 55:17 Is it called "Escape from Incel Island"? Brooke 55:19 Yeah, that one. Margaret 55:22 Is this my plugs moment? Brooke 55:24 Did you know If you preorder it right now, you can get a poster of that gorgeous cover that comes comes with the preordered one? Margaret 55:31 And, did you know that if you preorder it, I get a cut of the royalties when the book is released for all the preorders, which means that I can eat food. Brooke 55:43 Oh, we like it when you get food. Margaret 55:44 And I like having food. Yeah. So, if you go to tangledwilderness.org, you can preorder "Escape from Incel Island" and get a poster. And it's a fun adventure book. You can literally read it in a couple hours. It's very short. It's a novella. It's, to be frank, it's at the short end of novella. But that makes it good for short attention spans like mine. Brooke 56:08 Yeah, that's dope. I'm looking forward to that. And there'll be some other books coming out from that Strangers Collective one, one that I just started editing, that I don't know how much we're talking about it yet or not. Margaret 56:20 It's really cool. Brooke 56:20 So, I won't give too much away here, but just sucked me right in as I was editing, and it's cool. I'm so excited to read the rest of it. And then for us to release it. Margaret 56:29 Yeah. All right. Well, that's our Year in the Apocalypse, 2022 edition. And I know...wait, you're doing the closing part. Brooke 56:40 Yeah, sure. Margaret 56:41 I'm just the guest. Brooke 56:43 No, you're my co host. Margaret 56:45 Oh, I'm just the co host. Okay. Brooke 56:47 Yeah. Yeah. So I'm curious what other people think the worst things are that happened in 2022, if it's something that was on one of our lists, or something else that you know of, and reach out to us like on Twitter at tangledwild or Instagram, or you can reach out to me personally on Mastodon @ogemakwebrooke, if you can find me there. And the Collectiva Social, I think is my whatever, I don't remember how it works. But I'm yeah, I'm curious what other people would have to say is the worst which thing they want to vote for, if they have their own. So hit us up? Let us know. Margaret 57:22 Yeah, do it. Brooke 57:29 So, our listeners, we thank, we appreciate you listening. And if you enjoy this podcast, we would love it if you could give it a like or drop a comment or review or subscribe to us if you haven't already, because these things make the algorithms that rule our world offer our show to more people. The podcast is produced by the anarchist publishing collective Strangers in a Tangled Wilderness. Like I said, you can connect with us on Twitter, Instagram, or me personally on Mastodon, or through our website tangledwilderness.org. The work of Strangers is made possible by our Patreon supporters. Honestly, we couldn't do any of it without your help. If you want to become a supporter, check us out patreon.com/strangersInatangledwilderness. There are cool benefits for different support tiers. For instance, if you support the collective at $10 a month, one of your benefits is a 40% off coupon for everything we sell on our website, which includes the preorders for Margaret's new book, we'd like to give a specific shout out to some of our most supportive patreon supporters including Hoss dog, Miciaah, Chris, Sam, Kirk, Eleanor, Jenipher, Staro, Cat J., Chelsea, Dana, David, Nicole, Mikki, Paige, SJ, Shawn, Hunter, Theo, Boise Mutual Aid, Milica, paparouna, and Aly. Thanks so much. Find out more at https://live-like-the-world-is-dying.pinecast.co

D&J Power-Hour
Georgia Repeats, Black Monday for NFL Coaches

D&J Power-Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 64:23


-California getting crushed by rain and atmospheric rivers-Sports Recap-Lamar out against the Bengals-Georgia demolishes TCU and repeats as National Champions-More likely to retire:  Rodgers or Sean Mcvay?-NFL coaches fired, DylanGotz and Cruz go IN on the firingsPromocode "Powerball" for 15% off any purchase at www.smoothmyballs.com 5 star reviews for the win, submit one for a chance to win cash!@djpowerhour2021 on Instagram@djpowerhour on Twitter and Facebook

Pat Gray Unleashed
CNN Takes On Biden and His DISASTEROUS Immigration Policy | 1/11/23

Pat Gray Unleashed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 98:42 Very Popular


The Golden Globes were last night, but did anyone notice? President Biden finally addresses discovered classified documents. CNN takes on Joe Biden?! The Powerball, Ronaldo, and the next Wienermobile driver are just a few stories on today's Chewing the Fat with Jeffy. America's education system is rotten to the core. Medical "coincidences" keep happening. A man was arrested for allowing his self-driving car to drive him home while intoxicated. South Sudan's president has journalists arrested for releasing an embarrassing video of him Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Zedcast - The Tyler Zed Podcast
US Flight CHAOS, Record Powerball Prize AGAIN, Vince McMahon, Golden Globes, Carlos Correa Drama and more!

Zedcast - The Tyler Zed Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 44:30


Episode number 209! Thanks for supporting the show so far!Become a member and support the show today at zedmedia.substack.com!

The Presiquential Podcast
From American Presidents to American Gladiators

The Presiquential Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 79:11


Join Blaine, Ryan, & Russ as they recap Season 1, Episode 1 of American Gladiators!We're trying something new here - starting at the beginning of the American Gladiators first season. Let us know if you like it! 

Brandon Boxer
Erin Real- NBC- Who wants to be a BILLIONAIRE?!

Brandon Boxer

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 5:09


The Powerball jackpot is Billion Dollars! Thast's right, a Billion! What are your odds of winning?

The Steve Harvey Morning Show
Lori Harvey Essence, Negative Thoughts, Damar Hamlin, Powerball Jackpot and more.

The Steve Harvey Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 87:47


Good morning and welcome to the ride!  It's that NEW NEW and it's your time.  The CLO is dealing with all kinds of sugar honey iced tea when it comes to dysfunctional marriages.  Lori Harvey is on the cover of Essence.  Is Gabrielle Union a cheater?   Steve got some negative thoughts for the crew just in time for 2023.  What's up with the Mega Millions tho?  Facebook brings us a generous soul and an upset SO.  We are praying for Damar Hamlin.  There are STD's and long life in the first Would You Rather of 2023.  Today in Closing Remarks, Steve mentions the wise saying.  "This too shall pass."See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Acton Line: Taxes, Spending, and Powerball Winnings

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023


On November 7, 2022, the jackpot for the Powerball lottery reached an astonishing $2.05 billion. Even after the federal and state governments take their piece of that, the winner will still be the recipient of a life-changing amount of money, more than enough to last an entire lifetime. But if the winner of that $2.05 […]

The Rob and Joe Show
It's an Air Cut

The Rob and Joe Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 68:45


Happy New Year! Justin gives us a great gift card life hack. Joe filled on news on JSS this week. It ended up being much harder than usual. How would Joe take care of his friends if he won the Powerball? Justin got the worst haircut of his life. Joe had another needing to go to the bathroom incident. This time while doing the Ravens Pregame Show. Rob updates us on his 2023 comedy schedule with Koechner. Joe is heading back to Vegas next month despite potentially not being allowed inside a casino. And all the exciting plans for 2023 are unveiled including a rebranding of the show. 

MoneyWise on Oneplace.com
Pricing Life Insurance

MoneyWise on Oneplace.com

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 25:34


If you don't know what something should cost, it's easy to overpay. That's especially true with life insurance. If you have loved ones who depend on your income, having the appropriate amount of life insurance is an essential part of your financial plan. In today's Faith and Finance Rob tells you how to avoid paying too much for it. You won't find the expression life insurance in God's Word. But the concept of needing to financially support your family is certainly clear. 1 Timothy 5:8 reads, But if anyone does not provide for his relatives, and especially for members of his household, he has denied the faith and is worse than an unbeliever. For the vast majority of us, life insurance is a must. Overpaying for it is not. Let's start then with a question, How much should a 20-year policy providing $250,000 in coverage for a 30-year old cost per year?" A recent survey found that most respondents - especially millennials - think the cost would be around $1,000 a year. But the actual price tag is only about $160 a year. That means a lot of folks are setting themselves up to overpay. Here's how to make sure you're not one of them. First: avoid choosing whole life over term insurance. Don't get caught up in the idea that your policy should have a cash value during your lifetime, instead of what it will do for your family if you should die. Whole, permanent or universal life insurance policies build a cash value that you can tap into for certain things while you're still alive, but that's very expensive money. You'll be far ahead if you invest the difference between a whole life and a term policy in your retirement account. Instead of getting snared by a policy's cash value, think instead about how much insurance you actually need to protect your loved ones, which is usually 10 to 15 times your annual salary. Then look for the least expensive term policy that provides that amount if you die during the policy's term. You also want to pay attention to costly add-ons, which the industry calls riders. While these can help you customize your policy to fit a specific need you might have, they can also run up the cost. You especially want to avoid something called a return-of-premium rider. Check that box on your application, and the insurance provider will give you back all of the premiums you paid when the policy expires. If that sounds like a deal too good to be true, that's because it is. That one rider alone could double your premiums and keep you from getting the returns you'll realize if you invest the difference instead. So you want to stay away from anything that promises to repay your premiums. Another rider to watch out for is for accidental death. It raises the benefit if death results from an accident. But the restrictions as to what type of accident - and under what circumstances it applies to - severely limit its usefulness. Plus, if you take out enough coverage to begin with, you really don't need an accidental death rider. Now, another way you can overpay for life insurance is when the provider doesn't require you to have a medical exam. These are called guaranteed issue policies. Most companies, for most policies, will require you get a checkup and have bloodwork done. Of course, sometimes a policy that doesn't require a medical exam is just what the doctor ordered. For example, if you have a pre-existing condition that makes it impossible to get a standard policy. But keep in mind that you'll almost certainly have higher premiums and less coverage with a guaranteed issue policy. You also want to avoid something called an ART policy, an acronym for Annual Renewable Term. At first glance, these look very attractive because the premiums start out low. You're guaranteed coverage for the life of the term. But each year you have to renew the policy, and each year your premiums increase. It won't happen right away, but at some point you'll be paying more than you would for a standard policy. Go with a simple term policy that has level premiums throughout its entire term. All of the ways I've covered so far to get the best price on life insurance are easy to see. You can find them right in the policy descriptions. But the last way - and probably the biggest - isn't so obvious. It's to act while you're still young. Make sure you buy a policy while you're still young, and get it for as long as you can. On this program, Rob also answers listener questions: How can you dig yourself out of credit card debt that you incurred furnishing a new home and you are hoping to retire in three years at age 62 or six years at age 65? (Rob referred the caller to Christian Credit Counselors https://www.christiancreditcounselors.org/). Can you split your 10% tithe between your local church and mission work, or do you need to devote the first 10% to your church? If you are planning to sell your home for $600,000 and will downsize to a $250,000 home, what should you do with the surplus funds if you are age 61 and disabled and your wife is still working with a 401k worth $120,000? Will you owe taxes on a home you're selling for $600,000? Should a Christian be playing the Powerball lottery, and if you won, what should you do with the proceeds? Remember, you can call in to ask your questions most days at (800) 525-7000 or visit our website at FaithFi.com where you can join the FaithFi Community, and download the free FaithFi app. To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/1085/29

Acton Line
Taxes, Spending, and Powerball Winnings

Acton Line

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 40:00


On November 7, 2022, the jackpot for the Powerball lottery reached an astonishing $2.05 billion. Even after the federal and state governments take their piece of that, the winner will still be the recipient of a life-changing amount of money, more than enough to last an entire lifetime. But if the winner of that $2.05 billion Powerball jackpot was the United States federal government, they'd burn through that enormous sum of money in just over a week. How did the federal budget get this large? What does that budget say about our political system and the desires and priorities of the public and politicians? In this episode, Eric Kohn sits down with Dr. David Hebert, chair of the economics department and associate professor of economics at Aquinas College in Grand Rapids, to discuss his recent article for the American Institute for Economic Research using the Powerball to explain the size and scope of the federal budget. David Hebert graduated with a bachelor's degree in economics from Hillsdale College in 2009, and then attended George Mason University, where he earned a master's in 2011 and a doctorate in 2014. During graduate school, he was an F.A. Hayek fellow with the Mercatus Center and a fellow with the Department of Health Administration and Policy. He also worked with the Joint Economic Committee in the U.S. Congress. Since graduating, he has worked as an assistant professor at Ferris State University in Big Rapids, Michigan, and Troy University in Troy, Alabama. He was also a fellow with the U.S. Senate Budget Committee, where he authored a comprehensive report on federal budget process reform. Subscribe to our podcastsRegister Now for Business Matters 2023Apply Now for Acton University 2023 (Early Bird Pricing)Taxes, Spending, and Powerball Winnings by David Hebert | AEIR Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

D&J Power-Hour
2022 Sports Recap

D&J Power-Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 64:53


-Christmas Recap-Sports Recap-Is Carson the answer for Washington?-Christmas Parlay Recap-2022 athlete of the year, athlete bust of the year, team disappointment of the yearPromocode "Powerball" for 15% off any order at www.smoothmyballs.comHAPPY NEW YEAR!  Be safe! 5 star reviews for the win, submit one for a chance to win cash!@djpowerhour2021 on Instagram@djpowerhour on Twitter and Facebook

La Gozadera
El término más buscado en Pornhub durante 2022

La Gozadera

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 14:53


Tenemos los listados más top del 2022 en internet. Las palabras más buscadas en Google y la canción que batió todos los récords en la red. ¡Comienza año nuevo 2023 riendo sin parar con los dueños del entretenimiento en el Podcast de La Gozadera!

#WakeUpCLT To Go
Livingstone College athlete dies in crash involving off-duty sheriff's deputy: Wednesday, Dec. 28.

#WakeUpCLT To Go

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 1:53


A Rowan County college is mourning the loss of a basketball player who died in a car crash on Monday. Eric Henderson, 21, a Livingstone College sophomore who played on the team's basketball team, died in a crash on Monday in Cumberland County, N.C.  Investigators told WRAL that Henderson's car crossed the center line and hit a pickup truck driven by an off-duty Cumberland County deputy on U.S. Highway 13 just north of Fayetteville. Speed is believed to be a factor in the crash. The involved deputy was injured but is expected to recover. Family members said Henderson was on his way back to college after a Christmas visit, according to WRAL. READ MORE: https://www.wcnc.com/article/news/local/he-was-the-ultimate-student-athlete-livingstone-college-basketball-player-dies-in-car-crash-eric-henderson-rowan-county-fayetteville-crash-fatal/275-d9d03159-9917-4063-9a41-4c0e2ea5ba3e The Mega Millions jackpot has reached an estimated $565 million for Tuesday night's drawing. Will somebody go into the new year half a billion dollars richer, or will the latest huge lottery prize keep growing?  The winning numbers for the Tuesday, Dec. 27 Mega Millions drawing were 9-13-36-59-61 and Mega Ball 11. The jackpot was last won on Oct. 14, with 20 drawings going by since then without a big winner. The $565 million prize is for the annuity option, which is paid out annually over 29 years. The cash option would pay $293.6 million.  It's been a record-setting year for lottery games — even Tuesday's full prize pales in comparison to the $2.04 billion Powerball jackpot won in November by someone in Southern California.  READ MORE: https://www.wcnc.com/article/news/nation-world/mega-millions-winning-numbers-tuesday-dec-27-2022/507-da322794-3029-4bf2-8663-95d7419fa303 Watch Wake Up Charlotte each weekday morning from 4:30 to 7 a.m. on WCNC Charlotte, and as always, join the conversation on social media using #WakeUpCLT! 

Armstrong and Getty
The A&G Replay Tuesday Hour 1

Armstrong and Getty

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 37:08


Hour 1 of the A&G Replay for Tuesday December 20 features Jack's classic Christmas Tale, the trouble with Powerball, the employment dilemma and the strange notion of let extension surgery.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Down to Business English: Business News to Improve your Business English

Skip Montreux and Dez Morgan report on the economics of lotteries. How important is lottery revenue for governments? Why was the recent Powerball lottery in the US historic? Who gets the most benefit from lotteries? Listen in to learn the answers to these questions and more. Visit Apple Podcasts to subscribe to Down to Business English, rate the show, and leave a comment. Contact Skip, Dez, and Samantha at downtobusinessenglish@gmail.com Follow Skip & Dez Skip Montreux on Linkedin Skip Montreux on Instagram Skip Montreux on Twitter Skip Montreux on Facebook Dez Morgan on Twitter RSS Feed

Arkansas Democrat Gazette
12/13/22: Powerball jackpot fueled the Arkansas Scholarship Lottery's revenues in November...and more news

Arkansas Democrat Gazette

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 3:09


Powerball jackpot fueled the Arkansas Scholarship Lottery's revenues in November; Little Rock School District keeps tight lid on possible resolution to the breach of district data networks; North Little Rock Police Department promoted its first ever Black captain

Will This Be On The Test? Teacher Pod
WTBOTT Season 2 Episode 21: We've Gotta Get Out Of This Place: Life After Teaching

Will This Be On The Test? Teacher Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 61:49


We all have daydreamed about what we'd do if we won the Powerball. But do we have to wait for that 1 in 1 billion chance to leave teaching? According to Zachary Long, the originator (along with his wife, Brittany) of the Facebook group "Life After Teaching: Educator Options Beyond the Classroom" the answer is a resounding NO! This group (https://www.facebook.com/groups/495865574323107), as well as the accompanying website (https://lifeafterteaching.com/), has so many resources and so much advice and conversation for either leaving the profession, or starting up a side gig to supplement your income. So if you've had enough of kids ignoring you, admin asking you to do ridiculous tasks, and parents blaming you for pretty much everything, take a listen to this episode, and check out the Life After Teaching: Educator Options Beyond the Classroom Facebook group! We also dive into crappy jobs and job interviews, great moments in sports, and how being sick without having to act like you care about your classroom (aka writing sub plans) is definitely still not great, but slightly less awful. Thanks to Max Siskind, of the "Max and Maks in the Morning" podcast, for voicing our intro. Email: WTBOTTCast@gmail.com FB: Will This Be On The Test? Teacher Pod Instagram: WTBOTTCast Twitter: Will This Be On The Test? (Teacher Pod) Reddit: r/WTBOTT_Teacher_Pod Website: https://anchor.fm/wtbott-teacher-pod

D&J Power-Hour
Coach Prime to Colorado

D&J Power-Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 58:01


-Sports Recap-MLB free agency deals-Fantasy football bad beats-Deion Sanders to Colorado:  Can he have success?-Sports betting bad beats-DylanGotz football record between NFL and CollegeEnter promo-code "Powerball" for 15% off any order at www.smoothmyballs.com 5 star reviews for the win, submit one for a chance to win cash!@djpowerhour2021 on Instagram@djpowerhour on Twitter and Facebook

The Mediocre Alaskan Podcast
Episode 319 - Where do we go from here?

The Mediocre Alaskan Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 58:11


Harrison Gottschling and I are firm advocates for hunters making hunts happen and outdoor entrepreneurs helping others by providing valuable insight for those looking for new experiences. In this episode, we discuss the potential unintended consequences of such valuable resources being so readily available, not to advocate against them, but as a way of thinking through potential pitfalls in order to avoid them. We talk about hunting mindset, desperation, how a hunt changes as a result of population and pressure, the misconception that services like GoHunt, Rokslide or Huntin' Fool ruin hunting, the stupidity behind the "must be nice" attitude and how if I won the Powerball lottery I'd buy a ranch in Wyoming and only let my friends hunt it...just like those tycoons we resent. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Jason and Deb Full Show
The Morning X with Jason Dick and Friends - Emily Is Headed For A Throuple

Jason and Deb Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 78:11


We discuss Emily hooking up with her friend's ex at a wedding, why Jason wants to be a dog walker, and whether Nick can throw a football 30 yards.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Thriving Christian Artist
404 | 5-Minute Mentoring: Why I Played the Lottery

The Thriving Christian Artist

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 7:14


As of the time of this video, the Powerball lottery is up to something like $1.9 BILLION dollars.  Billion.  With a B.  Can you even fathom how much money that is?  It is such a staggering amount of money for a person to have for themselves that it might as well be called a “gazillion” or a “bajillion.”  It's no wonder so many people are buying a ticket or two in the infinitesimal hope that maybe they'll be the one to take it home (or at least what's left after taxes).  And when I hear people talking about what they would do with that kind of money (or even a tenth, or a hundredth of that amount) it's amazing to hear how people feel their lives would change.  All the great things that they could do in their lives, if only they had the money.  As fun as it can be to buy a ticket and dream, we need to realize that if we are good and faithful stewards, God has already given us everything we need to accomplish what He has in store for our lives.  Want to know more?  Listen to this episode of 5-Minute Mentoring!  ====================When you're ready to stop striving and start thriving, here are 4 other ways I can help: 1️⃣  Get my FREE Guide, “5 Biggest Misconceptions About Prophetic Art” Wondering how to create your art with God or what prophetic art is all about?  Grab my free guide and make sure you're not stuck in any of these misconceptions about prophetic art!   Download here ➡️ https://thrive.matttommeymentoring.com/5-biggest-misconceptions-about-prophetic-art2️⃣ Unlock Your Heart:  Are you ready to begin a journey of healing and wholeness that will yield deeper Spirit-led creativity and personal fulfillment?  I'll show you how in the 10th anniversary revised edition of “Unlocking the Heart of the Artist!” Grab the book, ebook, or audio on Amazon ➡️ https://www.amazon.com/dp/14609302583️⃣  Connect with God: Discover how to connect with the Lord and discover His intention for you and your art in His Kingdom in my course, How to Connect with God to Create & Sell Your Art. Get more details here ➡️ https://thrive.matttommeymentoring.com/how-to-connect  4️⃣  Ready to truly thrive?  Join the Created to Thrive Artist Mentoring Program to discover how to build your art business and live the abundant life Jesus promised you as an artist in His Kingdom! Click here for details and to enroll! ➡️  https://www.matttommeymentoring.com/artmentor.htmlThanks for listening!  You can also watch this podcast on YouTube at youtube.com/matttommeymentoring.  Be sure to subscribe so you don't miss an episode!Connect with Matt online: https://thrive.matttommeymentoring.com/stay-connected

Screaming in the Cloud
Crafting a Modern Data Protection Strategy with Sam Nicholls

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 37:26


About SamSam Nicholls: Veeam's Director of Public Cloud Product Marketing, with 10+ years of sales, alliance management and product marketing experience in IT. Sam has evolved from his on-premises storage days and is now laser-focused on spreading the word about cloud-native backup and recovery, packing in thousands of viewers on his webinars, blogs and webpages.Links Referenced: Veeam AWS Backup: https://www.veeam.com/aws-backup.html Veeam: https://veeam.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Chronosphere. Tired of observability costs going up every year without getting additional value? Or being locked in to a vendor due to proprietary data collection, querying and visualization? Modern day, containerized environments require a new kind of observability technology that accounts for the massive increase in scale and attendant cost of data. With Chronosphere, choose where and how your data is routed and stored, query it easily, and get better context and control. 100% open source compatibility means that no matter what your setup is, they can help. Learn how Chronosphere provides complete and real-time insight into ECS, EKS, and your microservices, whereever they may be at snark.cloud/chronosphere That's snark.cloud/chronosphere Corey: This episode is brought to us by our friends at Pinecone. They believe that all anyone really wants is to be understood, and that includes your users. AI models combined with the Pinecone vector database let your applications understand and act on what your users want… without making them spell it out. Make your search application find results by meaning instead of just keywords, your personalization system make picks based on relevance instead of just tags, and your security applications match threats by resemblance instead of just regular expressions. Pinecone provides the cloud infrastructure that makes this easy, fast, and scalable. Thanks to my friends at Pinecone for sponsoring this episode. Visit Pinecone.io to understand more.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. This promoted guest episode is brought to us by and sponsored by our friends over at Veeam. And as a part of that, they have thrown one of their own to the proverbial lion. My guest today is Sam Nicholls, Director of Public Cloud over at Veeam. Sam, thank you for joining me.Sam: Hey. Thanks for having me, Corey, and thanks for everyone joining and listening in. I do know that I've been thrown into the lion's den, and I am [laugh] hopefully well-prepared to answer anything and everything that Corey throws my way. Fingers crossed. [laugh].Corey: I don't think there's too much room for criticizing here, to be direct. I mean, Veeam is a company that is solidly and thoroughly built around a problem that absolutely no one cares about. I mean, what could possibly be wrong with that? You do backups; which no one ever cares about. Restores, on the other hand, people care very much about restores. And that's when they learn, “Oh, I really should have cared about backups at any point prior to 20 minutes ago.”Sam: Yeah, it's a great point. It's kind of like taxes and insurance. It's almost like, you know, something that you have to do that you don't necessarily want to do, but when push comes to shove, and something's burning down, a file has been deleted, someone's made their way into your account and, you know, running a right mess within there, that's when you really, kind of, care about what you mentioned, which is the recovery piece, the speed of recovery, the reliability of recovery.Corey: It's been over a decade, and I'm still sore about losing my email archives from 2006 to 2009. There's no way to get it back. I ran my own mail server; it was an iPhone setting that said, “Oh, yeah, automatically delete everything in your trash folder—or archive folder—after 30 days.” It was just a weird default setting back in that era. I didn't realize it was doing that. Yeah, painful stuff.And we learned the hard way in some of these cases. Not that I really have much need for email from that era of my life, but every once in a while it still bugs me. Which gets speaks to the point that the people who are the most fanatical about backing things up are the people who have been burned by not having a backup. And I'm fortunate in that it wasn't someone else's data with which I had been entrusted that really cemented that lesson for me.Sam: Yeah, yeah. It's a good point. I could remember a few years ago, my wife migrated a very aging, polycarbonate white Mac to one of the shiny new aluminum ones and thought everything was good—Corey: As the white polycarbonate Mac becomes yellow, then yeah, all right, you know, it's time to replace it. Yeah. So yeah, so she wiped the drive, and what happened?Sam: That was her moment where she learned the value and importance of backup unless she backs everything up now. I fortunately have never gone through it. But I'm employed by a backup vendor and that's why I care about it. But it's incredibly important to have, of course.Corey: Oh, yes. My spouse has many wonderful qualities, but one that drives me slightly nuts is she's something of a digital packrat where her hard drives on her laptop will periodically fill up. And I used to take the approach of oh, you can be more efficient and do the rest. And I realized no, telling other people they're doing it wrong is generally poor practice, whereas just buying bigger drives is way easier. Let's go ahead and do that. It's small price to pay for domestic tranquility.And there's a lesson in that. We can map that almost perfectly to the corporate world where you folks tend to operate in. You're not doing home backup, last time I checked; you are doing public cloud backup. Actually, I should ask that. Where do you folks start and where do you stop?Sam: Yeah, no, it's a great question. You know, we started over 15 years ago when virtualization, specifically VMware vSphere, was really the up-and-coming thing, and, you know, a lot of folks were there trying to utilize agents to protect their vSphere instances, just like they were doing with physical Windows and Linux boxes. And, you know, it kind of got the job done, but was it the best way of doing it? No. And that's kind of why Veeam was pioneered; it was this agentless backup, image-based backup for vSphere.And, of course, you know, in the last 15 years, we've seen lots of transitions, of course, we're here at Screaming in the Cloud, with you, Corey, so AWS, as well as a number of other public cloud vendors we can help protect as well, as a number of SaaS applications like Microsoft 365, metadata and data within Salesforce. So, Veeam's really kind of come a long way from just virtual machines to really taking a global look at the entirety of modern environments, and how can we best protect each and every single one of those without trying to take a square peg and fit it in a round hole?Corey: It's a good question and a common one. We wind up with an awful lot of folks who are confused by the proliferation of data. And I'm one of them, let's be very clear here. It comes down to a problem where backups are a multifaceted, deep problem, and I don't think that people necessarily think of it that way. But I take a look at all of the different, even AWS services that I use for my various nonsense, and which ones can be used to store data?Well, all of them. Some of them, you have to hold it in a particularly wrong sort of way, but they all store data. And in various contexts, a lot of that data becomes very important. So, what service am I using, in which account am I using, and in what region am I using it, and you wind up with data sprawl, where it's a tremendous amount of data that you can generally only track down by looking at your bills at the end of the month. Okay, so what am I being charged, and for what service?That seems like a good place to start, but where is it getting backed up? How do you think about that? So, some people, I think, tend to ignore the problem, which we're seeing less and less, but other folks tend to go to the opposite extreme and we're just going to backup absolutely everything, and we're going to keep that data for the rest of our natural lives. It feels to me that there's probably an answer that is more appropriate somewhere nestled between those two extremes.Sam: Yeah, snapshot sprawl is a real thing, and it gets very, very expensive very, very quickly. You know, your snapshots of EC2 instances are stored on those attached EBS volumes. Five cents per gig per month doesn't sound like a lot, but when you're dealing with thousands of snapshots for thousands machines, it gets out of hand very, very quickly. And you don't know when to delete them. Like you say, folks are just retaining them forever and dealing with this unfortunate bill shock.So, you know, where to start is automating the lifecycle of a snapshot, right, from its creation—how often do we want to be creating them—from the retention—how long do we want to keep these for—and where do we want to keep them because there are other storage services outside of just EBS volumes. And then, of course, the ultimate: deletion. And that's important even from a compliance perspective as well, right? You've got to retain data for a specific number of years, I think healthcare is like seven years, but then you've—Corey: And then not a day more.Sam: Yeah, and then not a day more because that puts you out of compliance, too. So, policy-based automation is your friend and we see a number of folks building these policies out: gold, silver, bronze tiers based on criticality of data compliance and really just kind of letting the machine do the rest. And you can focus on not babysitting backup.Corey: What was it that led to the rise of snapshots? Because back in my very early days, there was no such thing. We wound up using a bunch of servers stuffed in a rack somewhere and virtualization was not really in play, so we had file systems on physical disks. And how do you back that up? Well, you have an agent of some sort that basically looks at all the files and according to some ruleset that it has, it copies them off somewhere else.It was slow, it was fraught, it had a whole bunch of logic that was pushed out to the very edge, and forget about restoring that data in a timely fashion or even validating a lot of those backups worked other than via checksum. And God help you if you had data that was constantly in the state of flux, where anything changing during the backup run would leave your backups in an inconsistent state. That on some level seems to have largely been solved by snapshots. But what's your take on it? You're a lot closer to this part of the world than I am.Sam: Yeah, snapshots, I think folks have turned to snapshots for the speed, the lack of impact that they have on production performance, and again, just the ease of accessibility. We have access to all different kinds of snapshots for EC2, RDS, EFS throughout the entirety of our AWS environment. So, I think the snapshots are kind of like the default go-to for folks. They can help deliver those very, very quick RPOs, especially in, for example, databases, like you were saying, that change very, very quickly and we all of a sudden are stranded with a crash-consistent backup or snapshot versus an application-consistent snapshot. And then they're also very, very quick to recover from.So, snapshots are very, very appealing, but they absolutely do have their limitations. And I think, you know, it's not a one or the other; it's that they've got to go hand-in-hand with something else. And typically, that is an image-based backup that is stored in a separate location to the snapshot because that snapshot is not independent of the disk that it is protecting.Corey: One of the challenges with snapshots is most of them are created in a copy-on-write sense. It takes basically an instant frozen point in time back—once upon a time when we ran MySQL databases on top of the NetApp Filer—which works surprisingly well—we would have a script that would automatically quiesce the database so that it would be in a consistent state, snapshot the file and then un-quiesce it, which took less than a second, start to finish. And that was awesome, but then you had this snapshot type of thing. It wasn't super portable, it needed to reference a previous snapshot in some cases, and AWS takes the same approach where the first snapshot it captures every block, then subsequent snapshots wind up only taking up as much size as there have been changes since the first snapshots. So, large quantities of data that generally don't get access to a whole lot have remarkably small, subsequent snapshot sizes.But that's not at all obvious from the outside, and looking at these things. They're not the most portable thing in the world. But it's definitely the direction that the industry has trended in. So, rather than having a cron job fire off an AWS API call to take snapshots of my volumes as a sort of the baseline approach that we all started with, what is the value proposition that you folks bring? And please don't say it's, “Well, cron jobs are hard and we have a friendlier interface for that.”Sam: [laugh]. I think it's really starting to look at the proliferation of those snapshots, understanding what they're good at, and what they are good for within your environment—as previously mentioned, low RPOs, low RTOs, how quickly can I take a backup, how frequently can I take a backup, and more importantly, how quickly can I restore—but then looking at their limitations. So, I mentioned that they were not independent of that disk, so that certainly does introduce a single point of failure as well as being not so secure. We've kind of touched on the cost component of that as well. So, what Veeam can come in and do is then take an image-based backup of those snapshots, right—so you've got your initial snapshot and then your incremental ones—we'll take the backup from that snapshot, and then we'll start to store that elsewhere.And that is likely going to be in a different account. We can look at the Well-Architected Framework, AWS deeming accounts as a security boundary, so having that cross-account function is critically important so you don't have that single point of failure. Locking down with IAM roles is also incredibly important so we haven't just got a big wide open door between the two. But that data is then stored in a separate account—potentially in a separate region, maybe in the same region—Amazon S3 storage. And S3 has the wonderful benefit of being still relatively performant, so we can have quick recoveries, but it is much, much cheaper. You're dealing with 2.3 cents per gig per month, instead of—Corey: To start, and it goes down from there with sizeable volumes.Sam: Absolutely, yeah. You can go down to S3 Glacier, where you're looking at, I forget how many points and zeros and nines it is, but it's fractions of a cent per gig per month, but it's going to take you a couple of days to recover that da—Corey: Even infrequent access cuts that in half.Sam: Oh yeah.Corey: And let's be clear, these are snapshot backups; you probably should not be accessing them on a consistent, sustained basis.Sam: Well, exactly. And this is where it's kind of almost like having your cake and eating it as well. Compliance or regulatory mandates or corporate mandates are saying you must keep this data for this length of time. Keeping that—you know, let's just say it's three years' worth of snapshots in an EBS volume is going to be incredibly expensive. What's the likelihood of you needing to recover something from two years—actually, even two months ago? It's very, very small.So, the performance part of S3 is, you don't need to take it as much into consideration. Can you recover? Yes. Is it going to take a little bit longer? Absolutely. But it's going to help you meet those retention requirements while keeping your backup bill low, avoiding that bill shock, right, spending tens and tens of thousands every single month on snapshots. This is what I mean by kind of having your cake and eating it.Corey: I somewhat recently have had a client where EBS snapshots are one of the driving costs behind their bill. It is one of their largest single line items. And I want to be very clear here because if one of those people who listen to this and thinking, “Well, hang on. Wait, they're telling stories about us, even though they're not naming us by name?” Yeah, there were three of you in the last quarter.So, at that point, it becomes clear it is not about something that one individual company has done and more about an overall driving trend. I am personalizing it a little bit by referring to as one company when there were three of you. This is a narrative device, not me breaking confidentiality. Disclaimer over. Now, when you talk to people about, “So, tell me why you've got 80 times more snapshots than you do EBS volumes?” The answer is as, “Well, we wanted to back things up and we needed to get hourly backups to a point, then daily backups, then monthly, and so on and so forth. And when this was set up, there wasn't a great way to do this natively and we don't always necessarily know what we need versus what we don't. And the cost of us backing this up, well, you can see it on the bill. The cost of us deleting too much and needing it as soon as we do? Well, that cost is almost incalculable. So, this is the safe way to go.” And they're not wrong in anything that they're saying. But the world has definitely evolved since then.Sam: Yeah, yeah. It's a really great point. Again, it just folds back into my whole having your cake and eating it conversation. Yes, you need to retain data; it gives you that kind of nice, warm, cozy feeling, it's a nice blanket on a winter's day that that data, irrespective of what happens, you're going to have something to recover from. But the question is does that need to be living on an EBS volume as a snapshot? Why can't it be living on much, much more cost-effective storage that's going to give you the warm and fuzzies, but is going to make your finance team much, much happier [laugh].Corey: One of the inherent challenges I think people have is that snapshots by themselves are almost worthless, in that I have an EBS snapshot, it is sitting there now, it's costing me an undetermined amount of money because it's not exactly clear on a per snapshot basis exactly how large it is, and okay, great. Well, I'm looking for a file that was not modified since X date, as it was on this time. Well, great, you're going to have to take that snapshot, restore it to a volume and then go exploring by hand. Oh, it was the wrong one. Great. Try it again, with a different one.And after, like, the fifth or six in a row, you start doing a binary search approach on this thing. But it's expensive, it's time-consuming, it takes forever, and it's not a fun user experience at all. Part of the problem is it seems that historically, backup systems have no context or no contextual awareness whatsoever around what is actually contained within that backup.Sam: Yeah, yeah. I mean, you kind of highlighted two of the steps. It's more like a ten-step process to do, you know, granular file or folder-level recovery from a snapshot, right? You've got to, like you say, you've got to determine the point in time when that, you know, you knew the last time that it was around, then you're going to have to determine the volume size, the region, the OS, you're going to have to create an EBS volume of the same size, region, from that snapshot, create the EC2 instance with the same OS, connect the two together, boot the EC2 instance, mount the volume search for the files to restore, download them manually, at which point you have your file back. It's not back in the machine where it was, it's now been downloaded locally to whatever machine you're accessing that from. And then you got to tear it all down.And that is again, like you say, predicated on the fact that you knew exactly that that was the right time. It might not be and then you have to start from scratch from a different point in time. So, backup tooling from backup vendors that have been doing this for many, many years, knew about this problem long, long ago, and really seek to not only automate the entirety of that process but make the whole e-discovery, the search, the location of those files, much, much easier. I don't necessarily want to do a vendor pitch, but I will say with Veeam, we have explorer-like functionality, whereby it's just a simple web browser. Once that machine is all spun up again, automatic process, you can just search for your individual file, folder, locate it, you can download it locally, you can inject it back into the instance where it was through Amazon Kinesis or AWS Kinesis—I forget the right terminology for it; some of its AWS, some of its Amazon.But by-the-by, the whole recovery process, especially from a file or folder level, is much more pain-free, but also much faster. And that's ultimately what people care about how reliable is my backup? How quickly can I get stuff online? Because the time that I'm down is costing me an indescribable amount of time or money.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Redis, the company behind the incredibly popular open source database. If you're tired of managing open source Redis on your own, or if you are looking to go beyond just caching and unlocking your data's full potential, these folks have you covered. Redis Enterprise is the go-to managed Redis service that allows you to reimagine how your geo-distributed applications process, deliver, and store data. To learn more from the experts in Redis how to be real-time, right now, from anywhere, visit redis.com/duckbill. That's R - E - D - I - S dot com slash duckbill.Corey: Right, the idea of RPO versus RTO: recovery point objective and recovery time objective. With an RPO, it's great, disaster strikes right now, how long is acceptable to it have been since the last time we backed up data to a restorable point? Sometimes it's measured in minutes, sometimes it's measured in fractions of a second. It really depends on what we're talking about. Payments databases, that needs to be—the RPO is basically an asymptotically approaches zero.The RTO is okay, how long is acceptable before we have that data restored and are back up and running? And that is almost always a longer time, but not always. And there's a different series of trade-offs that go into that. But both of those also presuppose that you've already dealt with the existential question of is it possible for us to recover this data. And that's where I know that you are obviously—you have a position on this that is informed by where you work, but I don't, and I will call this out as what I see in the industry: AWS backup is compelling to me except for one fatal flaw that it has, and that is it starts and stops with AWS.I am not a proponent of multi-cloud. Lord knows I've gotten flack for that position a bunch of times, but the one area where it makes absolute sense to me is backups. Have your data in a rehydrate-the-business level state backed up somewhere that is not your primary cloud provider because you're otherwise single point of failure-ing through a company, through the payment instrument you have on file with that company, in the blast radius of someone who can successfully impersonate you to that vendor. There has to be a gap of some sort for the truly business-critical data. Yes, egress to other providers is expensive, but you know what also is expensive? Irrevocably losing the data that powers your business. Is it likely? No, but I would much rather do it than have to justify why I'm not doing it.Sam: Yeah. Wasn't likely that I was going to win that 2 billion or 2.1 billion on the Powerball, but [laugh] I still play [laugh]. But I understand your standpoint on multi-cloud and I read your newsletters and understand where you're coming from, but I think the reality is that we do live in at least a hybrid cloud world, if not multi-cloud. The number of organizations that are sole-sourced on a single cloud and nothing else is relatively small, single-digit percentage. It's around 80-some percent that are hybrid, and the remainder of them are your favorite: multi-cloud.But again, having something that is one hundred percent sole-source on a single platform or a single vendor does expose you to a certain degree of risk. So, having the ability to do cross-platform backups, recoveries, migrations, for whatever reason, right, because it might not just be a disaster like you'd mentioned, it might also just be… I don't know, the company has been taken over and all of a sudden, the preference is now towards another cloud provider and I want you to refactor and re-architect everything for this other cloud provider. If all that data is locked into one platform, that's going to make your job very, very difficult. So, we mentioned at the beginning of the call, Veeam is capable of protecting a vast number of heterogeneous workloads on different platforms, in different environments, on-premises, in multiple different clouds, but the other key piece is that we always use the same backup file format. And why that's key is because it enables portability.If I have backups of EC2 instances that are stored in S3, I could copy those onto on-premises disk, I could copy those into Azure, I could do the same with my Azure VMs and store those on S3, or again, on-premises disk, and any other endless combination that goes with that. And it's really kind of centered around, like control and ownership of your data. We are not prescriptive by any means. Like, you do what is best for your organization. We just want to provide you with the toolset that enables you to do that without steering you one direction or the other with fee structures, disparate feature sets, whatever it might be.Corey: One of the big challenges that I keep seeing across the board is just a lack of awareness of what the data that matters is, where you see people backing up endless fleets of web server instances that are auto-scaled into existence and then removed, but you can create those things at will; why do you care about the actual data that's on these things? It winds up almost at the library management problem, on some level. And in that scenario, snapshots are almost certainly the wrong answer. One thing that I saw previously that really changed my way of thinking about this was back many years ago when I was working at a startup that had just started using GitHub and they were paying for a third-party service that wound up backing up Git repos. Today, that makes a lot more sense because you have a bunch of other stuff on GitHub that goes well beyond the stuff contained within Git, but at the time, it was silly. It was, why do that? Every Git clone is a full copy of the entire repository history. Just grab it off some developer's laptop somewhere.It's like, “Really? You want to bet the company, slash your job, slash everyone else's job on that being feasible and doable or do you want to spend the 39 bucks a month or whatever it was to wind up getting that out the door now so we don't have to think about it, and they validate that it works?” And that was really a shift in my way of thinking because, yeah, backing up things can get expensive when you have multiple copies of the data living in different places, but what's really expensive is not having a company anymore.Sam: Yeah, yeah, absolutely. We can tie it back to my insurance dynamic earlier where, you know, it's something that you know that you have to have, but you don't necessarily want to pay for it. Well, you know, just like with insurances, there's multiple different ways to go about recovering your data and it's only in crunch time, do you really care about what it is that you've been paying for, right, when it comes to backup?Could you get your backup through a git clone? Absolutely. Could you get your data back—how long is that going to take you? How painful is that going to be? What's going to be the impact to the business where you're trying to figure that out versus, like you say, the 39 bucks a month, a year, or whatever it might be to have something purpose-built for that, that is going to make the recovery process as quick and painless as possible and just get things back up online.Corey: I am not a big fan of the fear, uncertainty, and doubt approach, but I do practice what I preach here in that yeah, there is a real fear against data loss. It's not, “People are coming to get you, so you absolutely have to buy whatever it is I'm selling,” but it is something you absolutely have to think about. My core consulting proposition is that I optimize the AWS bill. And sometimes that means spending more. Okay, that one S3 bucket is extremely important to you and you say you can't sustain the loss of it ever so one zone is not an option. Where is it being backed up? Oh, it's not? Yeah, I suggest you spend more money and back that thing up if it's as irreplaceable as you say. It's about doing the right thing.Sam: Yeah, yeah, it's interesting, and it's going to be hard for you to prove the value of doing that when you are driving their bill up when you're trying to bring it down. But again, you have to look at something that's not itemized on that bill, which is going to be the impact of downtime. I'm not going to pretend to try and recall the exact figures because it also varies depending on your business, your industry, the size, but the impact of downtime is massive financially. Tens of thousands of dollars for small organizations per hour, millions and millions of dollars per hour for much larger organizations. The backup component of that is relatively small in comparison, so having something that is purpose-built, and is going to protect your data and help mitigate that impact of downtime.Because that's ultimately what you're trying to protect against. It is the recovery piece that you're buying is the most important piece. And like you, I would say, at least be cognizant of it and evaluate your options and what can you live with and what can you live without.Corey: That's the big burning question that I think a lot of people do not have a good answer to. And when you don't have an answer, you either backup everything or nothing. And I'm not a big fan of doing either of those things blindly.Sam: Yeah, absolutely. And I think this is why we see varying different backup options as well, you know? You're not going to try and apply the same data protection policies each and every single workload within your environment because they've all got different types of workload criticality. And like you say, some of them might not even need to be backed up at all, just because they don't have data that needs to be protected. So, you need something that is going to be able to be flexible enough to apply across the entirety of your environment, protect it with the right policy, in terms of how frequently do you protect it, where do you store it, how often, or when are you eventually going to delete that and apply that on a workload by workload basis. And this is where the joy of things like tags come into play as well.Corey: One last thing I want to bring up is that I'm a big fan of watching for companies saying the quiet part out loud. And one area in which they do this—because they're forced to by brevity—is in the title tag of their website. I pull up veeam.com and I hover over the tab in my browser, and it says, “Veeam Software: Modern Data Protection.”And I want to call that out because you're not framing it as explicitly backup. So, the last topic I want to get into is the idea of security. Because I think it is not fully appreciated on a lived-experience basis—although people will of course agree to this when they're having ivory tower whiteboard discussions—that every place your data lives is a potential for a security breach to happen. So, you want to have your data living in a bunch of places ideally, for backup and resiliency purposes. But you also want it to be completely unworkable or illegible to anyone who is not authorized to have access to it.How do you balance those trade-offs yourself given that what you're fundamentally saying is, “Trust us with your Holy of Holies when it comes to things that power your entire business?” I mean, I can barely get some companies to agree to show me their AWS bill, let alone this is the data that contains all of this stuff to destroy our company.Sam: Yeah. Yeah, it's a great question. Before I explicitly answer that piece, I will just go to say that modern data protection does absolutely have a security component to it, and I think that backup absolutely needs to be a—I'm going to say this an air quotes—a “first class citizen” of any security strategy. I think when people think about security, their mind goes to the preventative, like how do we keep these bad people out?This is going to be a bit of the FUD that you love, but ultimately, the bad guys on the outside have an infinite number of attempts to get into your environment and only have to be right once to get in and start wreaking havoc. You on the other hand, as the good guy with your cape and whatnot, you have got to be right each and every single one of those times. And we as humans are fallible, right? None of us are perfect, and it's incredibly difficult to defend against these ever-evolving, more complex attacks. So backup, if someone does get in, having a clean, verifiable, recoverable backup, is really going to be the only thing that is going to save your organization, should that actually happen.And what's key to a secure backup? I would say separation, isolation of backup data from the production data, I would say utilizing things like immutability, so in AWS, we've got Amazon S3 object lock, so it's that write once, read many state for whatever retention period that you put on it. So, the data that they're seeking to encrypt, whether it's in production or in their backup, they cannot encrypt it. And then the other piece that I think is becoming more and more into play, and it's almost table stakes is encryption, right? And we can utilize things like AWS KMS for that encryption.But that's there to help defend against the exfiltration attempts. Because these bad guys are realizing, “Hey, people aren't paying me my ransom because they're just recovering from a clean backup, so now I'm going to take that backup data, I'm going to leak the personally identifiable information, trade secrets, or whatever on the internet, and that's going to put them in breach compliance and give them a hefty fine that way unless they pay me my ransom.” So encryption, so they can't read that data. So, not only can they not change it, but they can't read it is equally important. So, I would say those are the three big things for me on what's needed for backup to make sure it is clean and recoverable.Corey: I think that is one of those areas where people need to put additional levels of thought in. I think that if you have access to the production environment and have full administrative rights throughout it, you should definitionally not—at least with that account and ideally not you at all personally—have access to alter the backups. Full stop. I would say, on some level, there should not be the ability to alter backups for some particular workloads, the idea being that if you get hit with a ransomware infection, it's pretty bad, let's be clear, but if you can get all of your data back, it's more of an annoyance than it is, again, the existential business crisis that becomes something that redefines you as a company if you still are a company.Sam: Yeah. Yeah, I mean, we can turn to a number of organizations. Code Spaces always springs to mind for me, I love Code Spaces. It was kind of one of those precursors to—Corey: It's amazing.Sam: Yeah, but they were running on AWS and they had everything, production and backups, all stored in one account. Got into the account. “We're going to delete your data if you don't pay us this ransom.” They were like, “Well, we're not paying you the ransoms. We got backups.” Well, they deleted those, too. And, you know, unfortunately, Code Spaces isn't around anymore. But it really kind of goes to show just the importance of at least logically separating your data across different accounts and not having that god-like access to absolutely everything.Corey: Yeah, when you talked about Code Spaces, I was in [unintelligible 00:32:29] talking about GitHub Codespaces specifically, where they have their developer workstations in the cloud. They're still very much around, at least last time I saw unless you know something I don't.Sam: Precursor to that. I can send you the link—Corey: Oh oh—Sam: You can share it with the listeners.Corey: Oh, yes, please do. I'd love to see that.Sam: Yeah. Yeah, absolutely.Corey: And it's been a long and strange time in this industry. Speaking of links for the show notes, I appreciate you're spending so much time with me. Where can people go to learn more?Sam: Yeah, absolutely. I think veeam.com is kind of the first place that people gravitate towards. Me personally, I'm kind of like a hands-on learning kind of guy, so we always make free product available.And then you can find that on the AWS Marketplace. Simply search ‘Veeam' through there. A number of free products; we don't put time limits on it, we don't put feature limitations. You can backup ten instances, including your VPCs, which we actually didn't talk about today, but I do think is important. But I won't waste any more time on that.Corey: Oh, configuration of these things is critically important. If you don't know how everything was structured and built out, you're basically trying to re-architect from first principles based upon archaeology.Sam: Yeah [laugh], that's a real pain. So, we can help protect those VPCs and we actually don't put any limitations on the number of VPCs that you can protect; it's always free. So, if you're going to use it for anything, use it for that. But hands-on, marketplace, if you want more documentation, want to learn more, want to speak to someone veeam.com is the place to go.Corey: And we will, of course, include that in the show notes. Thank you so much for taking so much time to speak with me today. It's appreciated.Sam: Thank you, Corey, and thanks for all the listeners tuning in today.Corey: Sam Nicholls, Director of Public Cloud at Veeam. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an angry insulting comment that takes you two hours to type out but then you lose it because you forgot to back it up.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

The Nateland Podcast
#124 Scandals & Animals

The Nateland Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 126:17 Very Popular


This week, Nate visits Graceland, Aaron's car breaks down in an inconvenient location, and the guys debate how winning the Powerball would change them, Then they get down to business to discuss how to hide a racing bib on a subway, the helium problem in America, and what animal would be most terrifying if it could speak.      Podcast produced by Nate & Laura Bargatze Recording & Editing by Genovations Media https://www.natebargatze.com https://www.allthingscomedy.com https://www.genovationsmedia.com Email - Nateland@NateBargatze.com   PrizePicks - PrizePicks.com   ● Download the PrizePicks app or go to PrizePicks.com to sign up and play daily fantasy sports!  ● First time users can receive a 100% instant deposit match up to $100 dollars with promo code NATE  ● If you deposit $100, PrizePicks will give you $100. If you deposit $50, PrizePicks will give you $50.  ● Don't forget to enter promo code NATE at sign up for an instant deposit match up to $100 dollars!     Helix - HelixSleep.com/Nate   ·       Helix is offering up to 200 dollars off all mattress orders AND two free pillows for our listeners. ·       Go to Helix Sleep dot com slash NATE. With Helix, better sleep starts now.    Vuori - VuoriClothing.com/Nate Vuori is an investment in your happiness.  For our listeners they are offering 20% off your first purchase.  Get yourself some of the most comfortable and versatile clothing on the planet at VUORICLOTHING.COM/NATE that's VUORICLOTHING.COM/NATE  Not only will you receive 20% off your first purchase, but enjoy free shipping on any U.S. orders over $75 and free returns.  Go to VUORICLOTHING.COM/NATE and discover the versatility of Vuori Clothing.   Athletic Greens - AthleticGreens.com/Nate   Right now, it's time to reclaim your health and help your immune system with convenient, daily nutrition - especially heading into the flu and cold season!  It is just one scoop in a cup of water every day. That is it! No need for a million different pills and supplements to look out for your health.  To make it easy, Athletic Greens Is going to give you a FREE 1 year supply of immune-supporting Vitamin D AND 5 FREE travel packs with your first purchase.  All you have to do is visit ATHLETICGREENS.com/NATE. Again, that's ATHLETICGREENS.com/NATE to take ownership over your health and pick up the ultimate daily nutritional insurance!

iFanboy.com Comic Book Podcast
Pick of the Week #855 – Fantastic Four #694

iFanboy.com Comic Book Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 75:21


We can't be sure that the Powerball winner in Altadena isn't listening, so this one's for you. We've got that, along with stories about hidden garlic sauce, Del Taco, and a brief uninformed explanation of the Reformation. It's what you really want in a comic book podcast. Note: Time codes are subject to change depending on dynamic ad insertion by the distributor. Running Time: 01:13:51 Pick of the Week: 00:01:55 - Fantastic Four #694 Comics: 00:13:07 - The New Golden Age #1 00:21:22 - Love Everlasting #4 00:25:44 - Gospel #1 00:30:20 - Traveling to Mars #1 00:36:02 - The Knight and the Lady at Play 00:37:01 - Do a Powerbomb! #6 Patron Pick: 00:40:04 - WildC.A.T.S. #1 Patron Thanks: 00:50:42 - Karen Audience Question: 00:55:49 - We've made Mark wonder about our opinion on how to eat pizza in a restaurant. Brought To You By: • Better Help - This episode is sponsored by BetterHelp. Give online therapy a try at betterhelp.com/ifanboy and get on your way to being your best self. • iFanboy Patrons - Become one today for as little as $3/month! Or make a one time donation of any amount! • iFanboy T-Shirts and Merch - Show your iFanboy pride with a t-shirt or other great merchandise on Threadless! We've got twelve designs! Music: "Something's Gone Wrong Again" The Buzzcocks Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly
It’s time to talk about climate reparations

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 18:35


Rich countries, like the United States, are the biggest emitters of gases that drive climate change. Should they pay developing countries for climate damage? Kai and guest host Andy Uhler recap the COP27 summit and the debate over climate reparations. Plus, NASA thought it had collected all the artifacts from the 1986 space shuttle Challenger disaster, until now. And, we'll play a round of Half Full/Half Empty! Here’s everything we talked about today: “About Biden’s climate pit stop” from Politico “Here's What Happened on Tuesday at the COP27 Climate Summit” from The New York Times “Divers Discover Piece of Space Shuttle Challenger Off Florida Coast” from The New York Times “It's not a fluke, it's a rot: Why the political media blew the 2022 election” from Press Watch “Why high interest rates are partly responsible for the $2.04 billion Powerball jackpot” from Marketplace “Coming soon to a theater near you: company Zoom meetings” from Marketplace “Elon Musk's first big Twitter product paused after fake accounts spread” from The Washington Post “Are ‘I Voted’ stickers worth the cost?” from Marketplace We can’t do this show without you. Keep sending your comments and questions to makemesmart@marketplace.org or leave a voice message at 508-U-B-SMART.

Apple News Today
How strong youth turnout affected the midterms

Apple News Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 10:31


Forbes crunches the numbers on how young voter turned out in the midterms, and identifies the issues that motivated them. Biden is in Egypt for a major climate conference, where some delegates want the U.S. to do more to cut emissions. The Washington Post reports on new research showing the world has less than a decade to avert catastrophe. The Wall Street Journal and Reuters report on the collapse of FTX, a popular cryptocurrency exchange that went bankrupt after the digital equivalent of a bank run this week. The Los Angeles Times tells the story of a beloved gas-station owner who is getting $1 million for selling the record-breaking Powerball ticket. Apple News In Conversation looks at the dangers of using lottery programs to fund government services.

Wretched Radio
POWERBALL AND THE CHRISTIAN

Wretched Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 54:53


It’s Mailbag Friday! What if I bought just one Powerball ticket? -Michael Wretched Radio | Air Date: November 11, 2022 https://media-wretched.org/Radio/Podcast/WR2022-1111.mp3 It's Mailbag Friday! You have questions. We have answers. If you have questions, comments, conundrums, snarks, or ideas send them to idea@wretched.org. Segment 1 What if I bought just one Powerball ticket? -Michael Did you […] The post POWERBALL AND THE CHRISTIAN appeared first on Wretched.

The Dave Chang Show
Billion-Dollar Dreams and Jedi Kitchen Interventions | #AskDave After Dark

The Dave Chang Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 57:57


With Thanksgiving just two weeks away, the latest delirious #AskDave turns toward a bevy of holiday-navigation questions—while also considering Squid Game (Chris Ying Edition), the on-set artist-trailer lifestyle, a stuffing recipe to unite America, fish sauce and palm sugar, picture-book protagonist permanence, Michael Keaton, getting blocked on the Powerball app, the C+ scholarship, choosing between remodeling your kitchen and burning your house down, the Wittgenstein gambit, Thanksgiving in Australia, Japanese KFC, the Prime Directive vs. the Dulles Doctrine, and a 'Dave Chang Show' spice-drawer challenge. Hosts: Dave Chang and Chris Ying Producers: Sasha Ashall and Jordan Bass Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Outkick the Coverage with Clay Travis
Hour 2: LaVar, Brady & Jonas – Odell Beckham Jr. Close to Returning

Outkick the Coverage with Clay Travis

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 36:50


Wednesday on 2 Pros and a Cup of Joe, the Colts make another questionable move, promoting Park Frazier to OC. The guys give their takeaways from the new College Football Playoff Rankings. Plus, Palm Beach logistics, Lion King references, coffee  jingles and a Power Ball update on In Case You Missed It.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

THE UPSIDE with Callie and Jeff Dauler
S13 EP47: POWERBALL CHAMPS

THE UPSIDE with Callie and Jeff Dauler

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 34:02


This week's sponsors: Cozy Earth — save 40% off your first order Snow Days — use promo code UPSIDE to get 10% off Tex Mex Taco Bites and additional 50% off an additional original pizza bites KiwiCo — get your first month of any crate line free Liquid IV — use promo code 15% off anything MeUndies — get 20% off your first order Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

What A Day
Stuck In The Midterms With You

What A Day

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 19:03


Election Day has wrapped, but now the wait begins as votes are counted and results pour in from across the country. We walk through what we know so far, and what to watch in some key races.And in headlines: Tropical Storm Nicole is tracking toward Florida, the January 6th committee interviewed Donald Trump's driver from the day of the insurrection, and someone in Southern California won the record $2 billion Powerball jackpot.Show Notes:AP News: 2022 midterms live updates – https://tinyurl.com/2p8u52z2Crooked Coffee is officially here. Our first blend, What A Morning, is available in medium and dark roasts. Wake up with your own bag at crooked.com/coffeeFollow us on Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/whataday/For a transcript of this episode, please visit crooked.com/whataday

Green Light with Chris Long
Kyle Long! Indianapolis Colts Hire Jeff Saturday, Billion Dollar Powerball Winner & History Lessons.

Green Light with Chris Long

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 85:42


(2:08) - Layup Line, Texting Kingston & Cigs. (21:22) - Around the World: Jeff Saturday, Purchases if you're the Lottery Winner & Stadium Seats. (43:48) - Class with Kingston: Learning About Certain Historical Figures. (1:08:32) - Mailbag & Codebreaks: Chris as an Overwatch Character, Family Holiday Cards & Chris & Kyle as Youth Baseball Players. Green Light Spotify Music: https://open.spotify.com/user/951jyryv2nu6l4iqz9p81him9?si=17c560d10ff04a9b Spotify Layup Line: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/1olmCMKGMEyWwOKaT1Aah3?si=675d445ddb824c42 Green Light Tube YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/GreenLightTube1 Green Light with Chris Long: Subscribe and enjoy weekly content including podcasts, documentaries, live chats, celebrity interviews and more including hot news items, trending discussions from the NFL, MLB, NHL, NBA, NCAA are just a small part of what we will be sharing with you. https://www.greenlightpodcast.com/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Adam Carolla Show
Part 2: Don Jamieson + News (ACS November 9)

Adam Carolla Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 64:26


Comedian Don Jamieson joins Adam to talk his new prank phonecall collection, ‘Terrorizing Telemarketers', he recorded with Jim Florentine. They all dive into old ‘Crank Yankers' calls before Don tells stories of the time he was a writer for Lisa Lampanelli. Gina Grad reports the news of today including: someone in California winning the $2 billion Powerball jackpot, a meteor destroying a house, Chris Evans being named People magazine's 'sexiest man alive', and USPS warning customers not to use drop boxes. PLUGS: Listen to Edward Conlon's ‘Talk to Me' available wherever you listen to podcasts See Don Jamieson live: Tampa, FL - Side Splitters Comedy Club - December 1 Boca Raton, FL - Boca Black Box - December 2nd & 3rd For more dates, visit: DonJamieson.com Listen to Don Jamieson's new album ‘Terrorizing Telemarketers 7' on Spotify and Amazon Music Watch ‘That Jamieson Show' streaming on CompoundMedia.com And follow him on Instagram, @DonJamiesonOfficial THANKS FOR SUPPORTING TODAY'S SPONSORS: Geico.com TommyJohn.com/ADAM BlindsGalore.com, let them know we sent you The Jordan Harbinger Show

Drew and Mike Show
Drew And Mike – November 7, 2022

Drew and Mike Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 168:34


Election Day is here, Aaron Carter's death bath details, Lyin' LeBron James, Kentucky student canceled & arrested, we check in with Elon Musk's nemesis Jack Sweeney, John Wayne Gacy v. Jeffrey Dahmer, and Drew & Trudi's class reunion stories.NFL: Nobody cares that the Detroit Lions won a game. Drew's bestie Jim Irsay blew out Frank Reich and has hired Jeff Saturday away from TV.Trudi is fresh off crashing a class reunion. Drew has his own crazy class reunion stories.Election Day 2022 has finally arrived and will certainly be over this time tomorrow.Social media is a cesspool and 60 Minutes confirms it.This silly tweet about Dave Chappelle hosting SNL has no engagement, but inspired this New York Post clickbait article.Elon Musk owns Twitter, but will allow Jack Sweeney to stay on and track his private plane. Check out his website right here.Khalil Othman apparently exists, but not when we call him.Celebrity Madness: Britney Spears went on a new rant how spinning helps cure her incurable nerve damage. Did you know Sigourney Weaver can hold her breath for 6 minutes? BLOOP! More grim details of the Aaron Carter crime scene. Jessica Simpson looks bizarre and may not be able to read. Selena Gomez needs to stop beefing with her organ donor.George Best was the best drunk possibly ever.Here is an excellent road rage fight. Truck vs PT Cruiser: Who Ya Got?Only 10 out of 148 Michigan politicians aren't accepting money from DTE.Cher can't stop bragging about nailing a dude 40 years younger than her.Guess what happens in this sweet Camaro video...The Blended Festival is the new Fyre Festival.Drew loved 'Don't Worry Darling'. Marc recommends All Quiet on the Western Front. Black Panther: Wakanda Forever looks meh.Joe Biden almost fell again.The Powerball is $1.9 billion dollars.Some people are saying Michigan Supreme Court Justice Brian Zahra is the new Herschel Walker.The Alvin Kamara assault video has been released and BranDon is afraid it may hurt his fantasy team.University of Kentucky student Sophia Rosing got really drunk and said really dumb things while being filmed. She's been cancels for being racist and arrested for 3 assaults.The Brooklyn Nets are being pressured NOT to hire Ime Udoka.LeBron James is caught in another lie. More like LieBron James, right?Eli Zaret's Local 4 special will re-air the Wednesday before Thanksgiving. Someone out there has seen Sonny Eliot nude and you know who you are.Former WDIV meteorologist Andrew Humphrey gets a new gig in Memphis TN. Howard Stern is not a Herschel Walker fan.Social media is dumb, but we're on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter (Drew and Mike Show, Marc Fellhauer, Trudi Daniels and BranDon).