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Join hosts Jim Braude and Margery Eagan for a smart local conversation with leaders and thinkers shaping Boston and New England. We feature our favorite conversation from each show. To hear the full show, please visit wgbhnews.org/bpr To share your opinion, email bpr@wgbh.org or call 877-301-8970 du…

WGBH Educational Foundation


    • Jul 4, 2022 LATEST EPISODE
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    Latest episodes from Boston Public Radio Podcast

    Boston Public Radio Full Show: All things Oprah

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 164:46

    Today on Boston Public Radio we're on tape, bringing you some of our favorite conversations from recent years: Imani Perry talks about parenthood and how Black parents talk to their children about race. Perry is a professor of African American Studies at Princeton University. Her latest book is "Breathe: A Letter To My Sons.” Neal Thompson tells stories from the Kennedy family, tracing the political family's lineage from Ireland to the United States. Thompson's new book is “The First Kennedys: The Humble Roots of an American Dynasty.” Roger Bennett shares his experience growing up in Liverpool, and why he relates more to the U.S. than his home country of England. Bennett is the co-host of The Men In Blazers podcast and NBC show. His memoir is “(Re)Born in the USA: An Englishman's Love Letter to His Chosen Home.” Fiona Hill previews her memoir, “There Is Nothing for You Here: Finding Opportunity in the Twenty-First Century.” Hill served as deputy assistant to the president and senior director for European and Russian affairs in the Trump administration from 2017 to 2019, and was a witness in Trump's first impeachment hearing. Howard Bryant discusses his book, "The Heritage: Black Athletes, a Divided America, and the Politics of Patriotism." Bryant is a columnist and commentator for ESPN. First Lady of Iceland Eliza Reid previews her book, “Secrets Of The Sprakkar: Iceland's Extraordinary Women And How They Are Changing The World,” and explained why Iceland is leading the globe in gender equity. Reid is the First Lady of Iceland. Kellie Carter Jackson and Leah Wright Rigueur share insights on all things Oprah, from their podcast “Oprademics.” Jackson is an associate professor in the department of Africana studies at Wellesley College. Rigueur is an associate professor of history at Johns Hopkins. They host the “Oprahdemics” podcast from Radiotopia. Daniel Leader discusses his latest book, "Living Bread." Leader is a pioneer in the American baking world.

    BPR Full Show: Food from around the world

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 165:50

    Today on Boston Public Radio we're on tape, bringing you some of our favorite conversations from recent years. Elle Simone Scott shares tips on how to make the perfect food board for hosting. Scott is Executive Editor and Inclusion Leader at America's Test Kitchen. She is also founder of the mentoring organization SheChef. Her recently released book is “Boards: Stylish Spreads for Casual Gatherings.” Joanne Chang talks about her latest book inspired by her baking journals, “Pastry Love: A Baker's Journal of Favorite Recipes.” Chang is a James Beard Award–winning pastry chef and owner of the Cambridge bakery and cafe Flour. Billy Collins shares some of his poetry ahead of his June 16 appearance at 2Life Communities' annual gala. Collins was appointed U.S. Poet Laureate from 2001-2003, and New York State Poet Laureate from 2004-2006. His numerous collections include “Nine Horses: Poems, The Trouble with Poetry,” “Ballistics,” “Horoscopes for the Dead,” “Aimless Love” and “The Rain in Portugal.” Dan Shaughnessy tells anecdotes from his latest book about covering the Celtics during the Larry Bird era. Shaughnessy is a sports writer at the Boston Globe. His new book is “Wish It Lasted Forever: Life With The Larry Bird Celtics.” Christopher Kimball previews his latest cookbook “Vegetables,” sharing his favorite ways to bring vegetables to the center of the plate. Chris Kimball co-founded America's Test Kitchen, and now runs Christopher Kimball's Milk Street in Boston. His latest cookbook is “Vegetables.” Rosa Brooks discusses her new book, “Tangled Up In Blue: Policing The American City,” and described her experiences as a reserve police officer in Washington, D.C. Brooks is a former Pentagon official in the Obama administration and a professor of law and policy at Georgetown Law. Dylan Thuras tells stories of strange food from around the world, including psychedelic honey, the anti-masterbatory origins of graham crackers and the great molasses flood in Boston in 1919. Thuras is the co-founder and creative director of Atlas Obscura, and the co-author of the New York Times bestseller “Atlas Obscura: An Explorer's Guide to the World's Hidden Wonders.” His latest book is “Gastro Obscura: A Food Adventurer's Guide,” co-authored with Cecily Wong. Susan Orlean previews her latest book about animals, including the history of the movie “Free Willy,” her relationship with turkeys and her Valentine's Day spent with a lion. Orlean is a staff writer for the New Yorker, and an author; her latest book is “On Animals.”

    A Community Conversation: Roe Overturned

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 87:04

    The Supreme Court has overturned Roe v. Wade. What does that mean for the people of Massachusetts and beyond? Listen to GBH News hosts Callie Crossley, Margery Eagan and Paris Alston in “A Community Conversation: Roe Overturned.”

    BPR Full Show: Abortion, Guns, and the EPA

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 168:00

    Today on Boston Public Radio: Mayor Michelle Wu discusses the Federal Transit Administration's (FTA) findings from their investigation into the MBTA system, and shares her thoughts on the Supreme Court's recent decisions concerning abortion, guns, and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). She also answers listeners' questions during “Ask the Mayor.” Andrea Cabral talks about Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson being sworn into the Supreme Court, and Ghislaine Maxwell's 20-year sentence for sex trafficking. Cabral is the former Suffolk County sheriff and secretary of public safety, and former CEO of the cannabis company Ascend. David Abel weighs in on the Supreme Court curbing the regulatory powers of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in West Virginia v. EPA. Abel is a Pulitzer-prize winning writer who covers the environment for the Boston Globe. Then, we open the phone lines, talking with listeners about the EPA's now limited power to regulate emissions. Jonathan Gruber explains what current inflation numbers mean, and shares his thoughts on whether the U.S. might be heading into a recession. Gruber is the Ford Professor of Economics at MIT. His latest book is “Jump-Starting America How Breakthrough Science Can Revive Economic Growth and the American Dream.” Juliette Kayyem updates us on the latest news from the Jan. 6 committee hearings, focusing on the testimony of Cassidy Hutchinson, a former White House aide and assistant to former Chief of Staff Mark Meadows. Kayyem is an analyst for CNN, former assistant secretary at the Department of Homeland Security and faculty chair of the homeland security program at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government.

    BPR full show: Cassidy Hutchinson testifies before Jan. 6 committee

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 199:03

    Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners if it's time for Democrats to start being more aggressive to enact political change. Trenni Kusnierek talks about the NFL's push to suspend Deshaun Watson, and WNBA player Brittney Griner's upcoming trial in Russia. Kusnierek is a reporter and anchor for NBC Sports Boston, and a weekly Boston Public Radio contributor. Dr. Brenda Cassellius shares her thoughts on how the pandemic has affected the school system and the search for her replacement. Cassellius is the outgoing superintendent of Boston Public Schools. Jared Bowen discusses the new Designing Motherhood exhibit at the MassArt Museum through the lens of the recent Roe overturning, Maurice Sendak's exhibit at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, and Lesley Dill's sculpture exhibit at the Canterbury Shaker Village. Bowen is GBH's executive arts editor and the host of Open Studio. Then, we turn to live audio from the Jan. 6 hearings.

    BPR Full Show: Proper cannabis etiquette

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 164:43

    Today on Boston Public Radio we're on tape, bringing you some of our favorite conversations from recent years: Imani Perry talks about parenthood and how Black parents talk to their children about race. Perry is a professor of African American Studies at Princeton University. Her latest book is "Breathe: A Letter To My Sons.” Richard Blanco reads his favorite “aubade” poems — about lovers departing at dawn — including “Aubade with Burning City” by Ocean Vuong and “Ghosting Aubade” by Amie Whittemore. Blanco is the fifth inaugural poet in U.S. history. His latest book, "How To Love A Country," deals with various sociopolitical issues that shadow America. Lizzie Post weighs in on cannabis culture in her book, “Higher Etiquette: A Guide to the World of Cannabis, From Dispensaries to Dinner Parties.” Post is a writer, co-director of The Emily Post Institute and great-great-granddaughter of etiquette writer Emily Post. Christopher Kimball previews his latest cookbook “Vegetables,” sharing his favorite ways to bring vegetables to the center of the plate. Chris Kimball co-founded America's Test Kitchen, and now runs Christopher Kimball's Milk Street in Boston. His latest cookbook is “Vegetables.” Farah Stockman talks about how class divides manifest themselves culturally and politically in the United States, and why higher-class, well-educated communities struggle to understand and represent the majority of Americans. Farah Stockman is a member of the New York Times editorial board, and a Pulitzer Prize–winning reporter. Her latest book is “American Made: What Happens to People When Work Disappears.” Howard Bryant discusses his book, "The Heritage: Black Athletes, a Divided America, and the Politics of Patriotism." Bryant is a columnist and commentator for ESPN. Lindy West previews her latest book, "The Witches Are Coming," a collection of essays about feminism in the #MeToo moment. West is a writer, comedian and activist. Joshua Foer talks about “Atlas Obscura: An Explorers Guide To The World's Hidden Wonders.” Foer is a freelance journalist and author of "Moonwalking With Einstein: The Art And Science Of Remembering Everything.”

    Corby Kummer: Mushroom craze comes to Boston with The Mushroom Shop

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 22:59

    Swampscott native Tyler Akabane recently opened The Mushroom Shop in Somerville, stocking everything from cultivated exotic king oyster mushrooms to mushroom-bedecked merchandise. And according to award-winning food writer Corby Kummer, Akabane's shop is just one step in bringing the mushroom foraging craze to the Boston area. “We're finally catching up to the rest of the world, because in Europe and many parts of Asia, a lovely outing is going on a hike and looking for mushrooms,” Kummer told Boston Public Radio on Monday. “It's incredibly common.” “It's a real cult — it's fun and you learn how to do something.” Kummer is executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

    BPR Full Show: The End of Roe

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 129:36

    Today on Boston Public Radio: We start the show by asking listeners what should be done to protect abortion access in the U.S. Judge Nancy Gertner talks about the future of the Supreme Court post-Dobbs, including the direction Justice Clarence Thomas wants to take the court. Gertner is a retired federal judge and a senior lecturer at Harvard Law School. Corby Kummer discusses the climate of restaurant closings amid rising rents, and a new entirely mushroom-focused restaurant in Somerville. Kummer is executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. Hal Brooks and Gina Femia discuss the unorthodox approach to theater that the Cape Cod Theatre Project takes, and how the process worked for Femia's new play. Brooks is the The Cape Cod Theater Project's artistic director, and Femia is a playwright, who wrote “The Violet Sisters.” Revs. Irene Monroe and Emmett Price share their thoughts on how religious leaders should organize to effectively advocate for abortion rights, and where the separation of church and state plays in that organizing. Monroe is a syndicated religion columnist and the Boston voice for Detour's African American Heritage Trail. Price is founding pastor of Community of Love Christian Fellowship in Allston, and the Inaugural Dean of Africana Studies at Berklee College of Music. Together they host the “All Rev'd Up” podcast. We end the show by asking people what they think about SCOTUS' decision on Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization.

    BPR Full Show: Dobbs v. Jackson

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 165:40

    Today on Boston Public Radio: Attorney General Maura Healey shares her reaction to the recent Supreme Court decision on Dobbs v. Jackson. She also answers listeners' questions for this month's “Ask the Attorney General.” Healey is attorney general of Massachusetts and a candidate for governor. Judge Nancy Gertner discusses the future of abortions in the US, including the trials that will face those who seek abortion in light of the Dobbs v. Jackson decision. Gertner is a retired federal judge and is now a senior lecturer at Harvard Law School. Callie Crosley discusses the fate of other court-granted rights in the face of the Supreme Court decision. Crossley hosts GBH's Under the Radar and Basic Black. Then we turned to President Joe Biden's address concerning the Dobbs v. Jackson ruling, and continued taking calls about the Dobbs decision. Dr. Cheryl Hamlin talks about her advocacy for abortion access, and the state of her practice and colleagues considering the Dobbs decision. Dr. Hamlin is an obstetrician and gynecologist at Mount Auburn Hospital in Cambridge. She travels to the Jackson Women's Health Organization in Mississippi each month to provide abortion care, the clinic at the center of the Dobbs v. Jackson case that is being decided by the Supreme Court. We return to listeners' reactions to the Dobbs decision. Congresswoman Ayanna Pressley calls for the declaration of a public health emergency in light of abortion restriction. We end the show with more listener calls.

    BPR Full Show: Bleak Week

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 122:25

    Today on Boston Public Radio: Chuck Todd shares his thoughts on the Supreme Court's decision on “proper-cause” gun carriage, and the potential for a Trump 2024 run following the Jan. 6 hearings. Todd is the moderator of “Meet The Press” on NBC, host of “Meet The Press Daily” on MSNBC and the political director for NBC News. Then, we asked listeners what they think it'll take to bring unity to the U.S. during a bleak week of news. Juliette Kayyem talks about the Supreme Court gun decision's impact on Mass., and the potential for former President Donald Trump's prosecution following the Jan. 6 hearings. Kayyem is an analyst for CNN, former assistant secretary at the Department of Homeland Security and faculty chair of the homeland security program at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government. Paul Reville shares his thoughts on how the Supreme Court gun decision could impact the attitudes of Americans, and whether Boston should wait for a school improvement plan to place a new superintendent. Reville is the former secretary of education and a professor at Harvard University's Graduate School of Education, where he also runs the Education Redesign Lab. His latest book, co-authored with Lynne Sacks, is “Collaborative Action for Equity and Opportunity: A Practical Guide for School and Community Leaders.” Shirley Leung discusses President Joe Biden's new gas tax plan, and controversy surrounding the “fair share” amendment. Leung is a business columnist for the Boston Globe. We end the show by asking listeners how they unplug from the news cycle.

    BPR Full Show: “Do you know how it feels to have the president of the United States target you?"

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 128:34

    Today on Boston Public Radio: We start the show by asking listeners to respond to the testimony in congress of two election workers in Georgia, Wandrea "Shaye" Moss and her mother Ruby Freeman. Both were targeted by former President Donald Trump and his supporters in attempts to delegitimize the 2020 election. Medical ethicist Arthur Caplan discusses whether doctors should talk to their patients about gun safety. Art Caplan on BPR | June 22, 2022 Keri Blakinger, a Texas-based journalist covering mass incarceration, discusses her new memoir "Corrections in Ink" which traces her journey from the ice rink to a heroin addiction to prison, and getting out and getting clean. Award-winning Boston chef and restaurateur Tiffani Faison dishes on a new Food Network cooking competition show, Beachside Brawls. She also discussed throwing out the first pitch at Fenway Park, and the challenges she and other restaurateurs face amid rising prices. We again open the lines to callers to discuss the impacts of former president Donald Trump and his supporters' threats to election workers after the 2020 election. Sy Montgomery, a naturalist, journalist and author, joins us for another edition of the Afternoon Zoo. She tells us about the plight of Bonaparte, a 100-year-old snapping turtle whose habitat was threatened in Springfield and is about to return to the wetlands thanks to the efforts of the Turtle Rescue League.

    BPR Full Show: Continuing the Jan. 6 Committee hearings

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 221:01

    Today on Boston Public Radio: We start the show by asking listeners what they think about the state of Boston's public transit. Trenni Kusnierek discusses golfer Matthew Fitzpatrick's dramatic win at the US Open. She also talks about Jayson Tatum's role in the Celtics' loss, and Amy Kaufman speaking out as the victim of domestic violence from her ex-husband, sports writer Jonah Keri. Kusnierek is a reporter and anchor for NBC Sports Boston, and a weekly Boston Public Radio contributor. Jared Bowen shares his thoughts on the American Repertory Theater's revitalized run of “1776,” as well as “The Light” at the Lyric Stage Company, and the “wiild negro is love” exhibition at the Cultural Equity Incubator. Bowen is GBH's executive arts editor and the host of Open Studio. Bill Burr talks about being the first comedian to perform at Fenway Park. Burr is a comedian, actor and Massachusetts-native, with standup specials including “Paper Tiger,” “Walk Your Way Out,” and “I'm Sorry You Feel That Way,” and roles in Netflix's “F Is For Family,” Disney+'s “The Mandalorian,” and the film “The King of Staten Island.” He'll be playing Fenway Park on August 21. We end the show by turning to live coverage of the Jan. 6 hearings.

    BPR Full Show: Taking A Tumble

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 161:23

    Today on Boston Public Radio: EJ Dionne shares his thoughts on the latest news from the Jan. 6 committee hearing, and violent threats from the alt-right targeting Republicans in Congress. Dionne is a senior fellow at The Brookings Institution. His latest book is “Code Red: How Progressives and Moderates Can Unite to Save Our Country.” We then open the phone lines, asking listeners if they're holding back on their summer plans due to rising inflation. Michael Curry discusses the legacy of Juneteenth, and the CDC's approval of COVID-19 vaccines for children under 5. Curry is chair of the NAACP Advocacy and Policy Committee, and is president and CEO of the Mass League of Community Health Centers. Sally Starr reflects on 50 years of Title IX. Starr is the head field hockey coach at Boston University. She has coached women's collegiate sports for over 45 years. Next, we talk with listeners about their experiences in school sports in the 50 years since Title IX was enacted. Revs. Irene Monroe and Emmett G. Price III weigh in on the federal commemoration of Juneteenth, and potential corporatization of the holiday. Monroe is a syndicated religion columnist and the Boston voice for Detour's African American Heritage Trail. Price is founding pastor of Community of Love Christian Fellowship in Allston, and the Inaugural Dean of Africana Studies at Berklee College of Music. Together they host the “All Rev'd Up” podcast. Richard Blanco shares his favorite poems for Pride Month. Blanco joins us regularly to lead Village Voice, a conversation about how poetry can help us better understand our lives. He's the fifth presidential inaugural poet in US history. His latest book, “How to Love a Country,” deals with various socio-political issues that shadow America. We end the show by asking listeners for their most mortifying stories of falling down.

    BPR Full Show: Drag Queen Story Hour and Live Music Fridays

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 161:52

    Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by talking with listeners about whether families are being priced out of Boston. Callie Crossley talks about the history and future of Juneteenth, and the Boston bar trolling Stephen and Ayesha Curry. Crossley hosts GBH's Under the Radar and Basic Black. Patty Bouree and Allison McClaury join us for Drag Queen Story Hour, live at the Boston Public Library. They also talk about LGBTQ+ acceptance in the wake of politicians' attacks on drag events across the country. Patty Bouree heads Boston's Branch of Drag Queen Story Hour. MacLaury is the director of education for the Mosesian Center for the Arts. Together, they're organizing “Let's Say Gay! A Community Pride Event” at the Mosesian Center for the Arts in Watertown. David Hogg weighs in on the road ahead for gun legislation in Washington. Hogg is a Parkland shooting survivor and a co-founder of March For Our Lives. Sue O'Connell talks about Yellowstone National Park's “unprecedented” flooding, and the visible ways climate change has impacted the U.S. National Park System. O'Connell is the co-publisher of Bay Windows and the South End News, as well as NECN's political commentator and explainer-in-chief. Jessica Johnson Brock, Annie Rabbat, Patricia Au, and Vera Savage join us for a live performance at the Boston Public Library ahead of this weekend's Boston Lyric Opera's Street Stage shows. Johnson Brock is the Senior Director of Artistic Operations at the Boston Lyric Opera. Rabbat, Au, and Savage are members of the Boston Lyric Opera.  We end the show by talking with listeners about France's worker-friendly laws, from 30 days of paid vacation to restrictions on when bosses can text employees.

    BPR Full Show: Jan. 6 hearings continue

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 225:53

    Today on Boston Public Radio: Judge Nancy Gertner shares her thoughts on the Jan. 6 hearings so far, including Ginni Thomas' emails, and the possibility of former President Donald Trump being indicted. Gertner is a retired federal judge, and is now a senior lecturer at Harvard Law School. Then, we ask listeners if they're struggling to give the Jan. 6 hearings adequate attention given the overwhelming state of the news. Andrea Cabral talks about the Jan. 6 hearings, a the thwarted white supremacist riot plot on a pride event in Idaho, and the ruling that a Bronx Zoo elephant named Happy is not a legal person. Cabral is the former Suffolk County sheriff and secretary of public safety, and former CEO of the cannabis company Ascend. Judd Legum discusses his reporting on the pledges corporations made about not funding politicians who voted to overturn the 2020 election. Legum writes the newsletter Popular Information. He was the founder and editor of ThinkProgress, Hillary Clinton's Research Director for her 2008 presidential campaign and a Democratic nominee for State Delegate in Maryland in 2010. We then carry live coverage of the Jan. 6 hearings.

    Corby Kummer on Eating Alone

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 30:48

    During a segment of Tuesday's Boston Public Radio, award-winning food writer Corby Kummer chimed in on hosts Jim Braude and Margery Eagan's debate over eating alone. “Eating alone at a bar is one of life's most satisfying occupations,” Kummer told Boston Public Radio. “I was in a lot of Boston restaurants over the weekend, and the number of people I saw either happily with a book or sitting at a bar alone and looking like there was nothing else they would rather be doing I found really striking.” “[There was a] level of contentment — not artificially looking up as if they have a friend coming — there was none of that,” Kummer added. “There was ‘I'm happy to be here by myself.' This is a great thing.” Kummer is executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

    BPR Full Show: Love in the Bread Aisle

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 161:17

    Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by talking with listeners about rising costs amid inflation. Art Caplan discusses the World Health Organization's (WHO) upcoming assessment of monkeypox as a potential global health emergency. Caplan is the Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU School of Medicine in New York City. Shirley Leung talks about efforts to build greenspace in Boston's Seaport neighborhood, and the potential for safe consumption sites in Mass. Leung is a business columnist for the Boston Globe. Miles Howard shares his 25-mile Boston trail map, which connects green spaces across more than a dozen neighborhoods. Howard is a Boston-based journalist and author of the “Mind the Moss,” a newsletter about hiking. Then, we talk with listeners about their favorite hiking trails in the Boston area. Mitra Kalita discusses the role of the diversity officer in corporate spaces, and the transition of diversity, equity, and inclusion from human resources to the C-suite. Kalita is the co-founder and CEO of URL Media, a network of Black and Brown news and information outlets. Andy Ihnatko updates us on the latest tech headlines, focusing on the Google engineer claiming that Google's AI language model is sentient. Ihnatko is a tech writer and blogger, posting at Ihnatko.com. We wrap up the show by asking listeners about the regional fascination with Market Basket.

    BPR Full Show: On the bright side....

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 164:16

    Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners if they're feeling positive about the state of current events. Trenni Kusnierek talks about last night's Celtics loss, the suspension of several players from the PGA and Amy Schneider throwing the first pitch at the Giants-Dodgers game. Kusnierek is a reporter and anchor for NBC Sports Boston, and a weekly Boston Public Radio contributor. Juliette Kayyem reacts to the Jan. 6 hearings and the Senate's potential gun deal. Kayyem is an analyst for CNN, former assistant secretary at the Department of Homeland Security and faculty chair of the homeland security program at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government. Quincy Roberts Sr. explains his new role as Executive Director of LGBTQ+ Advancement, and his past experiences and advocacy in Boston. Roberts is is the inaugural Executive Director for the Mayor's Office of LGBTQ+ Advancement in Boston and co-founder of the Hispanic Black Gay Coalition. Then, we ask listeners to debate the merits of eating alone. Corby Kummer discusses the James Beard awards and their efforts to diversify, obstacles facing young farmers and Rhode Island becoming a restaurant hotspot. Kummer is executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. John King shares his insights about the Jan. 6 hearings and Joe Biden's potential 2024 run. King is CNN's chief national correspondent and anchor of "Inside Politics,” which airs weekdays and Sunday mornings at 8 a.m. We end the show by continuing the conversation about eating alone.

    BPR Full Show: The hearings, day two

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 230:26

    Today on Boston Public Radio: Juliette Kayyem previews day two of the January 6 hearings. Kayyem is an analyst for CNN, former assistant secretary at the Department of Homeland Security and faculty chair of the homeland security program at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government. Then, we air the House Select Committee Hearings on the Jan. 6 insurrection. Andrea Cabral shares her reactions to the proceedings. Cabral is the former Suffolk County sheriff and secretary of public safety, and former CEO of the cannabis company Ascend. Michael Curry discusses whether he thinks former president Donald Trump will be prosecuted, and how he thinks Trump supporters will react to the hearings. Curry is chair of the NAACP Advocacy and Policy Committee, and is president and CEO of the Massachusetts League of Community Health Centers. We end the show by taking calls from listeners on their reactions to the hearings.

    Corby Kummer: Free School Lunches Set to Expire June 30

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 19:34

    Pandemic-era federal waivers that expanded children's access to food through year-round, free school lunches are set to expire this month, after Congress failed to extend the waivers past their June 30 deadline. A cumulative 4.3 billion meals were distributed through the program over the last two summers. “Now parents have to go back to filling in humiliating applications saying, ‘Here's what money we make and why we need help from the school lunch,'” Kummer told Boston Public Radio on Friday. “What parent has time to do that, let alone wants the stigma of their kid asking for this kind of assistance?” Kummer is executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

    John Rosenthal on America's Gun Violence

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 23:33

    John Rosenthal, co-founder of the Boston-based nonprofit Stop Handgun Violence, joined Boston Public Radio live at the Boston Public Library on Friday to share his thoughts on America's inaction on gun violence.

    BPR Full Show: Beginning the Jan. 6 committee hearings, and gun violence in America

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 164:10

    Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by talking with listeners about the first night of the Jan. 6 committee hearings. DA Kevin Hayden discusses Mayor Michelle Wu's release of the complete file on former Boston Police Patrolman's Association union chief and convicted child-sex abuser Patrick Rose, Sr. He also talks about concerns over illegal guns in Mass. Hayden is the interim District Attorney for Suffolk County, and he's running for election for a full term as DA this fall.  David Gergen shares his thoughts on the future of youth leaders in politics, and the potential for mandatory community service. Gergen is a Senior Political Analyst for CNN, the Founding Director of the Center for Public Leadership at Harvard and a professor at the Kennedy School. He was a presidential advisor to four administrations. His new book is “Hearts Touched with Fire: How Great Leaders are Made.” Corby Kummer talks about the upcoming expiration of universal free school lunches, and updated us on the latest news from the baby formula shortage. Kummer is executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. John Rosenthal discusses the state of gun reform in Mass., and updated us on upcoming March for Our Lives gatherings. Rosenthal is a longtime gun control advocate, and the founder of the group Stop Handgun Violence. Red Shaydez talks about her work in Boston's music scene. She also performed her songs “I'm Not the Victim,” “I Like Dreamin'”, and “Catch a Vibe” live at the Boston Public Library. Red Shaydez is a rapper, entrepreneur, and youth mentor. She's also the Vice Chair of Events for the group Women in Music, and the host of the Boston Public Library's second annual Teen Music Maker Showdown. We end the show by asking listeners about their experiences with Boston's Open Streets initiative, which creates car-free spaces on select roads in Boston during the summer.

    BPR Full Show: Previewing the Jan. 6 committee hearings, and more

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 161:24

    Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners how they feel going into the Jan. 6 hearings. Paul Reville shares his thoughts about Mayor Michelle Wu's role in education, and the lifting of Boston Public Schools' mask mandate. Reville is the former secretary of education and a professor at Harvard University's Graduate School of Education, where he also runs the Education Redesign Lab. His latest book, co-authored with Lynne Sacks, is “Collaborative Action for Equity and Opportunity: A Practical Guide for School and Community Leaders.” Andrea Cabral weighs in on what we can expect from the Jan. 6 committee hearings, the state of gun control in America post-Uvalde, and the women suing the F.B.I. for early investigative failures in the Larry Nassar case. Cabral is the former Suffolk County sheriff and secretary of public safety, and former CEO of the cannabis company Ascend. Sue O'Connell discusses media coverage of the upcoming Jan. 6 trials, and updates us on the Pride Month events happening around Mass. O'Connell is the co-publisher of Bay Windows and South End News, and contributor to Current, on NBC LX and NECN. Revs. Irene Monroe and Emmett G. Price III comments on Southern Baptist Leaders releasing a sex abuser database, the labor activists pushing for a White House meeting on poverty, and Pope Francis' future in the papacy. Monroe is a syndicated religion columnist and the Boston voice for Detour's African American Heritage Trail. Price is founding pastor of Community of Love Christian Fellowship in Allston, and the Inaugural Dean of Africana Studies at Berklee College of Music. Together they host the All Rev'd Up podcast. David Abel discusses his reporting on a water-pollution crisis in New Hampshire, and his upcoming documentary about future sea level rise in Boston. Abel is a Boston Globe reporter, where he covers the environment. He was part of the Globe's team that won the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News. We end the show by talking with listeners about the catharsis of swearing.

    BPR Full Show: A New Leaf

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 161:34

    Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by talking with listeners about the incoming results from California's primary election. Shirley Leung talks about her recent piece featuring women whose decisions to have abortions changed their lives, and shares her thoughts on the potential for a 4-day work week. Leung is a business columnist for the Boston Globe. Juliette Kayyem shares what people can expect from the upcoming Jan. 6 committee hearings. She also talks about Uvalde native Matthew McConaughey calling for gun control in the wake of the Robb Elementary School shooting. Kayyem is an analyst for CNN, former assistant secretary at the Department of Homeland Security and faculty chair of the homeland security program at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government. Amy O'Leary talks about the push for accessible childcare in Mass. amid rising costs. O'Leary is the Executive Director of Strategies for Children, an advocacy and policy group aimed at ensuring access to childcare and early education in Mass. We then open the phone lines to ask listeners for their experiences with trying to find affordable childcare in Mass. Matthew Gilbert weighs in on Apple TV's “Severance,” HBO's “Somebody Somewhere,” and ABC's “Abbott Elementary.” Gilbert is the TV critic for The Boston Globe. Billy Collins shares some of his poetry ahead of his June 16 appearance at 2Life Communities' annual gala. Collins was appointed U.S. Poet Laureate from 2001-2003, and New York State Poet Laureate from 2004-2006. His numerous collections include “Nine Horses: Poems, The Trouble with Poetry,” “Ballistics,” “Horoscopes for the Dead,” “Aimless Love,” and “The Rain in Portugal.” We end the show by talking with listeners about their indoor plant obsessions.

    BPR Full Show: Early bird gets the worm

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 164:16

    Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners how they are coping with the rising cost of living. Trenni Kusnierek weighs in on the Celtics Sunday loss, advocacy across teams and leagues for gun control, LGBTQ+ pride and WNBA player Brittney Griner; she also shares dispatches from the French Open, and talked about Bruins coach Bruce Cassidy's departure. Kusnierek is a reporter and anchor for NBC Sports Boston, and a weekly Boston Public Radio contributor. Art Caplan talks about the scourge of mass shootings this year, negative reactions to mental health clinics in schools, a new drug that could transform breast cancer treatment and the FDA delaying access to contraception. Caplan is the Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU School of Medicine in New York City. Lee Pelton discusses guns being the leading cause of death for children, and closing the racial wealth gap in Boston. Pelton is the president and CEO of The Boston Foundation. Carol Rose speaks about the Beyond Roe coalition to protect and expand abortion access in Massachusetts, the Supreme Court potentially taking up a raft of election law cases over the power of state legislatures in federal elections and the ACLU's lawsuit over US denying Afghans humanitarian entry. Rose is the executive director of the ACLU of Massachusetts.  John King updates listeners on the latest national headlines, including the leadup to the Jan 6. hearings, gun legislation and upcoming primary elections. King is CNN's chief national correspondent and anchor of "Inside Politics,” which airs weekdays and Sunday mornings at 8 a.m. We end the show by discussing whether punctuality is back in style in the era of zoom.

    BPR Full Show: And they said 'Speak Now'

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 164:16

    Today on Boston Public Radio: EJ Dionne discusses the state of gun control negotiations in the U.S. Senate and the role of young voters in 2022 midterm elections. Dionne is a columnist for the Washington Post and senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. His latest book is “100% Democracy: The Case for Universal Voting.” Then we ask listeners their thoughts on Elon Musk requiring his employees to return to the office 40 hours a week. Alexandra Drane talks about the burden unpaid caretakers face, and what needs to change to better support people serving in such roles. Drane is the co-founder and CEO of Archangels, a group aimed at supporting unpaid caretakers.  Charlie Sennott updates listeners on the latest news from Ukraine following 100 days of Russia's invasion, and UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson facing a vote of no-confidence. Sennott is a news analyst for GBH, where he also heads up the GroundTruth Project. Jim Aloisi and Stacy Thompson weigh in on Boston's plan to open more streets this summer, and the poetry of the MBTA. Aloisi is the former Massachusetts transportation secretary, a member of the Transit Matters board and contributor to Commonwealth Magazine. Thompson is executive director of Livable Streets. Meredith Goldstein shares relationship advice, including on professing feelings for a carpool buddy and when to ask for a second date. Goldstein is an advice columnist and features writer for the Boston Globe. Her advice column, “Love Letters,” is a daily dispatch of wisdom for the lovelorn that has been running for more than a decade. She also hosts the “Love Letters” podcast. We end the show by asking listeners what to do if they know a friend is marrying the wrong person.

    BPR Full Show: T-E-K-T-I-T-E

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 161:30

    Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by talking with listeners about how they're handling the current political divide in America. Boston City Councilor Ricardo Arroyo shares how he would bring his previous experience as a public defender to the role of Suffolk County District Attorney if elected. He also discusses the need for transparency in the case of former Boston police officer Patrick Rose. Arroyo is a Boston City Councilor. He's running to be Suffolk County District Attorney. Callie Crossley talks about Harini Logan's win at the 2022 Scripps Spelling Bee, and Queen Elizabeth II's Platinum Jubilee Pageant. She also shared her thoughts on Sheryl Sandberg stepping down from her role as COO of Meta. Crossley hosts GBH's Under the Radar and Basic Black. Barbara Lynch shares her thoughts on the state of the restaurant industry, and called for student loan forgiveness for the next generation of restaurant workers. Lynch is a James Beard Award-winning chef, and the restarauter behind No. 9 Park, Menton, Sportello, and others. In 2017, she was one of TIME magazine's 100 most influential people, and is a Druker Award recipient. Art Caplan talks about President Joe Biden's response to the baby formula shortage, and the scientists that have successfully transplanted a 3D-printed ear. Caplan is the Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU School of Medicine in New York City. Erin Caldwell talks about Dorchester's first annual Dorchfest, while pop singer Rosa Cesario, acoustic singer-songwriter Tim Pitoniak, and hip-hop/spoken word artist Paul Willis performed live at the Boston Public Library. In honor of the 2022 Scripps National Spelling Bee, we host the annual Boston Public Radio Spelling Bee for listeners.

    BPR Full Show: Dancing Queen

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 161:34

    Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by talking with listeners about actions they're taking in the wake of multiple mass shootings. Bill McKibben shares his thoughts on the lack of action in the U.S. on climate change policies, and worsening water quality at Boston-area beaches. McKibben is an author, educator and environmentalist. He's the founder of 350.org and ThirdAct.org. He has a new newsletter on Substack titled “The Crucial Years.” He's also got a new, serialized book titled “The Other Cheek: An Epic Nonviolent Yarn.” Chris Muther talks about his experiences with masking on airlines, and shared his off-the-beaten-path weekend spots in Boston. Muther is a travel writer for the Boston Globe. Michael Curry weighs in on President Joe Biden's proposed $10,000 student debt relief plan, and lack of movement on gun control legislation in Washington. Curry is chair of the NAACP Advocacy and Policy Committee, and is president and CEO of the Mass League of Community Health Centers. Andy Ihnatko explains what internet surveillance might look like in a post-Roe America. Ihnatko is a tech writer and blogger, posting at Ihnatko.com. Jessica Bennett discusses the verdict reached in the Johnny Depp-Amber Heard defamation trial, sharing her thoughts on our cultural obsession with “celebrity misfortune.” Bennett is is a contributing opinion editor at the New York Times, and the author of two bestselling books, Feminist Fight Club: A Survival Manual for a Sexist Workplace, and This Is 18: Girls' Lives Through Girls' Eyes. We end the show by talking with listeners about their favorite summer foods.

    BPR Full Show: Spring Cleaning

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 164:39

    Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by talking with listeners about student anxiety, following a new GBH report that cites increased levels of bullying in Boston schools. Rep. Ayanna Pressley calls for stricter gun control measures – such as universal background checks and a ban on assault weapons – in the wake of the Robb Elementary School shooting in Uvalde, Texas. She also discusses broadening student debt relief from President Joe Biden's proposed plan to forgive $10,000 per borrower in student loans. Juliette Kayyem discusses the Department of Justice's (DOJ) announcement of an investigation into the police response to the Robb Elementary School shooting in Uvalde, Texas, and diminishing attention towards Russia's invasion of Ukraine. Kayyem is an analyst for CNN, former assistant secretary at the Department of Homeland Security and faculty chair of the homeland security program at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government. Shirley Leung talks about recent crypto scams targeting Asian Americans, and the out-of-state journey some women in Mass. take to get an abortion. Leung is a business columnist for the Boston Globe. Jerrod Carmichael joins us ahead of his June 3 show at The Wilbur, sharing his vision behind the HBO special “Rothaniel.” Carmichael is a comedian, actor, and filmmaker. Corby Kummer talks about Taco Bell's five-city drag brunch tour, and Guy Fieri's cult icon status. Kummer is executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. We end the show by asking listeners how their spring cleaning projects have gone.

    Corby Kummer: Adding Fuel to the Fieri Fire

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 17:09

    It's been nearly 15 years of “Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives,” and Guy Fieri's imprint on America's cultural landscape has reached new heights. Award-winning food writer Corby Kummer joined Boston Public Radio on Wednesday to share his thoughts on the Fieri fandom, following a recent New York Times profile of the celebrity chef. “The [New York Times] decided they were really going to celebrate Guy Fieri, and if he's raised $20 million [for restaurant workers, let's celebrate him, too,” Kummer said. During the wide-ranging interview, Kummer also shared his thoughts on Taco Bell's touring drag brunch, the discontinuation of mission-driven brand Honest Tea, and more. Kummer is executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

    BPR Full Show: Housing, gun reform, and the state of the Republican party

    Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 161:14

    Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by talking with listeners about gun reform. Trenni Kusnierek updates us on the Celtics' win over the Miami Heat in the Eastern Conference Finals, and the U.S. Open's return to The Country Club in Brookline this June. Kusnierek is a reporter and anchor for NBC Sports Boston, and a weekly Boston Public Radio contributor. Chris Doughty talks about his run for Mass. governor, and shared his thoughts on the state of the Republican party. Doughty is a Republican candidate for governor. Jenifer McKim and Rose Webster-Smith discuss the corporations buying up Springfield single family homes, following McKim's reporting for GBH News. McKim is a senior investigative reporter for the GBH News Center for Investigative Reporting. Webster-Smith is the program director for the nonprofit Springfield No One Leaves. Dr. Katherine Gergen-Barnett talks about the latest news regarding monkeypox cases in the U.S., and answers listeners' questions during this month's edition of “Ask the Doctor.” Gergen-Barnett is the vice chair of Primary Care Innovation and Transformation and residency director in the Department of Family Medicine at Boston Medical Center and Boston University Medical School. We end the show by returning to our conversation on gun reform.

    BPR Full Show: What it's like growing up with Joe Biden, how to learn falconry and more

    Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 164:51

    Today on Boston Public Radio we're on tape, bringing you some of our favorite conversations from recent months: John Della Volpe talks about Gen Z's relationship to political activism, and the events that pushed them to action. Della Volpe is director of polling at Harvard Kennedy School's Institute of Politics and a former campaign adviser to President Joe Biden. His new book is: “Fight: How Gen Z Is Channeling Their Fear And Passion To Save America.” Howard Mansfield previews his book, "Chasing Eden: A Book of Seekers," about communities throughout American history that sought freedom, happiness and utopia. Mansfield is an author who writes about history, architecture and preservation. Kim Kelly tells stories about the history of labor movements in the United States, and how they connect to renewed union pushes today. Kelly is a journalist, columnist for Teen Vogue and author of “FIGHT LIKE HELL: The Untold History of American Labor.” Rosa Brooks discusses her book, “Tangled Up In Blue: Policing The American City,” and describes her experiences as a reserve police officer in Washington, D.C. Brooks is a former Pentagon official in the Obama administration and a professor of law and policy at Georgetown Law. Valerie Biden Owens shares what life was like growing up in the Biden family, and talks about her experiences as the longtime campaign manager and political adviser to her older brother, President Joe Biden. Biden Owens is chair of the Biden Institute at the University of Delaware, a partner at Owens Patrick Leadership Seminars and a senior advisor to Diversified Search Group. Her book, “Growing Up Biden: A Memoir,” was released on Tuesday. Jelani Cobb explains how he positioned the Kerner Commission Report in today's political context for his book, “The Essential Kerner Commission Report.” Cobb is a staff writer at The New Yorker and the Ira A. Lipman Professor of Journalism at the Columbia Journalism School. Ken Burns dives into Benjamin Franklin's life, previewing his latest documentary on Franklin's early life and work as a scientist and inventor. Burns is an award-winning documentarian. Sy Montgomery talks about her encounters with birds of prey while learning falconry. Montgomery is a journalist, naturalist and a BPR contributor. Her latest book is "The Hawk's Way: Encounters with Fierce Beauty.”

    BPR Full Show: How to cook vegetables, what "aubade means" and more

    Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 165:24

    Today on Boston Public Radio we're on tape, bringing you some of our favorite conversations from recent years: Imani Perry talks about parenthood and how Black parents talk to their children about race. Perry is a professor of African American Studies at Princeton University. Her latest book is "Breathe: A Letter To My Sons.” Richard Blanco reads his favorite “aubade” poems — about lovers departing at dawn — including “Aubade with Burning City” by Ocean Vuong and “Ghosting Aubade” by Amie Whittemore. Blanco is the fifth inaugural poet in U.S. history. His latest book, "How To Love A Country," deals with various sociopolitical issues that shadow America. Lizzie Post weighs in on cannabis culture in her book, “Higher Etiquette: A Guide to the World of Cannabis, From Dispensaries to Dinner Parties.” Post is a writer, co-director of The Emily Post Institute and great-great-granddaughter of etiquette writer Emily Post. Christopher Kimball previews his latest cookbook “Vegetables,” sharing his favorite ways to bring vegetables to the center of the plate. Chris Kimball co-founded America's Test Kitchen, and now runs Christopher Kimball's Milk Street in Boston. His latest cookbook is “Vegetables.” Farah Stockman talks about how class divides manifest themselves culturally and politically in the United States, and why higher-class, well-educated communities struggle to understand and represent the majority of Americans. Farah Stockman is a member of the New York Times editorial board, and a Pulitzer Prize–winning reporter. Her latest book is “American Made: What Happens to People When Work Disappears.” Howard Bryant discusses his book, "The Heritage: Black Athletes, a Divided America, and the Politics of Patriotism." Bryant is a columnist and commentator for ESPN. Lindy West previews her latest book, "The Witches Are Coming," a collection of essays about feminism in the #MeToo moment. West is a writer, comedian and activist. Joshua Foer talks about “Atlas Obscura: An Explorers Guide To The World's Hidden Wonders.” Foer is a freelance journalist and author of "Moonwalking With Einstein: The Art And Science Of Remembering Everything.”

    BPR Full Show: Leadership tips from Charlie Baker and the First Lady of Iceland

    Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 165:31

    Today on Boston Public Radio: Chuck Todd shares his thoughts on the reaction from Washington D.C. in the wake of the Uvalde shooting, and why politicians refuse to take action on gun control. Todd is the moderator of “Meet The Press” on NBC, host of “Meet The Press Daily” on MSNBC and the political director for NBC News. Then, we ask listeners their thoughts on a growing sense that political action feels hopeless, in a moment where policy often does not match the desires of Americans. Andrea Cabral responds to the Uvalde shooting, the failings of the Supreme Court and a romance novelist convicted for killing her husband after writing a blog post titled “How to Murder Your Husband.” Cabral is the former Suffolk County sheriff and secretary of public safety, and former CEO of the cannabis company Ascend. First Lady of Iceland Eliza Reid previews her book, “Secrets Of The Sprakkar: Iceland's Extraordinary Women And How They Are Changing The World,” and explains why Iceland is leading the globe in gender equity. Reid is the First Lady of Iceland. Governor Charlie Baker and Steve Kadish discuss their recently released book on public governance. Then, Baker takes questions from listeners on topics including gun control, the MBTA and Boston public schools. Baker is Governor of Massachusetts. Kadish is a senior research fellow at Harvard's Kennedy School, and previously served Baker's Chief of Staff and Chair of the Commission on the Future of Transportation. Their book is “Results: Getting Beyond Politics to Get Important Work Done.”

    BPR Full Show: "What are we doing?!"

    Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 162:47

    Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by opening the phone lines, talking with listeners about gun violence in America in the wake of a mass shooting at an elementary school in Uvalde, Texas. Art Caplan shares his thoughts on the moral apathy Congress seems to have in cases of gun violence, and cases of monkeypox in the U.S. Caplan is the Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU School of Medicine in New York City. Juliette Kayyem explains how language is used to sanitize stories of gun violence, and updates us on the latest news out of Uvalde, Texas, where a gunman killed 19 elementary school students and two teachers. Kayyem is former assistant secretary for homeland security under President Barack Obama, and the faculty chair of the homeland security program at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government. We continue our discussion with listeners on the epidemic of gun violence in America. Paul Reville discusses the impact of school shootings on survivors. He also talks about the Mass. Department of Elementary and Secondary Education's (DESE) audit of Boston Public Schools. Reville is the former secretary of education and a professor at Harvard University's Graduate School of Education, where he also runs the Education Redesign Lab. His latest book, co-authored with Lynne Sacks, is “Collaborative Action for Equity and Opportunity: A Practical Guide for School and Community Leaders.” Sy Montgomery talks about the dolphins using coral mucus to heal, and new research into how Asian elephants mourn the dead. Montgomery is a journalist, naturalist and a BPR contributor. Her latest book is "The Hawk's Way: Encounters with Fierce Beauty.” We end the show by revisiting our discussion with listeners on mass shootings in America.

    BPR Full Show: Fairweather Friends

    Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 165:19

    Today on Boston Public Radio: Mayor Michelle Wu takes questions from listeners on topics including the state of Boston's public schools, the latest at Mass. and Cass and failures that led to former Boston Police Union President Patrick Rose remaining on patrol after reports of child sexual assault. Wu is Mayor of Boston. Trenni Kusnierek discusses the most recent Celtics win, the murder of elite cyclist Anna Moriah Wilson and controversy over Qatar hosting the World Cup due to its anti-LGBTQ policies. Kusnierek is a reporter and anchor for NBC Sports Boston, and a weekly Boston Public Radio contributor. Then, we ask listeners their thoughts on the Celtics' playoffs run. Melissa Etheridge previews her upcoming concerts, and recalls her three months at Berklee College of Music and her experience coming out as lesbian. Etheridge is a multiple Grammy-winning singer-songwriter and activist. She's coming to town to perform at the City Winery on June 5, 6, 8 and 9. Mark Esper talks about his recent book, insights from his time working in the Trump Administration and whether he thinks Former President Donald Trump could find success running in 2024. Esper is the former Secretary of Defense under President Donald Trump. His new memoir is “A Sacred Oath: Memoirs of a Secretary of Defense During Extraordinary Times.” John King updates listeners on the state of national politics, including the recent slew of Republican primaries, and concerns over Pennsylvania Democratic Senate nominee John Fetterman's health following a stroke. King is CNN's chief national correspondent and anchor of "Inside Politics,” which airs weekdays and Sunday mornings at 8 a.m. We end the show by asking listeners whether they're ready to return to concerts this summer.

    Corby Kummer: Big Dairy's Fight for the Definition of Milk

    Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 20:29

    In their fight against the alternative milk and nut-milk industries, Big Dairy has been lobbying Congress and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to reserve the term “milk” for fluids obtained through “lacteal secretion” — and the FDA looks like it may enforce a stricter definition for “milk” soon. Chief among the National Federation of Milk Producers' concerns are that consumers are “being misled about the nutritional content of plant-based imitators relative to real dairy products.” Award-winning food writer Corby Kummer joined Boston Public Radio on Monday to share his thoughts on the situation. “I think it's ridiculous,” Kummer said. “I think anybody who buys almond milk understands it's not cow's milk.” In the wide-ranging interview, Kummer also discussed the latest news from the nation's baby formula shortage, and talked about the lack of nutrition education in medical schools. Kummer is executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

    BPR Full Show: Let's go to the beach, beach

    Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 164:30

    Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners how they're finding positivity amid a slew of bad news.  Michael Curry discusses federal funding to combat hate crimes in the wake of the Buffalo shooting, and the conflict between politics and public health as COVID cases rise again. Curry is chair of the NAACP Advocacy and Policy Committee, and is president and CEO of the Massachusetts League of Community Health Centers. Chris Burrell shares insights from his investigative reporting into the inaccessibility of Massachusetts beaches. Burrell is an investigative reporter for GBH News. The first story in his series “Barriers at the Beach” is now out, GBHnews.org. Then, we take calls from listeners about their experiences with Massachusetts beaches. Corby Kummer talks about how the baby formula shortage became so dire, and the problems with the Food and Drug Administration. Kummer is executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. Revs. Irene Monroe and Emmett G. Price III weigh in on a new report on decades of sex abuse cover-ups in the Southern Baptist Church. Monroe is a syndicated religion columnist and the Boston voice for Detour's African American Heritage Trail. Price is founding pastor of Community of Love Christian Fellowship in Allston, and the Inaugural Dean of Africana Studies at Berklee College of Music. Together they host the “All Rev'd Up” podcast. Richard Blanco reads poetry on motherhood, including his poem “Mother Picking Produce,” and “Different Mothers” by Kim Dower. Blanco is the fifth presidential inaugural poet in U.S. history. His latest book, “How to Love a Country,” deals with various socio-political issues that shadow the United States. We end the show by discussing a recent study that showed women receive higher emotional benefits from hugs than men.

    BPR Full Show: AG Maura Healey calls for resignation of Everett Councilor

    Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 165:12

    Today on Boston Public Radio: Attorney General Maura Healey answers questions from listeners, including on criminal justice reform, housing prices skyrocketing and racism from officials in Everett. Healey is attorney general of Massachusetts and a candidate for governor. Labor Secretary Marty Walsh shares insights from his move to the federal government, and takes calls from listeners on income inequality, the state of inflation, workers rights and more. Walsh is Secretary of Labor, and former mayor of Boston. James Bennett II discusses the latest news in arts and culture, including praise of the new film “Everything Everywhere All at Once,” Olivia Rodrigo's local appearance at Roadrunner and the rise and fall of comedian Dane Cook. Bennett II is GBH's arts and culture reporter. Sue O'Connell talks about the baby formula shortage, the faltering future of People Magazine's print addition and LGBTQ teachers leaving Florida in the wake of the state's “Don't Say Gay” Bill. O'Connell is the co-publisher of Bay Windows and South End News, and contributor to Current, on NBC LX and NECN. Elena Spencer and Kristo Kondakçi previews the upcoming “Symphony for Science,” raising money for the Science Club for Girls. Also, orchestra members Sophia Szokolay, Elena Spencer, Victoria Suha, Alan Toda-Ambaras and Leina Xu perform a few pieces. Spencer is co-founder, president and CEO of the Kendall Square Orchestra. Kondakçi is musical director.  We end the show asking listeners about their workplace nemesis.

    BPR Full Show: Jim Braude's Day Off

    Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 164:19

    Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners their experiences navigating a difficult housing market. Gregory Fried and Phillip Martin discuss Martin's investigation into Massachusetts' growing neo-Nazi movement, and why white supremacy is taking a hold. Martin is GBH's Senior Investigative Reporter. Fried is a Professor of Philosophy at Boston College, where he studies white supremacy. His most recent book is “Towards a Polemical Ethics: Between Heidegger and Plato.” Kara Baskin breaks down her latest stories, including on the baby formula shortage, and the work of Eleanor Forbes, who directs mental health support for Boston Uncornered, a Dorchester nonprofit working with ex-gang members. Baskin is a Food & Parenting writer for the Boston Globe, and a humor writer for McSweeney's. Shirley Leung talks about how Gen-Z is affecting the workplace, the state of inflation and cryptocurrency as an option for retirement plans. Leung is a business columnist for the Boston Globe. Maine State Senator Chloe Maxmin and Canyon Woodward shares tips on how politicians can connect with rural America, in the wake of Democratic losses in red regions. Maxmin is the youngest person ever elected to Maine's State Senate, where she serves Maine's 13th District. Woodward was her campaign manager in both 2018 and 2020. The book they wrote together is “Dirt Road Revival: How to Rebuild Rural Politics and Why Our Future Depends on It.” Jonathan Gruber explains how the potential end of Roe v. Wade would affect the economy. Gruber is the Ford Professor of Economics at MIT. His latest book is "Jump-Starting America How Breakthrough Science Can Revive Economic Growth and the American Dream." We end the show by asking listeners how they enjoy days off.