Boston Public Radio Podcast

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Join hosts Jim Braude and Margery Eagan for a smart local conversation with leaders and thinkers shaping Boston and New England. We feature our favorite conversation from each show. To hear the full show, please visit wgbhnews.org/bpr To share your opinion, email bpr@wgbh.org or call 877-301-8970 du…

WGBH Educational Foundation


    • Oct 27, 2021 LATEST EPISODE
    • weekdays NEW EPISODES
    • 2h 17m AVG DURATION
    • 1,252 EPISODES

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    Latest episodes from Boston Public Radio Podcast

    BPR Full Show: Wu v. Essaibi George

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 164:03


    Today on Boston Public Radio: Art Caplan weighs in on Deborah Birx, who helped run the pandemic response under the Trump Administration, testifying to Congress about how many lives could have been saved from COVID-19 had Donald Trump taken preventative measures. Caplan is the Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU School of Medicine in New York City. Then, we ask listeners about their experiences with the ongoing nor'easter, and worsening extreme weather across the world. Juliette Kayyem gives an overview of the recently released Facebook files, and talks about what might happen if the Democrats cannot push through their spending bill. Kayyem is an analyst for CNN, former assistant secretary at the Department of Homeland Security and faculty chair of the homeland security program at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government. Boston City Councilor Michelle Wu talks about her plan to improve housing, address the crisis at Mass. and Cass, support the cannabis industry and require proof of vaccination for restaurants and other indoor venues. Wu is a Boston City Councilor At-Large running for mayor of Boston. Boston City Councilor Annissa Essaibi George discussing her approach to housing, solving Mass. and Cass and improving the MBTA, as well as her identity as Arab American. She also talked about her thoughts on cannabis and her husband's work as a developer. Essaibi George is Boston City Councilor At Large and a candidate for Boston mayor. Sy Montgomery gives the latest updates from the animal kingdom, including how squirrels store nuts, shark sightings along Cape Cod and why lemurs have rhythm. Montgomery is a journalist, naturalist and a BPR contributor. We end the show by talking with listeners whether or not they think jaywalking should be enforced and how, following propositions to raise fines for jaywalking.


    Corby Kummer: Restaurant Industry Wage Theft Has Worsened During the Pandemic

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 12:35

    Award-winning food writer Corby Kummer joined Boston Public Radio on Tuesday to discuss a pandemic-era increase of wage theft in the restaurant industry, following a recent report by the nonprofit restaurant advocacy group One Fair Wage. “[Forty-three] states still allow a tipped minimum wage, which means as low as $2.13 an hour,” Kummer said. “Employees who are waitstaff have the liberty to take home all their tips based on that. The catch is that it's on the restaurant manager to look to see, ‘what's the average hourly earning of those tipped minimum wage staff members of mine,' and ‘did it equal or better the state's minimum wage.' And if it didn't, they — the managers — have to make up for it by paying them enough money to make them whole.” “There's never been much enforcement of this, and there's less than ever enforcement now,” Kummer added. “There's evidence that there's more of this failure to make up for any of these losses than there was before the pandemic.” Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

    BPR Full Show: Say Cheese!

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 164:27


    Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners how they feel about President Joe Biden's spending bill shrinking as it nears finalization. Trenni Kusnierek updates listeners on all things sports, including anti-vaccine protesters storming barricades at Barclays Center to support Kyrie Irving, and Tom Brady's 600th touchdown ball. Kusnierek is an anchor and reporter for NBC Sports Boston, as well as a Boston Public Radio contributor. Ali Noorani talks about why despite the United States' declaration of China's policies against its Uyghur community as a genocide, the government has not provided anyone refugee status. Noorani is the President & Chief Executive Officer of the National Immigration Forum. His forthcoming book is “Crossing Borders: The Reconciliation of a Nation of Immigrants.” Gov. Charlie Baker talks about how he thinks the state is doing on vaccinations following his mandates, and how he plans to approach housing issues. Baker is the governor of Massachusetts. Corby Kummer discusses the growing issue of wage theft in the restaurant industry, when waitstaff fail to make minimum wage off tips and their employer fails to pay the difference. Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. John King weighs in on Virginia's mayoral race and the state of the Democrats' spending plan. King is CNN's Chief National Correspondent and anchor of “Inside Politics,” which airs weekdays and Sunday mornings at 8 a.m. We end the show by asking listeners if bad photos are dead in the age of iPhones.


    BPR Full Show: Buy Nothing

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 163:58


    Today on Boston Public Radio: Michael Curry discusses the importance of community partnerships in increasing vaccination levels, and weighs in on opinions on the mayor's race in Boston's Black community. Curry is the president and CEO of the Massachusetts League of Community Health Centers and a member of Gov. Charlie Baker's COVID Vaccine Advisory Group. He's also a member of the National NAACP Board of Directors and chair of the board's advocacy and policy committee. Then, we ask listeners about whether they think a recent rise in union actions symbolizes genuine change, or if the current push for better labor practices will fizzle out. Dr. Katherine Gergen Barnett takes questions from listeners about all things vaccine related, as authorization for children aged 5-11 nears and people begin to mix and match booster shots. Gergen Barnett teaches in the Department of Family Medicine at Boston Medical Center and Boston University Medical School. Revs. Irene Monroe and Emmett G. Price III talk about how Evangelical Christians are looking for a new label for their community. Monroe is a syndicated religion columnist, the Boston voice for Detour's African American Heritage Trail and co-host of the All Rev'd Up podcast. Price is the founding pastor of Community of Love Christian Fellowship in Allston, the Inaugural Dean of Africana Studies at Berklee College of Music and co-host of the All Rev'd Up podcast. Susan Orlean previews her latest book about animals, including the history of the movie “Free Willy,” her relationship with turkeys and her Valentine's Day spent with a lion. Orlean is a staff writer for the New Yorker, and an author; her latest book is “On Animals.” We end the show by talking with listeners about their experiences with “Buy Nothing” Facebook groups and efforts for sustainable buying and selling.


    BPR Full Show: Speak Now or Forever Hold Your Peace

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 164:26


    Today on Boston Public Radio: Stacey Abrams talks about what voters and politicians need to do to safeguard democracy, after Republicans blocked the Democrats' voting rights bill in Congress. She also weighs in on the status of Democratic negotiations over President Joe Biden's spending bill. Abrams is a voting rights activist, former Georgia State Representative and author. Then, we ask listeners how they approach compromise and negotiation following Stacey Abrams' conversation about political compromise. Shirley Leung pushes for ending tent encampments and providing housing for those at Mass. and Cass and weighs in on rent control, in her latest column on the Mass. and Cass crisis. Leung is a business columnist for The Boston Globe and a Boston Public Radio contributor. Sue O'Connell discusses one of the first rural health clinics by and for transgender people located in Northampton, and weighs in on when celebrities who commit harm can return to the public eye. O'Connell is the co-publisher of Bay Windows and the South End News, as well as NECN's political commentator and explainer-in-chief. Then, we ask listeners their thoughts on marriage, following a New York Times article about how the married may soon become the minority. Andy Ihnatko updates listeners on the latest tech headlines, including Facebook's upcoming rebranding, Donald Trump's new social media platform, Google's new signature phone and issues with Tesla's self-driving cars. Ihnatko is a tech writer and blogger, posting at Ihnatko.com.


    BPR Full Show: Sublime Snacking and Celebrity Sighting

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 163:47

    Today on Boston Public Radio: Chuck Todd begins the show by talking about what he thinks will get cut from the Democrats' spending bill, and what “reconciliation” actually means. Todd is the moderator of “Meet the Press,” host of “Meet the Press Daily” on MSNBC and the political director for NBC News. Then, we asked listeners if they plan to get their kids vaccinated, as FDA authorization is expected to go through for children aged five to 11 in the coming weeks. Andrea Cabral discusses jury selection in the trial of Gregory McMichael, Travis McMichael and William Bryan, who shot Ahmaud Arbery in February of 2020. She also talks about today's House vote on whether or not to hold Steve Bannon in contempt for defying a subpoena from a committee investigating the Jan. 6 insurrection. Cabral is the former Suffolk County sheriff and the former Massachusetts secretary of public safety. She is currently the CEO of the cannabis company Ascend. Paul Reville unpacks the boom in enrollment at Christian schools, and an elite Concord school cancelling its invitation to Nikole Hannah-Jones to speak about The New York Times' 1619 Project. Reville is the former Massachusetts secretary of education and a professor at Harvard University's Graduate School of Education, where he also heads the Education Redesign Lab. His latest book, co-authored with Lynne Sacks, is “Collaborative Action for Equity and Opportunity: A Practical Guide for School and Community Leaders.” Folu Akinkoutu talks all things snacks, including her recollections of helping her parents run vending machines, her favorite food fusions across cultures and snack containers that dredge up childhood memories. Folu Akinkuotu is the Boston-based creator of the Unsnackable newsletter. Jon Gruber highlights the legacy and importance of the Nobel Memorial Prize in economics, and how Joshua Angrist's win for “natural experiments” in the field contributed to the rise in prominence of empirical economic research. Gruber teaches economics at MIT. He was instrumental in creating both the Massachusetts health-care reform and the Affordable Care Act, and his latest book is “Jump-Starting America: How Breakthrough Science Can Revive Economic Growth And The American Dream.” We end the show by asking listeners about their celebrity encounters, after John Legend tipped a street performer playing “All of Me” outside Faneuil Hall.

    Is There Such Thing as an Eco-Friendly Steakhouse?

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 19:35


    When diners visit Seattle steakhouse Bateau, they'll find steakhouse staples such as prime rib and filet alongside more obscure cuts like ranch and coulotte. Award-winning food writer Corby Kummer joined Boston Public Radio on Wednesday to share his thoughts on Bateau's efforts to become an environmentally sustainable steakhouse, following New York Times contributor Brett Anderson's profile on the restaurant. “[Bateau is] only offering the cuts of meat that their farmers, who use pasture-raised cattle and practices they approve of, have available,” Kummer said. “So if it's out for the night, you have to have something else at the restaurant.” “This restaurant is also experimenting with different ways of cooking meat, so it's tender and palatable,” Kummer added. Kummer noted that the chefs and owners of Craigie on Main in Central Square and Alden & Harlow in Harvard Square are just two examples of the “many local chefs who've been into this method.” “The whole idea for them is, ‘we want to support local farmers — local farmers aren't corn finishing on huge meat lots in Texas. It's grass-fed — often that needs a sharp knife — and we're going to show you, the diner, how delicious it can be,'” Kummer said. “It's just not what you'd get at a national steakhouse chain that subscribes to environment-destroying animal raising.” Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.


    BPR Full Show: Don't Bet on Supply Chains

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 123:44

    Today on Boston Public Radio: Art Caplan discusses the first ever successful genetically modified kidney transplant, which could be a breakthrough for those waiting for transplants. He also talks about the latest in mixing vaccines for booster shots. Caplan is the Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU School of Medicine in New York City. Then, we ask listeners about their thoughts on sports betting as Connecticut just launched online sports betting, which remains illegal in Massachusetts. Juliette Kayyem weighs in on the acceleration of China's national space program, and updates listeners on the status of President Joe Biden and the United States' approval ratings. Kayyem is an analyst for CNN, former assistant secretary at the Department of Homeland Security and faculty chair of the homeland security program at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government. Howard Mansfield previews his latest book, “Chasing Eden: A Book of Seekers,” about communities throughout American history that sought freedom, happiness and utopia. Mansfield is an author who writes about history, architecture and preservation. Corby Kummer discusses how supply chain shortages could affect the food industry, and what happens when outdoor dining converges with the city's homelessness crisis. Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. We end the show by asking listeners what they're hoarding amid the latest slew of supply chain issues.

    BPR Full Show: Club Sandwich

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 128:04


    Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners what Massachusetts' paid family and medical leave means to them, as the program comes under threat at the federal level in Congress. Trenni Kusnierek talks about the Washington State University's firing of football coach Nick Rolovich after his refusal to get the COVID-19 vaccine, and updates listeners on the Red Sox' progression through the playoffs. Kusnierek is an anchor and reporter for NBC Sports Boston, as well as a Boston Public Radio contributor. Christopher Muther previews New Hampshire's hottest club, a live music venue in a barn owned by John Davidson in Sandwich. He also discusses the results of J.D. Power's annual airport satisfaction survey, where Boston Logan Airport ranked third to last among mega airports. Muther is a Boston Globe travel columnist and travel writer. Then, we talk with listeners about whether or not they would pay extra to fly on an all-vaccinated flight. Jonathan Martinis updates listeners on the status of Brittany Spears' case as she seeks to end her conservatorship, and discusses the importance of using her case to raise awareness of other instances of conservatorship abuse. Martinis is Senior Director for Law and Policy with the Burton Blatt Institute at Syracuse University, and was the lawyer in the 2012 Jenny Hatch guardianship case. John King weighs in on the latest political headlines, including updates on Democratic negotiations over President Joe Biden's spending bill, and what the Virginia's mayoral race means for Democrats. King is CNN's Chief National Correspondent and anchor of “Inside Politics,” which airs weekdays and Sunday mornings at 8 a.m. We end the show by continuing our conversation with listeners about what they would do to fly on a fully-vaccinated flight.


    BPR Full Show: The Sacred Art of Twerking

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 127:52


    Today on Boston Public Radio: EJ Dionne discusses the death of former U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell, and the status of Democratic negotiations over President Joe Biden's spending bill. Dionne is a columnist for The Washington Post and a senior fellow at The Brookings Institution. His latest book is "Code Red: How Progressives And Moderates Can Unite To Save Our Country." Then, we ask listeners if they would go back to the office if promised one month of remote work, after Amazon announced a similar plan for its corporate employees. Charlie Sennott talks about the United States' role in political and economic chaos in Haiti, following the kidnapping of 17 U.S. and Canadian missionaries. He also emphasizes the importance of journalism with the awarding of this year's Nobel Peace Prize to journalists Dmitri A. Muratov from Russia and Maria Ressa from the Philippines. Sennott is a GBH News analyst and the founder and CEO of The GroundTruth Project. Renée Landers previews the upcoming U.S. Supreme Court term, including the Dzhokhar Tsarnaev death penalty case and debates over abortion. She also weighs in on term limits and whether or not she thinks Justice Stephen Breyer will retire before the end of Biden's term. Landers is a professor of law and faculty director of the health and biomedical law concentration at Suffolk University's School of Law. Revs. Irene Monroe and Emmett G. Price III weigh in on Dave Chapelle's Netflix special and Lizzo calling twerking sacred. Monroe is a syndicated religion columnist, the Boston voice for Detour's African American Heritage Trail and co-host of the All Rev'd Up podcast. Price is the founding pastor of Community of Love Christian Fellowship in Allston, the Inaugural Dean of Africana Studies at Berklee College of Music and co-host of the All Rev'd Up podcast. We end the show by talking with listeners about how they respond to receiving care from private healthcare workers who remain unvaccinated.


    BPR Full Show: Phone Users Anonymous

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 129:04

    Today on Boston Public Radio: Rep. Katherine Clark discusses President Joe Biden's spending plan, including the importance of childcare funding, and updates listeners on the state of Democratic negotiations. Clark is assistant house speaker and represents the Fifth District of Massachusetts. Then, we ask listeners about their thoughts on vaccine mandates in Massachusetts and the politicization of vaccines, as New Hampshire residents push back against public health efforts. Sue O'Connell talks about Texas' child welfare agency removing resources for LGBTQ youth from its webpage, and an upcoming walkout by transgender Netflix employees over Dave Chappelle's latest comedy special. O'Connell is the co-publisher of Bay Windows and the South End News, as well as NECN's political commentator and explainer-in-chief. Shirley Leung breaks down latest proposals to address the crisis at Mass. and Cass, and tells the story of a woman from New Jersey who drove north to look for her son there. Leung is a business columnist for The Boston Globe and a Boston Public Radio contributor. Andy Ihnatko talks about how iPhones can now track location even when turned off, so that the Find my iPhone feature can locate the device. He also discusses bipartisan efforts in Congress to bar tech companies from giving preferential treatment to their own products. Ihnatko is a tech writer and blogger, posting at Ihnatko.com. We end the show by asking listeners for their tips on tackling phone addiction.

    BPR Full Show: Fiona Hill On Opportunity

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 128:54


    Today on Boston Public Radio: Chuck Todd begins the show by talking about the possible effect of supply chain shortages on approval ratings of President Joe Biden as the holidays near. He also discusses what programs might have to give in order to pass Biden's spending plan. Todd is the moderator of “Meet the Press,” host of “Meet the Press Daily” on MSNBC and the political director for NBC News. Then, we ask listeners what they think Democrats should cut to pass Biden's infrastructure bill. Andrea Cabral updates listeners on the latest in the conviction of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev for the Boston Marathon bombing. The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments this week as to whether Tsarnaev was properly sentenced to death, and whether he had a fair trial. Cabral also discusses a Boston Police officer back on duty after a suspension for bragging about hitting George Floyd protesters with his car. Cabral is the former Suffolk County sheriff and the former Massachusetts secretary of public safety. She is currently the CEO of the cannabis company Ascend. Then, we talk with listeners about their thoughts on police reform, and why they think efforts to change policing have faltered in the months since protests in the summer of 2020. Fiona Hill previews her memoir that came out this month, “There Is Nothing for You Here: Finding Opportunity in the Twenty-First Century,” and weighs in on the similarities and differences between Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin. Hill served as deputy assistant to the president and senior director for European and Russian affairs in the Trump administration from 2017 to 2019, and was witness in Donald Trump's first impeachment hearing. Jared Bowen rounds up the latest arts and culture happenings in the city, including the MFA's “Fabric of a Nation: American Quilt Stories” exhibit, and Gregory Maguire's latest novel, “The Brides of Maracoor.” Bowen is GBH's executive arts editor and the host of Open Studio.


    BPR Full Show: Spooky Season in Salem

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 127:36


    Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by talking about GBH's new multi-media series, “The Big Quit,” and asking listeners what they have quit in their lives since the start of the pandemic. Art Caplan discusses the first FDA authorization of e-cigarettes and the ethics of jumping the line for booster shots. Caplan is the Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU School of Medicine in New York City. Juliette Kayyem talks about a slew of flight cancellations by Southwest Airlines, and why she thinks Donald Trump might run in the 2024 Presidential Election. Kayyem is an analyst for CNN, former assistant secretary at the Department of Homeland Security and faculty chair of the homeland security program at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government. Richard Blanco reads poems in honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, including "The Latin Deli: An Ars Poetica" by Judith Ortiz Cofer, “Hearing Spider-Man Speaking Spanish in Times Square” by Ariel Francisco and “Suspended from School, the Pachuco's Grandson Watches Happy Days While his Homie Fulfills Prophecy” by Michael Torres. Blanco is the fifth inaugural poet in U.S. history. His latest book, "How To Love A Country," deals with various socio-political issues that shadow America. Salem Mayor Kim Driscoll talks about how Salem is adapting its Halloween festivities for the pandemic, and how the town negotiates the holiday's festivities with its darker history of witch trials. Driscoll is the mayor of Salem. We end the show by talking about where listeners can find the best Halloween displays, in the lead up to Oct. 31.


    BPR Full Show: Will He or Won't He?

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 164:30


    Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners whether or not they think Donald Trump will run in the 2024 Presidential Election. Trenni Kusnierek updates listeners on the latest sports news, including Jon Gruden's resignation as coach of the Las Vegas Raiders following the release of homophobic, racist and misogynistic emails, and the FBI's failure to investigate Larry Nassar. Kusnierek is an anchor and reporter for NBC Sports Boston, as well as a Boston Public Radio contributor. Ali Noorani discusses the scientific achievements of immigrants to the United States amid recent Nobel Prize announcements, and critiques the conditions at the border and treatment of Haitian migrants. Noorani is the President & Chief Executive Officer of the National Immigration Forum. His forthcoming book is Crossing Borders: The Reconciliation of a Nation of Immigrants. Rick Steves reports back from his latest travels to Paris and Mont Blanc, and shares his hopes for his next trip to Europe. Steves is an author, television and radio host and the owner of the Rick Steves' Europe tour group. You can catch his television show, "Rick Steves' Europe," weeknights at 7:30 p.m. on GBH 2 and his radio show, “Travel With Rick Steves,” Sundays at 4 p.m. on GBH. Revs. Irene Monroe and Emmett G. Price III talk about the significance of Indigenous People's Day and the effect of Facebook's outage on religious communities. Monroe is a syndicated religion columnist, the Boston voice for Detour's African American Heritage Trail and co-host of the All Rev'd Up podcast. Price is the founding pastor of Community of Love Christian Fellowship in Allston, the Inaugural Dean of Africana Studies at Berklee College of Music and co-host of the All Rev'd Up podcast. John King weighs in on the latest political headlines, including Democratic infighting in Washington D.C. and the possibility of Trump running again. King is CNN's Chief National Correspondent and anchor of "Inside Politics,” which airs weekdays and Sunday mornings at 8 a.m. We end the show by continuing the conversation with listeners about the possibility of a Trump 2024 campaign.


    BPR Full Show: Food on Tape

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 148:33

    Today on Boston Public Radio we're on tape, replaying some of our favorite conversations about food and cooking: Joanne Chang talks about her latest book inspired by her baking journals, “Pastry Love: A Baker's Journal of Favorite Recipes.” Chang is a James Beard award winning pastry chef. Bren Smith shares different ways to eat kelp in his book “Eat Like a Fish: My Adventures Farming the Ocean to Fight Climate Change.” Smith is a former commercial fisherman and executive director of the non-profit GreenWave, focused on regenerative farming in water ecosystems. Dolores Huerta talks about why her work as a labor leader for farm workers' rights remains as relevant today as it was in the 1960s, and about coining the phrase “Sí, se puede.” Huerta is an activist and co-founder of the National Farmworkers Association alongside Cesar Chaves. Andrew Li and Irene Li share food and tips from their latest cookbook, which they wrote with their sister Margaret Li: “Double Awesome Chinese Food: Irresistible and Totally Achievable Recipes from Our Chinese-American Kitchen.” Andrew Li and Irene Li are co-founders of the restaurant Mei Mei, along with their sister Margaret Li.

    BPR Full Show: Senator Elizabeth Warren Calls In

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 165:11


    Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by talking with listeners – including Senator Elizabeth Warren – about the country's child care crisis, as families struggle to pay for care and centers downsize due to lack of staff.  Shirley Leung discusses a proposal to house Mass. and Cass' homeless population in an empty detention center, and the state of fundraising in the mayor's race. Leung is a business columnist for The Boston Globe and a Boston Public Radio contributor. Callie Crossley talks about Tesla's $137 million payment to a former Black employee for racial discrimination at work, the quilt exhibit at the Museum of Fine Arts and Georgia's youngest farmer, a six year old girl. Crossley hosts GBH's Under the Radar and Basic Black. Sue O'Connell weighs in on the New York Times' article and subsequent Twitter controversy, “Who is the Bad Art Friend?”, and criticism of Dave Chappelle's latest Netflix stand-up special. O'Connell is the co-publisher of Bay Windows and the South End News, as well as NECN's political commentator and explainer-in-chief. Andy Ihnatko breaks down Monday's Facebook outage and the latest criticism facing the company following accusations by whistleblower Frances Haugen. Ihnatko is a tech writer and blogger, posting at Ihnatko.com. We end the show by asking listeners about their experiences with the Boston Marathon, as the race returns this Monday.


    BPR Full Show: A Tough Egg To Crack

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 164:24

    Today on Boston Public Radio: Chuck Todd updates listeners on the latest political headlines, including a federal judge siding with the Justice Department to block the restrictive Texas abortion law, current negotiations over a possible debt limit extension and what motivates Senator Kyrsten Sinema. Todd is the moderator of “Meet the Press,” host of “Meet the Press Daily” on MSNBC and the political director for NBC News. Then, we talk with listeners about their thoughts on the early stages of the 2022 Massachusetts Governor race, including Donald Trump's endorsement of former state Rep. Geoff Diehl. Andrea Cabral talks about the terrible conditions at Rikers Island, and how the Justice Department could be doing more work for police reform. Cabral is the former Suffolk County sheriff and the former Massachusetts secretary of public safety. She is currently the CEO of the cannabis company Ascend. Paul Reville discusses school board fights over mask mandates, and protests against legacy admissions in some of the country's most elite universities. Reville is the former Massachusetts secretary of education and a professor at Harvard University's Graduate School of Education, where he also heads the Education Redesign Lab. His latest book, co-authored with Lynne Sacks, is “Collaborative Action for Equity and Opportunity: A Practical Guide for School and Community Leaders.” Dan Carpenter weighs in on why it is taking so long to approve the COVID-19 vaccine for children aged 5-11, as Pfizer officially asks the Food and Drug Administration to issue Emergency Use Authorization. Carpenter is a professor of government at Harvard University, and oversees The FDA Project, a theoretical, historical and statistical analysis of pharmaceutical regulation in the United States as it is carried out by the F.D.A. His most recent book is “Democracy by Petition: Popular Politics in Transformation, 1790-1870.”  Corby Kummer talks about the impact of the pandemic on the restaurant industry, Guy Fieri's latest ventures and changing animal welfare laws that could raise egg prices in Massachusetts. Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. We end the show by asking listeners their thoughts on the potential for higher egg prices, as laws increasing pen space for hens are set to go into effect on Jan. 1, 2022.

    Corby Kummer: "There's Not Going to Be An Egg Shortage" in Massachusetts

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 20:04

    Massachusetts state legislators may revise a 2016 ballot law on animal welfare to prevent a potential statewide egg shortage. Award-winning food writer Corby Kummer joined Boston Public Radio on Thursday to share his thoughts on this, and more. “First of all, there's not going to be an egg shortage,” Kummer said. “It's only an economic measure to protect farmers.” While the law also contains enclosure standards for pigs and calves, legislators are concerned with rules on acceptable enclosure space for egg-laying hens. According to the bill, egg-laying hens must be given at least 1.5 square feet of floor space and be able to fully extend both wings without touching the sides of the enclosure. In a measure to counteract the potential egg shortage, lawmakers are attempting to amend the enclosure requirements from 1.5 square feet to 1 square foot, following enclosure laws in other states. Unless legislators pass this amendment, the law will go into effect as written on Jan. 1, 2022. Representatives for egg farmers, supermarkets, and some animal rights activists support changes to the law, noting that vertical or multi-tiered aviary systems that allow hens to fly upwards, perch, and roost within 1 square foot. While Kummer acknowledged that some farmers may struggle economically to adjust enclosure spaces to fit this new rule, he believes that the idea of an egg shortage caused by enclosure regulations is an “excuse.” “This is another way for the industry to protect itself at the expense of animal welfare,” Kummer said. “But, if the country has enacted 1 square foot, then maybe Massachusetts should be consistent with that.” Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

    BPR Full Show: Polyamorous Cats and Car-Eating Rats

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 164:34

    Today on Boston Public Radio: Art Caplan talks about healthcare workers resigning following vaccine mandates, after New York's largest healthcare provider lost 1,400 employees after a state mandate went into effect. Caplan is the Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU School of Medicine in New York City. Then, we hear from listeners about how they are planning for the holidays this year with the current status of the pandemic. Jim Aloisi and Stacy Thompson discuss why they think the MBTA is safe, how much they think the city should spend on transportation and the plan for the Mass. Pike development project in Allston. Aloisi is the former Massachusetts transportation secretary, a member of the Transit Matters board and a contributor to Commonwealth Magazine. Thompson is executive director of Livable Streets. Dr. Virginia Sinnott-Stutzman takes calls from listeners about caring for their pets, from dog food supply chain issues to combating kennel cough. Sinnott-Stutzman is a senior staff veterinarian at Angell Animal Medical Center.

    BPR Full Show: Happy Graduation, 18 Months Later

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 164:12


    Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners where the boundaries of protest lie, after activists followed Arizona Senator Kyrsten Sinema into the bathroom to protest her centrist policies. Trenni Kusnierek previews tonight's wild card game between the Yankees and Red Sox and the return of the Boston Marathon. Kusnierek is an anchor and reporter for NBC Sports Boston, as well as a Boston Public Radio contributor. Carol Rose talks about the status of the Texas abortion law and how the government should respond to internet privacy issues for users, and previews the U.S. Supreme Court's upcoming agenda. Rose is the Executive Director of the ACLU of Massachusetts. Michael Curry weighs in on vaccine mandates to combat the pandemic, and the debate over safe injection sites as a solution to the crisis at Mass. and Cass. Curry is the president and CEO of the Massachusetts League of Community Health Centers and a member of Gov. Charlie Baker's COVID Vaccine Advisory Group. He's also a member of the National NAACP Board of Directors and chair of the board's advocacy and policy committee. Stephanie Leydon previews the launch of GBH's new multi-platform project, “The Big Quit,” which profiles people who used the pandemic to quit aspects of their life for something new. Leydon is the Director of Special Projects at GBH. John King updates listeners on all things politics, including Sinema's centrist politics, and the persisting gridlock in Congress. He also talks about Donald Trump's political ambitions for the 2024 presidential election. King is CNN's Chief National Correspondent and anchor of "Inside Politics,” which airs weekdays and Sunday mornings at 8 a.m. Then, we talk with listeners about whether they found meaning in postponed graduations and life-cycle events during the pandemic, or whether the moment had passed.


    BPR Full Show: Rachael Rollins Refuses to Stay Silent

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 165:23

    Today on Boston Public Radio: District Attorney Rachael Rollins responds to Republican attacks, following a tied party-line vote by the Senate Judiciary Committee on her nomination for U.S. Attorney. She also talks about her decision to move towards overturning a 50-year-old rape conviction, after the victim expressed worries about identifying the wrong perpetrator. Rollins is the Suffolk County DA and nominee to be the State's next U.S. Attorney. Then, we ask listeners their thoughts on Facebook, as the company comes under fire by whistleblower Frances Haugen. Charlie Sennott talks about a partnership between over 150 investigative journalists to leak the Pandora Papers, which exposed financial secrets of some of the world's most wealthy and powerful people. He also discusses the need for better immigration policy from President Joe Biden. Sennott is a GBH News analyst and the founder and CEO of The GroundTruth Project. British Consul General Peter Abbott talks about opportunities for offshore wind energy partnerships between the U.S. and U.K., and the relationship between Biden and U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson. Abbott is the British Consul General to New England. Revs. Irene Monroe and Emmett G. Price III debate the ethics of singing Amazing Grace and other songs with troubled histories, given that Amazing Grace was written by a slave trader. They also discuss a racist email sent to Black students at UMass Amherst. Monroe is a syndicated religion columnist, the Boston voice for Detour's African American Heritage Trail and co-host of the All Rev'd Up podcast. Price is the founding pastor of Community of Love Christian Fellowship in Allston, the Inaugural Dean of Africana Studies at Berklee College of Music and co-host of the All Rev'd Up podcast. Adam Reilly weighs in on the state of the mayor's race, including Congresswoman Ayanna Pressley's endorsement of City Councilor and mayoral candidate Michelle Wu, and who he thinks has a leg up in the historic election. Reilly is a reporter for GBH news, co-host of the Scrum Politics podcast and co-host of Election 2021: Boston's Race Into History on GBH 2. We end the show by asking listeners whether they enjoy apple picking as a fun fall activity -- or decry its performativity -- as October begins.

    BPR Full Show: Will Brady and Belichick Hug?

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 87:22


    Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners their thoughts on Tom Brady's impending return to Gillette stadium this Sunday. Jon Gruber explains why the super rich pay a lower tax rate than most Americans, and breaks down President Joe Biden's proposal to raise taxes on the wealthy to fund his spending priorities. Gruber teaches economics at MIT. He was instrumental in creating both the Massachusetts health-care reform and the Affordable Care Act, and his latest book is “Jump-Starting America: How Breakthrough Science Can Revive Economic Growth And The American Dream.” Shirley Leung updates listeners on the latest business headlines, including her thoughts on the latest slew of issues with the MBTA and what it would take to get people back to the office on public transportation. Leung is a business columnist for The Boston Globe and a BPR contributor. Callie Crossley talks about what it means for the mail system with postal workers ordered to deliberately slow down delivery, and weighs in on the mayoral race, including Congresswoman Ayanna Pressley's endorsement of City Councilor Michelle Wu. Crossley hosts GBH's Under the Radar and Basic Black. Sue O'Connell discusses the latest updates in Britney Spears' fight for freedom as her father was suspended as her conservator. She also talks about Liz Cheney's comments on 60 Minutes this week admitting wrongdoing in her 2013 condemnation of same-sex marriage. O'Connell is the co-publisher of Bay Windows and the South End News, as well as NECN's political commentator and explainer-in-chief. Andy Ihnatko weighs in on Senate testimonies about recent reports of the harmful effect of Instagram on teenagers' mental health, and how Apple Music is lagging behind Spotify in subscribers. Ihnatko is a tech writer and blogger, posting at Ihnatko.com. Then, we continue our conversation about Brady's return in anticipation of Sunday's football game.


    Oh Deer! Is Venison the Most Eco-Friendly Food?

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 22:41

    That deer in your garden? It might just be the most eco-friendly dinner to eat — provided you kill it yourself. Award-winning food writer Corby Kummer joined Boston Public Radio on Thursday to discuss Washington Post columnist Tamar Haspell's proposal that venison is “unequivocally the single most ecologically friendly food you can eat.” “If you get farm-raised venison in a restaurant, it's not really addressing this [environmental] issue, because the only thing that's legal to sell is farm-raised venison,” Kummer said. “You have to go out and kill it.” Haspell argued that due to invasive deer populations posing threats to native animals and plants, the spread of Lyme disease by deer ticks, and the greenhouse gas emissions deer produce, wild venison could be considered the most eco-friendly food to consume. In her piece, Haspell noted that a Connecticut town reversed its no-hunting ordinance in 2000 after being overrun by deer. Scientists who monitored the situation found that in the seven following years, deer density dropped by 87%, and Lyme disease cases in the community dropped as well. “The minute I see cute deer in a backyard — which we do a lot in Jamaica Plain — I think, ‘ticks! Lyme disease!'” Kummer joked. “So there are a lot of advantages to thinning deer [populations].” Both Haspell and Kummer believe, however, that some people will refuse to hunt and eat wild venison despite its eco-friendliness. “As the Haspell column in the Post makes clear, the farther you are from the animal, the more comfortable you are eating it,” Kummer said. “The closer you are, and you see that it's cute — or if you ever name an animal that you raise, there is a shibboleth against things that you see. So there's absolutely no problem with inhumanely-raised slaughtered chickens, but when it comes to a deer that's invading your garden and giving you Lyme disease, ‘no, no, no — don't do it.'” Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

    BPR Full Show: Annissa Essaibi George Says She's the One For the Job

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 164:17

    Today on Boston Public Radio: Chuck Todd talks all things politics, including Democratic efforts to avoid a government shutdown, and what it would mean for the country if the United States defaults on its debt. Todd is the moderator of “Meet the Press,” host of “Meet the Press Daily” on MSNBC and the political director for NBC News. Then, we asked listeners how they were coping with the turbulent start of the school year amid the pandemic. Andrea Cabral discusses gun manufacturer Smith & Wesson's decision to relocate from Springfield to Tennessee, and the rise of the Proud Boys during the Trump era. Cabral is the former Suffolk County sheriff and the former Massachusetts secretary of public safety. She is currently the CEO of the cannabis company Ascend. City Councilor Annissa Essaibi George shares her views on policing and how she would work to solve the addiction crisis at Mass. and Cass. She also responds to a controversy surrounding a conflict of interest between her position on City Council and her husband's work in real estate development. Essaibi George is Boston City Councilor At Large and a candidate for Boston mayor. Corby Kummer weighs in on the state of restaurants, including staff struggles to make sure patrons wear masks, and one restaurant owner's decision to raise wages to keep staff. He also talks about how eating venison can help the planet. Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. Bill Walczak talks about ideas for boosting voter turnout, following a dismal showing in Boston's preliminary mayoral election. Walczak is the former president and CEO of Codman Square Health Center. He was a candidate for mayor of Boston in 2013. Then, we talk with listeners about how they're managing phone addiction.

    BPR Full Show: For the Love of Coffee

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 164:22


    Today on Boston Public Radio: Art Caplan weighs in on the role of vaccine mandates, and the quick spread of vaccine misinformation on social media. Caplan is the Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU School of Medicine in New York City. Then, we asked listeners about their experiences with the MBTA following a slew of recent derailments and other accidents. Juliette Kayyem updates listeners on all things national security, including updates on trials of those involved in the Jan. 6 riots, which have been slowed down due to an abundance of evidence. Kayyem is an analyst for CNN, former assistant secretary at the Department of Homeland Security and faculty chair of the homeland security program at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government. Jamarhl Crawford and Tanisha Sullivan criticize a lagging timeline and lack of transparency regarding efforts for police reform, and discuss the need to put reform at the top of the agenda in the mayoral race. Crawford is an activist, community organizer and Editor of The Blackstonian. Sullivan is an attorney and the President of NAACP Boston Branch. They are both members of the Boston Police Reform Task Force. Brian McGrory talks about the impact of The Boston Globe's Spotlight team, how the Globe is covering the mayoral race and Tom Brady's upcoming return to Gillette Stadium Sunday. McGrory is the editor-in-chief of the Boston Globe. Jared Bowen previews latest art exhibits, including the Titian exhibit at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, the Frida Kahlo exhibit at Brandeis' Rose Art Museum and Mariano Rodríguez's exhibit at Boston College's McMullen Museum of Modern Art. Bowen is GBH's Executive Arts Editor and host of the TV series Open Studio. Then, we ask listeners what they love (or hate) about coffee in honor of today's National Coffee Day.


    BPR Full Show: Tom Brady's Homecoming

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 164:35


    Today on Boston Public Radio: We start the show by asking listeners their thoughts on vaccine mandates and people threatening to quit their jobs before getting the shot. Trenni Kusnierek updates listeners on all things sports, including rifts in the NBA over vaccines and Tom Brady's return to Gillette Stadium. Kusnierek is an anchor and reporter for NBC Sports Boston, as well as a Boston Public Radio contributor. Dr. Renee Crichlow calls out remaining healthcare workers who are not yet vaccinated, and talks about latest data on vaccine efficacy months after vaccination. Crichlow is the Chief Medical Officer at Codman Square Health Center and the Vice Chair of Health Equity at the Boston University Department of Family Medicine. Bill McKibben discusses what it would mean for the plant if President Joe Biden fails to pass his economic agenda, and previews his new project, Third Act, which seeks to engage older individuals with climate activism. McKibben is co-founder of 350.org and the author of numerous books about climate change. His latest book is “Falter: Has the Human Game Begun to Play Itself Out?” Nia Grace opens up about her newest restaurant at Northeastern, The Underground Café, and talks about the challenges of keeping restaurants afloat during the pandemic. Grace is the owner and operator of Darryl's Corner Bar and Kitchen in the South End, and one of the founders of the Boston Black Hospitality Coalition. She is also the owner of The Underground Café and Lounge, which opened last week on the campus of Northeastern University. John King goes through top political headlines, including Republican threats to Biden's economic agenda and persisting allegiances to Donald Trump. King is CNN's Chief National Correspondent and anchor of "Inside Politics,” which airs weekdays and Sunday mornings at 8 a.m. We end the show by asking listeners about their thoughts on Tom Brady's upcoming return to Boston Sunday night.


    BPR Full Show: Holiday Shopping Came Early This Year

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 164:53


    Today on Boston Public Radio: EJ Dionne weighs in on whether he thinks the Democrats will pass President Joe Biden's economic agenda, and what it would mean for the party if they fail. He also talks about his visits to mayoral race victory parties and his thoughts on the race. Dionne is a columnist for The Washington Post and a senior fellow at The Brookings Institution. His latest book is "Code Red: How Progressives And Moderates Can Unite To Save Our Country." Then, we talk with listeners about their thoughts on Biden's economic agenda. Charlie Sennott discusses President Joe Biden's decision to deport Haitian migrants, Angela Merkel stepping down as Chancellor and the results of Germany's latest election. Sennott is a GBH News analyst and the founder and CEO of The GroundTruth Project. Chris Burrell unpacks his latest reporting for the Color of Public Money series, which showed that out of a $4.8 billion budget, Massachusetts spent less than $25 million in contracts with Black and Hispanic-owned businesses. Burrell is an investigative reporter covering criminal justice, housing, immigration and other topics for The GBH News Center for Investigative Reporting. Revs. Irene Monroe and Emmett G. Price III talk about a recent slew of racist incidents, including at UMass Amherst and the Roxbury Prep-Georgetown football game. Monroe is a syndicated religion columnist, the Boston voice for Detour's African American Heritage Trail and a visiting researcher in the Religion and Conflict Transformation Program at the Boston University School of Theology. Price is the founding pastor of Community of Love Christian Fellowship in Allston. Together, they host GBH's All Rev'd Up podcast. Richard Blanco read poems in honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, including his poem “Looking for the Gulf Motel,” and Caridad Moro-Gronlier's poem “Analfabeta.” Blanco is the fifth inaugural poet in U.S. history. His latest book, "How To Love A Country," deals with various socio-political issues that shadow America. We end the show by asking listeners how they are planning around warnings of supply chain shortages impacting the holiday season.


    BPR Full Show: A Tribute to Chelsea

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 152:25


    Today on Boston Public Radio: Ali Noorani talks about the resignation of Ambassador Daniel Foote, Special Envoy for Haiti, as the Biden Administration comes under fire for its treatment of Haitian refugees at the border. Noorani is the President & Chief Executive Officer of the National Immigration Forum. His forthcoming book is Crossing Borders: The Reconciliation of a Nation of Immigrants. Then, we ask listeners for their thoughts on the Biden Administration's handling of the humanitarian crisis and treatment of Haitian migrants at the border. Callie Crossley continues the conversation about the treatment of Haitian migrants, and weighs in on the mayor's race and perceptions of Annissa Essaibi George as OFD, or “Originally From Dorchester,” and Michelle Wu as NFH, or “Not From Here,” born in Chicago. Crossley hosts GBH's Under the Radar and Basic Black. Andy Ihnatko weighs in on accusations of labor issues at Apple, newest potential security leaks and Gen-Z struggles with older technology. Ihnatko is a tech writer and blogger, posting at Ihnatko.com. Sue O' Connell discusses the status of LGBTQ+ rights with the ten year anniversary of the end of the Don't Ask Don't Tell policy, which kept LGBTQ+ service members in the closet. O'Connell is the co-publisher of Bay Windows and the South End News, as well as NECN's political commentator and explainer-in-chief. John King updates listeners on the results of the Arizona audit of the 2020 presidential election, which confirmed President Joe Biden's win. He also talks about current political gridlock around the Infrastructure Bill. King is CNN's Chief National Correspondent and anchor of "Inside Politics,” which airs weekdays and Sunday mornings at 8 a.m. We end the show with guest and staff tributes to outgoing BPR producer Chelsea Merz, who is leaving GBH after over ten years.


    BPR Full Show: Michelle Wu Doesn't Want the Status Quo

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 164:23

    Today on Boston Public Radio: We start the show by talking with listeners about the current gridlock in Congress, and why divisions persist despite Democrats' control of the Senate, House and Presidency. Shirley Leung discusses her latest column about the escalating humanitarian crisis at Mass and Cass, and its impact on local businesses and nonprofits in the area. Leung is a business columnist for The Boston Globe and a BPR contributor. Dr. Eric Dickson gives a window into the pandemic in Central Massachusetts, where the largest healthcare system in Central New England has run out of ICU beds amid an influx of COVID-19 cases. Dickson is the President and CEO of UMass Memorial Health, based in Worcester. Paul Reville updates listeners on all things schools, including dropping MCAS scores and why he thinks Massachusetts schools are not as effective as they should be. Reville is the former Massachusetts secretary of education and a professor at Harvard University's Graduate School of Education, where he also heads the Education Redesign Lab. His latest book, co-authored with Lynne Sacks, is “Collaborative Action for Equity and Opportunity: A Practical Guide for School and Community Leaders.” Boston City Councilor Michelle Wu talks about her views on racial justice, the transportation crisis and other visions for Boston as she moves forward in the race for city mayor. Wu is a Boston City Councilor At-Large running for mayor of Boston. Jon Gruber argues that the demand for workers amid high unemployment is due to workers' desire for more humane hours, higher wages and generally better working conditions. Gruber teaches economics at MIT. He was instrumental in creating both the Massachusetts health-care reform and the Affordable Care Act, and his latest book is “Jump-Starting America: How Breakthrough Science Can Revive Economic Growth And The American Dream.” We end the show by asking listeners about ways they have built community during the pandemic.

    Corby Kummer: Business as Usual? Not for the Restaurant Industry

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 22:39

    Award-winning food writer Corby Kummer joined Boston Public Radio on Wednesday to share his thoughts on the movement within the restaurant industry to raise wages and foster better working environments in order to recruit workers. “There's a worker shortage. But more than that, there's a wage shortage,” Kummer said. “If you offer people more money, they will apply for jobs.” That's no easy feat for restaurant owners, Kummer noted. “Pay people more, give them paid time off, try to give them health insurance, all the stuff that's very expensive,” Kummer said. “Very expensive means you have to have a better business plan. That sounds easy, but it actually has been a huge challenge for restaurant owners before and after the pandemic.” Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

    BPR Full Show: Revenge of the Silt Throwing Octopuses

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 164:28


    Today on Boston Public Radio: First, we talk with listeners about “missing white woman syndrome” following the death of Gabby Petito, and how the media fixates on the disappearances of white women while ignoring people of color. Superintendent Brenda Cassellius weighs in on dropping MCAS scores, proposals to expand athletics in public high schools and the status of school funding. Cassellius is the superintendent of Boston Public Schools. Juliette Kayyem discusses the low turnout at the Justice for Jan. 6 rally, assesses the current influence of Donald Trump and critiques the Biden Administration's response to Haitian migrants at the border. Kayyem is an analyst for CNN, former assistant secretary at the Department of Homeland Security and faculty chair of the homeland security program at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government. Corby Kummer talks about how we should reframe the worker shortage in restaurants as a wage shortage. Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. Art Caplan weighs in on what should happen to doctors spreading vaccine misinformation, and how healthcare workers are experiencing “compassion fatigue” when treating unvaccinated COVID-19 patients. Caplan is the Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU School of Medicine in New York City. Sy Montgomery updates listeners on latest news from the animal kingdom, including sexual harassment by male octopuses and animal rescue efforts. Montgomery is a journalist, naturalist and a BPR contributor. Then, we talk with listeners about the economic barriers to staying healthy.


    BPR Full Show: Sharing is Caring

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 164:28

    Today on Boston Public Radio: Michelle Singletary talks about the effect of COVID-19 on Social Security Retirement funds, and her recent column on the financial impact of vaccine refusal on unvaccinated individuals. Singletary is a nationally syndicated columnist for The Washington Post, whose award-winning column "The Color of Money" provides insight into the world of personal finance. Then, we take calls from listeners about their thoughts on sharing desks as workplace protocols change throughout the pandemic. Michael Curry discusses latest efforts to combat vaccine hesitancy, and the importance of considering racial and socioeconomic equity when thinking about vaccine mandates. Curry is the president and CEO of the Massachusetts League of Community Health Centers and a member of Gov. Charlie Baker's COVID Vaccine Advisory Group. He's also a Member of the National NAACP Board of Directors and chair of the board's Advocacy & Policy Committee. Trenni Kusnierek gives an update on all things sports, including the Boston Bruins' fully vaccinated status and the Red Sox' lack thereof. She also discusses the Anti-Doping Agency's announcement that they will reconsider marijuana as a banned substance, following runner Sha'Carri Richardson's suspension amid the summer Olympics. Kusnierek is an anchor and reporter for NBC Sports Boston, as well as a Boston Public Radio contributor. Attorney General Maura Healey answers questions from listeners in this month's Ask the AG, including about lack of access to Real ID licenses for immigrants and combatting overdose deaths in Black and Brown communities. Maura Healey is the Massachusetts Attorney General.

    BPR Full Show: Don't Cry Over Spilled Gazpacho

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 161:05

    Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners whether they prefer to return to the office or work from home at this point in the pandemic. Charlie Sennott gives an update on top international news. He critiques the U.S. government's response to Haitian migrants at the border and the U.S. drone strike in Kabul that killed 10 civilians. Sennott is a GBH News analyst and the founder and CEO of The GroundTruth Project. Dr. Katherine Gergen Barnett takes questions from callers about all things vaccines. She discusses the ethics and uses of booster shots and the status of vaccine trials for children. Gergen Barnett teaches in the Department of Family Medicine at Boston Medical Center and Boston University Medical School. Revs. Irene Monroe and Emmett G. Price III critique some Christian leaders' hypocrisy in discouraging COVID-19 vaccines. They also talk about what it means for Boston that none of the three Black mayoral candidates made it through the preliminary election. Monroe is a syndicated religion columnist, the Boston voice for Detour's African American Heritage Trail and a visiting researcher in the Religion and Conflict Transformation Program at the Boston University School of Theology. Price is the founding pastor of Community of Love Christian Fellowship in Allston. Together, they host GBH's All Rev'd Up podcast. Christopher Muther share memories from his recent trip to Quebec's Eastern Townships, and discuss the decision by the European Union to remove the U.S. from its safe travel list. Muther is a travel writer and columnist for the Boston Globe. We end the show by asking listeners about their thoughts on the ethics of booster shots in the United States.

    Corby Kummer: Biden's "Big Almond" Pick for U.S. Trade Representative's Office Won't "Sit Well With Any Kind of Environmental Activist"

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 27:22

    Award-winning food writer Corby Kummer joined Boston Public Radio on Friday, explaining the controversy surrounding President Joe Biden's pick of almond-industry lobbyist Elaine Trevino for chief agricultural negotiator at the U.S. Trade Representative's office. Trevino is the president of the Almond Alliance of California. “Why do we care and why are we angry about this in particular?” Kummer said. “Because there's no effective limits on how irrigation controls and who shares water and who parcels out how much water various agriculture industries within California are able to use.” Kummer noted that up to 70% of California almond production is exported to Europe and China, and that the industry depends on these exports to maintain price supports. “This is kind of a sign that the Biden administration wants to help out industries that rely enormously on foreign purchases to keep up their price supports, how they manage U.S. trade pacts with different countries, so that the enormous amount of exports, in this case to almonds, can go,” Kummer explained. “But until there's effective and concurrent regulation of methane for the [National] Cattlemen's Beef Association, allotted resources for the almond industry, it's not going to sit well with any kind of environmental activist.” Other topics discussed in this wide-ranging interview include the legal groups looking into the companies fraudulently using “natural” and “sustainable” labels, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's research on food insecurity levels during the pandemic. Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

    BPR Full Show: Rats!

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 161:10

    Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners for their wildest rat stories, after a report showed that Boston's rat population is on the rise. Trenni Kusnierek discusses the Senate testimonies of four elite gymnasts, who said they blamed the FBI for failing to protect them against former USA team doctor and convicted sex offender Larry Nassar. She also talks about the pay gap in men and women's soccer. Kusnierek is an anchor and reporter for NBC Sports Boston, as well as a Boston Public Radio contributor. Rep. Ayanna Pressley talks about what it means for Boston to have two women in its mayoral election, following the historic win of Boston City Councilor Michelle Wu and Boston City Councilor Annissa Essaibi George in the preliminary election. She also makes an urgent call for supporting Haitian refugees in Texas. Pressley is the U.S. Representative for Massachusetts 7th District. Corby Kummer critiques how buzzwords like “healthy,” “all natural” and “sustainable” have no clear definitions in the food industry, and the ties between the “Big Almond” industry and the U.S. government with President Joe Biden's chief agricultural negotiator appointment at the United States Trade Representative's office. Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. Shirley Leung updates listeners on all-things business, including how Republican New Balance Chairman Jim Davis' $495,000 contribution to a pro-Essaibi George SuperPAC paid off in the mayoral preliminary election. Leung is a business columnist for The Boston Globe and a BPR contributor. Andy Ihnatko discusses the latest Wall Street Journal report that revealed Facebook's internal probe of Instagram's detrimental effects on teenage girl's mental health and self-image. He also weighs in on Epic Games, the company that makes Fortnite, and its lawsuit against Apple. Ihnatko is a tech writer and blogger, posting at Ihnatko.com. Ryan Landry ends the show by sharing memories from his all-expenses paid trip through Italy as a canned tomato influencer. Ryan Landry is a playwright, lyricist, actor and founder of the Gold Dust Orphans theatrical company. His new album is “The Vamps.”

    BPR Full Show: Not a Wink of Sleep

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 161:05


    Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by opening phone lines, asking listeners whether our nation is becoming less civic-minded following low voter turnout in Boston's mayoral preliminary election. Andrea Cabral shares her thoughts on low voter turnout in Boston's mayoral preliminary election, and explains where the mayoral candidates stand on police reform. Cabral is the former Suffolk County sheriff and Massachusetts secretary of public safety. She's currently the CEO of the cannabis company Ascend. Gov. Charlie Baker discusses the possibility of a statewide vaccination ID program, and support for refugee resettlement in Massachusetts after the Biden administration designated 900 Afghan evacuees to arrive in the state. Rick Steves shares his experience hiking for 10 days through France, and what it was like to travel abroad for the first time since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. Steves is an author, television and radio host and the owner of the Rick Steves' Europe tour group. You can catch his television show, "Rick Steves' Europe," weeknights at 7:30 p.m. on GBH 2 and his radio show, “Travel With Rick Steves,” Sundays at 4 p.m. on GBH. Jenifer McKim discusses the case of Tyrone Clark, whose decades-long rape conviction is being scrutinized by District Attorney Rachael Rollins after the victim claimed she may have misidentified her attacker. McKim is an investigative reporter with the GBH News Center for Investigative Reporting. Jared Bowen updates us on the latest local arts and cultural events, from the Huntington Theatre's showing of “Hurricane Diane” to comedian Jaqueline Novak and the Emerson Colonial Theatre's “Get On Your Knees.” Bowen is GBH's executive arts editor and the host of Open Studio. We wrap up the show by talking with listeners about how pandemic anxiety has changed their relationships to sleep.


    BPR Full Show: Return of the Wooly Mammoth

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 164:23


    Today on Boston Public Radio: First, we talk with listeners about their reactions to yesterday's mayoral primary, which saw Boston City Councilor Michelle Wu and Boston City Councilor Annissa Essaibi George take the lead for the runoff. Joseph Allen critiques what he sees as a failure to define the country's goals for COVID-19 reduction as a major obstacle facing the country. He also discusses how to prevent the spread of the virus indoors in buildings with poor filtration. Allen is the director of the Healthy Buildings program at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Juliette Kayyem talks about George W. Bush's comparison between extremists in the United States and the 9/11 terrorists, and worries about an upcoming far-right rally protesting the prosecution of people charged after the Jan. 6 riot. Kayyem is an analyst for CNN, former assistant secretary at the Department of Homeland Security and faculty chair of the homeland security program at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government. Jim Aloisi and Stacy Thompson update listeners on all things transportation. They weigh in on mayoral primary winners Michelle Wu and Annissa Essaibi George's platforms on transportation, and what role the mayor's office should have in governing the city's transport. Aloisi is the former Massachusetts transportation secretary, a member of the Transit Matters board and a contributor to Commonwealth Magazine. Thompson is executive director of Livable Streets. Bina Venkataraman talks about her reactions to the mayoral primary and why The Boston Globe endorsed Andrea Campbell for mayor. She also discusses the possibilities presented by safe injection sites and other ideas for improving the city. Venkataraman is the editorial page editor at The Boston Globe. Her latest book is “The Optimist's Telescope: Thinking Ahead in a Reckless Age.” Art Caplan weighs in on efforts to game the system to get a COVID-19 vaccine booster shot, and urges people to start getting their annual flu shot now. He also discusses the ethics of talks of attempts to bring back the now-extinct woolly mammoth. Caplan is the Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU School of Medicine in New York City. We end the show by asking listeners their thoughts on a $370,000 parking spot listed in Boston's South End.


    BPR Full Show: Preliminary-Palooza

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 166:51


    On today's Boston Public Radio, we bring listeners a day full of mayoral coverage: Adam Reilly kicks off election day by weighing in on why voter turnout tends to be low and which candidates he thinks has an advantage. He also talks about how sometimes having too many good candidates can depress voter turnout. Reilly is co-host of GBH's Politics podcast, “The Scrum.” Then, we hear from all the major candidates in the mayoral primary.  Boston City Councilor Annissa Essaibi George discusses her years as an educator and small business owner as qualifications for the city's top job. City Councilor Essaibi George is running for mayor of Boston. Boston City Councilor Andrea Campbell highlights her focus on affordable housing, public school policies and the opioid crisis as key parts of her background in running for mayor. Campbell is a Boston City Council member representing District 4, including parts of Dorchester, Mattapan, Jamaica Plain and Roslindale. She is running for mayor of Boston. Boston City Councilor Michelle Wu points to her stake in the city, with her children in public schools and mother receiving mental health care, as well as her years of experience in City Hall, as her strengths as potential mayor. Wu is a Boston City Councilor At-Large running for mayor of Boston. John Barros talks about his passion for environmental justice and neighborhood improvement work in Boston as reasons why voters should elect him. Barros most recently served as Boston's chief of economic development in the Walsh administration, and is running for mayor of Boston. Acting Mayor Kim Janey emphasizes her experience growing up in Boston, her non-profit work with children and families and service as acting mayor as qualifications for the job. Janey is the Acting Mayor of Boston, and is running for mayor of Boston. Throughout the show, we also take listener calls about who they're voting for and why. John King ends the show by putting the Boston mayoral race in a national context. He talks about voter turnout patterns across the country, California's recall election of Governor Gavin Newsom and worries about Republican claims of rigged elections following the 2020 presidential election. King is CNN's Chief National Correspondent and anchor of "Inside Politics,” which airs weekdays and Sunday mornings at 8 a.m.


    BPR Full Show: Atonement

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 164:23


    Today on Boston Public Radio: EJ Dionne discusses the voting rights measure and infrastructure spending package as the Senate returns from their August recess this week. He also weighs in on whether or not Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer should retire. Dionne is a columnist for The Washington Post and a senior fellow at The Brookings Institution. His latest book is "Code Red: How Progressives And Moderates Can Unite To Save Our Country.” Then, we talk with listeners about their opinions on masking indoors as the Delta variant continues to spread. Yawu Miller gives listeners a primer on tomorrow's Boston Mayoral primary, a historic race for its racial diversity and female-majority among major candidates. He also discusses current polling data and voter patterns along demographic lines. Miller is a Senior Editor of The Bay State Banner. Bruce Marks talks about what the Supreme Court's end to the eviction moratorium means for Massachusetts, and what his organization, the Neighborhood Assistance Corporation of America (NACA) is doing to help. Marks is the CEO and founder of NACA, the nation's largest Housing and Urban Development-certified nonprofit. Revs. Irene Monroe and Emmett G. Price III speak out against the Islamophobia in the United States that has persisted following 9/11. In the days before Yom Kippur, the Jewish Day of Atonement, they also argue about what forgiveness means. Monroe is a syndicated religion columnist, the Boston voice for Detour's African American Heritage Trail, and a visiting researcher in the Religion and Conflict Transformation Program at the Boston University School of Theology. Price is the founding pastor of Community of Love Christian Fellowship in Allston. Together, they host GBH's All Rev'd Up podcast. Richard Blanco gives a poet's take on poetry, reading famous quotes and weighing in on the purpose and impact of the art form. Blanco is the fifth inaugural poet in U.S. history. His new book, "How To Love A Country," deals with various socio-political issues that shadow America.  In the days leading up to Yom Kippur, we end the show by asking listeners what atonement and forgiveness should look like in a deeply divided country.


    BPR Full Show: On Camera

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 162:05

    Today on Boston Public Radio: Charlie Sennott tells the story of the Goodrich family, who lost their son in the 9/11 and went on to build a girls school in Afghanistan, which has since been taken over by the Taliban. Sennott is a GBH News analyst and the founder and CEO of The GroundTruth Project. Art Caplan weighs in on President Joe Biden's latest plan to fight COVID-19, which involves a federal rule requiring vaccines or weekly testing for all businesses with 100 or more employees. Caplan is the Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU School of Medicine in New York City. Then, we talk with listeners about their impressions of Biden's new vaccine mandate. Andrea Cabral talks about a lawsuit filed Thursday by the Justice Department against the state of Texas, aiming to invalidate the new abortion restrictions. She also weighs in on Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer's insistence that he will not retire. Cabral is the former Suffolk County sheriff and the former Massachusetts secretary of public safety. She is currently the CEO of the cannabis company Ascend. Juliette Kayyem discusses the impact of COVID-19 and climate change-induced natural disasters on the Federal Emergency Management Agency, or FEMA. Kayyem is an analyst for CNN, former assistant secretary at the Department of Homeland Security and faculty chair of the homeland security program at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government. Sue O'Connell weighs in on this week's Boston Mayoral debates and their potential effect on the race. She also talks about the recent loss of Michael K. Williams, who played Omar on “The Wire.” O'Connell is the co-publisher of Bay Windows and the South End News, as well as NECN's political commentator and explainer-in-chief. Andy Ihnatko talks about new developments in surveillance technology, including front door cameras and Ray Bans that record video straight to Facebook. He also discusses decisions by GoDaddy.com and Reddit to shut down threads aiming to bring lawsuits against people getting abortions in the wake of the recent Texas law. Ihnatko is a tech writer and blogger, posting at Ihnatko.com. Then, we talk with listeners about their thoughts on the Ray Bans sunglasses with recording capacity.

    BPR Full Show: Back to School

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 164:46

    Today on Boston Public Radio: First, we talk with listeners about the school bus driver shortage on back to school day. Denise Dilanni previews the new series from GBH, “The Future of Work,” about the current transformation of the American workforce brought by automation, the gig economy and COVID-19. The show airs on GBH2 on Sept. 15, the PBS Video app and the PBS Voices YouTube Channel. Dilanni is an executive producer at GBH and the series' creator. Ambassador Philippe Etienne talks about the effect of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks on Europe, and the impact of our nation's withdrawal from Afghanistan on European peace efforts in the mid-east country. He also talks about America's relationship with France under President Joe Biden, and the success of his country's vaccine “health pass” system. Etienne is the French ambassador to the United States. Paul Reville discusses the return of Mass. students to classrooms amid the Delta variant and fights over mask mandates, vaccines and school bus shortages. Reville is the former Massachusetts secretary of education and a professor at Harvard University's Graduate School of Education, where he also heads the Education Redesign Lab. His latest book, co-authored with Lynne Sacks, is “Collaborative Action for Equity and Opportunity: A Practical Guide for School and Community Leaders.” Then, we continue our conversation with listeners about going back to school during the pandemic. Jon Gruber talks about the connection between a lack of abortion rights and worse lifetime outcomes, in the wake of the new Texas law. Gruber teaches economics at MIT. He was instrumental in creating both the Massachusetts health-care reform and the Affordable Care Act, and his latest book is "Jump-Starting America: How Breakthrough Science Can Revive Economic Growth And The American Dream." In light of Boston Globe business columnist Shirley Leung's recent piece about the plight of hotel workers, we open phone lines to ask listeners their thoughts on hotel companies recommending guests forgo daily room cleanings at the expense of staff.

    BPR Full Show: Spare Change

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 163:15


    Today on Boston Public Radio: Art Caplan talks about the Supreme Court's upholding of the new Texas abortion law and an Ohio judge protecting hospital patients from the latest controversial and off-label COVID-19 treatment — the anti-parasitic drug ivermectin. He also weighs in on conflicting attitudes surrounding vaccine booster shots. Caplan is the Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU School of Medicine in New York City. Then, we hear listeners' opinions on boycotting business that have not spoken out against the new Texas abortion law. Andrew Bacevich weighs in on who should take responsibility for the crisis in Afghanistan, the United States' standing in the world 20 years after 9/11 and what service to the country should look like. Bacevich is the President of the Quincy Institute for Responsible Statecraft, a Professor Emeritus of International Relations and History at Boston University and author of "The Age of Illusions: How America Squandered Its Cold War Victory.” State Rep. Mike Connolly discusses his bill looking into reversing the state's Happy Hour ban, which he hopes could help restaurants bounce back from COVID-19. Connolly represents the Massachusetts House of Representatives' 26th Middlesex district, which comprises East Cambridge and East Somerville. Laura Sullivan shares insights from her reporting on the Red Cross' work in Haiti, and how the organization only built six homes in the country after raising half a billion dollars following the 2010 earthquake. She also talks about how to best support people in Haiti by donating to local organizations. Sullivan is an investigative correspondent for NPR who reported extensively on the Red Cross in 2015. Shirley Leung gives an update on the latest business headlines, including business leaders' opinions on the mayor's race, and a 50 million dollar donation from the Manning family to the UMass system. She also discusses how requesting housekeeping at hotels can keep staff employed. Leung is a business columnist for The Boston Globe and a GBH contributor. Then, we talk with listeners about the current coin shortage and the challenges of parking and paying for laundry.


    BPR Full Show: The Perilous Hot Dog Safari

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 163:55


    Today on Boston Public Radio: We kick things off by opening phone lines to talk with listeners about the state of the pandemic moving into fall of 2021. Trenni Kusnierek discusses the latest news on COVID-19 in the world of sports, including a recent outbreak within the Boston Red Sox. She also touches on news of tennis champion Naomi Osaka's indefinite exit from the sport. Kusnierek is an anchor and reporter for NBC Sports Boston, and a Boston Public Radio contributor. Carol Rose weighs in on the broader, grim constitutional implications of Texas' new abortion law. She also discusses the Supreme Court's decision not to intervene. Rose is the Executive Director of the ACLU of Massachusetts. Michael Curry talks about COVID-19 in the Commonwealth, and whether state leaders are doing enough to get residents vaccinated and quell the spread of the Delta variant. Curry is the president and CEO of the Massachusetts League of Community Health Centers and a member of Governor Charlie Baker's COVID Vaccine Advisory Group. He's also a Member of the National NAACP Board of Directors, and chair of the board's Advocacy & Policy Committee. Michael Kirk discusses the legacy of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks and America's response ahead of the 20-year anniversary, in a conversation sparked by his new FRONTLINE documentary, “America After 9/11.” John King calls in for his weekly round-up of national headlines, with a focus on President Biden's comments about climate change infrastructure and the state of his $3.5 trillion ‘human infrastructure' bill in Congress. King is CNN's Chief National Correspondent and anchor of "Inside Politics,” which airs weekdays and Sunday mornings at 8 a.m. We close out Tuesday's show by talking with listeners about new research into how the foods we eat impact our lifespan.


    BPR Full Show: Love in Dark Times

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 159:38


    Today on Boston Public Radio we're on tape, bringing you some of our favorite conversations from the not too distant past: Bishop Michael Curry joins us to preach the power of love in dark times, in a conversation sparked by his new book "Love Is The Way: Holding Onto Hope In Troubling Times.” Curry is the current presiding bishop of The Episcopal Church. Bill Buford discusses differences between attitudes around restaurant dining in France and the U.S., in a conversation about his new book, "Dirt: Adventures In Lyon As A Chef In Training, Father, And Sleuth Looking For The Secret Of French Cooking." Buford is an author and journalist. Alan Alda talks about the joy of creating his new interview podcast, and his trip to the New England Aquarium with BPR contributor Sy Montgomery. Alda is an actor, and hosts the podcast "Clear + Vivid With Alan Alda." Rick Steves shares his memories of his first visit to Afghanistan in 1978 and what travel may look like with the rise of the Delta variant. Steves is an author, television and radio host and the owner of the Rick Steves' Europe tour group. You can catch his television show, "Rick Steves' Europe," weeknights at 7:30 p.m. on GBH 2 and his radio show, “Travel With Rick Steves,” Sundays at 4 p.m. on GBH.


    BPR Full Show: Newly Printed

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 159:31


    Boston Public Radio is on tape today, bringing you some of our favorite conversations from the not too distant past. Sebastian Junger speaks about his latest book, “Freedom,” which looks at the meaning of freedom in its many iterations. Junger is a journalist, author and filmmaker. Michelle Singletary discusses her latest book, “What To Do With Your Money When Crisis Hits: A Survival Guide.” Singletary is a nationally syndicated columnist for The Washington Post, whose award-winning column "The Color of Money" provides insight into the world of personal finance. Michael Moss previews his new book and explained how some drug addiction experts are shifting their attention to food addiction. Moss is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author. His latest book is “Hooked: Food, Free Will And How The Food Giants Exploit Our Addictions.” Dr. Marcia Chatelain discusses the historic role McDonald's plays in the Black community and the origins of Black capitalism. Dr. Chatelain is a professor of history in African American studies at Georgetown University. She's the author of “Franchise: The Golden Arches in Black America,” which won a Pulitzer Prize this year for history.


    BPR Full Show: Hit the Books

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 159:30


    Today on Boston Public Radio we're on tape, replaying some of our favorite conversations with a focus on author interviews: Don Lemon tells stories from his book, “This Is The Fire: What I Say To My Friends About Racism." Lemon anchors “CNN Tonight with Don Lemon,” airing weeknights at 10 p.m. He's also a #1 bestselling New York Times author.  Chasten Buttigieg discusses his memoir, “I Have Something to Tell You,” and the challenges facing LGBTQ+ communities in the U.S. Buttigieg is a teacher and the husband of U.S. Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg. Sy Montgomery dives into the world of hummingbirds with her latest book, “The Hummingbirds' Gift: Wonder, Beauty And Renewal On Wings.” Montgomery is a journalist, naturalist and a BPR contributor. David Byrne talks about the film adaptation of his tour, "American Utopia," and his accompanying illustrated book. Byrne is a singer, songwriter and guitarist, and founding member of the Talking Heads. Nancy Schön discusses her recent work and the mysteries behind the decoration of her iconic “Make Way For Ducklings” sculpture in Boston's Public Garden. Schön is a sculpture artist, and her latest book is “Ducks on Parade!” Derek DelGaudio weighs in on the roles identity and illusion play in his work, along with the thought process behind his film "In & Of Itself." DelGaudio is a writer and artist. His latest book is “Amoralman: A True Story And Other Lies,” and his film, "In & Of Itself," is on Hulu. Gish Jen highlights differences between individualistic and collectivistic cultures in her new book, "The Girl At The Baggage Claim: Explaining the East-West Culture Gap." Jen is a novelist and nonfiction writer. Meredith Goldstein previews her YA book, “Things That Grow,” and talks about the state of romance and relationships during the pandemic. Goldstein is an advice columnist and features writer for the Boston Globe. Her advice column, Love Letters, is a daily dispatch of wisdom for the lovelorn that has been running for more than a decade. She also hosts the Love Letters podcast. Richard Blanco reads Chen Chen's poem “Poem in Noisy Mouthfuls”, Ocean Vuong's poem “Kissing in Vietnamese” and Li-Young Lee's poem “I Ask My Mother to Sing.” Blanco is the fifth inaugural poet in U.S. history. His new book, "How To Love A Country," deals with various socio-political issues that shadow America.


    BPR Full Show: Food for Thought

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 148:33

    Boston Public Radio is on tape today, bringing you BPR's cookbook – conversations with some of our favorite chefs from over the years. Joanne Chang talks about her latest book inspired by her baking journals, “Pastry Love: A Baker's Journal of Favorite Recipes.” Chang is a James Beard award winning pastry chef. Bren Smith shares different ways to eat kelp in his book “Eat Like a Fish: My Adventures Farming the Ocean to Fight Climate Change.” Smith is a former commercial fisherman and executive director of the non-profit GreenWave, focused on regenerative farming in water ecosystems. Jacques Pépin and Shorey Wesen discuss cooking together as grandfather and granddaughter as part of their latest collaboration, the cookbook “A Grandfather's Lessons: In the Kitchen with Shorey.” Pépin is a chef, author and PBS contributor. Wesen is his granddaughter and cookbook collaborator. Dolores Huerta talks about why her work as a labor leader for farm workers' rights remains as relevant today as it was in the 1960s, and about coining the phrase “Sí, se puede.” Huerta is an activist and co-founder of the National Farmworkers Association alongside Cesar Chaves. Nathan Myhrvold dives into the world of bread baking with his latest cookbook, a 50 pound, six-volume series titled “Modernist Bread, The Art and Science.” Myhrvold is a Microsoft executive turned experimental chef and founder of The Cooking Lab. Marcus Samuelsson highlights Ethiopian, Swedish and other international cuisines in talking about his PBS show “No Passport Required.” Samuelsson is a global restaurateur, chef and TV host. Andrew Li and Irene Li share food and tips from their latest cookbook, which they wrote with their sister Margaret Li: “Double Awesome Chinese Food: Irresistible and Totally Achievable Recipes from Our Chinese-American Kitchen.” Andrew Li and Irene Li are co-founders of the restaurant Mei Mei, along with their sister Margaret Li. Christopher Kimball previews his latest Milk Street cookbook, “Tuesday Nights Mediterranean: 125 Simple Weeknight Recipes from the World's Healthiest Cuisine.” Kimball is the founder of Milk Street, a food media company which produces Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Magazine. He's also the host of Milk Street Radio and Milk Street TV.

    BPR Full Show: Book Club

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 161:20


    Today's Boston Public Radio is on tape. We're bringing you the ultimate book club — back-to-back conversations from over the years with some of our favorite writers: Kevin Young shares from his collection of poetry, “Brown.” Young is the poetry editor of The New Yorker and the director of the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of African American History and Culture. Ann Patchett discusses the autobiographical elements of her book “Commonwealth,” and makes a pitch to all readers to shop at local, independent bookstores. Patchett is an author and the owner of Parnassus Books in Nashville, Tenn.  Sy Montgomery explores animal intelligence and what people can learn from animals. Montgomery is a journalist, naturalist and a BPR contributor. Her latest book is “The Hummingbirds' Gift: Wonder, Beauty, and Renewal on Wings.” David Duchovny talks about his book, “Miss Subways: A Novel.” Duchovny is an actor and writer, and recently appeared in the Netflix series “The Chair.” Elizabeth Gilbert discusses her book “Big Magic,” a self-help book about tapping into creativity. Gilbert is a journalist and writer — her other books include “Eat, Pray, Love” and “Committed.” T.C. Boyle drops in on the dropout culture with his novel “Outside Looking In,” which is based on the LSD research of Timothy Lear. Boyle is a novelist and short story writer. Lizzie Post weighs in on cannabis culture in her new book, “Higher Etiquette: A Guide to the World of Cannabis, From Dispensaries to Dinner Parties.” Post is a writer, co-director of The Emily Post Institute and great-great-granddaughter of etiquette writer Emily Post. Sebastian Smee talks about his book “The Art of Rivalry: Four Friendships, Betrayals, and Breakthroughs in Modern Art.” Smee is an art critic for The Washington Post.


    BPR Full Show: Ode to Joy

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 160:52

    Today on Boston Public Radio: Charlie Sennott talks about the Taliban's takeover of Afghanistan, and ISIS-K's attacks on the Kabul airport and a nearby hotel that killed as many as 170 people and injured at least 200. Sennott is a GBH News analyst and the founder and CEO of The GroundTruth Project. Then, we talk with listeners about the recent attacks in Afghanistan, and President Joe Biden's handling of the evacuation. Dr. Daniela Lamas discusses the toll of COVID-19 on hospitals, and how TV medical dramas can provide opportunities to educate viewers about the world of medicine. Lamas is a contributing opinion writer for The New York Times, a pulmonary and critical-care physician at Brigham and Women's Hospital, and a co-producer on the TV medical drama “The Resident.” Andy Ihnatko sheds light on the role of social media in the Taliban's takeover of Afghanistan, including new security measures Facebook and Twitter have taken to increase security and protect Afghans. Ihnatko is a tech writer and blogger, posting at Ihnatko.com. Marin Alsop and Tracy K. Smith talk about the Global Ode to Joy Project, celebrating Beethoven's 250th birthday. Smith reads part of her new lyrics for “Ode to Joy,” and Alsop talks about her experiences as a woman in orchestral conducting. Smith is a former U.S. Poet Laureate. Alsop is a conductor, violinist and creator of the Global Ode to Joy Project. Callie Crossley weighs in on the controversy surrounding “Jeopardy!” after Mike Richards stepped down from hosting, and critiques the hypocrisy of conservative media outlets spreading anti-mask and anti-vaccine views while requiring masking and vaccinations for employees. Crossley hosts GBH's Under the Radar and Basic Black. Michelle Caldeira and John Huet tell listeners about Boston Uncornered, a new initiative aimed at helping gang members go back to school. They also speak about the organization's public art exhibit featuring portraits of former gang members, business leaders, and Boston's mayoral candidates. Caldeira is the co-founder of Boston Uncornered. Huet is a renowned celebrity photographer best known for his portraits of professional athletes.

    BPR Full Show: Dog Days of Summer

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 161:21

    Today on Boston Public Radio: Chuck Todd talks about President Joe Biden's declining approval ratings, and the administration's response to COVID-19 and the evacuation of Afghanistan. Todd is the moderator of “Meet the Press,” host of “Meet the Press Daily” on MSNBC, and the political director for NBC News. Then, we talk with listeners about Delta Air Lines' decision to cut pay protection for unvaccinated employees. Andrea Cabral weighs in on the Massachusetts State Police officers and corrections officers pushing back against Gov. Charlie Baker's vaccine mandate, and a study from the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences showing that most law enforcement calls are not for mental health issues. Cabral is the former Suffolk County sheriff and the former Massachusetts secretary of public safety. She is currently the CEO of the cannabis company Ascend. Omar Hernandez updates listeners on efforts to rebuild infrastructure in Haiti following a 7.2 magnitude earthquake. Hernandez is the Director of Engineering for Build Health International, a Beverly-based nonprofit which has been involved in Haiti for over a decade. Dr. Renee Crichlow discusses combatting vaccine disinformation, and the importance of universal masking to help curb the spread of the Delta variant. Crichlow is the Chief Medical Officer at Codman Square Health Center and the incoming Vice Chair of Health Equity at the Boston University Department of Family Medicine. Shirley Leung talks about the upcoming closure of Russo's in Watertown, and Amazon's efforts to expand in Boston. Leung is a Business columnist for the Boston Globe and a GBH contributor. In honor of National Dog Day, we end the show by asking listeners about their experiences with adopting dogs during the pandemic.

    BPR Full Show: Class Acts and Class Clowns

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 162:29

    Today on Boston Public Radio: Art Caplan shares his thoughts on the FDA's approval of the Pfizer vaccine, explaining how the approval impacts arguments against vaccine mandates. Caplan is the Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU School of Medicine in New York City. Then, we talk with listeners about starting the school year with mask mandates. Juliette Kayyem talks about Congressman Seth Moulton's (D-MA) unauthorized trip to Afghanistan, and devastating flooding in Tennessee. Kayyem is an analyst for CNN, former assistant secretary at the Department of Homeland Security and faculty chair of the homeland security program at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government. Jonathon Gruber gives an economist's perspective on the ethics of wealthier countries moving on to COVID-19 booster shots while underdeveloped nations struggle with vaccine supplies. Gruber is Ford Professor of Economics at MIT. He was instrumental in creating both the Massachusetts health-care reform and the Affordable Care Act. His latest book is Jump-Starting America: How Breakthrough Science Can Revive Economic Growth and the American Dream. Ali Noorani talks about the evacuation from Afghanistan, and what it means for Afghan allies and refugees trying to leave the country. Noorani is the President & Chief Executive Officer of the National Immigration Forum. His forthcoming book is Crossing Borders: The Reconciliation of a Nation of Immigrants.  David Daley discusses Republican efforts to gain power through redistricting following the release of the 2020 U.S. census data. Daley is the author of two books on gerrymandering, Rat-bleeped: Why Your Vote Doesn't Count and Unrigged: How Americans Are Battling Back to Save Democracy. He's a senior fellow at FairVote and the former Editor-in-Chief of Salon.com. We end the show by asking listeners how they would say goodbye to Boston if they moved away, following Maya Jonas-Silver's plan to break the world record for the fastest visit to all 25 MBTA stations.

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