Podcasts about automobiles

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Motorized passenger road vehicle

  • 2,067PODCASTS
  • 6,382EPISODES
  • 37mAVG DURATION
  • 4DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 13, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about automobiles

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Latest podcast episodes about automobiles

Wheelbarrow Profits Podcast: Multifamily Real Estate Investment
Profiting from the Profound Demographic Shifts Ahead with Ken Gronbach

Wheelbarrow Profits Podcast: Multifamily Real Estate Investment

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 48:41


On this episode, Jake and Gino interview Ken Gronbach. Ken is president of KGC Direct, LLC and is an internationally respected demographer who has been able to forecast societal, commercial, economic, cultural and political phenomena with uncanny accuracy. Ken's unusual blend of marketing savvy and common-sense demography, based on over twenty years of proprietary demographic study, set him apart. Ken is the author of the current best-selling book The Age Curve: How To Profit from the Coming Demographic Storm. Ken's newest book, Upside: Profiting from the Profound Demographic Shifts Ahead, was published in April of 2017. Key Insights: 00:00 Introduction 02:59 Right now multifamily is the story 05:54 Getting into demographics 10:56 Generation X and baby boomers 12:55 Case in point: Levi's 16:00 Case in point: Automobile industry 21:09 Covid's impact on demographics 25:05 How can States incentivize core working population through tax 33:18 Conservatives and liberals 37:12 What's beneficial from personal finance perspective in 2022 40:12 Best-value market for multifamily 45:45 Recommended books 47:00 Wrap-up Learn more about Ken's initiatives: https://kgcdirect.com/ About Jake & Gino Jake & Gino are multifamily investors, operators, and mentors who have created a vertically integrated real estate company that controls over $100,000,000 in assets under management. They have created the Jake & Gino community to teach others their three-step framework: Buy Right, Finance Right and Manage Right®, and to become multifamily entrepreneurs. Subscribe to this channel: https://ytube.io/3McA Sign up for free training: https://jakeandgino.mykajabi.com/freetraining The resources you need to succeed at every level of apartment investing: https://jakeandgino.com/resources/ Apply for Mentorship: https://jakeandgino.com/apply/ #realestate #multifamilyrealestate #multifamilyinvesting #investing #apartmentinvesting Jake & Gino Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jakeandgino/ Jake & Gino Twitter: https://twitter.com/JakeandGino Jake & Gino Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/jake-and-gino-llc/ Jake & Gino Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jakeandgino/

Breakfast With Champions
Episode 703 with Liza Myers-Borches & Joy Farley - How To Be Friends In a Digital World

Breakfast With Champions

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 33:41


Thank you for joining us on Breakfast With Champions! Today we hear from Liza Myers-Borches & Joy Farley! Liza Myers-Borches is a 4th generation Automobile retailer with experience in growing an organization exponentially through a people-focused approach. Offering employee ownership, managing partnerships, and values based hiring, CMA has grown from 3 dealerships to 16 in the last 15 years, representing 6 markets, 700 associates and 17 franchises across Virginia. Joy Farley is a real estate broker in Charlotte, North Carolina - specializing in New Home Construction. She is known for building homes, but she is extra passionate about building hearts wherever she goes. Those that know her best call her a FRIEND COLLECTOR which is the perfect fit for her bubbly and outgoing personality. When she is not working you can find her spending quality time with friends and family, dabbling in fashion, exploring new places, spotting daily rainbows, and investing in her personal and professional development.

The Real Investment Show Podcast
What Happens when the Fed Takes Away the Punchbowl?

The Real Investment Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 47:53


The Markets' Wednesday reaction to Fed Minutes on Raising Rates was the worst on record--but was it justified? Will the Fed's panic attack result in another colossal policy blunder? A long term look at Automobile sector and chip fiascos. Is the Fed's "normalization" the right approach? SEG-1: Market Reaction to Fed: Worst Response on Record? SEG-2: Will the Fed Panic into Another Policy Mistake? SEG-3: How Does the Fed Clear Its Balance Sheet? SEG-4: The disparity between The Fed in December and Now. Hosted by RIA Advisors Chief Investment Strategist Lance Roberts, CIO, w Portfolio Manager, Michael Lebowitz, CFA -------- Watch today's full video of this show here: youtube.com/watch?v=dKmF_Ut0hS4&list=PLVT8LcWPeAugpcGzM8hHyEP11lE87RYPe&index=1&t=2556s -------- Our Latest "Three Minutes on Markets & Money: Was Wednesday's Market Sell-off All That Bad?" is here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jn6FAhBi1Vo&list=PLVT8LcWPeAujOhIFDH3jRhuLDpscQaq16&index=1 -------- Our previous show, "Why Does the Fed Always Raise Rates at the Wrong Time?" is here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S3_05oO7xhg&list=PLVT8LcWPeAugpcGzM8hHyEP11lE87RYPe&index=2&t=2585s -------- Register for the next Candid Coffee: https://us06web.zoom.us/webinar/register/9816369327340/WN_8UCalLNwRKOiI97F0L7pww -------- Get more info & commentary: https://realinvestmentadvice.com/newsletter/ -------- SUBSCRIBE to The Real Investment Show here: http://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealInvestmentShow -------- Visit our Site: www.realinvestmentadvice.com Contact Us: 1-855-RIA-PLAN -------- Subscribe to RIA Pro: https://riapro.net/home -------- Connect with us on social: https://twitter.com/RealInvAdvice https://twitter.com/LanceRoberts https://www.facebook.com/RealInvestmentAdvice/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/realinvestmentadvice/ #MarketRally #2022Market #MarketVolatility #BullishTrend #SmallBusinessDrivers #Markets #money #investing

Lance Roberts' Real Investment Hour
What Happens when the Fed Takes Away the Punchbowl?

Lance Roberts' Real Investment Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 47:52


The Markets' Wednesday reaction to Fed Minutes on Raising Rates was the worst on record--but was it justified? Will the Fed's panic attack result in another colossal policy blunder? A long term look at Automobile sector and chip fiascos. Is the Fed's "normalization" the right approach? SEG-1: Market Reaction to Fed: Worst Response on Record? SEG-2: Will the Fed Panic into Another Policy Mistake? SEG-3: How Does the Fed Clear Its Balance Sheet? SEG-4: The disparity between The Fed in December and Now. Hosted by RIA Advisors Chief Investment Strategist Lance Roberts, CIO, w Portfolio Manager, Michael Lebowitz, CFA -------- Watch today's full video of this show here: youtube.com/watch?v=dKmF_Ut0hS4&list=PLVT8LcWPeAugpcGzM8hHyEP11lE87RYPe&index=1&t=2556s -------- Our Latest "Three Minutes on Markets & Money: Was Wednesday's Market Sell-off All That Bad?" is here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jn6FAhBi1Vo&list=PLVT8LcWPeAujOhIFDH3jRhuLDpscQaq16&index=1 -------- Our previous show, "Why Does the Fed Always Raise Rates at the Wrong Time?" is here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S3_05oO7xhg&list=PLVT8LcWPeAugpcGzM8hHyEP11lE87RYPe&index=2&t=2585s -------- Register for the next Candid Coffee: https://us06web.zoom.us/webinar/register/9816369327340/WN_8UCalLNwRKOiI97F0L7pww -------- Get more info & commentary: https://realinvestmentadvice.com/newsletter/ -------- SUBSCRIBE to The Real Investment Show here: http://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealInvestmentShow -------- Visit our Site: www.realinvestmentadvice.com Contact Us: 1-855-RIA-PLAN -------- Subscribe to RIA Pro: https://riapro.net/home -------- Connect with us on social: https://twitter.com/RealInvAdvice https://twitter.com/LanceRoberts https://www.facebook.com/RealInvestmentAdvice/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/realinvestmentadvice/ #MarketRally #2022Market #MarketVolatility #BullishTrend #SmallBusinessDrivers #Markets #money #investing

Small Biz Tips with My Connections
How to retain your clients for 5 or more years with Al Navarro (Mint Advertising)

Small Biz Tips with My Connections

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 18:10


I had an amazing opportunity to connect with the team at Mint Advertising. Here is some background information on both of the founders Al and Eric: Al Navarro Al co-founded Mint Advertising after 13 years in the industry. His career began at the New York outposts of Grey Direct and J. Walter Thompson Direct, where he learned “old school” direct marketing. But things really started to happen when he moved to Rapp Collins (also in New York), where he worked on ADT Home Security, Delta Air Lines, Hyatt Hotels, and Mercedes-Benz. Al's work on the launch of the Mercedes M-Class Sport Utility Vehicle was honored with top awards in both the Caples and Addy Awards shows — and garnered response rates as high as 59%. He is probably the only agency person you will meet who has been mentioned in GQ (positively!) and Automobile magazine (twice). Eric Schoenfeld Before co-founding Mint, he was the VP of Business Development for Brann Worldwide in Wilton, Connecticut. Eric's career has carried him through the ranks of some of the world's biggest direct marketing agencies, including Rapp Collins (where, still in their mid-20s, he and Al were responsible for running over $40 million of business) and Wunderman Worldwide. He has lent his talents to clients such as ADT Security Services, Callaway Golf, Becks Beer, Sony, and the United States Postal Service. Mint Advertising Mint Advertising is an award-winning creative consultancy based in Clinton, NJ that offers a wide range of consumer and B2B marketing services. Founded in late 2002, we serve national, regional, and local brands in a wide range of industries. This episode is brought to you by AGM LinkedIn Accelerator Bundle - If you want to CRUSH IT on LinkedIn, enroll to the Best LinkedIn Online Course at: http://abrahamglobal.com/fire --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/julbert-abraham/support

Wheels Up
02x04 - Banking on Inconsistency

Wheels Up

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 85:02


Planes, Trains, and Automobiles! Oh my! In these week's episode of Wheels Up, we point out a lot of inconsistencies, James doesn't understand several points, and Bee says Minnesota weird. Welcome back to Wheels Up with an episode we expected to go up in 2021! Follow us on twitter / insta: WheelsUpPod

The People's Car
66. Here's to you 2022....or something

The People's Car

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 58:24


Winter rabbits, new ideas, snow tires and more...

TRUNEWS with Rick Wiles
Civil War Talk: Do Needle Nazis Fear Revolution When Vaccinated Discover the Truth?

TRUNEWS with Rick Wiles

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 78:19


Heart attacks and strokes are on the increase. Hospitals are overwhelmed with patients suffering heart and organ failure, and nobody knows why so many people are collapsing suddenly. Automobile fatalities are spiking in most US states. Strong, healthy young athletes are dropping dead and nobody asks why it's happening. Morticians are experiencing record numbers of funerals. And life insurance executives say they have never seen so many payouts for a record number of deaths. Is the unusual number of deaths linked to the rise in talks about a civil war in the USA? Do the Needle Nazis fear that the vaccinated will go berserk when they discover they were tricked into taking the Covid death shot? Rick Wiles. Doc Burkhart. Airdate 1/4/21.

Road Story Histoire d'Auto
LE RANGE ROVER « VOGUE » COMME LE MAGAZINE ?

Road Story Histoire d'Auto

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 7:42


Eh oui pour ceux qui ne l'ont jamais réalisé, si les Range Rover haut de gamme s'appellent « Vogue « c'est en référence au magazine éponyme. Mais revenons il y a près de 40 ans en 1981. A l'époque même si le Range Rover est déjà un véhicule haut de gamme, il n'est encore pas disponible en boite automatique, n'a pas de climatisation, sa carrosserie ne compte que 3 portes et son intérieur est en tissus. A retrouver sur https://www.histo-auto.com/fr/actualite/1370/le-range-rover-vogue-comme-le-magazine

Baby Geniuses
Automobile Folklore

Baby Geniuses

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 58:15


Hello babies!Welcome to 2022, a fresh start awaits! Lisa is trying to be a bit more bilingual, and Emily is still trying to understand why her neighbors are so awful. They also discuss some of their least favorite holiday films. On Wiki of the Week, we read the Wikipedia page for "Automobile Folklore," a list of the diverse customs and superstitions linked to that four wheeled vehicle we all love.

Breakfast With Champions
Episode 640 with Liza Myers-Borches & Joy Farley - What Impact Has 2021 Had On You?

Breakfast With Champions

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 63:53


Thank you for joining us on Breakfast With Champions! Today we hear from Liza Myers-Borches & Joy Farley! Liza Myers-Borches is a 4th generation Automobile retailer with experience in growing an organization exponentially through a people-focused approach. Offering employee ownership, managing partnerships, and values based hiring, CMA has grown from 3 dealerships to 16 in the last 15 years, representing 6 markets, 700 associates and 17 franchises across Virginia. Joy Farley is a real estate broker in Charlotte, North Carolina - specializing in New Home Construction. She is known for building homes, but she is extra passionate about building hearts wherever she goes. Those that know her best call her a FRIEND COLLECTOR which is the perfect fit for her bubbly and outgoing personality. When she is not working you can find her spending quality time with friends and family, dabbling in fashion, exploring new places, spotting daily rainbows, and investing in her personal and professional development.

MotorMouth Radio
MotorMouth Radio 20th Anniversary tribute show

MotorMouth Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 58:09


January marks the 20 year anniversary of MotorMouth Radio and Ray & Chris decided there was no better way to commemorate it than to compile show bits featuring many of the colorful listeners, callers & guests from the span of the show, as well as ALL of the co-hosts who've worked on it (six in total). Sit back and enjoy this mash-up of topics and personalities that have made us what we are, some aren't with us anymore and some are still going strong. Who knows, you may find yourself featured in this fitting tribute to a fine show.

zwoaus11 - der Tiefgaragentalk
Folge 121 - Silvester in der Garage 11

zwoaus11 - der Tiefgaragentalk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 62:28


Auch an Silvester haben wir für Euch nochmal einen Podcast aufgenommen. Wir hoffen Ihr seid gut ins neue Jahr gestartet und wir freuen uns auf viele gemeinsame Stunden in 2022.

WGN Plus - The Steve and Johnnie Podcast
Publisher of Consumer Guide Automotive Tom Appel gives the year-end review of automobile news!

WGN Plus - The Steve and Johnnie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022


Steve and Johnnie were joined by Publisher of Consumer Guide Automotive, Tom Appel, to discuss all things cars from 2021 and what to look for in 2022!

Breakfast With Champions
Episode 558 with Liza Myers-Borches & Joy Farley - What No One Tells You About Taking The Leap

Breakfast With Champions

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 61:00


Thank you for joining us on Breakfast With Champions! Today we hear from Liza Myers-Borches & Joy Farley! Liza Myers-Borches is a 4th generation Automobile retailer with experience in growing an organization exponentially through a people-focused approach. Offering employee ownership, managing partnerships, and values based hiring, CMA has grown from 3 dealerships to 16 in the last 15 years, representing 6 markets, 700 associates and 17 franchises across Virginia. Joy Farley is a real estate broker in Charlotte, North Carolina - specializing in New Home Construction. She is known for building homes, but she is extra passionate about building hearts wherever she goes. Those that know her best call her a FRIEND COLLECTOR which is the perfect fit for her bubbly and outgoing personality. When she is not working you can find her spending quality time with friends and family, dabbling in fashion, exploring new places, spotting daily rainbows, and investing in her personal and professional development.

Weary Travelers Podcast
Season 8 – Episode 6: Planes, Trains & Automobiles

Weary Travelers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 66:48


Join the fellas as they try to get home for the holidays.

Le monde bouge - Axel de Tarlé
Automobile : le boom des voitures d'occasion

Le monde bouge - Axel de Tarlé

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 2:54


Ce mardi sur Europe 1, l'économiste Emmanuel Duteil revient sur les ventes records de voitures d'occasions en France. 

L'éclairage éco - Nicolas Barré
Automobile : le boom des voitures d'occasion

L'éclairage éco - Nicolas Barré

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 2:54


Ce mardi sur Europe 1, l'économiste Emmanuel Duteil revient sur les ventes records de voitures d'occasions en France. 

MotorMouth Radio
Marty Schorr talks about Bill Kolb & the GT-40

MotorMouth Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 59:10


Ray & Chris have the immense pleasure of talking with Marty Schorr (previously of Cars magazine & Motion Performance) about his good friend Bill Kolb, a a die-hard Ford salesman, racer & a total Ford fanatic. Marty's time spent driving cars like the early Shelby's, GT-40's, and Cobras out of Bill's dealerships are stories to be awed by and listened to carefully. Marty also talks about his time as a magazine editor and V.P. as well as his future plans of writing a book about the GT-40 development.

zwoaus11 - der Tiefgaragentalk
Folge 120 - X-mas in der Garage 11

zwoaus11 - der Tiefgaragentalk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 66:23


Jens Seltrecht und Frank Otero Molanes verbringen zusammen den Vormittag des ersten Weihnachtsfeiertages und nehmen zusammen einen Podcast in der Garage 11 auf :-)

Il n'y a pas qu'une vie dans la vie - Isabelle Morizet
EXTRAIT - Poulets et automobiles : quand Philippe Katerine travaillait à la chaîne

Il n'y a pas qu'une vie dans la vie - Isabelle Morizet

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 2:03


Au micro d'Isabelle Morizet dans l'émission "Il n'y a pas qu'une vie dans la vie" samedi, le chanteur le plus loufoque de la chanson française, Philippe Katerine, revient sur son parcours personnel et professionnel. Et notamment sur la courte époque de sa vie où il a travaillé à là chaîne dans des usines.

The Midday Report with Mandy Wiener
Automobile Association of South Africa says parliament needs to audit how CEO at state-owned companies are paid

The Midday Report with Mandy Wiener

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 5:55


Layton Beard | Spokesperson at Automobile Association See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

zwoaus11 - der Tiefgaragentalk
Folge 119 - Adventskalender 2021 Tür 24

zwoaus11 - der Tiefgaragentalk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 5:17


C&T Talk - Hannah Tree Productions
C&T Talk Episode 310 - A Festivus for the Rest of Us - December 23, 2021

C&T Talk - Hannah Tree Productions

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021


The Annual Airing of Grievances followed by feats of strength. Put up your aluminum pole and join us.

zwoaus11 - der Tiefgaragentalk
Folge 118 - Adventskalender 2021 Tür 23

zwoaus11 - der Tiefgaragentalk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 4:11


Good Morning Business
Le Journal de l'économie - 22/12

Good Morning Business

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 7:23


Ce mercredi 22 décembre, Audrey Maubert et Christophe Jakubyszyn ont présenté le Journal de l'économie dont voici les premiers sujets : la production automobile mondiale est sérieusement affectée par la pénurie des composants, le gouvernement accélère sur le pass vaccinal et les plateformes en ligne se multiplient. Retrouvez l'émission du lundi au vendredi et réécoutez la en podcast.

Self-Driving Cars: Dr. Lance Eliot
Ambient Intelligence and Self-Driving Cars

Self-Driving Cars: Dr. Lance Eliot "Podcast Series"

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 5:41


AI Insider and self-driving car industry guru, Dr. Lance Eliot explains ambient intelligence and self-driving cars. See his website www.ai-selfdriving-cars.guru for further information.

On en parle - La 1ere
Question-minute: le grand et le petit service automobile

On en parle - La 1ere

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 1:42


Quelle est la différence entre le grand et le petit service automobile? La réponse de Nicolas Leuba, président de la section vaudoise de l'Union professionnelle suisse de l'automobile.

Middle Class Film Class
Muppet Christmas Carol / Ride the Eagle / Jack Frost / Macbeth / Santa Girl / The Devil Wears Prada / The Santa Clause

Middle Class Film Class

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 70:14


On this episode: The gang wraps up the year streaming live on Twitch through STAB comedy. Click the link to watch both episodes https://www.twitch.tv/videos/1237091675 We also go through our top 5 and bottom 5 movies we reviewed in 2021. Plenty of streaming picks, and gab and chatter to go around. Catch us on our next stream, every 4th Saturday of the month. In news:  Christmas movies are overrated, Hallmark, Valentines day, money laundering schemes, yenta porn, Hereditary, The Hills Have Eyes, Planes Trains and Automobiles, Addams Family Values, The Nightmare Before Christmas, Disneyland, Danny Elfman, The Movies That Made Us, The Lighthouse, Halloween, Tulsa, When Harry Met Sally, Spider-man, Far From Home, Homecoming, No Way Home, Home Sweet Home Alone for the Holidays, Michael Keaton, J.B. Smoove, Martin Starr, spoilers, Sam Raimi, >implying we can discuss kino, Jon Watts, Cop Car, Clown, Andrew Garfield, Tom Holland, The Hunt, MAGA, Harold and Maude, Punch Drunk Love, Bruce Purkey, STAB comedy theater, Adam Sandler, Under the Silver Lake, Adam Murphy, Primer, Michael Greaves, The Half Blood Prince, The Master, Joaquin Phoenix, Phillip Seymour Hoffman, The Last Black Man in San Francisco, Beasts of the Southern Wild, A Fish Called Wanda, MacGruber, Titane, Black Dynamite, The Hateful Eight, Kurt Russell, mustache rides, Super Troopers, Life is Beautiful, Roberto Benigni, Trolls World Tour, Gnomeo and Juliet, Kate, Frances Ha, Javier, Nomadland, Dune, Star Wars Episode, Rogue One, Lord of the Rings, Fellowship of the Rings, FighteroftheKnightman, Don't Tell a Soul, DigitalDaquinley, Two Towers, Rustomire, Army of the Dead, Mel Gibson, Quentin Tarantino, Pulp Fiction, Reservoir Dogs, virtue signaling, Caveman, Passion of the Christ, Willem Dafoe, Martin Scorsese, The Last Temptation of Christ, Harvey Keitel, classphemy, Destroyer, The Last Starfighter, The Human Centipede, Flogging Jesus, Demonic, Come True, Djinn, Cold Creek Manor, Dennis Quaid, Deacon Frost, Christianity vs Catholicism, Jesus wept, Riki-Oh, Sharknado, Antichrist, Lars Von Trier, Man of Steel, MilkMyth, Kabluey, Rare Exports, http://www.MCFCpodcast.comEmail us at MCFCpodcast@gmail.com    Leave us a voicemail (209) 730-6010Joseph Navarro    Pete Abeyta   and Tyler Noe    Streaming Picks:Santa Girl - Netflix **ANTI PICK**Jack Frost - Amazon PrimeAmadeus - $3.99 rental on Youtube or AmazonRide the Eagle - HuluThe Devil Wears Prada - StarzMacbeth - HBO MaxThe Santa Clause - Disney+The Muppet Christmas Carol - Disney+

zwoaus11 - der Tiefgaragentalk
Folge 115 - Adventskalender 2021 Tür 20

zwoaus11 - der Tiefgaragentalk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 4:15


zwoaus11 - der Tiefgaragentalk
Folge 114 - die zwoaus11 Community

zwoaus11 - der Tiefgaragentalk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 64:49


Tiefgaragentalk at its best :-)

Winning In Asia: A ZoZo Go Podcast
Ganesh Iyer, Global CIO & Executive Vice President, NIO

Winning In Asia: A ZoZo Go Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 43:22


Joining us on this week's Winning in Asia conversation is Ganesh Iyer, Global CIO and EVP at NIO USA. Ganesh moved to NIO in 2016 after a 5 year tenure at Tesla . Think of NIO as a Chinese company with a global DNA. The seven year old automaker founded by Chinese billionaire William Li operates from bases in Munich, London, San Jose and Shanghai. NIO differentiates itself from the competition in several important ways: On the battery front, NIO offers owners the options of fast-charging, battery swapping and even battery as a service (leasing). NIO has also developed an AI assistant named Nomi that sits on the dashboard that handles all voice commands. NIO has sold more than 150,000 premium electric vehicles since launching its first product, the ES8 all-electric SUV, in June 2017. Now, NIO is expanding into several European markets, including Norway, Denmark, Sweden and even Germany.#WinningInAsia / #ZozoGo https://twitter.com/Dunne_ZoZoGohttps://www.instagram.com/zo.zo.go/?hl=enhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/michael-dunne-a696901a/

Good Morning Business
Le Journal de l'économie - 17/12

Good Morning Business

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 6:53


Ce vendredi 17 décembre, Jean-Baptiste Huet a présenté le Journal de l'économie dont voici les premiers sujets :Airbus engrange les commandes, 400 milliards d'euros pour les sous-traitants auto, ordonnances travail : le bilan mitigé. Retrouvez l'émission du lundi au vendredi et réécoutez la en podcast.

Financial Survival Network
The Feds Doubling Up, Newly Created Currency, Extremely Negative Interest Rates - John Rubino #5355

Financial Survival Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 30:31


Summary: The Fed seems to be doubling up on their tapering—but what is going on behind the scenes? I sit down and chat with John Rubino, who breaks down what is happening with inflation and how different economical components and markets are being affected. We're seeing massively negative interest rates, and we're merely dumping less dollars into the new market; buying government bonds with newly created currency. Additionally, we see gold as a barometer within the economy, and automobile companies/other commodities seem to be doing well in these conditions. Tune in for more. Highlights: The Fed is doubling up on their tapering -They planned to buy fewer government bonds going forward (even though they still are) -We are seeing massively negative interest rates -They're just dumping less dollars into the market going forward -They're buying government bonds with newly created currency -Gold is the perfect barometer -Used cars are going for more than they would new -Car companies (and commodities in a similar boat) benefit from inflation -Automobile inventories are getting more valuable -This has been a great environment for the gold miners, but costs are inevitably rising -Buying out houses and renting them out to the masses has been part of the inflationary play -In any crisis, there are winners and losers; if you get ahead of the trends, you can be a winner -Shorting something has unlimited risk—you have to get the timing right Useful Links: Financial Survival Network Dollar Collapse All Your Stimmies Belong to Us, and More Black Friday Insights with John Rubino Here's What Will Spook Markets | John Rubino

Watch With Jen
Watch With Jen - S2: E55 - Adventures in Physical Media: Part 3 (With William Boyle + Rob & Sandi Belushi)

Watch With Jen

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 112:37


Wrapping up our Physical Media series with this third and final installment, which also brings this season of Watch With Jen to a close, I hope you've enjoyed listening to these freewheeling episodes half as much as my collaborators and I did making them as well.Continuing on from where we left off yesterday with Walter Chaw and Nikki Dolson in Part 2, today we're kicking things off with my friend (and frequent guest), the gifted novelist William Boyle discussing The Window (1949), Harold and Maude, and Heaven Can Wait (1978).Then, after he and I dissect that unexpected trio of films, I serve up a trio of a different kind in the form of a hilarious, awkward, and enlightening three-way conversation about Reds, which just so happens to be my buddy, actor Rob Belushi's mother Sandi's favorite film of all time. Enlisting Rob to not only sit down and watch it for the very first time but also, to join in for a fun, anything goes discussion of Warren Beatty's 1981 epic alongside Sandi, Rob took his task seriously, teasing and interrogating his mother in equal measure throughout our extended conversation.And following these two fun yet very different chats, you'll hear me review the recent Paramount releases of Ragtime and the new steelbook edition of the celebrated holiday favorite Planes, Trains, and Automobiles as well.A nice way to wrap up the season before I return in 2022, if you're looking for more Watch With Jen in the meantime, please be sure to check out our backlog of over 120 episodes and also join the conversation with me on Patreon or Twitter (via the user name FilmIntuition) in order to find out who and what you'll be hearing on the podcast soon. Until next time, I want to thank you so much for listening, subscribing, and supporting the show. I'm wishing you and your loved ones a very safe, happy, and healthy holiday season and happy movie-watching to you all!Originally Posted on Patreon (12/15/21) here: https://www.patreon.com/posts/59921295Theme Music: Solo Acoustic Guitar by Jason Shaw, Free Music Archive

Staying In
Hawkeye, Exit: The Game - Advent Calendar: The Mystery of the Ice Cave, and Secret Santa - Ep141

Staying In

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 61:41


00:00 - A festive crop top and a weekend at Willington's. 13:40 - Secret Santa, Part 1. 19:06 - Exit: The Mystery of the Ice Cave is an absolute treat: it has great puzzles and an excellent, slow burn narrative. It's sold out this year, but fingers crossed for another one from Kosmos in 2022. 30:18 - Secret Santa, Part 2. 35:09 - Hawkeye often plays a supporting role in the MCU but in his new series - which is Planes, Trains and Automobiles by way of The Avengers - he's put centre stage. It's a lot of fun, with a good mix of humour and action. 47:24 - Secret Santa, Part 3. 56:26 - Twenty Twenty Twix. All that, and a can of Ollie's, with Dan (@ThisDanFrost), Kris (@DigitalStrider), Peter (@XeroXeroXero), and Sam (@MrSamTurner). Interested in picking up Peter's Call of Cthulhu one-on-one scenario The Catcott Collection? You can find it via TitanMoth.com or get it direct from DriveThruRPG. We have a lovely Spotify Playlist we're constantly updating with music inspired by all the things we waffle on about. Links to where you can find us - StayingInPodcast.com Note: sometimes we'll have been sent a review copy of the thing we're talking about on the podcast. It doesn't skew how we think about that thing, and we don't receive compensation for anything we discuss, but we thought you might like to know this is the case.

Movie Time! with Ang and Ari
Episode 80 - Planes, Trains, and Automobiles Review, Nicolas Cage as Dracula, and our Favorite Fat Icons

Movie Time! with Ang and Ari

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 48:28


On today's episode of Movie Time!, we review John Hughes's celebrated holiday movie, Planes Trains, and Automobiles (starring Steve Martin and John Candy). In honor of John Candy, we offer a list of our Top Five Fat Icons. Although movie news is light this week, we discuss yet another upcoming Toni Collete movie, Tom Holland's upcoming role as Fred Astaire, and more! Tune in to hear our takes! Time Stamps: What Are We Watching: 1:45 Movie News: 5:30 Fat Icons: 16:50 Planes, Trains, and Automobiles: 24:16 Connect with us on social media: twitter.com/movietimepod instagram.com/movietime_pod movietimepod.contact@gmail.com Intro music by Dodo from the Applied Anime podcast. You can find his podcast here: Podcast: anchor.fm/applied-anime Twitter: twitter.com/appliedanime

The Next Reel Film Podcast Master Feed
2021-12-11 • Saturday Matinée

The Next Reel Film Podcast Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 62:34


Is there a problem with ABC's efforts to amp the nostalgia in “Live In Front of a Studio Audience”? You take the good, you take the bad, am I right? Trailers this week surprise us all as Mandy gets her pick in first with Spidey, Kyle brings a trailer only our Brit friends will be able to watch, and Rob brings Ritchie and a prayer. Mandy's Trailer: SPIDER-MAN: Into the Spider Verse 2 Kyle's Trailer: Last Train to Christmas Rob's Trailer: Operation Fortune: Ruse De Guerre THE LIST! Action in the Snow! What does that mean, you ask? Great question! Might be funny. Might be horrific. Might be … you know … an acorn. Also, there is some strange Christmas Story antagonism in this segment. You have been warned. Mandy's List Ice Age A Christmas Story Dumb and Dumber Kyle's List Die Hard 2: Die Harder Cliffhanger The Long Kiss Goodnight Rob's List Spies Like Us Stripes Planes, Trains and Automobiles

Sub Club
The 4 Foundational Frameworks of Consumer SaaS — Robbie Kellman Baxter, Peninsula Strategies

Sub Club

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 52:40


On the podcast we talk with Robbie about finding your super users, the real reasons for subscription fatigue, and why pricing isn't as important as you might think, especially early on.Our guest today is Robbie Kellman Baxter, consultant, keynote speaker, and author. She's advised many of the world's leading subscription-based companies, including serving on the advisory board of Strava. Her most recent book, “The Forever Transaction” is a deep dive into everything consumer subscription, and a must read for anyone in the space.In this episode, you'll learn: Identifying and attracting lifetime value customers How to get and maintain customer loyalty Three causes of subscription fatigue Why customers cancel their subscriptions Links & Resources Strava Intuit Survey Monkey Oracle The Subscription Economy Tien Tzuo: Subscribed Eric Crowley Seth Miller CrossFit Shopify Calm Matthieu Rouif PhotoRoom GoPro Elevate VSCO Robbie Kellman Baxter's Links Robbie Kellman Baxter's website Follow Robbie on Twitter Robbie's book: The Forever Transaction Robbie's book: The Membership Economy Robbie's LinkedIn Follow us on Twitter: David Barnard Jacob Eiting RevenueCat Sub Club Episode Transcript00:00:00 David:Hello, I'm your host, David Barnard, and with me, as always, RevenueCat CEO, Jacob Eiting.Our guest today is Robbie Kellman Baxter, consultant, keynote speaker, and author. She's advised many of the world's leading subscription-based companies, including serving on the advisory board of Strava. Her most recent book, “The Forever Transaction” is a deep dive into everything consumer subscription, and a must read for anyone in the space.On the podcast we talk with Robbie about finding your super users, the real reasons for subscription fatigue, and why pricing isn't as important as you might think, especially early on.Hey Robbie, welcome to the podcast.00:00:58 Robbie:Thanks for having me. I'm excited to chat with you both. 00:01:00 David:I was introduced to your work by somebody recommending your book, The Membership Economy, and it really struck me. I was so excited that you agreed to be on the podcast, because here's a book written in 2015, and we'll talk about your other book that was written more recently, but written in 2015. I was looking through it, scanning the chapters, so I bought the book. I was like, this is everything we're talking about now, thinking it's all so novel with subscription apps, but really consumer subscriptions have been around for decades. You've been working in this space way longer than any of us.So, I thought it would be really fun to have you on the podcast to talk more broadly about these principles of consumer subscriptions that apply equally to D to C subscriptions, as well as the app space that we work in. That's where I wanted to kick things off.So, how did you get your start in consumer subscriptions?00:01:57 Robbie:A couple of threads came together. I was in product-marketing for what is now called SaaS, for five years, right before I hung out my own shingle and started consulting. So, I had that background as a product manager working with software products that were being sold as subscriptions, and then as an independent consultant.My fifth client was Netflix. I fell in love with their business model, and I was wondering why isn't everybody else falling in love with their business model, too? This is amazing. Recurring revenue, predictable cashflow, the amount of data they were collecting on their customer. The fact that they're offering was just a much better way of delivering on a promise that many of us wanted delivery for, which is a professionally created catalog of video content delivered in the most efficient way possible. It meant not having to put a raincoat over your jammies to go pick up a movie, with cost certainty and no late fees.I was consulting with Netflix. I was already a customer, and a few people started calling and saying, “Hey, we heard you worked with Netflix. We want to be the Netflix of our space.” Whether that was news, or music, or bicycles, or dental pain management products, or clothes, there was a lot of interest in what it was that Netflix was doing.So, I started trying to create frameworks, trying to say, what are they doing? Which parts are applicable to other businesses, and which parts are just unique to that group of people solving that particular problem?That's really where I got started, and it turns out to be big enough and deep enough that it's kept me really busy for, it's been 20 years, 20 years. 00:03:55 David:Fifth client to, to land as a consultant. That's a. Really great. And so you were with them before they even introduced the, video on demand on the internet, right. You started with them when it was DVDs in the mail, 00:04:09 Robbie:Yeah. 00:04:10 David:Traditional D to C subscription service. 00:04:13 Jacob:But, but even then was satisfying a lot of those, almost all of those conditions. Right. I didn't have to go outside just to my mailbox, not too bad price certainty. I didn't have late fees. and then like, you know, insanely large catalog. Right. you know, it was, it was, it wasn't. We tend to wait for the technology to get that right.And then, then we had VOD being, 00:04:33 Robbie:Yeah. And they were already thinking, I mean, it was amazing to me. So I was there, you know, the time that I worked most actively with dev 2001, 2003, even during that time, which was all DVDs, all three DVDs out at a time, they were already thinking about streaming versus, you know, should they let you download it?And then have it explode after, you know, you know, some duration. What was the best way to deliver it? Should they come through your, you know, for awhile? I remember I think it came through your PlayStation or your, your we, were thinking like, 00:05:06 Jacob:My first like set top box experience with Netflix would have been on Nintendo. Yeah.00:05:10 Robbie:Yeah. I mean, so they, they were already thinking about it and I think that's a really important part of any subscription is even if your subscription works great today and it's good enough to get people to sign up the product team has to be thinking, how are we going to continue to evolve it in particular fringy? Right. How do we continue to stay relevant to these people while also having those new and improved features that bring new people in? And I think a lot of organizations. I have been taught to over-index on acquisition benefits and not thinking as much about those, the sticky engagement benefits that often are really hard to talk about credibly. Right? If I say to you, you know, sign up for my subscription, my, my video subscription, because it's the most, it's the easiest to find the next piece of content. And you're going to love our algorithm, right? People aren't going to believe you. You don't have credibility. So, all they're going to say is, oh, you have Hamilton, I'll sign up for that.And then I'll cancel. And then it's still up to you, you know, if you're Disney plus to get them from Hamilton to princess movies, national geographic titles, ESPN, all the other great stuff that they have. Star wars.00:06:26 David:I'm 00:06:26 Robbie:Yeah. 00:06:26 David:My son right now. Yeah. That's great. And then I do want to kind of step back and you're kind of right into the weeds with some really actionable advice, but I want to, I want to step back a little bit and talk more broadly. So after working with a few, companies in the subscription space and Netflix so early eventually wrote this book, The Membership Economy, which I love.Phrase and wanted to ask actually, did you, did you coin that phrase then how did you at the time and how do you still kind of define this membership economy that you wrote about. 00:06:57 Robbie:Yeah. Well, first of all, I'd love to say that, like I just came up with it and it was so natural and obvious, but, you know, I was thinking, I was like, is it, is it about subscription pricing? Is it about premium services? Is it about recurring revenue? Should I call it the recurring revenue that I was trying to think?What is it? And where I came out was it's not about the subscription pricing, which I think is a tactic. it's a tactic that you earn the right to do by having. Relationship that is trusted with your customer. The customer trusts you so much that they're like fine. You can charge me every month or you can charge me every year and I will just keep paying you and not look for alternatives.And for me, that was based on a certain kind of human relationship. And that's where I came up with this concept of membership that you belong. That it's, you're committing upfront to a long-term relationship as a vendor, and then you earn the right to have subscriptions. So that was kind of where I came up with it.I worked with Netflix. I also worked. At that time Intuit. I worked with a survey monkey and their predecessor. Uh Zoomerang and I worked with Oracle on the B2B side, and those were some of the companies that helped me sort of connect the dots and figure out how. The framework, of, you know, here's some ways to think about what happens when you treat your customers like membership members.Here's what you need to track. Here's how you need to think about it. And here's what it, what it can do for you. Honestly, the first book, all I was trying to do is say, this is a good idea. You might want to consider it for a bunch of reasons.00:08:26 Jacob:Think of it in opposites. I think it's is it the. the Zuora founder's book subscription economy,but but you're right in the sense that subscription kind of implies like 00:08:37 Robbie:Okay. 00:08:38 Jacob:Particular tactic for monetization that does go really well with this concept. But when I think of membership, as opposed to just subscription, like membership implies also community to me, right.00:08:48 Robbie:Yeah. 00:08:49 Jacob:Like building this. This, this ecosystem, this community that, that, which was then in genders trust, which then allows you to monetize, right. And and this great business model. about it in those terms, I think is a really nice way to put it as opposed to like, let's take something.Let's take something that, that we were monetizing another way and just slop noodle on it, which is something a lot in the, in the app world, this transition from paid upfront or micro-transactions driven apps to subscriptions, some have made it and some have not. And I think the ones that have made it are the ones who look at it in that light, in the membership light, in the.Earning their business repeatedly through content or through community. so I, yeah, that, that framing I think is really accurate.00:09:36 Robbie:Your point about, you know, so many companies to slap a subscription price onto whatever they already had, you know? Okay. We have a usage based model. Let's see what happens if we do a subscription based model for the same product, or let's see what happens if we take, you know, a model where you have ownership, where I download the app and it's mine, and I can use it forever, even if it's really, really obsolete.If it solves my problem, who cares, to one where you're being forced to pay every month. Yeah, extensively to get upgrades and maybe access to your peers and some kind of community functionality. It really is a different product. You need a different product for subscription than for, you know, a purchase or usage based model.And, you know, I love teens books. Subscribed is a great book. I recommend it to people. It's very, well-read has a lot of interesting ideas. but I didn't go with that, you know, subscription economy model just because I really want. To focus more on the culture and the relationship and not jump straight to let's get some of that subscription pricing stuff so that we can get a good valuation, you know?00:10:39 Jacob:Yeah. Yeah. I, it, you made me think of this one experience I had just as an anecdote was, X-Box in for three or four years ago, released an Xbox subscription. And I thought this is a really cool one because I could defer, I buy another X-Box every three or four or five years. So it was like, oh, I'll just spread that cost out.I didn't have a lot of cash at the time. I was like, this is a great 40 bucks a month. I get a new Xbox, right. And so I went in to do this at the, at the Microsoft store. What it really was, was they were giving me like a cash advance, like they were giving me, like, basically I had to get a credit check to get a subscription.And I was like, this is 00:11:12 Robbie:That's not a subscription. 00:11:13 Jacob:In mind. Exactly. Right. Like I thought I was joining the, the X-Box club and I was going to just get an expert and they're going to place my Xbox for me. Right. example. of that case of just like slapping subscription pricing on what was essentially a loan.00:11:26 Robbie:Yeah. Yeah.00:11:27 Jacob:Now my credit score, I have loan for a 19 20 16 Ford edge and a next box, on those are my two like credit items I've ever had. So it's really weird.00:11:37 Robbie:And they've come a long way. I mean, Microsoft has come a long way with their subscription strategies, you know, not just on the gaming side, but you know, with, with office 365 and you know, they've done a lot of thinking about subscription, but it really is super complicatedto, to make it work. 00:11:54 Jacob:Right? Like with software zero marginal costs or whatever you can It makes a lot of sense. will say, I will say, I want to give Microsoft some credit, back in the gaming world there Xbox game pass product product, which I also subscribed to has been amazing.I bought a new X-Box game in forever, cause I don't really care about title individuality. I just, whatever it is, $10 a month or $15 a month. And I get access to like 50 different games that rotate. Plenty. That's plenty for me. And I will probably never unsubscribe from that. Right. But it feels like a 00:12:22 Robbie:Yeah. 00:12:22 Jacob:Cause it's, software-driven, in there. There's like there's changing and there's events stuff that comes in and out and they make it a big thing. built it up into this, into this. Yeah. This kind of, it feels like a membership, as opposed to, yeah, just slapping an affirm loan on an X-Box purchase, basically.00:12:39 David:I do want to step back to your, to your book, The Membership Economy, and, I love the subtitle. Find your super users, the forever, transaction and build recurring revenue. finding super users is something we've actually talked a lot about here on the podcast. So looking for those cohorts, one of our recent podcast, guests, Eric Crowley.Talked about locals versus tourists. Seth Miller, another recent podcast guests talked about how, you know, figuring out these cohorts was just a huge unlock for their business. so what's your process? How do you recommend clients find these super users and how do you think about these, super users?You mentioned all the way back in 2015 before any of us were thinking about these things.00:13:24 Robbie:Yeah. Well, so for me, what I think about with super you. So I think about, you know, anybody does subscriptions knows. Segmentation is like re like the most important thing. You have to know who your customer is. Not just at the moment of acquisition, what they look like. You know, when you're like, that's the person I want, but how are they going to behave once they join?The moment of transaction becomes the starting line for understanding your customer, not the finish line. What like, oh, we knew them well enough to get them to buy it. We knew them well enough to get them to buy. And then to get them to make this a habit and then to get them to go deeper and to stay for a long time and maybe even bring their friends.So, you know, the first thing I always do with my clients, I say, let's focus on who you're, who you're making the problem. What is the promise you're making, who are you making it to? and that's kind of part one. And then we map out the journey. What is it? What is the goal that they have that is ongoing or the problem that they have that is ongoing?And what are the moments on their journey where you might be able to intervene and help. Right. So in the beginning it might be just one or two places, right? I'm I'm, I'm QuickBooks. I help you at tax time, but then it might be, oh, and I'm going to help you with some other key moments in your process of adulting financially.Right. You know, one of the things is you move at your parent's house and you pay your own taxes. Another is you might take out a loan for that. Awesome. You know, for whatever car you said, you know, you're going to get an, get a car and you need a loan and you know, they can help you. And so you're layering in those different beds.On a journey cause you want them to stay. You want to keep providing value. and then once you know what that person looked like, then you go tell your marketing team to go get lookalikes, get more people like that. Super users goes one step beyond that, which is not only are they great customers, you know, high customer, lifetime value, easy to serve, whatever.They also were putting their own money and effort, their own resources into strengthening your model. So these are people that bring in. These are evangelists who bring in other members. These are people who give you feedback on your products and services, which sometimes doesn't feel like a gift, but always is a gift.And it's, people who are willing to help onboard. New members. Right? So the ones that, you know, explain in the user group, you know, that, you know, this is, this is how you use that product, or this is, this is my workaround, or this is, you know, what was hard for me and how I fixed it. So those people, you know, that make referrals, that that speak out on your behalf that gather, you know, others they're so valuable.And I got really into this idea actually with CrossFit. my sister is a, is a big CrossFitter and watching her. in addition to all the money she was spending to, to be a member of this CrossFit box, the amount of time and effort she was spending to onboard new members to invite them over. When the, when the box was closed, she and her husband would put out their equipment on their live on a cul-de-sac.They put it all out on the street and invite the whole box, come over and get their workout done there because they love the community so much, right. Their own time and money to support the community.00:16:27 David:There kind of specific, Ways, especially digitally like, with, with or customer service, what are the tools that, that you see people be successful in finding those kinds of users and understanding those patterns and who they are and what they 00:16:45 Jacob:Yeah. 00:16:45 David:Like. And those sorts of things. 00:16:47 Robbie:So the, the starting point, I think is always lifetime customer value. So. You look at the group of customers who stay the longest and spend the most right. And the ones that people would say, we wish we could make more of these, you know, and then you look, you develop hypotheses. What does this group share?And it can be as simple as writing the names of your first 10 customers on a boards. These are the 10 customers we had. These five have been awesome. These. You know, didn't stick around long canceled, complain a lot, you know, whatever the reason is. And then you try to come up with what is, what did this group share that this group doesn't share?That's the simplest way in a, in a data world where you have the data you're doing the same thing, but digitally, how did they onboard? What was the source of the lead? what time of year? Like which cohort are they in? Did they join? You know, people like, for example, with QuickBooks people that join in tax season, Might be behave very differently than people who join as a new year's resolution or who joined in August.Right. What kind of person starts thinking really hard about managing their money in August? Great. you know, so, so looking for those things, developing hypotheses, looking at the data, trying to say what's the difference between our most valuable customers and our not most valuable customers, which is not your worst customers, because your worst customers are often outliers, but just the ones where you're like, they're just not that good.They came for two months, they left, they binged, they used up, you know, they were using us really heavily for six weeks. And then they left. What's different about them than the ones who continue to use this gradual. For five months. and I think that's where the hypotheses come out and then tactically, what you do after, you know, as you look at the difference in onboarding those different groups and you optimize your onboarding experience.To build those habits and then you mark it. This is often requires a tremendous amount of discipline. You mark it to only attract the high value people and not to attract the others. So if I walk into McDonald's with a gown on with my husband and I say, it's our 20th anniversary, show us to your finest team.Give us the best you've got. And we'd like a nice bottle of champagne, right? Customer's not always right at McDonald's. Right. They're not going to say, oh man, Robbie needs champagne. Somebody scraped down to the seven 11 and you know, get a bottle of Prosecco and you know, we'll try to pass it off. They say, that's not really what we do here.Dummy. They might not say dummy, but they might be thinking it, right. That's not what we here, you know 00:19:10 Jacob:The 00:19:12 Robbie:Right. We're here, you know, we're cheap, we're fast. It tastes good. Your kids love it. You can drive through and eat it. But we don't do, we don't do special occasion stuff. And so they know who they are.Right. And they're okay with me not coming in. Right. They're even okay with me saying, by the way, don't go to McDonald's, it's a terrible place to celebrate your anniversary. Right. They're kind ofCause it. 00:19:32 Jacob:Just all 00:19:33 Robbie:Right. The leaning is terrible. It makes your skin look awful. You know, the point is that if they took care of. Right. What am I going to do? I'm going to tell you, you know what, just go there for your anniversary. Just tell them it's your anniversary. They'll run out and get all the stuff you need. Right? And then they have all these people that are expensive to serve. Right? It's the same thing digitally, right? If you bring in the wrong people who are going to binge on your content in the first month, or the people who are going to push you to create features that nobody needs, except that.Right. It's just going to throw your whole business off in the wrong direction. So having that discipline upfront to know what you do and you don't do well. And to say no to some prospects, it's really hard to say no to prospects, right? If they have money and they're like, just add this feature and I'll pay.You know, Netflix in the early days, a lot of people wanted them to have video games. Right? Video games were also on discs seems easy, right? As an outsider, as an expert, right? I'm like, ah, video games, same thing. Video games work in a totally different way. And what Netflix said is we don't really understand how people would view.Games. We don't understand how they've use them. We don't understand how many we need. We don't understand how they value that. We don't understand how to negotiate terms with gaming companies, but that's a whole different thing we're going to, we have plenty of runway here. Just focusing on video content.00:20:51 Jacob:Yeah, it's, it's really interesting that, that, that feeling as a founder, especially true in SaaS, when you have literally 10 customers and like you will do 00:20:59 Robbie:Yeah. 00:21:00 Jacob:For the, your 11th, it's a little bit true in consumer. Two in the early days, like you, you're just kind of like, how do I get the funnel bigger?How do I, how do you, I think you are a little bit myopic on, the top of the funnel and not thinking about this long-term thing, partially because we don't have a lot of data. You launched your app six months 00:21:19 Robbie:Yeah. 00:21:19 Jacob:Trying to make decisions on customer lifetime value. And you don't really have a good sense because you don't know who's sticking around.You probably don't have a ton of data, but one thing you said. That really got my gears turning was that of putting them on a board and just looking at them, looking at the 10 customers or whatever it is, a hundred, even in consumer SaaS, where you have hundreds of 00:21:37 Robbie:Yeah, 00:21:38 Jacob:So it's not that many, you can grab it.You'll be surprised at how many things I've in my old days in consumer's house of like just clicking into a customer and just watching how they use the app, like an individual, right. It doesn't, not data, but it gives you hints and you can start there. And then, and 00:21:54 Robbie:Yeah. Hypotheses, right? 00:21:55 Jacob:Yeah. Hypothesis. And then you actually talk to those people, if you can, like get them on the 00:22:00 Robbie:Yeah. 00:22:00 Jacob:Surprised what they tell you. One of our, our guests Matthew and photo room a few weeks ago talked about, they would take their app to McDonald's and just show it to people to keep the McDonald's references going, and get like in-person feedback.And that helped them learn, you know, they, they were, they were an app that thought that. For everybody and find out later that they're actually like, kind of like a pursuer app for Shopify people, people 00:22:23 Robbie:00:22:24 Jacob:And people with, with e-comm and, and that like kind of exploded their business for this exact case.You're talking about where they found out. Okay. Yeah. We're not for this entire, like long tail of low intent users where for this really core set, but that can be really scary if that sets kind of 00:22:39 Robbie:It's always scary to niche down, but it's almost always. a good strategy. And I wanted to tag onto something else that you said, Jacob, which I think is really important. People often say, how can I make any decisions about, you know, based on, you know, who has the highest customer lifetime value?When, you know, we've only been around for three months or six months, we have to wait until they leave. Hopefully not for three years or five years, but what I've found. And, you know, I wonder if you've seen the same thing. Most people who leave leave in the first two months. So what you really want to do is optimize for onboarding, you know, are they adopting habits that look like people who are steady users getting value, and you can often tell that in the first month, by how many people drop off by who stays and buy, you know, are they bingeing or are they using it in kind of a normal way? And so you don't have to wait for 18, 18 months or however many periods, a lot of it, you get your answer right away. Do they cancel at the end of the first period?00:23:43 Jacob:Yeah, it's good to think about your product in terms of not just. Like signups and getting through the end of onboarding, like that day one experience, but think about what hooks are like, what are the things that people are actually investing contingent on? I always think that that's, that's a, know, you think about this long-term relationship, giving users, in your product to invest and to give back and to connect, like putting in 00:24:05 Robbie:Yeah. 00:24:06 Jacob:Themselves.Like there's passive usage consumption. Netflix does a good job. Like you can save, listen stuff that they do a lot of this just in passively, right? Like you consume content and they learn about you and then they have a profile. but I think some of the best apps, like let put in and that's going, gonna also not only probably make them stickier users, but also it gives you early indications and some things to hook on and be like, okay.I mean, Dropbox, this was a big thing in Dropbox. This story. they, they could get people to like understand the concept, but we had massive product issues, getting people to put a file in the thing, right? Like 00:24:41 Robbie:Yeah. 00:24:42 Jacob:Not necessarily the most user friendly thing. Like is some sort of app that runs in the background whenever they would, they did, they pulled users in, they watched them do it and totally fail.And then they fixed the product. Right. and, that's, that's. core product problem, but it relates to this this story of getting somebody to membership, right? Like getting them 00:25:00 Robbie:Yeah 00:25:00 Jacob:And focusing on that.00:25:02 David:One of the things that you talked about in your most 00:25:05 Robbie:No. 00:25:05 David:That I think, is so important to understanding the activation. Is is this concept of a forever promise. And so, so your most recent book that forever transaction we'll we'll link to in the show notes and whatnot. but in order to activate, in order to even just build a business, especially a subscription business, you need to start with Promise that you're going to make to customers. and then, especially again, like you said earlier to justify recurring payments, like, so tell me how you think about a forever promise and how, how any app, any business that wants to set up recurring payments should be thinking about this forever promise.00:25:47 Robbie:Yeah, it's, it's really simple. You take a step back and you say, when my customers come to. What is the ongoing problem they're trying to solve, or what is the ongoing goal they're trying to achieve and how can I best align my product and my messaging with that goal, that ongoing goal or that ongoing problem.So what can I promise them about it? So with a Netflix, it's about, you know, entertaining. You know, I'm going to provide you with the biggest selection of professionally created video content delivered in the most efficient way, right. With cost certainty. you're never going to have to pay extra fees and you know, there's a lot of, a lot of apps that are around.You know, helping you with some part of your business process, getting a certain kind of work done or tracking your finances or creating beautiful images for, you know, personal use for your hobbies. What have you gaming apps for fun? And I think first getting really clear on what your promise is and who you're making it to, and then you design the features and benefits to support them.Forever on their journey. And you say, as long as you continue paying me regularly, I am going to continue improving the way I deliver on my promise to you. Right? If I'm a gym, I'm going to have new equipment, I'm going to have new classes. I might offer you stuff online. If I'm news source, I'm going to offer it maybe through an app.Maybe I'm getting the access to the journalists. Maybe I'm getting, get the access to conferences or webinars on top of news because. My promise is I'm going to help you understand the world around you so you can make better decisions. And I don't have, like, if you even think about that promise, There's nothing about that promise that makes you say it needs to be a newspaper, right?It could be a conference. It could be classes, it could be a community of like-minded people sharing their learnings and their observations. So why not layer all of that in over time so that you get closer and closer to guaranteeing that they're going to get the impact that they hoped for on an ongoing basis.00:27:55 Jacob:It's interesting. in some ways relates to like what a company mission can be for a different audience. Right? You say, you know, revenue has as a mission. And that's one thing that I won't change, right. That that's kind of what we do. And that's part of joining the company and whatever. But, but I do think there's value in communicating that as well.This is like the customer facing version of that. Like, what's our 00:28:15 Robbie:Exactly. 00:28:16 Jacob:Charter. Like, why are we here? And what can I 00:28:18 Robbie:Right, 00:28:19 Jacob:That's not going to change. Right. It, especially when you think in those terms of not the like person who's coming to do a very quick transactional thing as in, I'm going to binge you put it, or maybe I just some trying this out, or I have this like one limited life or limited pain, like a limited time pain. Like what's 00:28:35 Robbie:Yeah. 00:28:36 Jacob:Engagement that we're going to do, is really interesting ground when I read the, framing of just the forever transaction forever promise. It's really exciting because we have the infrastructure for the first time in human history to really make this efficient at scale that like computers can do these sort of like, patronage relationships for us.Yeah. And, rethinking how we frame and, and relationships with customers, I think. Yeah. I mean, it's some of the work are a bit ahead of us on.00:29:05 Robbie:Yeah. Well, I mean, I, you know, I've been here a lot. Like I got here first cause I was here for a long time, but you know, it kind of a dubious distinction, but you know, I think you're right. Like you step back and you say, what are the problems? What's the ongoing problem. The ongoing problem is I'm constantly running out of laundry detergent.Right? The ongoing problem is I look in my closet and I have nothing to wear for this occasion, whatever this occasion might be. Right. you know, something that I think is really interesting to think about, you know, Amazon. Talks about removing all friction from all buying decisions, right. They started with just books.Right. And you still have to wait two weeks to get the book right when you ordered it, but they had this. All the different friction in all the different buying decisions. We're just going to, you know, layer by layer. We're gonna remove all of those things. And, you know, at some point, you know, I think they want to get to the point where I think to myself, those are really cool headphones that Jacob's wearing.I wish I had those. And before I even say. They're on my ears. And then I'm like, oh, these are uncomfortable. And they make my hair look bad. They're gone. Right. That it's almost magical. That's what they're moving to. No friction. I don't even have to say a word. It just happens. you know, I think having that kind of guidance of like, that's what we're trying to do, there's so many times when I've gone shopping and I've needed something, whether it's like buying a new house or buying a white blouse for an event and thinking this shouldn't be that hard.I have enough money to pay for. I know exactly what I need it for. And I've already spent four hours or four months, or in the case of buying a house for years, trying to find, you know, the needle in the haystack. It should not be this. When, when you say it should not be this hard, that's probably00:30:46 Jacob:An 00:30:46 Robbie:Good, 00:30:47 Jacob:Opportunity. 00:30:48 Robbie:Opportunity.Yeah, 00:30:49 Jacob:No, I I'm. I mean, I'm just sitting here thinking about revenue. Cats are, you know, this is a shameless plug time to talk about my company, but, I think about our forever promise and we, our mission is like we help developers make more money. That's our goal. but I almost think that. Kind of like a short, pithy way of like phrasing. It really it's about how do we remove the way he put his barriers? Like, how do we remove all the barriers for a developer to make money? How do we remove all the for a developer to value with software for other people? and often like people see a lot of these.Yeah. Subscription, infrastructure problems, data problems, all these, all these things are not why somebody got into it. Right. When they started Netflix, it wasn't like, I just can't wait to do like cohort analysis. 00:31:35 Robbie:Okay. 00:31:35 Jacob:Like all these things, it's like, no, we want to deliver entertainment to people the easiest way possible.And so, you know, for us, like, In some ways, our particular problem that we're, we've committed and, and going to the forever thing to, you know, our product is, it's a subscriber, it's a, it's a subscription essentially. but it's a long-term commitment by the nature of it. It's very infrastructure-related so like I've always talked how to, you know, is there something the early days had to give a lot of assurances to folks like yeah.We're, we're sticking around like, yeah, this is, 00:32:06 Robbie:Yeah. 00:32:07 Jacob:The long-term goal for us. But I think, I think that comes down to consumers too. Like the best companies I've seen. In our space doing consumer software apps, subscription apps essentially have like a really deep connection to the mission. And the problem I think of calm, I think of, 00:32:24 Robbie:Yeah. 00:32:24 Jacob:Photo room, this app, we work with that the, you know, they've been in vision, computer vision, and they've worked for GoPro and they've just, this is in their DNA to 00:32:34 Robbie:00:32:35 Jacob:Of image manipulation.And then, and then on the other spectrum of that, you think of. Companies that are just stamping out, don't know anybody ever heard that company stamping out utility apps or like whatever it is, and then slapping a subscription thing on it. Yeah, it works. I'm going to get marginally more LTV than they were, you know, before, but 00:32:54 Robbie:Yeah. 00:32:54 Jacob:Not going to, that's 00:32:55 Robbie:Yeah. 00:32:56 Jacob:The level of like computer or like problem solving for consumers that we were then we were doing before.00:33:02 Robbie:I think you have to be really passionate about the customer needs and the customer's journey rather than on your product. And this is, this is always a really rough conversation because a lot of businesses, really, really, really hold their products in high regard, whether it's. Automobiles or, you know, software, I mean, software, you know, most companies around here in Silicon valley, like the software team, they run everything.Like that's, that's the talent and everything, you know, they can build what they want. And, you know, I, I used to joke that, you know, when you work with. The car world, right? Sometimes it's just about the cup holders, right? It's not about, it's not about the big engine, right. Which is what a lot of the people, a lot of people go into the world of cars, automotive because they love cool cars, but a lot of people who buy cars.Don't buy cool cars. They buy practical cars that solve certain problems for them. And you have to be passionate about the problems you're solving for the customers. That again. So I did a lot of work early on with, in my sort of subscription life in the high-end bicycle industry. I was working with the bicycle product suppliers association, really, really interesting space.But one thing about it is that most people who own bike stores and work in bike stores and sell bikes and manufactured by. Our bike researchers and off-road, you know, risk-taking bike enthusiasts that have nine bikes at home, there's a whole huge untapped market of people who just need a bike to get to school or a bike to get to work or a bike for, for Saturdays to go to the farmer's market.And they ask really annoying questions at the bike store. Like, does this come in pink or can I get a basket for this? Or, this going to get em, you know, Reese on my, on my work pants and at some point, even, you know, like there's always this tension because the people who create the products, sometimes they're like those aren't problems I want to work on.Right. Or, you know, I worked in the hospital, you know, kind of in the, in the, in the health industry. And I talked to a lot of surgeons and they're like, yeah, you guys can do whatever you want around customer, this customer that treating customers like patients, whatever. But I want to see my patient unconscious on a table and I'll cut them open and I'll fix them and make them better.And I don't want to do all that other stuff. Right. it's hard because they're the talent. you know, I think this is a big issue with subscriptions because those Mark Key elements, aren't always the thing that's going to drive engagement, retention.00:35:30 Jacob:It's falling in love with your own product, right. It's falling in love with the 00:35:33 Robbie:Yeah. 00:35:34 Jacob:And not the problem, you know? you 00:35:37 Robbie:Exactly. 00:35:38 Jacob:I mean, I've been in the, you know, in the past, when I was in the weeds, like you start to really over it. I think analytics can actually like be, this is where, yeah.Back to the discussion of like, just throw 10 users on the board and maybe don't like, get the finest. Tooth comb to like go through your data. First is like, when you have like super high fidelity data on everything, you can start to get really data oriented. But if your product is the thing, collecting the data, you sort of inherently bias the data collection you're doing based on the product you have.You miss a lot of opportunities because you're not just thinking about the problem space. I worked on this app called elevate, which was training, and I can remember so many. So many like heated discussions about, this flow, should we do this or X and Y and Z. And not as many as we should have had about like, why are people actually coming to this app like addressing those questions from like head-on, and thinking about ways that we can improve the product with that.The beginning. And I haven't seen that revenue cat too. Like we have a lot of which are really deep and rich and people use and they're in love with, and we can, you know, you can spend a lot of brain power and a lot of focus thinking about the next iteration of that thing. The re yeah, like you said, the, the, the, the bike shop owner who's really into bikes are like really into some particular technology touch with.Yeah, these bigger things, it's like forever promise this, like, what are we actually building? Like what does revenue cap mean? And in a decade when the problems we're solving now, actually, maybe aren't that relevant the case. We've talked a lot about media companies and I almost snuck in a metaverse joke.And now I will just refer to OMA 00:37:14 Robbie:Yeah. 00:37:15 Jacob:Joke your headphones, but like, Yeah, we think about this as like modes of consumption are going to be changing. that's where these, like, missions, customer mission or forever promises kind of come in. It's like making sure that regardless of a Netflix delivered on a DVD or on a streaming set top box, or into some sort of like brain 00:37:34 Robbie:Okay. 00:37:35 Jacob:Like this, the subscribers will transfer.Right. 00:37:38 Robbie:Yeah. 00:37:39 Jacob:Yeah. And this is one of my, like now I'm now I'm ranting, but think is one of the reasons I'm still really excited about all of these pieces coming together, is because it does just feel like we've reached some stage in our economy where we can align a lot more incentives this way.Then maybe we have been able to in the past, which I think is just exciting.00:38:00 David:But as we align those incentives and people get more and more subscriptions. Nice little transition there. Thank you, 00:38:07 Jacob:That's great. David, you're getting this podcasting thing, like really turning it in.00:38:11 David:There is a growing, chorus of, but subscription fatigue, People are tiring of all these subscriptions and no matter how much you can align incentives And everything else, people are just not going to want to pay subscription. So having, having seen the, the growth in subscription, consumer subscription starting way back at Netflix in the early two thousands, and now we are layering on more and more and more.What what's your perspective on this, this concept of subscription fatigue, our consumers really tiring of, paying in this way. 00:38:49 Robbie:Yeah. So the upside of, you know, this explosion and subscriptions is that consumers, and actually businesses alike are much more receptive to subscription offerings. They understand them, they understand the value they can provide if they're done. Right. and they're easier than ever before for any kind of company.You know, from the smallest mom and pop up to the, you know, the biggest multinationals to offer subscription pricing. The downside is there's this glut of subscriptions. Every company has them and not all of them are well-designed as, as we've been discussing. and that leads to subscription fatigue, and, and there's sort of three things.Contribute to that. One of them is where these, the product does not justify subscription pricing, right? This is a product I'm going to need once and you're requiring me to subscribe to it. That feels unfair. you know, or I'm never, I'm hardly ever going to use this in. You're making me subscribe, even though, you know, my use case doesn't justify that investment.Second problem is kind of the flip side of that, which I think of the subscription overwhelm or subscription guilt, which is. This great value. Actually, your product is fantastic, but I can't use all the value because of my own issues. And that makes me feel bad about myself. Like this is when you, you know, you have the new Yorker magazine piling up on your bedside table.Right. And you just cause you just want to Netflix and chill cause you're tired. But like your thought at the beginning of the day is I'm going to get so smart. I'm going to read all these great. That makes you feel bad about yourself, you can't, you know what I would suggest for example, that a new Yorker does is to educate consumers, that you only have to read one or two articles to get the full value of your subscription.It's all you care to consume, not consume all of it or you're, you're lazy. but I think that overwhelm, or, you know, same thing with blue apron where the meal kits are in your fridge and you're not using 00:40:34 Jacob:No, Don't even fatigue. it's a rough subject.00:40:39 Robbie:Yeah. Cause you feel bad, like the meals are calling to you and you're like, don't go out with your friends. 00:40:44 Jacob:Yeah. 00:40:44 Robbie:In the fridge. Don't be a waster. 00:40:47 Jacob:With my spouse about cooking because we have the giant meal kit to do. but it's great. I love the time.00:40:53 Robbie:Yeah. So then, and then, and then I think the last one, I mean, but it's, it's great. Cause it's not the fault. The meal is great. It's I don't feel like eating it today or someone invited me over for like the crazy one is when someone invites you to dinner. And so then it's not even a question of finances.You're like, well, either way, I'm not going to have to spend any more money and I'm going to get a delicious dinner. Do I want to make the blue apron dinner or go to my friend's house? Who just invited me? Well, I can't go to my friend's house because I feel bad throwing the blue apron in garbage 00:41:19 Jacob:To, the lettuce is going to be wilted by the next by tomorrow.So. 00:41:22 Robbie:Day I can cook. And then the last issue, so there's there's know, bad product-market fit. There's this subscription overwhelmed or subscription guilt. And then the last one is hiding the cancel button. And I'm really interested in what you guys think about that one. Cause a lot of subscriptions, make it really hard for you to get out of this.Cancel anytime relationship, even though. That's what they pitched. Join and cancel any time. If you can find the cancel button, which we've hidden behind 27 clicks with a call us on Tuesday, you know, extra hurdle.00:41:54 Jacob:Yeah, I think it's, well, my take is it's terrible. And anybody that does, it should really reevaluate what they're doing in software. Cause like, I think it violates that trust, right? Like, welcome. We're going to ask for this thing where you're gonna you're you're gonna let us charge. We're just going to suck money out of your bank account every month, because you've decided to like enter this relationship with us and then we're going to go ahead and betray that trust.Right. We can turn around and betray that 00:42:16 Robbie:Yeah,Advantage. 00:42:17 Jacob:But, yeah, I hadn't. Thought of fatigue in so many channels like that are so many aspects, but like the, the overwhelming aspect is interesting. And I resonate. I feel that, like, I feel that with, with dinner boxes, for sure, but even in software too, there's certain pieces of software.Like, I feel like, ah, I can't cancel it cause I have these intense and things like that. And that's not really what you want to, those, aren't the relationships you want to focus on. Right? Like so. 00:42:40 David:Side there, I think like I use this example a ton, but, Visco, I'm not a daily user. I'm not even necessarily a monthly user, but when there's a photo of my kids or just a photo, I took that I really cherish. I important into Visco and Fisco makes it better. And that to me is so valuable that I didn't even care.I mean, 20 bucks a year, I think is too cheap for their product. I would pay a lot more, even though I maybe only use it quarterly sometimes, or maybe once a month or, you know, when I'm on vacation, maybe I use it every day for a week, but it's interesting that that product. Doesn't create that sense of, oh, I'm not getting enough value out of it because I get so much value when I do. Yeah, maybe. Yeah. Maybe if it were $60 a year, it would be too much. But I mean, I just, I just would never consider canceling because I it's just, when I have a photo I care about, I take it to Bisco and it's better and it like, that's their forever promise and it just resonates so well with me that I don't, I don't get that, guilt you know, I get more than $20 a year of value out of 00:43:49 Jacob:00:43:50 Robbie:Yeah, I think, I mean, it's interesting. I think one of the things about this, you know, sort of dealing with subscription overwhelm is, you know, is it framed like whatever the customer is, anchoring their pricing to. where they say it's valuable enough. So, so for example, I worked with, one of these produce box companies, and one of their challenges was that most of their customers said that most weeks they ended up throwing something away.Right. Because it's never the exact right amount of produce. Right? So you end up at the end of the week with like soggy kale or, you know, turnips, and then you go on vacation and you come back and they put them into with these turnips. But one of the things that we did is we set expectations. That it's okay to throw out a little bit of produce that you're still getting a better price than you would at the store.And you're still supporting farmers, local farmers. So sometimes it's as simple as just reframing what the expectation is like saying for Visco. You know, if you, if you use, you know, if you use this for two or three, you know, memory pictures a year, You know, doesn't that pay for itself in 20 bucks worth, you know, three great shots of your life.You know, the three best moments of 2021. a lot of it is about, is about, I think, expectation setting and understanding your customer and what the value is. Like. I don't know how much I pay for Amazon prime. I don't care.00:45:05 Jacob:Yeah, 00:45:06 Robbie:I it almost every 00:45:07 Jacob:I 00:45:07 Robbie:Mean, I don't. 00:45:08 Jacob:A decade ago and haven't thought about really 00:45:11 Robbie:Right. But I use it every day. Like I don't care what it costs. I mean, if they start charging $3,000, I would care. But like, if it's a hundred dollars a year or $85 a year or $115, I don't care. And that's a really important point about pricing is that at least I've found with many of the subscription companies I've worked with and a lot of, you know, software products when they don't sell well, when their business isn't growing, they immediately jumped to the. Must be too expensive. We'll have to lower our price. But in so many cases, it's not about the price. It's about the value. I'm not using it. If I'm not using it, it doesn't matter if it's a dollar or a hundred dollars. and so thinking about why aren't they using it before you jump right to, well, I guess I'll take 10% off the top.00:45:56 David:Yeah, let let's let's talk pricing real quick.Cause you, you do have several strategies that you get through in the book and in what you were, what you were just explaining was one of the things I really took away from your book. is it you say in the book that it's more important to understand product-market fit and willingness to pay than finding the exact right price.And so you, you were, you kind of backed into explaining that, but let, let's elaborate a little bit. And essentially what you were just describing was that a product that doesn't have product-market fit, it doesn't matter what you price it. You know, what are, what are your, what else, what are your thoughts on that?00:46:36 Robbie:Yeah. I, I just think, I mean, in so many things in life, you're kind of on a continuum. Like, you know, I remember when many years ago I started doing weightlifting and, you know, I told people that I was doing it to be more fit and you know, stronger, and now it's very common, but at the time a woman doing weightlifting, you know, working out with weights and people would say to me, I don't want.Huge muscles. And I was like, oh honey, you are so far from that being a problem. Like we're at the other end of the continuum. Like there are certainly people, women who work out and get too muscly and that's not what they want men to wear. Like then it intervenes with my ability to do my sport. But for most people it doesn't just happen.And I think in the world of apps, I think most people. Kind of over index on pricing and think that that's going to be the key thing to figuring this out. When a lot of times there's actually a pretty big gap between, you know, kind of where you can make money and where your customer is willing to pay there's lots of room, lots of different prices. And as long as you launch somewhere in that. You're going to make some money and over time, there's lots of ways to become more sophisticated and get to a better and better price point. But a lot of people assume that if they have a highly elastic product, meaning that for every dollar you increase your pricing.Your number of customers drops by a predictable percentage. And I think in many cases for a lot of products that are inelastic, if I use it, I'll pay anywhere between five and $10 month. And if I don't use it, I will pay nothing. And so if you notice that people aren't are canceling and they're the same people who aren't using the product, it's probably not a pricing problem.It's probably a product problem.00:48:17 Jacob:Right. I mean, if you're talking about product-market fit and a forever relationship like that, I'm going to pay incident money in terms of my lifetime. Right? Like I'm going to pay 00:48:27 Robbie:Great. Right. And it's, and the thing is that people assume like, so what I would say is if. If you're trying to figure out your first price, I'd say, don't worry about it too much. if you need to do a land, grab like a Spotify priced low and you can raise your price later, although that's hard, but just do it cause you, you want people to adopt your solution.If you're worried about, you know, hurting your core business, And so, you know, then start by pricing really high and you can lower it as you have increased confidence and understanding of use case. But there's a lot of room in there and that's really, my advice is be somewhere in that range. And if people aren't buying it or aren't staying.Look for the other signs of what might be driving it besides pricing, like, is it that they, you know, failure to launch? They never onboarded. They never activated, they never used the best features. is it that they were using it for a while and then their usage trickled off. Maybe they used it up, right?Either they binged or, you know, they've watched everything they've seen, maybe their job changed. So these features are no longer relevant to their work, but really try to be a detective about where the problem is like. it's like you have a party, in a bar you're not making money from the party in the bar. Like before you lower the price at the front door, see like, are people walking by and not recognizing that you have a party, so you have nobody in there because that's an awareness problem or is it that people come in the front door and can't find their way to the food and drink and music. And so they think it's a lame party is that they leave and they never come back.You know, that's an onboarding problem. Is it that they've been eating all the food and dancing to all the music and they're like, I'm tired of these songs. I'm tired of this food, which is a different kind of product problem, product assortment problem. Or is it, I went downstairs to the food and there was no food and the music, you know, the speakers weren't working and that's an operational issue.Right. So fix the problems before you drop the price.00:50:20 David:That's such...00:50:21 Jacob:I mean I think about it, if you have product-market fit, you're going to go this way (up and to the right on the curve). All the price is going to do is maybe define that inflection on that curve. Exponential curves, the slope doesn't matter often all that much in the longterm. You can optimize it eventually, but it's really getting that product-market fit. Then it just takes care of itself.00:50:52 David:That that is a great bit of advice to wrap up on.Your book, The Forever Transaction, is fantastic. Reading it was so fun just to think about—we put our blinders on with this podcast and in the space we work in with apps—but realizing that so many of the ideas that we think about, so many of the problems we work on, are things that are across the entire industry, across all consumer subscriptions, even a lot of overlapping in B2B SaaS.So, it was just so fun reading your book, and then getting to ask you questions here. I had 30 more questions that I wanted to ask you. I could go another hour or two, but I'll, put links to your LinkedIn, to your website, to your Twitter in the show notes.Is there anything else you wanted to share with our audience as we wrap up?00:51:42 Robbie:No, I think we covered a lot. If there's one thing that I want to leave people with, it's this idea that if you start with the promise you're making to your customers, helping them with an ongoing problem, or achieving an ongoing goal that's important to them, and then you optimize your offering around that, your chances of both acquiring and retaining your customers going to go way up.00:52:06 David:Such great advice. Great place to end.You mentioned that there's some extra goodies listeners can get if they click on the link in the show notes, they can get your book and some extra goodies along with that.So, thank you so much for being on the podcast.00:52:22 Robbie:Yeah. A real pleasure.

Good Morning Business
La pépite : Opisto est une entreprise leader dans la distribution en ligne de pièces automobiles d'occasion en France - 13/12

Good Morning Business

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 5:29


Ce lundi 13 décembre, une plateforme de pièces autos d'occasion pour les particuliers a été abordée par Lorraine Goumot et Johan Branca, cofondateur d'Opisto, dans la chronique La pépite dans l'émission Good morning business présentée par Sandra Gandoin et Christophe Jakubyszyn sur BFM Business. Retrouvez l'émission du lundi au vendredi et réécoutez la en podcast.

Global Captive Podcast
GCP Short: Group captives in Canada and Europe

Global Captive Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 22:08


In this GCP Short, produced in collaboration with Zurich Insurance Company, we discuss a specific group captive case study, the potential for future group captive growth in Canada and why the concept has never taken off in Europe. Joining Richard on the episode are Grant Mitchell, from Canadian transport and haulage business WestCan Bulk and Chairman of the board of directors at Fleet Resolutions Insurance Ltd. Linda DeSouza, Vice President of Automobile and Transportation at Zurich Canada. Jean-Pierre Paquet, senior vice president of the alternative risk transfer practice at Zurich Canada. And Joshua Nyaberi, who is head of captive fronting for Europe. He also supports the fronting managers in the APAC and LATAM regions. For more information on Zurich, visit their Friend of the Podcast page: https://www.globalcaptivepodcast.com/zurich Read the third edition of GCP Insights here: www.globalcaptivepodcast.com/gcp-insights You can subscribe to the Global Captive Podcast on iTunes, Apple Podcasts, Spotify or any other podcast app. Contact Richard: richard@globalcaptivepodcast.com Visit the website: www.globalcaptivepodcast.com Follow us on LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/global-captive-podcast/

Remarkable Results Radio Podcast
700th Episode Milestone- 7 Trends [RR 700]

Remarkable Results Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 50:11


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wN_5phsLcII Key Talking Points Donnie Hudson, 3 Location, Troy Auto Care, Troy, MI Retaining great employees   Listen to your employees and keep the morale up  Flexible schedules  Feedback- transparent communication  Take care of your people and they will take care of you AJ Nealey, Nealey Auto Service, Edgewater and Deale, MD Talent mining (Finding superstars) Hand in hand with retention Your employees should be your biggest advocate and biggest fan Do you have the right culture internally and align with your organization? Can new hires be adaptable to a new culture they aren't used to?  Each role builds the company Seth Thorson, Eurotech,  New Brighton, Woodbury, Medina, MN Tesla Factor  Electric cars break and need repair/maintenance- an opportunity Tesla training starting to come to the market “Service Mode” disables live view and summon capabilities Don't say no to EV's Dr. Laura Shwaluk, The Auto Shop, Plano, TX Retaining great employees   “Now Hiring” signs no longer work 50-65% of workers that are currently working are either actively looking for a new job or open to a new job How engaged are your employees with their work and the business? When you lose an employee you lose productivity Employees are looking for a “home”- core values, being appreciated, respect from owners and team members, integrity, achievement projects, sportsmanship Emily Chung, AutoNiche, Markham, ON Attracting the next generation  By the time we talk to them about trades mid to late high school it's already too late. We need to get them interested at a younger age and get rid of the stigma with parents Capturing the youth- by high school they have already formed their opinion of their career paths.  How are you portraying your shop? What does it look like to the parents? Keith Perkins, L1 Automotive Diagnostics, Tulsa, OK Mobile Car Repair Trend (Vehicle Service) Working on a car in someone's driveway- unsafe Over 60 google listings in the local area of Tulsa, OK, less than 10% are more than 4 years old of mobile auto repair business-wide acceptance  Facebook Marketplace/Craigslist- individuals ready to perform repairs What started this movement? Technicians that didn't have a “home”  Consider “concierge service” for picking up and driving back  Colleen Yarger, Mark's Independent Service, Chatsworth, CA Aging fleet Car shortage- people aren't as willing to get new cars.  10-15 year old cars is the new niche- bigger tickets Automobiles that are age 12 years or older are anticipated to increase by 15% The number of vehicles 5 years old or less is predicted to increase by almost 25%. Research shows in 2021, there will be an estimated 76 million vehicles aged 16 years or older in the United States. Connect with the show: https://aftermarketradionetwork.com/ (Aftermarket Radio Network) http://youtube.com/carmcapriotto (Subscribe on YouTube) https://remarkableresults.biz/episodes (Visit us on the Web) https://www.facebook.com/RemarkableResultsPodcast (Follow on Facebook) https://remarkableresults.biz/insider/ (Become an Insider) https://www.buymeacoffee.com/carm (Buy me a coffee) https://remarkableresults.biz/books/ (Important Books) Check out today's partners:       This episode is brought to you by AAPEX, the Automotive Aftermarket Products Expo. AAPEX represents the $740 billion global automotive aftermarket industry and has everything you need to stay ahead of the curve.  AAPEX 2021 is in the record books and lived up to presenting leading-technical and business management training from some of the...

The Straight Shift with The Car Chick
The Straight Shift, #81: Why Vehicle Crash Test Results Don't Apply to Women!

The Straight Shift with The Car Chick

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 44:13


In this episode of "The Straight Shift", The Car Chick talks (ok, rants) about why the government-regulated vehicle crash tests don't apply to women and, in fact, the majority of the US population. She talks about the what actually happens in a car crash, how men's and women's bodies react very differently, and how a decades-old data bias is proving fatal to women drivers and passengers.

Le Batard & Friends Network
CINEPHILE - We Celebrate Cinephile Episode 200

Le Batard & Friends Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 61:29


We celebrate the 200th episode of Cinephile by hearing from some old friends and looking back at some of the best moments in show history. Adnan talks everything HBO with James Andrew Miller and he reviews King Richard and Planes, Trains & Automobiles. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Winning In Asia: A ZoZo Go Podcast
Linda Zhang, Chief Engineer, Ford F-150 Lightning

Winning In Asia: A ZoZo Go Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 45:47


When she was nine years old, Linda Zhang got on a plane for the first time in her life and flew to America. Her father met her at the airport in Chicago and they drove three hours to Purdue University where he was a graduate student. Riding in a car - also for the very first time - taking in the bright city lights, Linda says she felt a "little bit like a princess" in a fairytale. Well, Linda's life story certainly looks like something that could be made into a movie. At just 19, she graduated from the University of Michigan with a degree in electrical engineering. She has since added an MA in computer engineering and an MBA, also from Michigan. In 2018, Linda was named chief engineer of arguably Ford's most important product launch in decades - the Ford F-150 all-electric Lightning. The F-150 has been America's best-selling vehicle for 44 straight years. And the profits from the F-150 series are greater than total annual profits at Nike or McDonalds. In today's Winning in Asia conversation, Linda talks about the challenges and breakthroughs in her work as a Chief Engineer. What was the vision for the all-electric truck? How did she deal with the skeptics? What features will the Lighting offer that the gasoline-powered F-150 does not? #WinningInAsia / #ZozoGo https://twitter.com/Dunne_ZoZoGohttps://www.instagram.com/zo.zo.go/?hl=enhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/michael-dunne-a696901a/

This Day in History Class
The first American automobile race is held in Chicago - November 28th, 1895

This Day in History Class

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 11:53


On this day in 1895, the first American auto race took place in Chicago, Illinois, with six racers competing in custom, handcrafted cars. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Cine-Files
Planes, Trains and Automobiles Revisited

The Cine-Files

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 119:07


Happy Thanksgiving Cine-Files, we are going way back to November of 2017 when Steve and John discussed what is, without question the greatest Thanksgiving film ever made, John Hughes' Planes, Trains and Automobiles. However, before they get into the movie, John and Steve talk about how their perspective on this film has changed in the last four years. If you haven't seen this incredible film you can buy or stream it right here. https://amzn.to/32vgVo8 Don't forget to support The Cine-Files at https://www.patreon.com/TheCineFiles and purchase any film we feature at https://www.cine-files.net Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheCineFilesPod/?ref=bookmarks John @therochasays Steve @srmorris The Cine-Files Twitter @cine_files Instagram thecinefilespodcast --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thecine-files/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thecine-files/support

Buzzn The Tower
Planes, Trains & Automobiles

Buzzn The Tower

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 63:21


John Hughes is to Thanksgiving what Santa is to Christmas. You cannot think of turkey, stuffing, cranberries and a cross country road trip without joyfully visiting the 1987 classic: Planes, Trains & Automobiles. With Thanksgiving only two days away, we thought it would be best to dive into the Steve Martin/John Candy classic. So today on Buzzn The Tower adjust your seat as much as you need, drop some quarters in the vibrating bed, and allow Max and I to be your soft pillows as we revisit one of the best holiday movies ever. I'm Mo Shapiro and joining me as always, the Del Griffith to my Neal Page, Max Sanders.

The John Batchelor Show
S4 Ep1811: The unknown Fed plan for the rocky inflation road ahead. @VerodeRugy @Mercatus HFN

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 10:15


 Photo:  Price control. Auto repairs. Automobile repairing is one of the services controlled by Office of Price Administration (OPA) price ceilings because an actual commodity is involved. (1930s?) The unknown Fed plan for the rocky inflation road ahead. @VerodeRugy @Mercatus HFN https://www.creators.com/read/veronique-de-rugy/11/21/pouring-fuel-on-the-spending-fire