Podcasts about Eyewitness News

American television newscast format

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Eyewitness News

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Best podcasts about Eyewitness News

Latest podcast episodes about Eyewitness News

P3 Musikdokumentär
Kiss - rockbandet som lät maskerna falla

P3 Musikdokumentär

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 69:11


Det här är berättelsen om rockbandet som blev kända för sin gränslöshet på scen, om deras uppgång och fall och när det är dags att visa sitt rätta ansikte. Det är nyårsafton i New York, 1973. Trots att det är långt kvar till midnatt har publiken på Academy of music redan korkat upp.De flesta är här för att se Blue Oyster Cult och Iggy and The Stooges, men det hittills rätt okända förbandet har också dragit publik. Det ryktas om att deras utflippade scenshower inte liknar någonting man sett förut och många undrar vilka som döljer sig bakom de vita och svarta maskerna. Det går ett sus genom publiken. Ut på scenen stolpar Kiss, vitsminkade i skyhöga platåskor, svart läder och tuperade hår. Bara några månader tidigare stretade bandet runt på olika sunkhak i New York. Nu står de här, framför en stor publik, på ett av stans mest creddiga konsertställen. Alla i bandet vet: det är nu det gäller. Kiss ska senare bli kända för sina mäktiga scenshower där leviterande trumset, pyroteknik och eldkanoner ingår, men ikväll ska basisten Gene Simmons göra något han aldrig har gjort på scen förut.I slutet av låten Firehouse går Gene fram till scenkanten med en fackla i näven, han breder ut sina fladdermusvingar, höjer facklan och blåser eld.Publiken fullkomligt exploderar, och Gene Simmons tuperade kalufs fattar eld - för allra första gången. P3 Musikdokumentär om Kiss är berättelsen om bandet vars vilda konserter och noggrant utmejslade scenpersonas tar dem till den absoluta toppen men som snart ska befinna sig vid ett vägskäl ska de fortsätta gömma sig bakom maskerna, eller ska de visa sina rätta ansikten?Dokumentären gjordes av Siri Hill sommaren 2022. Producent Hanna Frelin. Exekutiv producent Lars Truedsson. Tekniker Fredrik Nilsson. Programmet görs av produktionsbolaget Tredje Statsmakten Media.Medverkande: Carl Linnaeus, Kristofer Andersson och Monica Borgman.Biografierna KISS den osminkade sanningen av Carl Linnaeus och KISS - Partners in crime vol 2 av Carl Linnaeus och Alex Bergdahl samt dokumentären KISSTORY (2021) av D.J Viola är de främsta källorna i programmet.Ljudklipp i dokumentären kommer från: Nightbird med Alison Steele, WTHI-TV, Eyewitness News, People Magazine, Youtube-kanalen KISS ARMY ROCKS, KISS Catalogue, The tomorrow show med Tom Snyder, MTV och KDLT News Today.

Old Chicks Know Sh*t Podcast
Cracking the Code on Sleep in Menopause

Old Chicks Know Sh*t Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 33:04


Sleep! Almost all of us want more or better sleep. Some of us struggle with it. Especially during the menopausal journey. And you sure can't create your kick ass next chapter when you're dragging your see through the day.  So todays episode is all about sleep!  I   I really struggled with insomnia  and constant wale ups during my menopausal journey. Not having enough energy to get through the day to only lay awake all night was truly awful.  I became obsessed with sleep. I thought about all day, I read all the latest research, tried all the supplements and wore the sleep devices and still couldn't get relief.  I finally did but it was a long road.   Thats why I'm excited to share my guest today, Dr. Shelby Harris. She is a behavioural sleep expert who shares her insights, tips and strategies (some of which might sound counter intuitive) for how we can improve our sleep.   We talk about: Why sleep is so important  Getting the right amount of quality sleep How we inadvertently create and perpetuate our sleep issues  Why you shouldn't try to make up for a bad night of sleep Common sleep disruptors Tips and strategies for better sleep (some of which might sound counter intuitive)  If you find yourself struggling with sleep issues, you're going to want to listen to this one.     Dr. Harris is in private practice in White Plains, NY where she specializes in the use of Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) for anxiety and depression. She is board certified in Behavioral Sleep Medicine (BSM) by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and treats a wide variety of sleep disorders (insomnia, nightmares, circadian rhythm disorders, narcolepsy, apnea treatment noncompliance) using evidence-based non-pharmacological treatments.   Dr. Harris has been an invited columnist for the New York Times "Consults Blog," Dr. Oz's website "You Beauty," and Psychology Today and is frequently quoted in the media, including such publications as The New York Times, The Huffington Post, The New Yorker, Wall Street Journal, O Magazine, and New York Magazine. She has appeared on the Today Show, World News with Diane Sawyer, Good Morning America, ABC7-NY's Eyewitness News, CBS News and ABC's Primetime: Live. She is also the author of a book called  The woman's guide to overcoming insomnia.    https://www.drshelbyharris.com/   https://www.amazon.com/Womens-Guide-Overcoming-Insomnia-Medication/dp/0393711617/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1661444774&sr=8-1  

Fresh Faces with Aggie Gold

Michael Bua is a highly experienced union stagehand; “Carp-trician,” having over “25 years of stage experience” with wide ranging equipment expertise!  He is a member of International Alliance of Theatrical Stagehand Employees (I.A.T.S.E.) LOCAL ONE - Member #3050.  Michael's talents include construct, install, maintain and operate the lighting and sound equipment, the scenery, props and special effects which thrill and delight audiences attending Broadway Shows, Concerts at Radio City Music Hall, Madison Square Garden, Carnegie Hall, the magnificent and spectacular productions at The Metropolitan Opera and throughout Lincoln Center, and the many entertaining broadcasts from NBC, CBS, ABC, FOX, CNN and PBS.  Plus numerous cable TV studios, major corporate industrials, galas, fashion shows, fundraisers and special events for a multitude of Entertainment Productions in New York City.He has been a Production Carpenter, Staging Assistant, Electrician and Studio Mechanic, Set-Dresser, Prop-maker, “MacGyver”, Light Board Operator, Moving Light Programmer, Follow Spot Operator, as well as Grip, FX, handled Live Props, Set-Dressing, and Property Assistant.His amazing resume includes these works: “The Book of Mormon” (2009-2015), “Lysistrata Jones”, “The House of Blue Leaves”“HAIR”,  “Elf”,  “How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying”, “The Bronx Bombers” , “Annie”,  “Holler If Ya Hear Me”,  “RENT”, “The Addams Family”, “Hugh Jackman, Back on Broadway”,  “700 Sundays”,  “Rebecca”, “End of the Rainbow”, “Golden Boy”, “The Lion King” And more! The Metropolitan Opera – Lincoln Center, New York  -  (2004 – 2011)Night Gang, Service Crew, Property Department, Lighting Crew and Electrics Shop.Midsummer Night Swing, Lincoln Center Outdoor and Red Carpets.Theatrical Resources  (2007 – present) The Nightly Show with Larry Wilmore,  NBC's New Year's Eve with Carson Daly,  ABC's Dick Clark's Rockin Eve with Ryan Seacrest,  Radio City's Christmas Spectacular Rehearsals at St. Paul's Cathedral,  Rockefeller Center Tree Lighting, NBC & CBS Thanksgiving Day Parade,  America's Got Talent NYC and Las Vegas,  “Women in the World” at The Koch Theatre,  VH1-You Oughta Know Live in Concert,  The Million Second Quiz,  Time Warner Cable Studios Gala,  Hulu,  The US Open, Mercedes Benz Fashion Week,  American Comedy Awards NYC,  Versus Versace Fashion Show, Giorgio Armani Fashion,  TBS/TNT Upfronts,  G-Shock Production Gala,  JC Penny Jingle Mingle LIVE, Victoria's Secret Fashion Shows,  USA Upfronts,  Tommy Hilfiger Fashion Show,  Chanel Gala,Marc Jacobs Fashion Show,  LOGO TV Trailblazers – St. John's Cathedral,  Black Girls Rock – BET Network, VH1 – Storytellers – Jason Mraz,  LEGO,  Minds and Machines,  NIKE GALA; NIKE PHENOM, NIKE COURT,  Nokia Project Blue Box Times Square – Nicki Minaj,  Robinhood Foundation Galas; Javitz Center and Central Park – Black Eyed Peas,  The Bloomberg Party and The Governor's Ball – Randall's Island,  Bon Jovi Live at The Best Buy Theatre, The Grammy's at Madison Square Garden, The Little Shubert Theatre: Tommy Tunes, Hank Williams.NBC Universal – 30 Rockefeller Center Plaza, New York – (1999 - 2009)The Today Show, Weekend Today, The Toyota Concert Series-Dynamic, demanding, high-pressured, 4 hour constrained live television production.-Construction of different stagings and lighting truss configurations.-Installed, operated and maintained a wide variety of electronic peripherals during training, rehearsal and performance concerts.Saturday Night Live, Conan O'Brien, The Carson Daly Show, Countdown with Keith Olbermann, Dateline, NBC Sports, MSNBC and Nightly News.- SNL, The Today Show and Conan O'Brien Prop Department experience.- Obsession Operator, Remote Electrician, Spot Operator and Assistant Lighting DesignerABC Disney – Times Square Studios & 77 West 66th Street, New York – (2006 – present) Regis and Kelly, The View, Eyewitness News, All My Children, One Life to Live, Who Wants to Be a Millionaire.- Carpenter, Prop-man, Electrician, Stagehand.CBS Viacom – 524 West 57th Street, New York – (2006 – present)Evening News with Katie Couric, BET, Guiding Light, Nate Berkus, The Marriage Ref.- Carpenter, Prop-man, Electrician, Stagehand. AMV – All-Mobile-Video – Chelsea Studios - (2006 – present)Martha Stewart, The Whatever Show, Rachael Ray, Wendy Williams, Tyra Banks, Project Runway, The Talk, The Iron Chef, The Food Network, HBO, MTV, VH1, The Discovery Channel, Bravo, A&E, and SciFi…Citi-View Productions – The Rainbow Room – Cipriani's  - (2000 – 2006)- Lighting Designer and technician for multiple galas.IATSE Local 340 – Long Island, New York – (1998 – present)Nassau Coliseum, Jones Beach Theatre, Grumman Studios, CW Post Tilles Center, Hofstra U.Gateway Playhouse, GSD Productions, Bestek Lighting,  Electrician, Ground Rigger, Backline and Technician in a multitude of large-scale theatrical, concert event and touring productions.IATSE Local 4 – Brooklyn Navy Yard, New York Stiegelbauer Carpentry Shop – (1998 – 2004)- Learned valuable carpentry skills building sets for SNL, Guiding Light, and As the World Turns.LOCAL 52 – Experience – Motion Picture Studio Mechanics – (1998 – present)Silvercup Studios, Kaufman Astoria Studios, Paramount Studios and Steiner Studios.Boardwalk Empire, Gossip Girl, Law & Order SVU, Salt, Sex and the City I & II, A Couple of Dicks (Copout), Project Runway, Spiderman, The Sopranos, Non-Stop, The Following.Performance Environment Design Group (PEDG) – David Stark Design - (2006- 2012)Robinhood Foundation Gala – The Jacob Javitz Center, New York- Project Manager, Production Assistant, Lighting Coordinator, Stagehand.Oceanside Public School District – Oceanside, New York – (1998 – 2009)Drama Director and teacher for the Drama Department producing a musical every year with a cast of over 60 children.  Auditioned, cast, and directed children, blocked and facilitated rehearsals, choreographed, taught songs, Designed and constructed scenery, costumes, props and special effects for Beauty and the Beast, Alice in Wonderland, The Wizard of Oz, The Lion King, The Little Mermaid, Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, Cinderella, Aladdin, Annie, and Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.The Stage – Long Island Live Theatre – Merrick, New York – (1994 – 2000)Producer, Box Office Manager, Actor, Director, Designer, Stagehand, Scenic Artist.- Supervised and Managed all ticket sales, advertisements, and bookkeeping.  Produced and performed in The 30th Anniversary of the production HAIR.  Responsibilities also included Technical Direction and Set Design, along with Directing Children's Theatre and performing with them on main stage productions.

america tv women director new york live new year world new york city house las vegas talk law west local theater hbo spider man abc cnn island grammy nbc actor broadway responsibility cbs hair couple salt hulu concerts lego mtv succeed designers saturday night live governor oz wizard construction rent minds pbs rainbow millionaires countdown prop bet long island bravo lion king aladdin today show msnbc designed machines us open fx sopranos carpenter beauty and the beast elf grip little mermaid madison square garden food network hugh jackman cathedrals snow white willy wonka discovery channel vh1 alice in wonderland martha stewart managed wendy williams learned carnegie hall nbc sports book of mormon nonstop chocolate factory addams family gossip girl one life nbc universal macgyver lincoln center technician golden boys dateline katie couric tyra banks project runway ryan seacrest order svu electricians hank williams boardwalk empire carp seven dwarfs metropolitan opera radio city music hall guiding light iron chef dick clark rachael ray all my children installed world turns production assistants carson daly child actors radio city keith olbermann bronx bombers supervised larry wilmore backline international alliance nassau coliseum lighting designer evening news set design nightly news paramount studios eyewitness news red carpets business without really trying brooklyn navy yard nate berkus auditioned cbs viacom mercedes benz fashion week iatse local weekend today stagehand rockin eve lysistrata jones drama department stagehands javitz center set dresser holler if ya hear me marriage ref box office manager million second quiz midsummer night swing
The Overcomer's Podcast
S7:Episode 2 - Jen Maxfield - More After the Break

The Overcomer's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 30:08


Jen Maxfield is an Emmy-award winning reporter and anchor for NBC New York. Prior to joining the station in 2013, she worked for Eyewitness News for ten years, also as a reporter and substitute anchor. Starting her broadcast career in Binghamton, New York, Maxfield worked in Syracuse before moving to New York City in 2002. Maxfield's first book, More After the Break: A Reporter Returns to Ten Unforgettable News Stories will be published by Greenleaf Book Group in July of 2022. Maxfield revisits the most memorable stories she has covered during her two-decade career, describing in heart-pounding detail how the events unfolded through the eyewitness perspectives and her own. Returning to the families years–even decades– after their stories were featured on the news gives Maxfield an opportunity to ask the burning question she had always pondered: what happened after the live truck pulled away? One review called the book, “impossible to put down,” while another veteran journalist said the book “will strengthen your faith in humanity.” Maxfield is also an adjunct professor at the Graduate School of Journalism at Columbia University. She teaches courses in broadcast journalism, including Video 1 and On-Air skills. A graduate of the class of 2000, Maxfield enjoys coming back to her Alma Mater to educate the next generation. She finds it truly rewarding to work with young people as they launch their journalism careers. Maxfield's experience in academia has also proved useful when she is coaching other professionals who want to convey their message clearly and cohesively in front of a live audience. Her advice has helped clients feel more comfortable and confident in front of the camera. Because of her live television and lecturing background, Maxfield is an experienced speaker, emcee, and moderator, having hosted dozens of events for various charitable and educational organizations. After thousands of live shots, she is well-prepared for the unpredictability of a live event. Maxfield and her husband, Scott Ostfeld, met as undergraduate students at Columbia University. Living in Northern New Jersey with their three children, they enjoy travel, hiking, tennis, and trying out new vegan restaurants and recipes. Maxfield grew up in Tenafly, New Jersey as the oldest of six children. An 8-varsity letter athlete, she held the Tenafly High School high jump record (5'3”) for 26 years.

Early Breakfast with Abongile Nzelenzele
Are we seeing a surge in children being kidnapped?

Early Breakfast with Abongile Nzelenzele

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 2:42


Guest: Bianca Van Aswegen | National case officer at Missing Children SA Africa is joined by Bianca van Aswegen, National Coordinator at Missing Children South Africa to talk about if we're seeing a surge in children being kidnapped. This comes after the news broke yesterday of a 6-year-old boy that has been kidnapped in Kensington, Cape Town. It's reported that two suspicious vehicles were spotted near but not at the boy's school on Wednesday morning. Police have told Eyewitness News that six suspects fled the area and that no one's been arrested as yet.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham
TODAY MARKS 10 YEARS SINCE THE MARIKANA MASSACRE

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 5:55


Guest: Theto Mahlakoana is a Reporter at Eyewitness News, and she joins John to discuss the official ceremony that has been conducted today to mark 10 years since the Marikana Massacre.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Best of Breakfast with Bongani Bingwa
Newly weekly Eyewitness News column with Mandy Weiner

The Best of Breakfast with Bongani Bingwa

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 5:08


Journalist, author, and 702 host Mandy Wiener discusses the launch of her new weekly column on Eyewitness News, as well as a preview of what to expect in her first column, which is now available on the news website.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The My Future Business™ Show

InvisaBlend Dino Dondiego Interview with founder of InvisaBlend Hair Loss Treatment Dino Dondiego #InvisaBlend #Hairloss #DinoDondiego Hi, and welcome to the show! On today's show I have the pleasure of welcoming author and founder of Invisablend Mr. Dino Dondiego to talk about hair loss, and how his revolutionary technology is changing the way hair loss is treated, and how you can get involved with Invisablend. During today's content-rich call, Dino shares his revolutionary technology behind adding hair to make hair fuller. Dino's products are made for women or men and for anyone with any kind of hair situation. His products are referred to as a cure-all because they work on any hair problem. Not only has Dino lectured on hair loss, corresponding therapies and treatments at leading industry summits, including the Beauty Pro Health Fitness Show and The Beauty Industry Empowering Seminar, he's also been featured on a number of radio and television shows such as Good Day New York, Eyewitness News, and America's Talking. Dino invented a highly advanced hair extension and hair replacement method that blends single real hairs in between a person's existing hair so the hair can still grow freely, and it's called InvisaBlend. A key part of the product is called a ‘Micro Strand' which is the key component to why this technology is revolutionary. Dino mentions that this technology type in the world that adds additional hair to make hair fuller or longer that uses the individual's own hair, keeps their own existing hair safe & healthy, and adds hair in a way that replicates the same way hair grows out of the scalp. InvisaBlend also offers online video training courses to hair professionals, salon owners, entrepreneurs, and who want to be entrepreneurs. This is also a great opportunity for salespeople and or anyone that wants to either start their own business or become an InvisaBlend Agent to offer this technology. During this interview Dino explains in detail how this technology works, the comparisons to any other technologies in the world, what's involved with his training courses, how to implement this technology into someone's existing business, and what's involved in becoming an InvisaBlend Agent. To learn more about the topics discussed, or to contact Dino directly, click the link below. Disclosure of Material Connection: This is a “sponsored post.” My Future Business is disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

The Midday Report with Mandy Wiener
A wrap of the NUMSA congress.

The Midday Report with Mandy Wiener

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 4:08


Uveka Rangapa standing in: Theto Mahlakoana | Reporter at Eyewitness News   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Midnight Train Podcast
Crazy Sting Operations

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 140:13


www.patreon.com/accidentaldads for bonus content and to support the show AND The Save The Music Foundation!   Top police stings   A sting operation is a deceitful operation used by law enforcement to apprehend criminals in the act of trying to commit a crime. In order to obtain proof of a suspect's misconduct, a typical sting involves an undercover law enforcement officer, investigator, or cooperative member of the public acting as a criminal partner or prospective victim and cooperating with a suspect's activities. Journalists for the mass media occasionally use sting operations to film and disseminate footage of illegal conduct.   Sting procedures are prevalent in many nations, including the United States, but are prohibited in others, like Sweden and France. Certain sting operations are prohibited, such as those carried out in the Philippines where it is against the law for police enforcement to act as drug traffickers in order to catch purchasers of illegal substances.   Examples   Offering free sports or airline tickets to lure fugitives out of hiding. Deploying a bait car (also called a honey trap) to catch a car thief Setting up a seemingly vulnerable honeypot computer to lure and gain information about hackers Arranging for someone under the legal drinking age to ask an adult to buy an alcoholic beverage or tobacco products for them Passing off weapons or explosives (whether fake or real), to a would-be terrorist Posing as: someone who is seeking illegal drugs, contraband, or child pornography, to catch a supplier (or as a supplier to catch a customer) a child in a chat room to identify a potential online child predator a potential customer of illegal prostitution, or as a prostitute to catch a would-be customer a hitman to catch customers and solicitors of murder-for-hire; or as a customer to catch a hitman a spectator of an illegal dogfighting ring a documentary film crew to lure a pirate to the country where a crime was committed.   Whether sting operations constitute entrapment raises ethical questions. Law enforcement might have to be careful not to incite someone who wouldn't have otherwise committed a crime to do so. Additionally, while conducting such operations, the police frequently commit the same crimes, like purchasing or selling narcotics, enticing prostitutes, etc. The defendant may raise the entrapment defense in common law jurisdictions.   Contrary to common belief, however, laws against entrapment do not forbid undercover police personnel from pretending to be criminals or deny that they are police officers. Entrapment is normally only a defense when suspects are coerced into confessing to a crime they probably would not have otherwise committed. However, the legal meaning of this coercion differs widely from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. Entrapment might be used as a defense, for instance, if undercover agents forced a possible suspect to manufacture illicit narcotics in order to sell them. Entrapment has often not taken place if a suspect is already producing narcotics and authorities pretend as purchasers to apprehend them.   Operation Entebbe The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) commandos successfully carried out Operation Entebbe or Operation Thunderbolt, a counterterrorism hostage-rescue mission, at Entebbe Airport in Uganda on July 4, 1976. A week earlier, on June 27, two members of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine - External Operations (PFLP-EO) (who had previously split from the PFLP of George Habash) and two members of the German Revolutionary Cells hijacked an Air France Airbus A300 jet airliner carrying 248 passengers. The declared goal of the hijackers was to trade the hostages for the release of 13 detainees in four other countries and the release of 40 Palestinian terrorists and related prisoners who were detained in Israel. The flight, which had left Tel Aviv for Paris, was rerouted after a stopover in Athens through Benghazi to Entebbe, the country of Uganda's principal airport. The ruler Idi Amin, who had been made aware of the hijacking from the start[10], encouraged the hijackers and personally greeted them. The hijackers confined all Israelis and a few non-Israeli Jews into a separate room after transferring all captives from the plane to a deserted airport facility.  148 captives who were not Israelis were freed and taken to Paris over the course of the next two days. Ninety-four passengers—mostly Israelis—and the 12-person Air France crew were held captive and threatened with execution.  Based on information from the Israeli intelligence service Mossad, the IDF took action. If the demands for the release of the prisoners were not granted, the hijackers threatened to murder the hostages. The preparation of the rescue effort was prompted by this threat. These strategies included getting ready for armed opposition from the Uganda Army. It was a nighttime operation. For the rescue mission, Israeli transport planes flew 100 commandos to Uganda over a distance of 4,000 kilometers (2,500 miles). The operation took 90 minutes to complete after a week of planning. Out of the 106 captives still held, 102 were freed, and three were murdered. In a hospital, the second captive was later slain. Lt. Col. Yonatan Netanyahu, the unit leader, was one of the five injured Israeli commandos. Netanyahu was Benjamin Netanyahu's elder sibling and the future Israeli prime minister. Eleven Soviet-built MiG-17s and MiG-21s of the Ugandan air force were destroyed, and all five hijackers and forty-five Ugandan troops were killed. Idi Amin gave the command to attack and kill Kenyans living in Uganda after the operation because Kenyan sources supported Israel. 245 Kenyans in Uganda were killed as a consequence, and 3,000 left the nation. In honor of Yonatan Netanyahu, the commander of the force, Operation Entebbe, which had the military codename Operation Thunderbolt, is occasionally referred to retroactively as Operation Jonathan.   Operation Valkyrie Senior Nazi military officers and Adolf Hitler convened in the Wolf's Lair in Rastenburg, Eastern Prussia, on July 20, 1944. Hitler's body was discovered scattered across the table as the Nazi military chiefs sat down to plan troop deployments on the Eastern Front when an explosion burst through the steamy meeting room. With the Führer's death, the Nazi threat to Europe could have been lifted. or so it seems at first.   Claus von Stauffenberg and his accomplices believed they had turned the course of World War II and maybe saved thousands of extra lives for a brief period of time in history. The July Plot, also known as Operation Valkyrie, was the most famous attempt to have Hitler killed, although it was ultimately unsuccessful for a variety of reasons, some of which are still unknown to this day. The July Plot Is Hatched Many Germans, including some of the country's top military figures, had begun to lose faith in Germany's ability to win the war by the summer of 1944. Hitler was widely held responsible for ruining Germany. The Wolfsschanze was one of Hitler's military headquarters. A number of prominent politicians and senior military figures devised a plan to murder the Führer by detonating a bomb at a conference there in order to spark political unification and a coup. Operation Valkyrie was the name of the strategy. The plan was that after Hitler's death, the military would assert that the murder was the result of a Nazi Party coup attempt, and the Reserve Army would take significant buildings in Berlin and detain senior Nazi figures. Carl Friedrich Goerdeler would become Germany's new chancellor, and Ludwig Beck would become its first president. The new administration wanted to negotiate a peaceful conclusion to the war, ideally with benefits for Germany. The main conspirators' motives varied, according to Philipp Freiherr Von Boeselager, one of the last remaining participants in the July Plot. Many of them only saw it as a means of avoiding military defeat, while others hoped to at least partially restore some of the nation's morals. They chose Claus von Stauffenberg, a young colonel in the German army, to carry out the assassination. Despite not being a member of the Nazi party in the traditional sense, Stauffenberg was a devoted German patriot. In the end, he came to think that if Germany was to be saved, it was his patriotic duty to expel Adolf Hitler. Hitler, though, had experienced assassination attempts before. Assassination attempts against Hitler had been more frequent since his spectacular ascent to the top of Germany's political scene in the late 1930s. Hitler, who was becoming more and more paranoid, frequently altered his plans without warning and at the last minute. What Went Wrong Stauffenberg entered the bunker at Wolfsschanze on July 20, 1944. The conference was planned to take place in a concrete, windowless subterranean bunker that was closed off by a large steel door. By making sure it happened within one of these facilities, the detonation would be confined and anyone nearby the explosive device would die quickly from the shrapnel. The conference was moved to an above-ground wooden bunker with better air circulation on July 20 due to the oppressively hot weather, according to Pierre Galante's Operation Valkyrie: The German Generals' Plot Against Hitler. Numerous windows, a wooden table, and other beautiful furniture were all present in the area, which meant that the potential explosion would be much diminished since the energy of the blast would be absorbed and diffused. Stauffenberg was aware that this was the case, but he nonetheless proceeded, assuming that two explosives would be sufficient to destroy the room and kill everyone within. Stauffenberg excused himself when he arrived, saying that he needed to change his clothing, and went to a private room. The two explosives needed to be armed and primed. However, he only had time to arm one of the two devices due to an unexpected phone call and a quick knock at his door. Thus, the possibility of a greater blast was cut in half. Stauffenberg realized that in order to cause any kind of harm, the explosive device needed to be placed as near to Hitler as possible. He was able to get a seat as near to Hitler as possible with only one other person between them by claiming that his hearing was impaired due to his wounds. Placing the bag as near to Hitler as possible, Stauffenberg then left the room pretending to take a personal call. The briefcase was accidentally shifted to the opposite side of a large wooden leg that was supporting the meeting room table as another official was taking a seat. The Aftermath Panic broke out after the device exploded at precisely 12:42 pm. Twenty individuals were hurt, including three cops who subsequently died from their injuries, and a stenographer was instantaneously murdered. Stauffenberg and his assistant Werner von Haeften leapt into a staff car and bluffed their way past three different military checkpoints to flee the mayhem at the Wolfsschanze complex because they believed that Hitler was indeed dead. Hitler, however, along with everyone else who was protected by the large wooden table leg, only suffered a few minor cuts and an eardrum perforation. He had fully torn-up pants, and the Nazi leadership would subsequently utilize pictures of them in a propaganda effort. Ian Kershaw, a historian, claims that during the explosion, contradictory news concerning Hitler's fate came. In spite of the disarray, the Reserve Army started detaining senior Nazi officials in Berlin. The entire scheme, however, was eventually thwarted by delays, unclear communication, and the announcement that Hitler was still alive. The conspirators were all given the death penalty in a hastily called court martial the same evening by General Friedrich Fromm. In the courtyard of the Bendlerblock, a makeshift firing squad murdered Stauffenberg, von Haeften, Olbricht, and another officer, Albrecht Mertz von Quirnheim, while Ludwig Beck committed himself. At Berlin's Plötzensee jail, Berthold Stauffenberg was gently strangled while the incident was being recorded for Hitler to see. Hitler's life was ultimately saved that day by a number of interrelated reasons, but the conspirators were right that Germany was headed for disaster. Less than a year later, the Nazi leader and his closest advisers committed suicide. Operation Iceman Ever wonder what its like working undercover with an alleged murderer? Well, let's just say it's not hard to get a stuffy nose around this case… In fact, serial killer Richard Kuklinski's preferred method of murder involved using a nasal spray bottle to spritz cyanide into the faces of his victims. As a result, undercover agent Dominick Polifrone was never more on guard than during the 18 months he spent building a case against the so-called Iceman. “No matter where I went with him, I wore this leather jacket with a pocket sewn inside containing a small-caliber weapon,” recalls Polifrone, who gained his target's confidence and taped dozens of their conversations. “I knew that I was somewhere on his hit list. If he'd pulled out that nasal spray, I'd have to protect myself.” The streetwise New Jersey officer acquired enough proof before Kuklinski had suspicions, preventing that situation from occurring. Finally, the enormous 6-foot-4 gangland killer was apprehended thanks to his evidence. “I've met hundreds of bad guys, but Kuklinski was a totally different type of individual,” he tells The Post. “He was coldhearted — ice-cold like the devil. He had no remorse about anything.”  Kuklinski was captured by Polifrone in a combined operation between the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms and the office of the New Jersey attorney general. The criminal, who was a leading suspect in the murder of a mobster whose body was found two years after his disappearance, was posing as a respectable businessman residing in suburban Dumont, New Jersey. The reason the medical examiners discovered ice in the muscle tissue was because Kuklinski, who earned his notoriety for frequently freezing the bodies of his victims and then defrosting them, erred that time. Police made an indirect connection between the deceased man and Kuklinski, who was charged with a number of previous homicides.  “We had to get something nobody knew,” recalls Polifrone. The sting only appears briefly on screen in the film. In order to gain Kuklinski's trust, Polifrone, a resident of Hackensack, New Jersey, pretended to be a "bad person" for a whole year and a half. They met in parks and rest areas along highways and discussed the horrific killings Kuklinski had carried out, including a Mafia hit in Detroit for which he was paid $65,000. Additionally, there were "statement killings." To put a dead canary in the mouth of a victim as a warning to other victims, one mafia leader paid him extra. Another occasion, Kuklinski made light of the fact that he saw a gang member consume an entire cheeseburger laced with cyanide before passing away while joking with Polifrone. Recalls the cop: “He told me that cyanide normally works real quick and easy, but that ‘this guy has the constitution of a God damn ox, and is just eating and eating.  “He said he almost ate the whole burger and then, bam, he's down!” Polifrone knew exactly how to play his role. “I laughed, of course,” he shrugs. “That's what bad guys do.”  Paradoxically, Kuklinski was a committed family man. He led a Jekyll-and-Hyde existence.  “He never socialized, gambled or messed around with other women,” adds Polifrone. “He lived for his wife and kids.” One minute he'd be repairing his daughters' toys, the next, dismembering a body with a chain saw and stuffing it into an oil drum. “He would come home and completely shut off this murderous component and seek security and love from his family,” says “Iceman” director Vromen. “He fulfilled the need to provide for them by killing.” Polifrone finally nailed Kuklinski after tricking him into buying what he thought was pure cyanide. A team of feds and ATF officers arrested him in December 1986. Twenty-eight years later, he reflects on the man who died, apparently of natural causes, in Trenton Prison in 2006 at age 70. Eyebrows were raised because he was due to appear as a witness at the trial of a Gambino family underboss. “I hope he died a slow death because of what he did to families and individuals,” concludes Polifrone. “He had no mercy. And if it was foul play, that's OK with me.” So let's talk about some controversial sting operations you may or may not have heard of.   ACORN Sting   Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now is known as ACORN. ACORN was a group of neighborhood-based organizations in the US that supported low- and middle-income families. They also offered details on affordable housing and voter registration. James O'Keefe and Hannah Giles, two young conservative activists, published recordings that had been edited with care in 2009. The two pretended to be a pimp and a prostitute before using a hidden camera to get unflattering answers from ACORN workers that seemed to give them advice on how to hide their prostitution business and avoid paying taxes.The plea for assistance in obtaining funding for a brothel didn't appear to deter the ACORN employees either. This sparked a national debate and led to a reduction in financing from public and private sources. ACORN declared on March 22, 2010, that it was disbanding and shutting all of its connected state chapters as a result of declining funding. Interesting fact: On January 25, 2010, James O'Keefe and three other people were detained on felony charges for allegedly tampering with the phones at Democratic Senator Mary Landrieu's office in New Orleans. O'Keefe stated that he was looking into claims that Landrieu's staff had dismissed constituent phone calls over the health care issue. O'Keefe recorded the action as they pretended to be telephone repairmen.In the end, they were accused with breaking into a government building under false pretenses, a misdemeanor. Following his admission of guilt, O'Keefe received a three-year probationary period, 100 hours of community service, and a $1,500 fine.   Operation West End The largest undercover news story in Indian journalism has been described like this. In order to expose the alleged culture of bribery inside the Indian Ministry of Defense, a well-known newspaper from India by the name of Tehelka—which translates as "sensation" in Hindi—started its first significant undercover operation, "Operation West End" in 2001. Two reporters from the publication pretended to be London-based armaments dealers from a fake firm. In the undercover film, numerous politicians and defense officials are shown discussing and accepting bribes in exchange for assisting them in obtaining government contracts, including Bangaru Laxman, secretary of the ruling BJP party. Laxman and Military Minister George Fernandes (shown above) resigned following the release of the tapes, and a number of other defense ministry employees were placed on administrative leave.   Interesting Fact: Instead of initially acting on the evidence from the sting operation, the Indian government accused the newspaper of fabricating the allegations. The main financial backers of Tehelka were made targets of investigations, and the newspaper company was almost ruined. In 2003, Tehelka was re-launched as a weekly newspaper, and was funded by faithful subscribers and other well-wishers. In 2007, Tehelka shifted to a regular magazine format.   Senator Larry Craig On June 11, 2007, an undercover police officer conducting a sting operation targeting males cruising for sex at the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport detained Idaho Senator Larry Craig. Sgt. Dave Karsnia, the arresting officer, claimed that just after noon, the suspect entered a restroom and shut the door. Craig then moved into the stall next to him and propped his suitcase up against the stall door's front. By obscuring the front view, this is frequently done in an effort to hide sexual activity. Several minutes later, the officer claimed to have noticed Craig looking into his stall through a gap, tapping his right foot repeatedly, then moving it till it brushed Karsnia's. Craig then passed his hand under the stall divider into Karsnia's stall with his palm up and guided it along the divider toward the front of the stall three times. Karsnia then waved his badge back, to which the senator responded, “No!” The senator pleaded guilty to disorderly conduct and paid a fine, but changed his mind after word of his arrest later became public. Craig claimed he just had a “wide stance”, and he only pleaded guilty to avoid a spectacle.An appeals court rejected his request to change his mind about entering a guilty plea. Craig completed his time in the Senate but was unable to have his case dismissed by the Senate Ethics Committee. Craig departed office on January 3, 2009, having not to run for reelection in 2008. Fascinating Fact: Soon after Craig was arrested, the men's room started to resemble a tourist destination, with people coming to seek directions and take photographs. Even restroom tissue may be purchased on eBay. Listen to the conversation between Senator Craig and Sgt. Karsnia immediately following the arrest here.   7 Sarah Ferguson was victimized by Mazher Mahmood, a reporter for the tabloid daily "News of the World," in May 2010. In order to set up a meeting with Ferguson, Mahmood pretended to be a wealthy international businessman. The Duchess, who was discreetly recorded throughout the encounter, offered to connect the "tycoon" with Prince Andrew's influential inner circle. "500,000 pounds when you can, to me, open doors," Sarah Ferguson is heard saying on the video. She may also be seen removing a briefcase that is holding $40,000 in cash. After the event was reported, Ferguson's spokesman claimed she was both "devastated" and "regretful." She said that she had been drinking before asking for the money and was "in the gutter at that point" in an interview with Oprah Winfrey. Mazher Mahmood, the guy who pretended to be the tycoon, is referred to as the "Fake Sheikh" and has conned several famous people. No one is certain if that is his true name or what his real history is since he likes to make things as mysterious as possible. The journalist denies ever allowing his face to appear in any of his pieces and claims to have received several death threats. He also avoids public appearances.   Bait Cars The Minneapolis Police Department employed the first bait cars in the 1990s. The largest bait car fleet in North America is now situated in Surrey, British Columbia, which is widely regarded as the continent's "auto theft capital." The cars are carefully modified, equipped with GPS tracking equipment, audio/video surveillance, and an engine-disabling remote control. It has helped to lower car theft by 47% when it was introduced in Surrey, British Columbia, in 2004. In one of the more contentious bait vehicle stings, a lady was murdered nearly instantaneously after a robber driving a bait car drove into her in Dallas, Texas, in 2008. To resolve the litigation, $245,000 was given to the victim's family. Fact: The key to determining whether police are utilizing a bait car improperly and would result in entrapment is if they left it in a way that would tempt someone who would not ordinarily commit a crime. Here, you can view one of the more eye-catching (to put it mildly) bait vehicle stings. Many others will undoubtedly have the same thoughts as I had. “Where the heck was the kill switch?”   Marion Barry A well-known politician and former mayor of Washington, D.C., Marion Barry. Police were going to conduct an undercover narcotics transaction with former Virgin Islands official Charles Lewis on December 22, 1988, but they were turned back when they discovered Mayor Marion Barry was in Lewis's hotel room. This prompted a grand jury inquiry into potential mayor meddling in the narcotics probe. Barry testified for three hours in front of the grand jury before telling reporters he had done nothing wrong. Then, on January 18, 1990, Barry was arrested in a Washington, D.C. hotel after using crack cocaine in a room with his former girlfriend, who had turned informant for the FBI. This was the result of a sting operation put up by the FBI and D.C. Police. Barry said the now-famous phrase, "Bitch set me up," which has come to be linked with him. Following his arrest and subsequent trial, Barry made the decision not to run for mayor again. He was charged with 14 charges by a grand jury, including suspected grand jury perjury. The mayor could have spent 26 years in prison if found guilty on all 14 counts. Barry was only given a six-month prison term after the jury found him guilty of using cocaine. Barry campaigned for municipal council after being let out of prison. He garnered 70% of the vote due to his widespread popularity and the perception held by many that Marion Barry was the target of a political witch hunt by the government. Then, in 1995, Barry won a fourth term as mayor of Washington, D.C. Barry is currently back in his position on the D.C. city council. Regardless of your opinion on Marion Barry, you have to respect his perseverance and drive to help the people of Washington, D.C. The aforementioned occurrence is only a small portion of his remarkable life. A documentary titled "The Nine Lives of Marion Barry" was produced by HBO.    Joran Van der Sloot Dutch national Joran Van der Sloot is a key suspect in the case of Natalee Holloway, who vanished on May 30, 2005, while traveling to Aruba to celebrate her high school graduation. On March 29, 2010, Van der Sloot got in touch with Beth Twitty Holloway's mother's attorney John Q. Kelly, reviving the case. Van der Sloot promised to provide details about Holloway's demise and the whereabouts of her remains in exchange for a total of $250,000 with a $25,000 down payment. After Kelly and Twitty made contact with Alabama law enforcement, the FBI launched a sting operation. On May 10, Van der Sloot accepted a wire transfer of $15,000 to his Dutch bank account along with an additional cash payment of $10,000. He drove Kelly to the location of Holloway's remains in exchange for the cash. He indicated a home, saying that his father had assisted in burying the body in the foundation. The home had not yet been constructed when Holloway vanished, therefore this turned out to be untrue. Later, Van der Sloot informed Kelly through email that the entire incident was a fraud. At this point, police might have detained Van der Sloot for wire fraud and extortion, but they chose to wait while they worked to establish a case of murder against him. Van der Sloot was not only let free, he was also given permission to depart Aruba and travel to Bogotá, Colombia, and then Lima, Peru, with the money he had made from the operation. He met Stephany Flores Ramirez, a 21-year-old University of Lima business student, in a casino hotel in the city. Ramirez and Van der Sloot are seen entering a hotel room together on security footage, but only Van der Sloot is seen exiting. On June 2, Ramirez was discovered dead in the hotel room that Van der Sloot had booked, her neck broken and she had been battered to death. On May 30, 2010, precisely five years after Natalee Holloway vanished, Ramirez passed away. A person arrested Van der Sloot He admitted to the murder on June 3 and June 7. Fascinating fact: Van der Sloot is presently detained at Peru's Miguel Castro jail, where murder charges have been brought. He apparently now claims that if he is permitted to move to a jail in Aruba, he would tell the whereabouts of Natalee Holloway's remains.   Perverted Justice Stings Perverted-Justice is a group that uses volunteers to masquerade as juveniles online, often between the ages of 10-15, and wait for an adult to message or email the decoy back. If the topic becomes sexual, they won't actively reject it or support it. Then, in order to set up a meeting, they will attempt to identify the males by acquiring their phone numbers and other information. The group then provides law enforcement with the information. Additionally, Perverted-Justice has worked with the American reality show "To Catch a Predator." In Murphy, Texas, one of the more contentious instances took place in 2006. Louis Conradt (seen above), a district attorney in Texas, pretended to be a 19-year-old college student and had sexually explicit internet conversations with a person he thought was a 13-year-old kid. They hired an actress to portray the youngster on the phone when Conradt demanded images of the boy's genitalia. Conradt stopped returning phone calls and instant messages, so police and the reality program decided to conduct a search warrant operation at his residence. A gunshot was heard as the police entered the scene to make an arrest. Conradt was inside with a self-inflicted wound when they arrived, and he eventually passed away at a hospital. 23 people were taken into custody for online solicitation of minors as a consequence of the sting operation in Murphy, Texas. Due to inadequate evidence, none of the 23 instances were prosecuted as of June 2007. Conradt's family launched a $105 million lawsuit against Dateline's To Catch a Predator series. The dispute was ultimately resolved outside of court. All next episodes' development was halted by the network in 2008. Rachel Hoffman On February 22, 2007, a traffic stop in Tallahassee, Florida, resulted in Rachel Hoffman being found in possession of 25 grams of marijuana. Then, on April 17, 2008, police searched her flat and found 4 ecstasy tablets and 151.7 grams of marijuana. Police allegedly threatened to put her in jail unless she worked as an undercover informant for them, according to her account. She was then dispatched untrained to an undercover gathering to purchase a weapon and a significant quantity of narcotics from two alleged drug traffickers. The suspects relocated the drug purchase while she was there. When she departed the buy place in the car with the two suspects, the police officers who were keeping an eye on the sting lost sight of her. The identical gun she was intended to purchase was used to kill her by the two suspects while they were in motion. Two days later, her corpse was discovered close to Perry, Florida. One of the murder suspects was convicted of first-degree murder and given a life sentence without the possibility of parole on December 17, 2009, which would have been Rachel Hoffman's 25th birthday. Trial for the second murder suspect is set for October 2010. Interesting Fact: On May 7, 2009, a law called “Rachel's Law” was passed by the Florida State Senate. Rachel's Law requires law enforcement agencies to (a) provide special training for officers who recruit confidential informants, (b) instruct informants that reduced sentences may not be provided in exchange for their work, and (c) permit informants to request a lawyer if they want one.    Mr. Big The Royal Canadian Mounted Police created Mr. Big, sometimes known as "the Canadian method," in the early 1990s in response to unsolved killings. It is employed in Canada and Australia, but many other nations, like the United States and England, view it as entrapment. The technique works something like this: An undercover police unit poses as members of a fictitious gang, into which the suspect is inducted. The suspect is invited to participate in a series of criminal activities (all faked by the police). In addition, the “gang members” build a personal relationship with the suspect, by drinking together and other social activities. After some time, the gang boss, Mr. Big, is presented to him. The police have a fresh interest in the first crime, and the suspect is instructed to provide the gang with further information. They clarify that Mr. Big might be able to affect the course of the police investigation, but only if he confesses to the full extent of the crime. He is also warned that if he conceals any other previous offenses, the gang could decide against working with him in the future since he would be a burden. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police are shown in the picture above carrying the hats of the four officers who were killed in Edmonton, Canada, in 2005 at a memorial service. Two of the men serving prison sentences for the murders made confessions to Mr. Big operatives.Interesting Fact: In British Columbia, the technique has been used over 180 times, and, in 80% of the cases, it resulted in either a confession or the elimination of the suspect from suspicion. However, cases of false confessions and wrongful convictions have recently come to the public's attention, and many are starting to question the controversial technique. In 2007, a documentary was made, called Mr. Big, that was very critical of the procedure.   You can't talk about undercover operations without talking about the mob. Here are five badasses who infiltrated the mob.   In law enforcement, working as an undercover officer carries the high risk of discovery by criminal suspects, leading to violence, torture and death. But the rewards can be huge, with wire recordings and eyewitness testimony that can result in arrests and convictions. A trained officer knows how to strategize, win the confidence of their targets and get them to reveal what's needed to build a case to take to trial. It requires an unusual kind of person, able to work under stress, stay focused, pull off the character he or she is playing and be prepared to tell many lies. What follows here is a list of five remarkable individuals whose undercover operations, despite real dangers, resulted in the convictions of leaders and associates of organized crime, over almost a century. This list leaves out many other famous undercover officers, whom we would like to recognize in the future. Perhaps because of the gravity of the investigations, and the financial resources required, all of these undercover officers worked for agencies of the U.S. government. MICHAEL MALONE Mike Malone worked undercover for the Treasury Department's Intelligence Unit. In the late 1920s, he infiltrated Al Capone's Chicago Outfit and helped convict the crime boss of tax evasion. Michael Malone had all the makings of an undercover agent who would successfully infiltrate Al Capone's Chicago gang for nearly two years. Malone, whose parents came over from Ireland, grew up in New Jersey and meshed well with its European immigrants, eventually learning to speak Gaelic, Italian, Yiddish and Greek. With his “black Irish” dark hair and skin, he resembled someone from southern Europe. After finessing his way into Capone's inner circle in 1929, Malone proved invaluable to his superiors in the Treasury Department pursuing a tax evasion case against the Chicago crime boss. Despite the danger, Malone kept an iron will. Blowing his cover would have proved fatal. But given his skills, it didn't happen. While Malone kept up the charade, he delivered information that proved incriminating not only for Capone, but for his top enforcer, Frank Nitti (aka Nitto). Malone remained disguised within Capone's bootlegging band even for a time after the feds filed tax charges against Capone, Nitti and Capone's brother, Ralph, in 1931. When Capone's jury trial commenced, and the Treasury Department removed Malone from his undercover job, the agent gained a bit of respect from the embarrassed gang chief himself. In the Chicago courthouse, Malone happened to enter an elevator where Capone stood with his defense lawyers. “The only thing that fooled me was your looks,” Capone is said as to have remarked to Malone. “You look like a Wop. You took your chances, and I took mine. I lost.” From 1929 to 1931, Malone fed intelligence about Capone that would culminate in the historic conviction of the nation's most notorious Mob boss. His fascinating story began after his service in World War I. With law enforcement his career goal, Malone joined the Treasury Department's Intelligence Unit later known as the “T-Men.” Early on, in the 1920s, Malone appreciated how donning disguises brought him closer to the suspects. He posed in everyman roles such as garbage man and shoe shiner. Elmer Irey, chief of the Intelligence Unit, had worked with undercover agent Malone on Prohibition cases. Once, Irey enlisted Malone to smash a West Coast version of “Rum Row,” rumrunners selling contraband Canadian liquor from ships off the coast of San Francisco. Malone posed as gangster from Chicago in hiding, with money to invest in illegal booze. He devised a nighttime sting operation. Agents posing as bootleggers drove speedboats out to the booze-laden mother ship and, after money changed hands, Malone fired off a flare, signaling the U.S. Coast Guard, which boarded the mother ship and arrested the astonished bootleggers. President Herbert Hoover entered office in March 1929, a few weeks following the infamous St. Valentine's Day Massacre in Chicago, where seven men associated with Capone's bitter rival in bootlegging, George “Bugs” Moran, died in gunfire. Hoover conferred with Irey and urged him to compile a team of special agents to “get Capone” on tax charges. Meanwhile, another team of Prohibition Unit agents in Chicago, headed by Eliot Ness, would attack Capone on violations of federal liquor laws under the Volstead Act. Irey appointed Special Agent Frank Wilson, Malone and several others to the get Capone team. Meanwhile, a group of wealthy business executives in Chicago, called the Secret Six, donated large sums of money for expenses to assist the feds in getting Capone. Malone used their largess to purchase some expensive clothing to look the part of a well-heeled hoodlum that Capone would envy. Malone set about infiltrating Capone's underworld at its core – the Lexington Hotel, where the boss and his men lived. Wearing a fancy suit, purple shirt and white hat, Malone sat in the lobby, reading newspapers for days on end. He spoke in an Italian accent, introduced himself as “Mike Lepito,” met Capone men playing craps and played the part of a mobster. He mailed letters to friends in Philadelphia, who wrote back. Capone's guys broke into his room, noted his pricey checkered suits and silk underwear. They opened his mail from Philadelphia, read the letters written, impressively, in underworld lingo they understood. They informed Capone. Finally, Capone sent a cohort down to the lobby to ask “Lepito” about his business in town. “Keeping quiet,” Malone replied in his Italian inflection. In the coming days, over drinks, Malone told the guy he was on the lam for burglary in Philadelphia. That got Malone invitations to play poker and trade gossip with the gang, then dinner at their hangout, the New Florence, and then to attend the birthday party Capone planned for Frank Nitti at the Lexington. Malone met Capone at Nitti's party. The secret agent's new acquaintances included big-shot hoods Nitti, “Machine Gun” Jack McGurn, Jake “Greasy Thumb” Guzik, Paul “The Waiter” Ricca, Murray “The Camel” Humphreys and Sam “Golf Bag” Hunt. Malone was in. He discreetly phoned Wilson about what he'd overheard within the gang. Wilson and his aides traced signatures on bank checks while pursuing tax evasion cases against Nitti and Guzik. A federal court in Chicago convicted Guzik, who got a five-year sentence. But Nitti skipped town. Malone, assigned to find him, followed Nitti's wife to an apartment building in Berwyn, Illinois. There, the cops nabbed Nitti, later sentenced to 18 months in prison for tax evasion. Then the police pinched Al himself following his 1931 indictment on tax charges. “Mike Lepito” was there at the Lexington when Al Capone arrived back, triumphant about his release on $50,000 bail. Malone listened and reported to Wilson about Capone's scheme to bribe and fix the jury in his favor. The feds moved quickly and a judge created a new list of jurors. Malone then reported Capone's plot to hire five gunman from New York to kill four federal officials in Chicago – including Wilson. With safety measures in place, Capone ordered the gunmen to leave town. Capone's trial, after a judge refused to plea bargain with the Mob boss, started in October 1931. Four days afterward, Malone finally gave up the act. The news spread fast to Capone and his men. Malone had heard that Phil D'Andrea, Capone's bodyguard, planned to bring a concealed gun into the courthouse. Malone and another agent frisked and disarmed D'Andrea, and had him arrested. A jury Capone could not fix found the boss guilty on 22 criminal counts. The judge gave him 11 years in the federal pen and a $50,000 fine, plus court costs. Months later, in early 1932, the Intelligence Unit had Malone, Irey, Wilson and Special Agent A. P. Madden probe the kidnapping of aviator Charles Lindbergh's son. The team's persistence paid off within two years, with the capture (and conviction) of suspect Bruno Hauptman, who still had some of the marked currency the agents convinced Lindbergh to use as ransom money. Malone had other notable cases. In 1933, Irey assigned him to find fugitive New York gangster Waxey Gordon, wanted for tax evasion. Malone located Gordon in a remote cottage in the Catskill Mountains. Special Prosecutor Thomas Dewey took the case, and the court put Waxey away for 10 years. A year later, Malone infiltrated Louisiana Governor Huey “Kingfish” Long's crooked crew. After Long's assassination, the IRS won a tax fraud conviction against Malone's target, Long's close aide, Seymour Weiss. In his last undercover operation before his death, the Intelligence Unit gave Malone a large amount of cash and a Cadillac to use in Miami Beach, disguised as a rich syndicate man. He found and reported what the agency wanted – details of a coast-to-coast illegal abortion ring. After Malone's death in 1960, Wilson described him to a news reporter as “the best undercover agent we ever had.” JOSEPH PISTONE Joe Pistone is one of the FBI's most celebrated undercover agents. Using the name Donnie Brasco, he infiltrated the New York Mafia and helped produce 200 indictments. Courtesy of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. In New York City during the mid-1970s, the FBI investigated a rash of truck hijackings happening each day. The agency assigned agent Joseph “Joe” Pistone to go undercover for six months to find out where the Mob-connected thieves took the stolen cargo. His adopted name was “Donnie Brasco.” He was so effective as a wiseguy that the FBI let him keep it up. No one knew how far the investigation would lead, or what it would mean for Pistone, who started as an agent in 1969. His experience would eventually prompt the mobsters in New York to put out a $500,000 contract for his murder, but it never happened. In the end, the evidence and trial testimony he provided in the 1980s produced 200 indictments of Mob associates and more than 100 convictions. His work decimated the Bonannos, one of New York's five major crime families. Pistone's journey while undercover, impersonating a mobbed-up jewel thief, would last an incredible five years, from 1976 to 1981, during which he penetrated the upper levels of the Bonnano organization. No FBI agent had made it inside the Mob like that. The agency beforehand had to rely on informants. Pistone took a class to learn about jewelry to make his affectation believable. In Brooklyn and Manhattan, he roamed bars and restaurants frequented by Mob types. He communicated using the street smarts he absorbed growing up as a working-class Italian-American kid in Paterson, New Jersey, where he went to Italian social clubs and encountered local hoods. Years in, he had the Bonanno circle so convinced that it moved to have him a “made” man shortly before the FBI ended his assignment. At first he befriended low-level mobsters. He wore a wire to record conversations, and committed to memory names and license plates since taking notes would obviously raise red flags. By 1976, he'd won the trust of important Bonnano members, notably family soldier Benjamin “Lefty Guns” Ruggiero, said to have killed 26 people, and capo Dominick “Sonny Black” Napolitano. Ruggerio recommended him so that he could join the clan. Pistone's Mob activities centered in New York and Florida, taking him away from his wife and young daughters for extended times. Pistone even had to vacation with his demanding cohorts. He moved his family members out of state for their protection. As “Donnie Brasco,” Pistone helped Ruggerio transfer stolen goods and sell guns. He engaged in loansharking, extortion and illegal gambling. Once, while pretending to be an expert in burglar alarms, angry Mob associates intent on committing burglaries demanded he reveal the name of a mobster who would vouch for him. The FBI used an informant to quell their suspicions. In the 1997 film Donnie Brasco, undercover agent Joe Pistone is played by Johnny Depp, left. Al Pacino, right, plays Benjamin “Lefty” Ruggiero. In 1981, the situation intensified again when the crime family commanded him to kill an adversary. The FBI pulled him out of the sting. It was time to start making cases, and for him to testify in open court as himself. Starting in 1982, Pistone's testimony over the next several years in racketeering cases sent more than 100 mobsters to long prison terms. Prosecutors considered him crucial to convicting 21 defendants in the “Pizza Connection” case of pizzerias used to traffic in heroin and launder money for the Sicilian Mafia. Pistone went into hiding and later retired from the FBI, unscathed, in 1986. In the 1990s, Salvatore “Sammy the Bull” Gravano, former underboss for the Gambino family who turned FBI informant, said the embarrassment from the “Brasco” case drove bosses in New York's crime families to suspend the Bonanno group from its board of directors. But Pistone couldn't stay retired. In 1992, at age 53, he requested reinstatement with the FBI, which agreed only if he would enter the agency's strict training class, lasting 16 weeks at its base in Quantico, Virginia. Pistone endured the rigorous course alongside recruits in their 20s. He passed and the FBI rehired him, at least until the mandatory retirement age of 57. Pistone's 1988 book on his undercover experiences, Donnie Brasco: My Undercover Life in the Mafia, was a bestseller. Based on the book, actor Johnny Depp portrayed Pistone in the 1997 feature film Donnie Brasco, with Al Pacino as Ruggerio. JACK GARCIA Jack Garcia was an FBI undercover agent of Cuban descent who convinced members of the Italian-American Mafia that he was Italian. He took part in more than 100 undercover investigations over a 26-year career. Before he succeeded in infiltrating New York's Gambino crime family, FBI agent Joaquin “Jack” Garcia had to go school. That is, the FBI's “mob school,” where he received an education in how to hit the ground running with veteran mobsters. His teacher was special agent Nat Parisi. First off, Parisi said, do not carry a wallet – wiseguys carry wads of currency, often bound by the kind of rubber band grocery stores use to keep broccoli together. Also, correctly pronouncing Italian food matters – as Tony Soprano might say, those long pasta shells are not “manicotti,” but “manicote.” Another valuable lesson he learned is that his Mob brethren loved compliments – his favorite one: “Where did you get those nice threads? You look like a million dollars.” In his 26-year career as an FBI agent, Garcia took part in more than 100 undercover investigations, from Miami to New York, Atlantic City and Los Angeles, targeting mobsters, drug traffickers and corrupt politicians and cops. He participated in the highest number of undercover cases in FBI history. In many of his capers, he impersonated a mobster, using the name “Jack Falcone” (in honor of the Italian judge Giovanni Falcone, killed by the Sicilian Mafia in the 1990s). As a backstory, he told his Mob marks about having a Sicilian pedigree (actually he's a native of Havana and grew up in the Bronx) with an expertise in stealing and fencing stolen goods, with jewelry as his specialty. Sometimes, he had to run several undercover roles at once. He took advantage of his fluency in Spanish and Italian, being careful not to mix things up when the phone rang. In the early 2000s, the FBI chose Garcia for what would be the most fruitful infiltration of an organized crime family since Joe Pistone's in the 1970s. While undercover as “Jack Falcone” with the Gambino's family's chapter in Westchester County, New York, for two years, he flashed cash, Rolex watches, diamond rings, flat-screen TVs and other supposed stolen property (items seized in other FBI cases). Much of the cash he held went to pay for expensive dinners – mobsters, he said, are notoriously cheap when the check comes. He gained 80 pounds over the two years. One mobster in particular who liked his money and goods, and would become his almost daily companion, was Gambino capo Gregory DePalma. An “old school” hood who in 2003 finished serving 70 months for racketeering, DePalma right away threatened violence and extorted owners of Westchester-area construction firms, strip joints, restaurants and other businesses. Garcia said he witnessed DePalma commit a crime almost every day. The FBI had Garcia pose as a wiseguy seeking to invest in a topless bar in the Bronx. Garcia's inquiries led him to meet DePalma in 2003. By providing stolen property for DePalma to sell for cash, Garcia convinced him that “Jack Falcone” was an experienced jewelry thief and fencer from Miami. When Garcia hung out with DePalma over the two-year period, he wore a body wire, and the FBI planted bugging devices at DePalma's hangouts. Garcia gave DePalma a cell phone that the talkative mob capo used prodigiously, not knowing the FBI had bugged it. The operation yielded 5,000 hours of recorded conversations used to implicate DePalma and other Gambino men in racketeering. In 2005, DePalma planned to honor “Falcone” by rendering him “made” within the Gambino family. In a recorded conversation, Garcia as “Falcone” replied to DePalma, “I'm honored for that,” he said, in the tape later used in court. “I will never let you down either.” But it wasn't to be. After Garcia witnessed a Gambino soldier beat another member with a crystal candlestick, the FBI shut down the undercover operation. (Garcia and Pistone are the only law enforcement officers ever nominated to be “made.”) Garcia's efforts inside the Gambino crew paid off big time. The evidence he delivered for the FBI resulted in the arrest of 32 Gambino members and associates, including DePalma, Gambino boss Arnold “Zeke” Squitieri and underboss Anthony “The Genius” Megale. DePalma went to trial in 2006. Garcia, who retired from the FBI two months before the trial started, agreed to testify in federal court in Manhattan. The jury found DePalma guilty on 27 counts, and the judge gave the 74-year-old a 12-year prison term. Like Pistone, Garcia's undercover career is chronicled in a memoir, Making Jack Falcone: An Undercover FBI Agent Takes Down a Mafia Family. KIKI CAMARENA Kiki Camarena was an undercover agent for the Drug Enforcement Administration in Mexico. After contributing information that led to major drug busts, he was tortured and murdered by drug cartel bosses in 1985. Enrique “Kiki” Camarena, the late Drug Enforcement Administration agent assigned to investigate drug trafficking in Guadalajara, Mexico, in the 1980s, is famous as one of the most heroic DEA agents ever. But he is more well-known in death than in life. His torture-murder in Mexico in 1985 took place at the hands of drug cartel bosses with the complicity of high-level Mexican government officials, law enforcement and, allegedly, the CIA. At the time, the Reagan administration was secretly training and supplying Central American guerilla fighters, known as the “Contras,” against the leftist Sandinista government in Nicaragua. The U.S. government allegedly granted the cartel bosses free rein to traffic drugs – to the point of using CIA-recruited American pilots to fly cocaine into the United States to sell for cash so the cartel could make donations to buy more weaponry for the Contras. Camarena, born in Mexicali, Mexico, in 1947, moved with his impoverished family to Calexico, California. He served as a firefighter in Calexico, and with a strong desire for police work, joined the Imperial County Sheriff's Department, moving up to its narcotics task force. The experience led to his career in the DEA starting in 1975. Assigned to the DEA office in the “narco paradise” of Guadalajara in 1980, Camarena was a convincing undercover officer with his appearance and ability to speak Spanish and barrio “street” language to fit in with the drug underworld. His target was the powerful Guadalajara drug cartel (which later evolved into the Sinaloa cartel). In the early 1980s, in what he called “Operation Padrino,” Camarena arranged for U.S. agents to seize international bank accounts held by wealthy cartel drug lords. He developed evidence of major marijuana plantations in the Mexican state of Zacatecas, based on informants and overflights in a plane flown by his DEA pilot, Alfredo Zavala Avelar. In November 1984, from his background work, Mexican federal police and the DEA raided enormous pot-growing operations on a ranch in Zacatecas that employed thousands of field hands. The task force confiscated 20 tons of marijuana, burned the crop and made 177 arrests. The bust cost cartel figure Rafael Caro Quintero about $50 million. Caro Quintero believed his operation had the protection of the Mexican army, and the CIA, since he owned a farm used to train the U.S.-backed Contras. He vowed revenge against Camarena. Meanwhile, a DEA force organized by Camarena seized a large cache of cocaine shipped by cartel boss Miguel Felix Gallardo's operation to New Mexico and Texas. Gallardo also believed he had CIA and Mexican official protection. During the fall of 1984, Quintero held meetings with top cartel traffickers Gallardo, Ernesto “Don Neto” Fonseco Carrillo and Ruben Zuno Arce. Also present, thanks to rampant corruption bought by the Guadalajara cartel, were Mexico's minister of domestic affairs and DFA chief Manuel Bartlett Diaz, plus Mexico's defense minister, the head of Mexico's Interpol office and the governor of the state of Jalisco. The agenda was to kidnap Camarena and get him to reveal his informants and other information. Zuno Arce gave the order. Fonseca only intended to scare and release him, but Quintero wanted to kill the DEA man. On February 7, 1985, Quintero and Gallardo directed their henchmen to kidnap Camarena off a street in Guadalajara. As the agent walked from the U.S. consulate to meet his wife for lunch, they forced him at gunpoint into a car and drove him to a residence used for cartel rendezvous. They bound and blindfolded him, turned on a tape recorder and questioned him, during which he was severely beaten and tortured. The lead interrogator was the crooked head of the secret police in Guadalajara, Sergio Espino Verdin. The cartel men wanted to know what Camarena knew about them, their dealings with Mexican officials and the CIA's involvement in drug trafficking. The gangsters also brought in and beat up Zavala, Camarena's pilot. Both men died about two days later, angering Fonseco, who told Quintero not to kill Camarena. Camarena's wife reported him missing and Washington launched what would be the largest manhunt in the history of the DEA. The cartel had the two men's bodies buried, then dug up and relocated to a farm in another state, where Mexican police found them in early March. During his funeral a week later, Camarena's family interred his ashes in Calexico. His slaying triggered an international incident. U.S. officials ordered all cars from Mexico at the border searched, effectively closing it. The investigation revealed the CIA connection, leading to bitter clashes between CIA and DEA agents. A federal court in Los Angeles charged 22 defendants in the murders of Camarena and Zavala. Under pressure, Mexican authorities acted, arresting 13 men. Mexican courts convicted Fonseco, Quintero and Espino, and sentenced each to 40 years, although Quintero won early release on a technicality in 2013. U.S. officials are still seeking Quintero to face federal charges. Mexican police arrested Gallardo in 1989, and he received 40 years. A court in Los Angeles found Zuno Arce guilty in the murders in 1990, sentenced him to two life terms in prison, where he died in 2012. In Camarena's honor, in 1985 the National Family Partnership started the National Red Ribbon Campaign, a volunteer anti-drug use and education effort that urges youths to recite a pledge to refrain from drugs, and celebrates “Red Ribbon Week” on drug awareness each October. Camarena's is featured as a character, played by actor Michael Pena, in a chapter of the Netflix series Narcos: Mexico, about on his actions with the DEA. JAY DOBYNS Jay Dobyns went undercover with the Hells Angels outlaw motorcycle gang for 20 months in Arizona on behalf of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. His work led to 16 arrests. For Jay Dobyns, fitting in with the infamous biker gang the Hells Angels for almost two years meant adhering to his undercover alter ego, Jay “Bird” Davis, to the point of obsession. To maintain his cover, he had to divert his mind away from his wife and kids. And it all would be worth it – at least that's what he thought at the time. Dobyns had hit on his best clandestine ruse yet while in Arizona in 2001, after 15 years of service as an undercover special agent with the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. While working undercover cases in the late 1980s for the ATF, he'd been injured twice – from a gunshot wound to the back from a suspect in Tucson and when gunrunners hit him with a car during an attempted getaway in Chicago. He took part in investigations of the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing and the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Other undercover roles of his ended in the arrests of a Mexican drug boss and members of the Aryan Brotherhood gang. Altogether, he served in more than 500 undercover operations disguised as a hitman and Mob debt collector. He infiltrated organized crime groups and gangs engaged in drug and arms smuggling. In 2001, to gather intelligence as “Davis” for the ATF in northern Arizona, Dobyns worked in the Bullhead City area, posing as a gun seller and an enforcer for a nonexistent collections agency. But his operation was interrupted in 2002 with the now-famous riot and shootout among members of the Angels and a competing biker gang, the Mongols, at the Harrah's casino in nearby Laughlin, Nevada, during the annual River Run motorcycle rally. Two Angels and one Mongol died and dozens of people were injured. The ATF brass soon redirected him to penetrate the dangerous Hells Angels club. Dobyns certainly had the physical part down with his beard and six-foot, one-inch frame he used as an all-conference football player for the University of Arizona. Later, an Angels member would apply tattoos covering his upper arms. Dobyns teamed with another ATF agent, two other undercover officers and a pair of paid informants. The idea was to create a fake biker gang with the aid of one of the informants who once served in a motorcycle gang based in Tijuana, Mexico. The gangster informant and Dobyns would run the gang, called the Solo Angeles, promote it as a pro-Hells Angels crew and request to join the Angels as a “nomad” chapter. The ATF named the setup “Operation Black Biscuit.” As a convincer, Dobyns and his fellow agent feigned an execution of a Mongol member, tying up an agent, placing cow's brains and bloody Mongol clothing on him and taking a photo. Based on the picture, the Angels took the bait and let them hang out and ride with them. They trusted him so much they offered to make him a member of the Angels' Skull Valley Chapter. He was the first law enforcement officer to infiltrate the Angels. His undercover penetration of the Angels lasted more than 20 months, one of the longest ever for the ATF. His work ended with 16 arrests from the Angels gang. But the criminal case, amid problems between the ATF and Justice Department lawyers, fell through in federal court. Federal prosecutors blamed the ATF, saying the agency did not reveal evidence from informants. In 2006, the feds dropped racketeering enterprise charges – the most serious — against all but four of 42 Angels charged in the Laughlin riot. Dobyns' battle with his own employer, the ATF, soon began. He filed suit in federal court against the agency alleging it did not protect him while he was on duty. He won a $373,000 settlement in 2007. The next year, Dobyns's wife and two kids barely escaped after someone firebombed the family home in Tucson. The ATF investigated Dobyns himself as a suspect in the arson. Investigators cleared him. In 2014, the year he retired after 27 years with the ATF, he filed another suit, for $17.2 million, saying the ATF failed to safeguard his family amid death threats. A judge awarded him $173,000. During an appeal, the judge voided the monetary judgment, but recommended discipline for ATF personnel and barred seven Justice Department attorneys from the case. He ordered a special master to investigate government actions in the case, and possible misconduct by the feds in the arson investigation. But the judge died of cancer. The special master in a report said that the first case was fair enough and required no further probe into the federal government. A new judge accepted the recommendation. Dobyns has authored two books, one on his undercover experiences, another on his travails with the ATF. These days, he delivers lectures on his life to audiences at universities and law enforcement associations nationwide. And now some of our infamous quick hitters:   Donald Duck decoy   Police in Fort Lee, New Jersey used a Donald Duck costume as a decoy to catch drivers who failed to yield to pedestrians. Drivers who didn't stop for the cartoon duck were ticketed. One woman, Karen Haigh, fought her $230 ticket.   "They told me that I was getting a ticket for not stopping for a duck," she told Eyewitness News. "But it scared me. I'm a woman. This huge duck scared me."  Coco the Clown   These old clips from the show COPS show a strange undercover police sting, and proves the adage that clowns are usually scary or just creepy. One cop dressed up as Coco the Clown, an outfit that kind of resembles John Wayne Gacy, to catch women working as sex workers. Spoiler: he pretty much sprays all of them with silly string and the whole thing is sad to watch. Amish woman   At least one cop from the Pulaski Township Police Department in Pennsylvania dressed up as an Amish woman in an attempt to catch a sexual predator. Sgt. Chad Adams of the Pulaski Township Police Department wandered the streets for two months in 2014 after police were tipped off that a predator was masturbating in front of children, according to the Associated Press. He posted on the department's Facebook page, “Hey friends, sometimes being a police officer means going undercover and doing what you have to do to catch the bad guy. Now that our investigation is complete I'll share with you this photo! Back in January we had an individual preying on Amish children walking home from school. The male individual was pulling up to the children and getting out of his car and masturbating in front of them. Although we did not apprehend the individual we believe he was caught in another county. I wanted to share with you that we will use all means available to try and protect our children. That includes dressing up as an Amish woman to attempt to apprehend a pervert! Thanks goes out to the Neshannock police and New Wilmington police in assistance with the investigation! Sincerely, Sergeant Chad Adams.”   Sadly, the sting didn't work, but police believe it is because the culprit moved into another county.   DVD Prize sting   Police in Phoenix, Arizona set up a sting to catch people with outstanding warrants, mostly DUIs, in 2002. The people were told they won a DVD player. People thought they were showing up to pick up their prize. Instead, they walked right into their own arrest. Watch as these suspects went from excited to shocked to sad. Panhandling trick   In 2015, undercover cops in California posed as panhandlers to ticket distracted drivers. They stood on the side of the road, posed as panhandlers and holding signs that identified them as police officers. The pieces of cardboard they were holding also stated that they were looking for seatbelt and cellphone violations. For those drivers who weren't paying attention

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Life Through the Big Screen
The MPAA is Useless

Life Through the Big Screen

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 40:53


Please note that I there may be some adult content in this episode as I discuss different reasons for film ratings. The second half of this episode is purely subjective -- I fully expect my listeners to have differing opinions, and that's okay. These are just the guidelines I go by when choosing to show my kids certain movies. Welcome to season 4 of Life Through the Big Screen. Typically I've been keeping my seasons six episodes long, so being 4 seasons in isn't as impressive as it sounds. I do think that I'm going to start expanding the length of episodes per season eventually. I just love creating new introductions - and speaking of, which one has been your favorite so far? Give me some feedback. A little update about my personal life, because I let you in on it on my last solo episode: my open heart surgery is no longer scheduled for late in July - it's been pushed back to September or October. I'm not thrilled that it might overlap with the holidays - but it is what it is. It was pushed back because there's fluid in my lungs from possible COVID that needs to completely clear out before they cut me open. So I do appreciate that the doctors are taking extreme precautions. I also got a job! It's my dream job of marketing and content creation. It's for a super cool retirement firm who seems to always want to be on the cutting edge of unique ideas and new ways of reaching their target demographics. I start a week from the time of this recording. And if Zach, Dylan, and Larin are listening to this, my highest gratitude goes out to you for taking a chance on me.And thank you, listeners for continuing to take a chance on this podcast. I know your time is valuable and you dozens of other podcasts you could be listening to right now, so I am honored that your spending your time with me. I do my best with the tools I have available to bring you the best quality podcast I can. And with time I hope to continue to get better. I'm also open to hearing your feedback and any suggestions you may have, so feel free to email me at author.andrewtoy@gmail.com or leave a comment in Apple podcasts. As you know, I open up each season with me gabbing about a particular topic that I feel I want to discuss for a little bit. As you know my kids are seven and eight at the time of this recording and that means that they're becoming of age to start watching more movies that fall outside of the Disney catalogue. This also means that my wife and I can find more common ground on what we can show the kids - or at least that it's easier for her to allow more space for me to show them what I think might be appropriate, because they're no longer tiny children. They're growing kids, who, as long as they know what's on screen is fabricated with great skill and masterful imagery and film magic, they can take in what I allow to be placed in front of them. They know too that movies are meant to be vessels of enjoyment and pleasure. And Sarabeth knows that movies are my best way of connecting to the kids. The same way that Tim Taylor was obsessed with his tools and wanted to pass that love on to his boys, that's how I am with movies and my kids. It's also fun debating with them, for instance, which of the Star Wars movies are superior. My daughter claims that Kylo Ren is a great villain, but I get a little overzealous when I try to explain to her how he started off as a great character, but went downhill quickly as Disney executives started listening to the angry mobs rather than focusing on telling a great story, thus his character was ruined for time immortal. I'm looking at YOU Kathleen Kennedy and Ryan Johnson, and whosever idea it was to make Ray-lo a disgusting reality. But I do thank you on behalf of my daughter. Yesterday my son said that The Empire Strikes Back is his least favorite Star Wars movie. When I pressed him, he said it was because Yoda was boring. I'll be interested to see if and when his opinion changes on that. So what is the MPAA? You'll know it as soon as I say one color: Green. That's right, when you go the theater and that green screen with a bunch of random words nobody has ever read pops up on the screen - and if you were cool like me, you yelled "Green!" when you were in high school. The words state that the following preview - or trailer - has been approved for all audiences by the Motion Picture Association of America. The MPAA. These are the people who have been telling parents which movies they can or cannot take their kids to see. You already know by the title of my episode that I'm not going to speak very favorably about the MPAA, and I'll explain why they're full of crap, and always have been. But first, a little history on the MPAA. According to motionpicture.org, the MPAA was, and I quote: "Established in 1968, the film rating system provides parents with the information needed to determine if a film is appropriate for their children." This sounds like it had good intentions. "Ratings are determined by the Classification and Ratings Administration (CARA), via a board comprised of an independent group of parents."Before I read a little about the history of the MPAA, I'm going to breeze through a quick refresher course of what the individual rating are today: If a film is rated G, that means it's approved for general, or all, audiences: Nothing that would offend parents for viewing by children.A PG rated film stands for Parental Guidance. Where parents are "urged to give “parental guidance.” May contain some material parents might not like for their young children." A PG-13 film is not only the most common film rating, but it's also the newest. This means that parents are strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13, so parents are urged to be cautious. An R-rated film means "Restricted." This type of film contains some adult material. Parents are urged to learn more about the film before taking their young children with them. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian. And finally NC-17 means that no one under 17 is admitted. I can't recall a mainstream film being given this rating and being shown in a local movie theater. So we're not going to touch on this one for the purposes of this podcast.Now MotionPictures.org makes this beginning part sound much moralistic than it really is, and for a good video on what went on to REALLY inspire the formation of the Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America (MPPDA), check out a video called The History of Hollywood Censorship and the Rating System by Filmmaker IQ. I'll put a link to that down in the show notes. But this organization was formed in 1922, basically to protect the rights of corrupt elitists in Hollywood. In 1945, the organization changes its name to what we now know it today as the MPAA. In 1968, the film industry sought artistic freedoms and the removal of strict limits on certain content. The result? The MPAA created the film rating system (G, PG, PG-13, R) we use today. I got a little curious about the rating system, so I looked up some interesting stats. I looked up the most inappropriate G-rated movies. Screencrush gave me a list of 15 suggestions. I'm going to list just 10 of them. 2001 A Space Odyssey - I haven't seen this movie yet, so no comment. But according to the description it has some pretty violent deaths it it. And 3. 1968's Planet of the Apes, and 1970's Beneath the Planet of the Apes. These I haven't seen, either but apparently Charlton Heston gets shot in the throat and bleeds to death, Tarrantino-style, and entire planets of people die. Sarabeth cannot stand blood, but these movies did not traumatize her as a child, so I'm sure it's fine for kids today. 4.   Dracula has Risen From His Grave (1968). I promise you I've watched movies before, but I also have not seen this. Maybe I just tend to stay away from G-rated movies as a rule. But I'd think any Dracula film rated G is a little suspect, unless it's those Adam Sandler cartoons. 5. Romeo and Juliet from 1968 is also rated G. Not sure I'd care to watch a G-rated version of this story - and yes, that was my adolescent self talking. 6. The Andromeda Strain (1971) - Didn't see this either, but I read the book. The book was bull crap with 0 suspense. Can't imagine the movie being any different. 7. Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (1971). Sure it was a little unsettling when Violett turned into the blueberry, but I don't think this film is outside the range of being G-rated. My kids like it. 8. Gone with the Wind - I can get on board this one not being G-rated. This is a dark, dark movie, filled with corpses, attempted abortion, child death, racism, a lot of traumatizing stuff here. Still one of the greatest films ever made, to be clear. 9. 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea - I'm in the middle of reviewing this for an episode. So far, nothing very unsettling. 10. Old Yeller. I mean, it gets pretty freaky when they show Old Yeller baring his teeth like he's about to rip Travis' throat out. Moving along with the stats: There used to not be a PG option. The rating system actually began with four categories: G, M (for Mature audiences, which changed in 1969 to PG), R, and X. I couldn't find the first PG movie, but the first Disney-released PG movie was the Black Hole, which came out in 1970. Most people know this, but I'll talk about the history of the PG-13 rating briefly here. This is the newest on the rating system, even though it's the most populated. In 1984, parents were outraged at the PG rating of Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (remember, at that time it went from PG to R). And I believe Gremlins was also part of the outrage as it was PG as well, as a little holiday horror classic with bloodthirsty puppets ravaging the small town of Kingston Falls. (But I think the most traumatizing part of that movie is when Phoebe Cates talks about her dad suffering and dying in the chimney that might have justifiably resulted in the PG-13 rating.) So after the outrage from parents, the PG-13 rating was invented and thus Red Dawn, starring Patrick Swayze, was the first to earn the most popular rating in the system. A movie called Greetings, which was released in 1968, was the first film to earn the R-rating. The Wolf of Wall Street, starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Jonah Hill, held the record for the number of the uses of the F-word at a count of 569. It has been beat by two other films since then, but neither are R-rated. And finally, here is the list of the top 10 highest grossing R-rated films of all time as of July 2022: Number 10, is Fifty Shades of Grey, followed by The Hangover 2 (bad start). Then we get into better territory with The Passion of the Christ at number 8 and Logan at number 7. Number 6 is Defective Chinatown 3, whatever that is. Number 5 is appropriately It from 2017. Number 4, The Matrix Reloaded, sure whatever. And the top 3 are appropriately Deadpool raking in $78.6 million, followed by the superior Deadpool 2 at just about the same amount of earnings at just a few million more. And the highest grossing R-rated movie is also the only R-rated film that has earned its spot in the billion-dollar movie club, Joker, at just over a billion dollars. When we come back I'm going to talk about how to break movies down when deciding what to show my kids. *Commercial Break*One thing the MPAA has improved on is that now they'll actually list the reasons a film is rated what it is. That wasn't always the case. Our poor parents would take us to Blockbuster and see that Mr. & Mrs. Smith, for instance, was rated PG-13, but it wouldn't state why. Was it sequences for action/violence? Sensuality? Sexual references? So you see, the rating, without the reasoning, is pretty useless. Take for example The Lost World: Jurassic Park and Twister, two PG-13 movies that came out within a year of each other. Both have the same ratings, but for very different reasons and to extremely differing degrees. If you're the kind of parent who doesn't want their kids seeing people die on screen, The Lost World: Jurassic Park won't be the movie to watch with your kids. Peter Stormare gets savagely attacked by the compys, Arliss Howard gets toyed and played with by a baby T-rex before he's eaten by it and the mommy T-rex. My favorite character in the movie, played by Richard Schiff gets the worst death in the Jurassic Park trilogy when the two T-rexes flip him in the air and rip his body apart. Not to mention several deaths of people in the camp and in the *sigh* San Diego scene. It also has more blood than the first movie, but it's not nearly as scary. Twister, by contrast, has an unusually low body count, especially for a disaster film. Helen Hunt's dad dies his needless death in the movie's opening, and no one else dies except for Cary Elwes much later in the film, and it's sort of off-screen. Those are the only two deaths in the entire movie -- everyone else lives happily ever after, and completely bloodless. Yet, despite the high body count and flowing blood, I'll show The Lost World: Jurassic Park to my kids before I show them Twister. Why? Because Twister, as silly of a movie as it is (though don't knock it too hard, because it's my favorite natural disaster movie), is based off of real-life threats. Living in the mid-west, or south, we get tornado warnings pretty regularly. When I showed my kids the original Jurassic Park, they didn't go to bed afraid that they'd be attacked by dinosaurs. Real life disasters, however, might have a different affect on them. I could be wrong, but I know from experience when my parents had me watch Unsolved Mysteries or Eyewitness News, I sometimes had a hard time going to sleep because I knew the things were credible, though distant. Now let's compare a couple of R-rated movies to some PG-13 ones and I want you to tell me which one you'd rather have your young kids watch with you. Would you rather watch Swimfan with your kids, or Mel Gibson's The Patriot? If you said The Patriot, that's R-rated for "strong war violence." But that strong war violence is momentary and brief. But Swimfan is PG-13 for mature thematic elements, sexual content, disturbing images, and language. Would you feel more comfortable showing The King's Speech to your kids, or The Dark Knight? Can you believe that The King's Speech is the R-rated one, and The Dark Knight is deemed appropriate for children as young as 13? The King's Speech has a few F-words, which is always meant for humor. My kids have heard Sarabeth and I use much harsher language. But for those of you who've seen The Dark Knight, you'd agree that that movie could be scarring for young audiences. And the MPAA reasoning is only half-truthful. It reads that the Dark Knight is PG-13 for intense sequences of violence and some menace, but it makes no mention at all of terrifying imagery. I'm sorry, but Two Face is much scarier than any monster I've seen depicted in an R-rated film. Let's do one more comparison, shall we? Would you rather show your kids the PG-rated Poltergeist, or the R-rated Planes, Trains, & Automobiles? The MPAA has not bothered to go back and re-rate 1982's Poltergeist, despite the moderate use of violence, and severe and frequent use of frightening and intense scenes. Planes, Trains, and Automobiles, however, is only appropriate for adults, according to the MPAA, because Steve Martin cusses out the car rental lady. So are you starting to see what I mean when I say ratings mean nothing? My kids' first PG-13 theater experience was Ghostbusters: Afterlife and it was for my son's 6th birthday and my daughter was 7. Felix got a little freaked out during the big climax, but I told him to hang in there, and before he knew it, it was over, and now he wants to own the movie and watch it again. Some people may say that the rating system is completely subjective, but I say it's not subjective enough. There's no board of parents anywhere that can predict or dictate what would be okay or not okay for my kids to watch. Sometimes it's not based off the content at all, but more about the message being delivered. I've told you that I've shown my kids the first two Jurassic Park movies because 95% of the human relationships are people helping people. There is very little human infighting. The struggle is between man and creature, and the overall idea is people depending on the kindness and bravery of others. That's a good message that I want to subconsciously sink into my kids' heads. But I'll skip the first beginning part of Home Alone where Kevin is a complete asshole to his mom. "Content-wise" and I'm doing air-quotes, it's acceptable, because it lacks violence or sexuality, but the message behind it is something my kids aren't ready to see because if they watch that part enough, they'll think it's acceptable to talk to their parents the way Kevin does. Also, he doesn't really get punished for that particular crime - his punishment, if you want to call it that, is unrelated to the way he treats and talks to his family. (Best Christmas movie ever, by the way.)I know this is sort of a lot, and I hope you're tracking with me. I hope this helps you see past just the rating system that the MPAA offers. Another example is this. The Lord of the Rings, compared to Jurassic Park, is relatively bloodless. However, it's going to be many years before I show that trilogy to my kids. Why? It's action and adventure and fantasy, you'd think it'd be a great candidate to show the kiddos. Well, it never let's up. Pretty much once the hobbits leave the Shire within the first 30 minutes of Fellowship, it's nothing but heartache and stress and nightmare visions until the last 30 minutes of Return of the King. And there's no comic relief to relieve the heavy tension. Also, it gets pretty convoluted and drawn-out. So even if the stress didn't get to them, I don't want them to get bored on their first viewing and not have an appreciation of the films from the start. I want to make sure their brains are developed and mature enough to be able to grasp the magnitude of the story beyond just the sword fights. In the previous episode about Spider-Man: No Way Home, Dean Letini brought up a great point that there are many movies in the MCU that he has yet to show his 9 year old, notably Winter Soldier because some guy gets kicked into the propeller of a helicopter. PG-13. You know what else is PG-13 in the MCU? Ant Man. That's right. The giant Thomas the Train bouncing off the tracks in the little girl's room warranted the same rating as Winter Soldier, or The Sixth Sense. Why? It's one word, and it'll come as no surprise: Money. You better believe that the studio execs at Disney know full well that if they release an MCU movie with a PG rating, it'll lose a lot of money. When's the last time a G-rated movie snuck into theaters? I don't know either. Frozen is PG. Ice Age is PG. Zootopia is PG. They're all PG because it's a chance that it'll get more butts int he seats - those kids teetering on adolences who might be skeptical going to see an animated movie. You know what's rated G? Snow White and the Seven Dwarves. Pinocchio. All Dogs Go to Heaven. Those movies are nightmare-inducing! Pinocchio was banned in Germany for any child at the time of its release - it had an equivalent of an R-rating. But what kid do you know that got a single nightmare from Moana? So the rating system is stupid. Lightyear is PG, but I don't give a crap because I'm not taking my kids to see a movie where lesbians are normalized. That doesn't make me a bigot and I'll tell you why. Sexuality is complicated enough without a million different influences and ideas barraging our kids. Sexuality needs to not be discussed in front of or around kids for the simple reason that kids need to be kids. We need to keep their minds clear of all that stuff. They've got the rest of their lives to figure it all out, and wrestle with it and grapple with what sexuality is and what it means to them. If we're in such a hurry for our kids to grow up, why the hell not hand them over the keys to our cars? Put them to work in the factories? Take out a portion of their allowance for taxes? Actually, that last idea isn't half bad. But please understand what I'm saying. Once human beings are of age, where their brains are fully developed and they can reason on their own and take in entertainment with critical thinking and they've been properly educated on the basics of sexuality, then we can loosen things up a little bit.I'm not a bigot because Oscar is my favorite supporting character in The Office. Those two guys in Modern Family? They were hilarious. The fact that Negasonic Teenage Warhead has a lesbian lover in Deadpool and the way Ryan Reynolds plays it is awesome. Deadpool himself is practically bi or A-sexual or something, and I love him anyway. But my kids don't need to see any of that because they barely know how a mommy and a daddy make a baby. They're still at level one knowledge. There's absolutely no reason for them to know anything more than that at this age. And I understand that they're likely not going to turn to me and ask why two women are married and kissing in a cartoon movie, but the thought will stick with them, and it will grow overtime the more they see that. My religion teaches that it's wrong to be in a same-sex relationship, and I'll teach my kids the same, but when they're of age, it's ultimately going to be their choice. All I can do is teach them what I know to be morally right and to love those who don't see it that way. So the rating system is based off of 4 or 5 main elements. Violence. We spoke pretty extensively about violence so I won't go over it again except to add that there are different styles and different degrees. I'll let my kids watch people get eaten by dinosaurs (and keep in mind, they know that it's fake), but I won't be showing them any Tarrentino-style movies any time soon. That's a style of violence that I don't think would be good for my kids to see - with blood squirting out of arteries and flooding the ground. Not because it's realistic, but it's just a lot. And most of it is caused by human on human violence - that goes back to the message behind the movie. I don't want my kids thinking we applaud or glorify humans murdering one another. Just as there's different styles of violence, there's also different degrees of it. Yes, I'm okay with my kids watching dinosaurs or creatures eating people, but even that can be taken too far for them at this age. I wouldn't dare show them the bear attack in The Revenant, for instance, because that's way too realistic and could be traumatizing. Or even the pig-creature attack in Annihilation, or any of the Alien franchise just yet. Why? Because that's a level of gore and creepiness that's above Jurassic Park. It's also prolonged. When someone gets eaten in Jurassic Park, it's usually pretty quick and the movie movies on. I admit that this is all purely subjective. You may think Jurassic Park is too gory for your kids, and I won't tell you you're wrong. Only you know what your kids will be able to handle. We've talked about sex, in movies. It's not that my wife and I are sensitive to the subject. No, it's that we're unabashedly over-protective of our kids when it comes to it. And when they're ready to talk about it, we'll be ready to lead them in a frank and honest discussion that we're not afraid to have with them. The point here is that we want to be the first source our kids get that information from. Thankfully there are a lot of movies - PG, PG-13, or even R that don't mention or show anything sensual. But be weary of the PG movies from our youth. We turned on a random movie from Disney + not too long ago. It was a movie that starred Jonathan Taylor Thomas and Chevy Chase called Man of the House. Now to be fair, I remember watching it as a kid and it didn't affect me, but we turned it off 15 minutes in, first because it was boring, but secondly, it seemed like all they were talking about was how JTT didn't want Chevy Chase to sleep with Farrah Fawcett. It was just a little TMI in this JTT "family comedy." Air quotes again. And honestly, even when my kids do come of age, there's a ton of stuff I'll be uncomfortable watching with them. I'll never forget how awkward it got watching Friends with my parents on Thursday nights - especially the later episodes - and particularly when I learned how to *ahem* do certain things, and the show addressed that more and more. So, so awkward. As far as language goes in movies, this is sort of a funny story, and it's not to shame my kids, but to celebrate their innocence. They've seen plenty of PG-13 movies where there's cursing throughout - I even showed them the PG-rated Back to the Future films which are basically just damn and shit every other line (that's not a fundamentalist complaint, by the way, that's just an observation). But you know where my kids have heard the majority of cursing? That's right, from their mom and dad, during our dark days leading up to our separation and even a bit afterwards on some bad days. And we use every word in the book and then some. Thankfully it's not like that any more, but if any kid had reason to mimic curse words, it would be ours. But recently we asked them to list off some bad words they know - we did this with wry smiles and curiosity - they could only come up with "stupid" and "dumb." I wonder if they know more than they're letting on. I showed them Raiders of the Lost Ark not too long ago and Harrison Ford goes, "God Damn it," at one point, and of course my son laughs because of the line delivery and he goes, "He just said God damn it." Sarabeth promptly explained that that's not something we say, and he hasn't since. Every movie is going to have cursing. You're going to hear cursing when you take your kids to Taco Bell or to the beach. It's everywhere. Just remember, it's not a sin for them to hear it. And I believe when they're older, it's not even a sin for them to curse. I curse all the time, though I do try to limit it in front of the kids. Lastly, ratings can be determined on drug use, and now tobacco use. I've really got no reason to show my kids Pineapple Express or any stoner movie. And seeing Peter Pan smoking a bong never made me want to go out and try it myself. Nor did the racist depictions make me think racist thoughts against Native Americans. But really, are the Indians in Neverland REALLY Native Americans? Shouldn't they be called Native Neverlandians? All that to say, the MPAA can look like they're nit-picking things and trying to be more protective, but in my opinion, they're nitpicking the wrong things. It's up to each parent to decide what's important to restrict from their children, because only each parent knows their children. Not the MPAA, and certainly not Hollywood. Thanks for tolerating this little lecture about my thoughts on movie ratings. If you have different thoughts or opinions, I'd love to hear them. Drop me an email at author.andrewtoy@gmail.com or leave a comment down below. You can follow Life Through the Big Screen on Instagram or Facebook or Twitter, all that stuff is in the show notes below. Here's the video talking more about the history of the MPAA: The History of Hollywood Censorship & the Rating SystemFollow Life Through the Big Screen on these following pages:InstagramFacebookTwitterEmail: Author.andrewtoy@gmail.comThis episode was sponsored by Spur Creative 

covid-19 god america jesus christ history money movies friends culture hollywood disney social apple man house politics star wars film passion real living germany parents office green san diego drop train temple joker wall street wolf alien speech sexual mcu fellowship doom native americans sexuality air lord of the rings raiders frozen back to the future indiana jones deadpool jurassic park dracula pg taco bell winter soldier adam sandler planes indians blockbuster home alone ant man hangover trains ratings dark knight ryan reynolds established gremlins leonardo dicaprio patriot beneath yoda mature black holes harrison ford spider man no way home peter pan mel gibson planet of the apes poltergeist automobiles snow white empire strikes back useless annihilation willy wonka pinocchio steve martin ghostbusters afterlife lost ark lightyear moana unsolved mysteries fifty shades modern family chocolate factory twister jonah hill ice age revenant sixth sense patrick swayze classification kylo ren tmi chevy chase zootopia sensuality big screen goddamn restricted shire red dawn charlton heston two face matrix reloaded best christmas helen hunt distributors pineapple express cary elwes mpaa ryan johnson parental guidance lost world jurassic park peter stormare farrah fawcett leagues under phoebe cates old yeller jonathan taylor thomas tim taylor rating system jtt andromeda strain seven dwarves sarabeth eyewitness news swimfan motion picture association all dogs go richard schiff screencrush violett life through negasonic teenage warhead kingston falls tarrantino
The Best of Breakfast with Bongani Bingwa
Unpacking Part V of the state capture report

The Best of Breakfast with Bongani Bingwa

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 11:42


Theto Mahlakoana, Senior Political Reporter at Eyewitness News, Tshidi Madia, Eyewitness News Senior politics journalist, and Bernadette Wicks, EWN Reporter See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Dave Ward & Friends
Dave Ward & Friends Season 2 - Episode 12: Don Nelson Pt. 2

Dave Ward & Friends

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 28:56


Last week you heard what happens when two legendary, local Houston broadcasters get together with a combined on-air experience of almost 100 years.In this episode, Dave continues reminiscing with the former “Good Morning Houston” host, Don Nelson. All Houston households at one point likely woke up with Don Nelson weekdays on channel 13's “Good Morning Houston” (with Jan Glenn and Lisa Trapani) and went to bed with Dave on “Eyewitness News at 10pm.” Hear more about their storied careers and newsroom shenanigans.

Motorcycle Madhouse Radio Podcast
EP 764 OUT BAD MONGOL INTERNATIONAL P WAS COMPROMISED & AFRAID | WHERE IS AMERICA'S MORALS GONE

Motorcycle Madhouse Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 81:54


There's a new twist in a federal case already marked by murder and mayhem. The Mongols Motorcycle Club was convicted in late 2018 of racketeering and conspiracy. Now the Mongols want a new trial and say their former president, David Santillan, was a confidential informant for the ATF. The explosive allegations come after a secretly recorded video surfaced of Santillan talking to his wife about the lead ATF agent on the case -- John Ciccone. Eyewitness News has obtained the video that was recorded in June of 2021 when David Santillan was drunk and despondent. He and his wife, Annie, were estranged after he had an affair. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/motorcyclemadhouse/message

The Clement Manyathela Show
Across The Desk - Ramaphosa Farmgate scandal

The Clement Manyathela Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 37:19


Clement Manyathela is joined by Tshidi Madia Senior Political Journalist at Eyewitness News and Carol Paton Political and financial journalist at News24, to analyse the complaint that has been launched by former spy boss Arthur Frazer, on a burglary that took place in president Ramaphosa's farm in 2020. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham
KZN Floods/Weekend Rains

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 4:15


Guest: Nhlanhla Mabaso is the KwaZulu-Natal-based reporter for Eyewitness News. He joins John to report on the heavy rains over the weekend that caused severe flooding in parts of KwaZulu-Natal. This comes after last month's devastating floods which claimed over 450 lives. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Live Laugh Murder Podcast
#7 Area 50 What?

Live Laugh Murder Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 53:35


Movie or True Crime? A news broadcast is shown, and the anchorman asks us to keep an open mind about what he's about to say. Buckle up, Butter Cups! Because according to Eyewitness News at 8, the government is covering up the truth about what is really out there in the desert of Nevada. Is it the plot of a spooky movie? Or is it a true crime case? The truth will be revealed. Thanks for listening! We want your stories! If you are a writer or have had a spooky incident happen in your own life, type it up, put it into a PDF, and email us! We want to share your Listener Tales. Write your story exactly as you want it read and please reveal at the end if it is truth or if it is a fiction story. Can't wait to see what you send us! (Please include any names/locations as you want read on the pod). Email: Livelaughmurderpod@gmail.com IG: Live Laugh Murder Podcast Patreon: patreon.com/livelaughmurderpodcast Joanna's "Florida Man" story: https://cnsnews.com/mrctv-blog/curtis-kalin/mcrage-woman-sets-car-fire-after-man-refuses-buy-mcflurry News Broadcast: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4UjqFaQq_7I --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/livelaughmurderpod/support

The Holistic Kids Show
66. Road to Making TV History | Ayah Galal

The Holistic Kids Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 31:47


Join us on The Holistic Kids Show as learn more about how Ms Ayah Galal made her dreams come true! She is such an amazing role model for all of us! Ms Ayah Galal is a reporter and multimedia journalist at WFSB-TV, the CBS News affiliate in Connecticut. Ayah joined the Eyewitness News team in 2018 and currently serves as the Hartford Bureau Chief. In December 2021, Ms Ayah made history, becoming the first woman in hijab to anchor a newscast in Connecticut. Before becoming a full-time reporter, Ayah worked as a producer at WFSB and WTNH. Ayah graduated from Quinnipiac University, where she double majored in journalism and political science. We are soooo honored! Learn more https://ayahgalal.com/

Ed's Auto Garage Podcast
Dave Kunz - Automotive Specialist SoCal KABC 7 Eyewitness News

Ed's Auto Garage Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 54:05


Dave Kunz has been an employee of ABC7 for a quarter-century, becoming the Eyewitness News Automotive Specialist in February 2001. In addition to his duties as a photographer and editor, his on-camera work makes ABC7 the only station in Southern California with a dedicated reporter covering automobiles and related topics. Growing up in the San Fernando Valley, Dave always gravitated toward the Southern California car culture that was all around him. His television career started in an unusual way, however. Dave was offered a "temporary, part-time job" at KABC-TV while in college as a business major. Though business would always be something to fall back on (keeping his family happy), broadcasting was continually calling his name. He went on to a formative career in television, first at KTLA and then back at KABC. Eventually, Dave was able to merge his career in television with his passion for things with wheels, and now gets to experience just about anything that runs on gasoline (or increasingly, clean new cars that don't use any), and bring them to Eyewitness News viewers. He is a member of both the Motor Press Guild and the Society of Automotive Historians. Dave also volunteers as an emcee at local vintage car shows such as The Friends of Steve McQueen Car and Motorcycle Show, the Palos Verdes Concours d'Elegance, and the Art Center Car Classic. Dave spends his free time with his wife, Suzanne, who helps him keep a small collection of classic cars in (usually) running order. Follow Dave on social media: Facebook.com/abc7davekunz Twitter.com/abc7davekunz Instagram.com/abc7davekunz

Lori & Julia
5/5 Thurs Hr 1: We had a late start today... Brittany is Back!

Lori & Julia

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 21:49


Larry Phar joins the show to talk about what can we be planting now? We also talk about the 25th season of Get Growing that launches tonight on 5 Eyewitness News. Amber Heard details alleged abuse by ex-husband Johnny Depp while taking the stand in high-profile defamation trial. Legal analyst Dana Abrams calls Amber Heard's testimony “a critical moment” in the Johnny Depp defamation trial.

Shaping Opinion
Encore – How Business Influences TV News

Shaping Opinion

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 52:01


TV news industry veteran and consultant John Altenbern joins Tim to talk about the business of TV news. John runs a consulting firm named Crawford Johnson & Northcott, Inc., that specializes in helping TV news operations get better ratings and grow their audiences. John tells what it takes for TV news operations to compete against each other for your time and attention. He gives a glimpse of some of the methods and strategies those news directors, producers and reporters use to keep us tuned in. This Encore Episode was originally released on May 11, 2020. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Encore_-_The_Business_of_TV_News.mp3 In 2016, the Pew research organization published a report that told us that more Americans get their news from local TV stations than any other place. Pew reported that back in 2007, that 29.3 million people watched their local evening newscasts, but by 2015, the total was roughly 22.8 million. A big drop of over 6 million, but still the most sizable audience for news consumption. In this episode, we explore some of the reasons why the change, and also why local TV news remains so dominant in the media landscape. In 1965, Westinghouse Broadcasting, known as Group W, owned a TV station in Philadelphia, KYW-TV. The station was a CBS network affiliate. Until this time, the stereotypical newscast looked like this. A curmudgeonly man sat at a desk delivering headlines as though it was ripped right off of a wire service ticker tape machine. He'd deliver the news with all the seriousness of Walter Cronkite. In many cases, the producers would even pipe in background audio of the tickety tap of typewriters and wire machines as the anchor man delivered the day's news. But news director Al Primo had a different idea. He hired field reporters and sent them out into the city to get the news, and then film their reports from the field. (Yes, they used film cameras, not video cameras). He diversified the news team, adding women and minorities, and he instructed his team to engage in more relaxed conversation in between the delivery of those serious news stories. He called it Happy Talk. If you tuned into KYW back then, you'd see the news anchors walking into their places on the set in a hurry, scripts in hand, as though they were working right up until air time to bring you the latest news. He even gave his approach to news a brand. He called it Eyewitness News. On the other side of town, WPVI-TV responded to the challenge. News director Mel Kampmann gave his viewers a different brand. Rather than happy talk, he focused on short news clips, and nothing but hard, fast news. The pace of the stories was relentless, giving viewers the idea that if they changed the channel, or even left the room, they might miss something. Mel branded his approach to the news as well. He called his style Action News. In this episode, John gets into detail on just how the business of TV news works and why. Links Crawford Johnson & Northcott How COVID-19 Has Impacted Media Consumption, by Generation, Visual Capitalist Oy, the Traffic. And it's Pouring! Do I hear sirens?, Columbia Journalism Review State of the News Media, Pew Research Center Reinventing Local TV News, Nieman Reports About this Episode's Guest John Altenbern John Altenbern is President of Crawford Johnson & Northcott, Inc., – or CJ&N – an Iowa-based media market research and consulting company. For the past 30 years, he has worked with media executives and newsrooms around the country to help them achieve ratings and audience success. John is a graduate of the University of Iowa, with degrees in Journalism and Political Science. As a Phi Beta Kappa member, he also holds an MBA from Iowa, and is a past-chairman of the Iowa Journalism School's professional advisory board. In addition, he has served as an adjunct journalism instructor. He worked for local television newsrooms both in on-air...

Experience, Strength and Hope | Tony Da’ Mayor
Greg Taylor | Part 2 Junction City Eyewitness News

Experience, Strength and Hope | Tony Da’ Mayor

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 30:54


Gregory Lamont Taylor was born in Mobile Alabama May 14th, 1972. He has four kids 1 daughter and 3 Sons. Greg graduated in 1990 from Murphy High School in 1990 and joined the United States Army that same year. After 20years of service, he retired from the military. Greg is the owner and founder of Junction City Eyewitness News in Junction City. Greg has a passion for helping Inspire our Youth to have confidence in themselves and achieving their goals. He also wants to educate them about our systemic racism history and how to treat each other with respect no matter what race, color or creed. Greg has a vision for Junction City Eyewitness News to go World-wide and to have a full TV Production. Greg states “the two other high points in my life was organizing the Black Lives Matter movement at Heritage Park in Junction City Ks. with Michael Turner on May 29th, 2020, after the death of George Floyd and being a member of the Eagles Aries 830 in Junction City in which we help with local programs and help with the homeless and less fortunate” --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Experience, Strength and Hope | Tony Da’ Mayor
Greg Taylor | Part 1 Junction City Eyewitness News

Experience, Strength and Hope | Tony Da’ Mayor

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2022 23:08


Gregory Lamont Taylor was born in Mobile Alabama May 14th, 1972. He has four kids 1 daughter and 3 Sons. Greg graduated in 1990 from Murphy High School in 1990 and joined the United States Army that same year. After 20years of service, he retired from the military. Greg is the owner and founder of Junction City Eyewitness News in Junction City. Greg has a passion for helping Inspire our Youth to have confidence in themselves and achieving their goals. He also wants to educate them about our systemic racism history and how to treat each other with respect no matter what race, color or creed. Greg has a vision for Junction City Eyewitness News to go World-wide and to have a full TV Production.

Greg states “the two other high points in my life was organizing the Black Lives Matter movement at Heritage Park in Junction City Ks. with Michael Turner on May 29th, 2020, after the death of George Floyd and being a member of the Eagles Aries 830 here in Junction City in which we help volunteer with local programs and help with the homeless and less fortunate”

Bleav in Middle Age Warriors
From Attica to Artist - John Johnson Reflects

Bleav in Middle Age Warriors

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 1, 2022 52:47


The Middle Age Warriors share time with New York & Network TV icon John Johnson, part of the initial EyeWitness News team. We also explore John's initial passion, which has been with him since childhood, art. From Johnson's covering the Attica prison uprising, to the rise to freedom of Nelson Mandela, John shares his experience, as well as the personal moments of his childhood and his love of art and painting which to this day he continues in a very prolific manner.

Queens Memory: Our Major Minor Voices
Episode 1: We Call It Home

Queens Memory: Our Major Minor Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 24, 2022 18:42


In Season 3 of the Queens Memory podcast, “Our Major Minor Voices,” we feature stories from our neighbors of Asian descent in Queens, New York.    Too often, these voices are deemed “minor” – as in “of a minority.” But in this series – as in our borough – they are a major force. One in four Queens residents identifies as Asian-American.    In this episode, Executive Producer Melody Cao chronicles the turmoil these communities are experiencing in the present, as well as the richness of their pasts in our borough.   If you’re listening with others and want to discuss, here are some guiding questions:    What does ‘HOME’ mean to you?When did you start to call Queens home?What makes Queens feel like home to you?   Resources mentioned in the episode can be found below: Asian American / Asian Research Institute, CUNYAsian American Center in Queens CollegeChinese-American Planning Council   This episode was produced by Melody Cao in conjunction with Anna Williams and Natalie Milbrodt. It was hosted by J. Faye Yuan.   Mixing and editing by Cory Choy with music composed by Elias Ravin.    Special thanks to Wayne Ho, Joyce Moy, and Madhulika Khandelwal   The news clips quoted in the episodes are from:   “Anti-Asian Attacks in NYC Woman Arrested in Spree of Beatings ” — News 4 Now, July 23 2021;“Anti-Asian incidents top 6,000 since start of pandemic” — CBS Evening News, May 6 2021;“Asian woman struck in head with rock in Queens; Police investigating as possible hate crime” — ABC 7 Eyewitness News, November 27 2021;“Hate Crimes Against Asian Americans On The Rise” — NBC News Now, February 20 2021   This podcast has been made possible in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities: Democracy demands wisdom. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this podcast do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities. The views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this episode are those of its creators and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of National Endowment for the Humanities, Queens Public Library, the City University of New York, or their employees.

The Arcanum Project
Where is Ray Gricar?

The Arcanum Project

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 21, 2022 66:56


The hunt for Ray Gricar: 15 years of clues, theories and the search for answers | News, Sports, Jobs - The Express (lockhaven.com)Timeline - RayGricar (google.com)Ray Gricar: A look inside the 10-year-long investigation into the missing Centre Co. DA - pennlive.comRay Frank Gricar – The Charley ProjectWhere is Ray Gricar? | Eyewitness News (pahomepage.com)What happened to Ray Gricar? | CNN

The Clement Manyathela Show
SONA in 60 mins

The Clement Manyathela Show

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 11, 2022 50:03


Clement and Cape Talk's Lester Kiewit unpack President Cyril Ramaphosa's State of the Nation Address with Eyewitness News' Tshidi Madia and Babalo Ndenze as well as 702 Midday Report host, Mandy Weiner. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Bucket List Careers
NYC Reporter to Artist & Radio Show Host: Lauren DeFranco's Journey to Authenticity

Bucket List Careers

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 10, 2022 23:37


Lauren DeFranco started her career in journalism at WFSB TV in Hartford, CT where she was an assistant to THE Gayle King (Oprah's bestie!) Lauren then landed at Channel 7 Eyewitness News in New York City, the top local station in the country, where she was a reporter in the field for 14 years. In this episode, we get to hear a behind-the-scenes perspective of what it's like to be a local TV reporter covering the biggest stories and, of course, we explore a passionate career transition! Lauren is now an artist and radio host on KJOY Radio. Her popular call-in show includes a professional dating coach, who helps singles find their soulmates and navigate the difficulties of dating in a pandemic. This is a classic pivot-centric BLC episode highlighting how Lauren finally became honest with herself, following her heart more and more in her journey to professional purpose!

Bucket List Careers
NYC Reporter to Artist & Radio Show Host: Lauren DeFranco's Journey to Authenticity

Bucket List Careers

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 10, 2022 23:37


Lauren DeFranco started her career in journalism at WFSB TV in Hartford, CT where she was an assistant to THE Gayle King (Oprah's bestie!) Lauren then landed at Channel 7 Eyewitness News in New York City, the top local station in the country, where she was a reporter in the field for 14 years. In this episode, we get to hear a behind-the-scenes perspective of what it's like to be a local TV reporter covering the biggest stories and, of course, we explore a passionate career transition! Lauren is now an artist and radio host on KJOY Radio. Her popular call-in show includes a professional dating coach, who helps singles find their soulmates and navigate the difficulties of dating in a pandemic. This is a classic pivot-centric BLC episode highlighting how Lauren finally became honest with herself, following her heart more and more in her journey to professional purpose!

The Money Show
July Unrest Report: Intelligence failed to anticipate and prevent the riots

The Money Show

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 7, 2022 81:41


Theto Mahlakoana, senior political journalist at Eyewitness News delineates the report released by the presidency on the 2021 July unrest. Paul Makube, senior agricultural economist at FNB explains how the recent sharp increase in cooking oil prices will impact the cost of food. Then, on Other People's Money Dave Foord, chief officer of Foord Asset Management gives insights on how he manages his own money. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hondo Handy’s Podcast
Hondo Handy's Podcast shares the story of Travon Miles, Sports Anchor at ABC11 Eyewitness News WTVD.

Hondo Handy’s Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 47:30


Residence Inn by Marriott presents the 85th Episode of the Hondo Handy's Podcast. The podcast shares the journey of Travon Miles, who is excited to be joining the super talented team at ABC11 Eyewitness News - WTVD in Raleigh, NC, as a Sports/Reporter. He recently served as the Sports Director at 47 ABC. The Salisbury native is a proud alumni of Wicomico High School, where he played football. He also graduated in 2012 from Salisbury University with a B.A. in Communication Arts. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

I Gotta Girl 4 That
Ep. 15: Hidden in Plain Sight

I Gotta Girl 4 That

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 42:35


Are you a true crime junkie? Is so, do I have a girl for you?! This week I am highlighting one of the few female owned Private Investigator firms in the game, Root Investigations. Lizzy is hired by men, women, families, and coworkers during some of their hardest times in life. Yes, she even worked on the Free Brittney Movement! Hear what sets her apart in this mans world, it's no surprise she has been sought out by Eyewitness News, Hulu, and other news outlets. While Lizzy is based in New York, her span is wide. Whether you are looking to become a Private Investigator (PI) or you have that uneasy feeling in your gut, give Lizzy a shout!  Have a question? Want to be a guest? e-mail: alana@igottagirl4that.com

I Gotta Girl 4 That
Ep. 15: Hidden in Plain Sight

I Gotta Girl 4 That

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 42:35


Are you a true crime junkie? Is so, do I have a girl for you?! This week I am highlighting one of the few female owned Private Investigator firms in the game, Root Investigations. Lizzy is hired by men, women, families, and coworkers during some of their hardest times in life. Yes, she even worked on the Free Brittney Movement! Hear what sets her apart in this mans world, it's no surprise she has been sought out by Eyewitness News, Hulu, and other news outlets. While Lizzy is based in New York, her span is wide. Whether you are looking to become a Private Investigator (PI) or you have that uneasy feeling in your gut, give Lizzy a shout!  Have a question? Want to be a guest? e-mail: alana@igottagirl4that.com

I Gotta Girl 4 That
Ep. 15: Hidden in Plain Sight

I Gotta Girl 4 That