Podcasts about Dorchester

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  • 348PODCASTS
  • 753EPISODES
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  • Nov 23, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Dorchester

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Latest podcast episodes about Dorchester

Radio Boston
How to navigate difficult conversations this Thanksgiving

Radio Boston

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 17:00


We take listener questions on how to navigate difficult conversations when reuniting with family this Thanksgiving with Rev. Mariama White-Hammond, the founding-pastor of the New Roots AME Church in Dorchester, and Omar Ruiz, a licensed marriage and family therapist and owner of the practice TalkThinkThrive.

CWTFB Radio
Episode 98: "Misunderstood" (w/ Wave (Capone))

CWTFB Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 70:33


Hailing from the infamous and talent-saturated area of Harbor Point is one of the newer names being discussed over the past few years and known by simply "Wave"! While some call him Wave Capone, the music is always quality and comes from a real place. We've been paying attention to the artist since the release of his "Capone" album which also was re-released as a Deluxe version and the sounds will force you to dig deep into her story and eager to hear more! Since his first project "Help Me Help You", Wave has asserted himself as someone to keep an eye out for. Prior to the release of his first project, the rapper was wrongfully accused of shooting and murdering a gas station clerk in Dorchester–which he thankfully moved past since there was no evidence to the claim and he is just another Black man the system tried to take advantage of. Shaking off the weight of yesterday, Wave remained consistent with work and visuals which leads to his most resent effort "Misunderstood". On his latest project he allowed himself to get more personal, and exposing his life past the streets. We really enjoyed this sit down that ended in a very memorable #RedCupsAndRap freestyle! Join Charlie MaSheen & KASH as they host Wave (Capone) on this podcast interview talking about his music, recently becoming a father, where he's from, and SO MUCH MORE!!! TAP IN!!! MAKE SURE YOU GO BUY STREAM WAVE's LATEST PROJECT "Misunderstood" AVAILABLE ON ALL DSPs!! CHECK OUT ALL OF OUR CONTENT: http://www.lintr.ee/CWTFBradio

Let's Talk with Carolyn Murray
Let's Talk with Dr. Mary Thornley

Let's Talk with Carolyn Murray

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 9:07


She is responsible for breaking ground on the 48 year old community college in Charleston, Berkeley, and Dorchester counties. And ground breaking changes such as the Culinary Institute of Charleston, the Nursing and Science building, and the South Carolina Aeronautical Training Center. It's her job and her mission to make higher education and job training accessible to everyone. In this episode, we talk to Dr. Mary Thornley, President of Trident Technical College.

Family Plot
Episode 68 A Listener Story and the Lost Dutchman Mine

Family Plot

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 54:03


Laura, Krysta and Dean discuss a listener's tale about the home she was renting and is now buying. A home that has brought her phantom noises, strange dreams, shadow people, mists, apparitions and strange illness and malaise. But first Krysta entertains us with weird facts about the Ukraine. After that, they discuss the Lost Dutchman Mine in the Superstition Mountains in Arizona. The Mine's strange origins and the fate of several of those who have gone in search of it. They discuss their thoughts about both stories and share their beliefs.

F1 And Done
Ex-pats, Ed Bradley, Al Jazeera, Brinksmanship, The Duke Of Dorchester, Pandering, Fish Sandwich, Butts & Bets, Meat Raffle, Gary Coleman, Lottery, Haas-pitality, Say Anything, Village Of The Damned, Aaron Rodgers, Sustained Member

F1 And Done

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 51:35


The Howie Carr Radio Network
When Cops get Shot, Wu Can't Comment - 11.10.21 - Hour 4

The Howie Carr Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 39:14


Howie is joined by Larry Calderone, president of the Boston Police Patrolmen's Association to talk about the Dorchester shootings of 3 police officers and Michelle Wu who can't comment on it.

The GetUp Crew
GetUp Crew : What's Hot and Trending (Wednesday,11/10)

The GetUp Crew

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 9:56


Standoff in Dorchester leave 3 officers shot and 1 dead, Travis Scott went to Dave and Busters after the show, not knowing what was goin' on 

Hill-Man Morning Show Audio
GHS - Pete Davidson; Patriots vs. Browns; The News with Courtney

Hill-Man Morning Show Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 56:12


Hour 2 opens with a segment from late-night TV where Emily Ratajkowski explained why women love Pete Davidson. Courtney sees it, but Greg and Wiggy can't understand the appeal. The crew looks ahead at Patriots vs. Browns. Then, The News with Courtney featuring a Dorchester shooting, a Thanksgiving Turkey shortage causing panic, and Paul Rudd named Sexiest Man Alive. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

New England Weekend
New England's "Lost Towns", and Dorchester's Interim House Needs Help for Repairs

New England Weekend

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 26:52


Local history author Renee Mallett joins Nichole to talk about her new book, "Lost Towns of New England". Did you know New England has several towns that were either destroyed or completely abandoned? Renee talks with Nichole about her research, what the process was like to write her book, and a couple of the towns she features in her work. Joyce Linehan's mother, Yvonne, founded the Interim House in Boston's Dorchester neighborhood nearly 50 years ago. It's been a safe haven for men trying to break free of addiction. Now, the beautiful Victorian needs a boost. Joyce explains the fundraiser they're running, and tells Nichole a bit about the history of the home and her family's mission.

Nightside With Dan Rea
Does Boston Need School Cops? - Part 1 (9 p.m.)

Nightside With Dan Rea

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 40:32


Boston School Police were phased out this past July under the Police Reform Act. Many opponents were concerned this would leave students and teachers in possibly dangerous situations. That fear was realized this week when the principal of a Dorchester school was beaten unconscious by a student. Boston Mayor-elect Michelle Wu says this does not change her mind about reinstating cops in schools. Do you agree with her?

Nightside With Dan Rea
Does Boston Need School Cops? - Part 1 (8 p.m.)

Nightside With Dan Rea

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 38:36


Boston School Police were phased out this past July under the Police Reform Act. Many opponents were concerned this would leave students and teachers in possibly dangerous situations. That fear was realized this week when the principal of a Dorchester school was beaten unconscious by a student. Boston Mayor-elect Michelle Wu says this does not change her mind about reinstating cops in schools. Do you agree with her?

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: How to Eat Fried Worms

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 164:12


Today on Boston Public Radio: Chuck Todd begins the show by unpacking Tuesday's election, including what Glenn Youngkin's win for Virginia mayor means for Democrats and the role of education as a dividing issue. Todd is the moderator of “Meet the Press,” host of “Meet the Press Daily” on MSNBC and the political director for NBC News. Then, we ask listeners about their reactions to the election, including Youngkin's win and Boston Mayor-elect Michelle Wu's win. Andrea Cabral talks about why only one Black juror was chosen in the trial of Gregory McMichael, Travis McMichael and William Bryan, who shot Ahmaud Arbery in February 2020. Cabral is the former Suffolk County sheriff and the former Massachusetts secretary of public safety. She is currently the CEO of the cannabis company Ascend. Paul Reville weighs in on why he maintains hope following Tuesday's election, and his thoughts on Wu's education plan. Reville is the former Massachusetts secretary of education and a professor at Harvard University's Graduate School of Education, where he also heads the Education Redesign Lab. His latest book, co-authored with Lynne Sacks, is “Collaborative Action for Equity and Opportunity: A Practical Guide for School and Community Leaders.” Tori Bedford discusses her recent reporting on Mass. and Cass following Acting Mayor Kim Janey's executive order, including the state of arrests, tent clearings, and proceedings at a makeshift courthouse in the Suffolk County House of Correction. Bedford covers Boston's neighborhoods, including Dorchester, Roxbury and Mattapan for GBH. Jon Gruber draws parallels between the government in the hit Korean show “Squid Game” and the United States, including who viewers and voters find culpable for poverty and why rich countries fail to care for their poor. Gruber teaches economics at MIT. He was instrumental in creating both the Massachusetts health-care reform and the Affordable Care Act, and his latest book is “Jump-Starting America: How Breakthrough Science Can Revive Economic Growth And The American Dream.” We end the show by asking listeners whether they would eat insects, which was proposed as a solution to the environmental effect of farming at the U.N. Climate Summit in Glasgow.

Hollywood & Levine
EP249: Writer/Producer Clyde Phillips

Hollywood & Levine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 21:07


The man has done it all — from game shows, to movies, dramas, and comedies. Discover the fascinating career of writer, Clyde Phillips along with some great advice on how to break into the business. Get 20% off your first order at https://dadgrass.com/HOLLYWOOD More podcasts at WAVE: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/artist/wave-podcast-network/1437831426

HUB History - Our Favorite Stories from Boston History

For Halloween weekend, we're dropping some of our spookiest past episodes back into the feed. What could be more spooky than witches? Before the Salem witch trials, Boston held its own. Between 1648 and 1688, four innocent women were executed as "witches" in Boston and Dorchester. Listen now for the tragic tale of the trials and executions of Margaret Jones, Alice Lake, Ann Hibbins, and Ann Glover. Full show notes: http://www.hubhistory.com/episodes/women-and-witchcraft-episode-152/

PsychU Community Podcast
Pharmacists Month: Role In Depression Treatment - Dr.'s Ehret & Silvia

PsychU Community Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 21:17


Listen to Amica Simmons-Yon, PharmD, PhD and Jacquelyn Canning, PharmD, BCPP as they spill the tea about this week's hot topic in celebration of Pharmacists Month. With special guests Dr.'s Ehret and Silvia, they will discuss what's going on in the Pharmacist Corner and explain the role of pharmacists in depression management. Megan Ehret, PharmD, MS, BCPP is a psychiatric pharmacist and a Professor at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy. Dr. Ehret is also the Past-President of CPNP and the current Section Editor for the Pharmacist Corner on PsychU. Richard Silvia, PharmD, BCPP is Professor at the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences. Dr. Silvia maintains a practice site at the Codman Square Health Center, in Dorchester, MA. Join the PsychU Podcast team this week and learn more about the role of Pharmacists in depression management. Featuring: • Amica Simmons-Yon, PharmD, PhD, OPDC MSL • Jacquelyn Canning, PharmD, BCPP, OPDC Sr. MSL • Megan Ehret, PharmD, MS, BCPP • Richard Silvia, PharmD, BCPP #MDD #PharmacistsMonth #PharmD The Role Of The Pharmacist In The Treatment Of Depression - PsychU: https://bit.ly/3peY7ms Suicide Stratification Risk Models & The Role Of Pharmacists In Suicide Education & Prevention - PsychU: https://bit.ly/30xH9VX Pharmacist Corner - PsychU: https://bit.ly/3jdtudn Amica Simmons-Yon and Jacquelyn Canning are employees of Otsuka Pharmaceutical Development & Commercialization, Inc. Megan Ehret and Richard Silvia are paid consultants of Otsuka Pharmaceutical Development & Commercialization, Inc. PsychU is supported by Otsuka Pharmaceutical Development & Commercialization, Inc. (OPDC), Otsuka America Pharmaceutical, Inc. (OAPI), and Lundbeck, LLC – committed supporters of the mental health treatment community. The opinions expressed by PsychU's contributors are their own and are not endorsed or recommended by PsychU or its sponsors. The information provided through PsychU is intended for the educational benefit of mental health care professionals and others who support mental health care. It is not intended as, nor is it a substitute for, medical care, advice, or professional diagnosis. Health care professionals should use their independent medical judgement when reviewing PsychU's educational resources. Users seeking medical advice should consult with a health care professional. No CME or CEU credits are available through any of the resources provided by PsychU. Some of the contributors may be paid consultants for OPDC, OAPI, and / or Lundbeck, LLC. US.CORP.X.21.00677

Get Your Act Together with Mike Bain

Mike sits down with actor and singer Brandon Wahlberg to talk about the Sopranos, ordering strippers, fighting the homeless, dating apps, quitting porn, and working with film students.

The Rancor's Brothel | A Tabletop Gaming Podcast
Delta Green - Impossible Landscapes 27 (A Volume of Secret Faces)

The Rancor's Brothel | A Tabletop Gaming Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 28:53


As each one consumes the patzu in turn, the Agents wink from existence and are consumed by darkness. Have they finally escaped the Dorchester? Everything changes today as we continue Impossible Landscapes, a Delta Green campaign. Starring: Lucas as Adrian Kirsch Flynn as Gideon Sommers Troy as Reginald Dwight Daniel as Franky Fontaine   Want to leave a comment? -Email therancorsbrothel@gmail.com.  -Follow us on Twitter @Rancors_Brothel

Black Girl Couch Reviews
The Sinner Season 3 ”Part I”

Black Girl Couch Reviews

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 22:14


The Sinner episode (season 3, episode 1) " Part I" While on a trip to Dorchester, Detective Ambrose investigates a tragic, yet suspicious, car accident on the outskirts of town.     Scorecard: 10/10   Feedback : blackgirlcouch@gmail.com (audio MP4 or written) Twitter: Black Girl_Couch Tumblr: slowlandrogynousmiracle

The Loop
Afternoon Report: Friday, October 1, 2021

The Loop

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 6:48


The Afternoon Report for Friday, October 1: A man from Alaska is killed in a crash in Danvers. Boston Police find the driver who hit a boy in Dorchester. Congresswoman Ayanna Pressley names her pick for Boston mayor. Five minutes of news that will keep you in The Loop.

The Rancor's Brothel | A Tabletop Gaming Podcast
Delta Green - Impossible Landscapes 25 (A Volume of Secret Faces)

The Rancor's Brothel | A Tabletop Gaming Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 57:45


Group therapy was different, but it was the least of the team's problems. They're about to discover they aren't the only Program Agents stuck in the Dorchester. Tune in as we continue Impossible Landscapes, a Delta Green campaign. Starring: Lucas as Adrian Kirsch Flynn as Gideon Sommers Troy as Reginald Dwight Daniel as Franky Fontaine   Want to leave a comment? -Email therancorsbrothel@gmail.com.  -Follow us on Twitter @Rancors_Brothel

Holy City Sinner Radio
 Episode 27: Melanie Pasheluk of the Berkeley-Charleston-Dorchester Council of Governments

Holy City Sinner Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 33:53


This week's topics - Murdaughs (of course); Berkeley County School District officials are investigating a video posted to TikTok which captured a teacher using a racial slur; the South Carolina Supreme Court upheld the Heritage Act, but did make one important change; and Dorchester School District Two board member Barbara Crosby has been suspended from her position pending a criminal investigation into alleged child endangerment. Christian then talks to Melanie Pasheluk, a Loan Administrator with BCDCOG. Berkeley-Charleston-Dorchester Council of Governments whose objectives are to assist local governments develop local and regional plans within the tri-county region. Melanie talked about the recently extended BCDCG CARES Revolving Loan Fund, which is a way for business owners to obtain low-cost, flexible financing. You can learn more at https://www.bcdcog.com/economic-development/bcdcog-cares/   The show's artwork was created by Grace Lancaster-Goguen (glancastergoguen@gmail.com). This episode's music is by Tyler Boone (tylerboonemusic.com). The episode was produced by LMC Soundsystem.

New England Weekend
"Rise and Rumble" for Boston's Best Donuts, and "Tiny DAP Concerts" Uplift the Hub's Newest Stars

New England Weekend

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 32:48


Who doesn't love a donut? Pastry chef Dee Steffen Chinn of Big Heart Hospitality has all the details on this year's "Rise and Rumble" contest, which pits top pastry chefs against each other to create an intricate, tasty masterpiece. She also talks with Nichole about her creative, but busy, job coming up with fascinating desserts for one of Boston's hottest restaurant groups. Sam Potrykus and Jay Hunt from the Dorchester Art Project chat with Nichole about their "Tiny DAP Concerts", which focus on intimate performances with Black and brown artists from around the city of Boston. Sam also talks about the other amenities DAP has for artists of all kinds.

The Rancor's Brothel | A Tabletop Gaming Podcast
Delta Green - Impossible Landscapes 24 (A Volume of Secret Faces)

The Rancor's Brothel | A Tabletop Gaming Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 79:12


The team has mingled with the patients of the Dorchester, who teach them impossible things. Yet their time within the facility is just beginning, and Dr. Friend has plans on how to cure the Agents of their illness. We continue Impossible Landscapes, a Delta Green campaign. Starring: Lucas as Adrian Kirsch Flynn as Gideon Sommers Troy as Reginald Dwight   Want to leave a comment? -Email therancorsbrothel@gmail.com.  -Follow us on Twitter @Rancors_Brothel

Raw Data By P3
Jeff Sagarin

Raw Data By P3

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 86:06


There's a place where sports and data meet, and it's as powerful a collision as on any football field!  Jeff Sagarin has been a figurehead in the sports analytics realm for decades, and we're thrilled to have had the chance to have him on to talk about his data journey!  There's a fair mix of math AND sports geek out time in this episode.  And, did we mention that Dr. Wayne Winston is sitting in on this episode as well? References in this Episode: 2 Frictionless Colliding Boxes Video Scorigami Episode Transcript: Rob Collie (00:00:00): Hello, friends. Today's guest is Jeff Sagarin. Is that name familiar to you? It's very familiar to me. In my life, Jeff's work might very well be my first brush with the concept of using data for any sort of advantage. His Power Ranking Columns, first appeared in USA Today in 1985, when I was 11 years old. And what a fascinating concept that was. Rob Collie (00:00:29): It probably won't surprise you if I confess that 11-year-old me was not particularly good at sports, but I was still fascinated and captivated by them. 11-year-old kids in my neighborhood were especially prone to associating sports with their tribal identity. Everyone had their favorite teams, their favorite sports stars. And invariably, this led to arguments about which sports star was better than the other sports star, who was going to win this game coming up and who would win a tournament amongst all of these teams and things of that sort. Rob Collie (00:01:01): Now that I've explained it that way though, I guess being an adult sports fan isn't too terribly different, is it? Those arguments, of course, aren't the sorts of arguments where there's anything resembling a clear winner. But in practice, the person who won was usually the one with the loudest voice or the sickest burn that they could deliver to their friends. And then in 1985, the idea was planted in my head by Jeff Sagarin's column in USA Today, that there actually was a relatively objective way to evaluate teams that had never played against one another and likely never would. Rob Collie (00:01:33): I wasn't into computers at the time. I certainly wasn't into the concept of data. I didn't know what a database was. I didn't know what a spreadsheet was. And yet, this was still an incredibly captivating and powerful idea. So in my life, Jeff Sagarin is the first public figure that I encountered in the sports analytics industry long before it was cool. And because it was sports, a topic that was relevant to 11-year-old me, he's really also my first brush with analytics at all. Rob Collie (00:02:07): It's not surprising then, that to me, Jeff is absolutely a celebrity. As a guest, in insider podcasting lingo, Jeff is what we call a good get. We owe that pleasure, of course, to him being close friends with Wayne Winston, a former guest on the show, who also joined us today as co-guest. Rob Collie (00:02:28): Now, if none of that speaks to you, let's try this alternate description. He's probably also the world's most famous active FORTRAN programmer. I admit that I was so starstruck by this that I didn't even really push as hard as I normally would, in terms of getting into the techniques that he uses. I didn't want to run afoul of asking him for trade secrets. At times, this conversation did devolve into four dudes sitting around talking about sports. Rob Collie (00:02:59): But setting that aside, there are some really, really interesting and heartwarming things happening in this conversation as well. Again, the accidental path to where he is today, the intersection of persistence and good fortune that's required really for success in anything. Bottom line, this is the story of a national and highly influential figure at the intersection of the sports industry and the analytics industry for more than three decades. It's not every day you get to hear that story. So let's get into it. Announcer (00:03:34): Ladies and gentlemen, may I have your attention, please? Announcer (00:03:39): This is the Raw Data by P3 Adaptive podcast with your host, Rob Colley and your co-host, Thomas LaRock. Find out what the experts at P3 Adaptive can do for your business. Just go to p3adaptive.com. Raw Data by P3 Adaptive is data with the human element. Rob Collie (00:04:02): Welcome to the show, Jeff Sagarin. And welcome back to the show. Wayne Winston. So thrilled to have the two of you with us today. This is awesome. We've been looking forward to this for a long time. So thank you very much gentlemen, for being here. Jeff Sagarin (00:04:16): You're welcome. Rob Collie (00:04:18): Jeff, usually we kick these things off with, "Hey, tell us a little about yourself, your background, blah, blah, blah." Let's start off with me telling you about you. It's a story about you that you wouldn't know. I remember for a very long time being aware of you. Rob Collie (00:04:35): So I'm 47 years old, born in 1974. My father had participated for many years in this shady off-the-books college football pick'em pool that was run out of the high school in a small town in Florida. Like the sheets with everybody's entries would show up. They were run on ditto paper, like that blue ink. It was done in the school ditto room and he did this every year. This was like the most fascinating thing that happened in the entire year to me. Like these things showing up at our house, this packet of all these picks, believe it or not, they were handwritten. These grids were handwritten with everyone's picks. It was ridiculous. Rob Collie (00:05:17): He got eliminated every year. There were a couple of hundred entries every year and he just got his butt kicked every year. But then one year, he did his homework. He researched common opponents and things like that or that kind of stuff. I seem to recall this having something to do timing wise with you. So I looked it up. Your column first appeared in USA Today in 1985. Is that correct? Jeff Sagarin (00:05:40): Yeah. Tuesday, January 8th 1985. Rob Collie (00:05:44): I remember my dad winning this pool that year and using the funds to buy a telescope to look at Halley's Comet when it showed up. And so I looked up Halley's Comet. What do you know? '86. So it would have been like the January ballgames of 1986, where he won this pool. And in '85, were you power ranking college football teams or was that other sports? Jeff Sagarin (00:06:11): Yes. Rob Collie (00:06:12): Okay. So when my dad said that he did his research that year, what he really did was read your stuff. You bought my dad a telescope in 1986 so that we could go have one of the worst family vacations of all time. It was just awful. Thank you. Jeff Sagarin (00:06:31): You're very welcome. Rob Collie (00:06:39): I kind of think of you as the first publicly known figure in sports analytics. You probably weren't the first person to apply math and computers to sports analytics, but you're the first person I heard of. Jeff Sagarin (00:06:51): There is a guy that people don't even talk about very much. Now a guy named Earnshaw Cook, who first inspired me when I was a sophomore in high school in the '63-'64 school year, there was an article by Frank Deford in Sports Illustrated about Earnshaw Cook publishing a book called Percentage Baseball. So I convinced my mom to let me have $10 to order it by mail and I got it. I started playing around with his various ideas in it. He was the first guy I ever heard of and that was in March of 1964. Rob Collie (00:07:28): All right, so everyone's got an origin story. Jeff Sagarin (00:07:31): The Dunkel family started doing the Dunkel ratings back I believe in 1929. Then there was a professor, I think he was at Vanderbilt, named [Lipkin House 00:07:41], he was I think at Vanderbilt. And for years, he did the high school ratings in states like maybe Tennessee and Kentucky. I think he gave Kentucky that Louisville courier his methodology before he died. But I don't know if they continue his work or not. But there were people way before me. Rob Collie (00:08:03): But they weren't in USA Today. Jeff Sagarin (00:08:04): That's true. Rob Collie (00:08:06): They weren't nationally distributed, like on a very regular basis. I've been hearing your name longer than I've even been working with computers. That's pretty crazy. How did you even get hooked up with USA Today? Jeff Sagarin (00:08:23): People might say, "You got lucky." My answer, as you'll see as well, I'd worked for 12 years to be in a position to get lucky. I started getting paid for doing this in September of 1972 with an in-house publication of pro football weekly called Insider's Pro Football Newsletter. Jeff Sagarin (00:08:45): In the Spring of '72, I'd written letters to like 100 newspapers saying because I had started by hand doing my own rating system for pro football in the fall of 1971. Just by hand, every Sunday night, I'd get the scores and add in the Monday night. I did it as a hobby. I wasn't doing it for a living. I did it week by week and charted the teams. It was all done with some charts I'd made up with a normal distribution and a slide rule. So I sent out letters in the spring of '72 to about 100 papers saying, "Hey, would you be interested in running my stuff?" Jeff Sagarin (00:09:19): They either didn't answer me or all said, "No, not interested." But I got a call right before I left to go to California when an old college friend that spring. It was from William Wallace, who was a big time football correspondent for The New York Times. That anecdote may be in that article by Andy Glockner. He called me up, he was at the New York Times, but he said also, "I write articles for extra money for pro football weekly. I wanted to just kind of talk to you." Jeff Sagarin (00:09:49): He wrote an article that appeared in Pro Quarterback magazine in September of '72. But during the middle of that summer, I got a phone call from Pro Football weekly, the publisher, a guy named [inaudible 00:10:04] said, "Hey Jeff. Have you seen our ad in street and Smith's?" It didn't matter. It could have been their pro magazine or college. I said, "Yeah, I did." And he said, "Do you notice it said we've got a world famous handicapper to do our predictions for us?" I said, "Yeah, I did see that." He said, "How would you like to be that world famous handicapper? We don't have anybody." Jeff Sagarin (00:10:25): We just said that because he said William Wallace told us to call you. So I said, "Okay, I'll be your world famous handicapper." I didn't start off that well and they had this customer, it was a paid newsletter and there was a customer from Hawaii. He had a great name, Charles Fujiwara. He'd send letters every week saying, "Sagarin's terrible, but he's winning a fortune for me. I just reverse his picks every week." So finally, finally, my numbers turn the tide and I had this one great week, where I went 8-0. He sent another letter saying, "I'm bankrupt. The kid destroyed me." Because he was reversing all my picks. That's a true story. Rob Collie (00:11:07): At least he had a sense of humor. It sounds like a pretty interesting fellow on the other end of that letter. Jeff Sagarin (00:11:13): He sounds like he could have been like the guy, if you've ever seen reruns of the old show, '77 Sunset Strip. In it, there this guy who's kind of a racetrack trout gambler named Roscoe. He sounds like he could have been Roscoe. Rob Collie (00:11:26): We have to look that one up. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:11:27): It's before your time. Rob Collie (00:11:28): I don't think I saw that show. Jeff Sagarin (00:11:29): Yeah. Wayne's seen it though. Rob Collie (00:11:31): Yes. I love that. There are things that are both before my time and I have like old man knees. So I've heard this kind of thing before, by the way. It's called the 10-year overnight success. Jeff Sagarin (00:11:47): I forgot. How did I get with USA Today? I started with Pro Football weekly and continued with them. I was with them until actually why don't we say sometime in the fall of '82. I ended up in other newspapers, little by little: The Boston Globe, Louisville Courier Journal. And then in the spring of '81, I got into a conversation over the phone with Jim van Valkenburg, who is the stat guy at the NCAA. I happened to mention that going into the tournament, I had Indiana to win the tournament. They were rated like 10th in the conventional polls. Jeff Sagarin (00:12:23): And so he remembered that and he kept talking behind the scenes to people in the NCAA about that. And so years later, in 1988, they called me out to talk to them. But anyhow, I had developed a good reputation and I gave him as a reference. Wayne called me up excitedly in let's say, early September of 1984. He said, "Hey, Jeff. You've got to buy a copy of today's USA Today and turn to the end of the sports section. You're going to be sick." Jeff Sagarin (00:12:53): I said, "Really? Okay." So I opened to where he said and I was sick. They had computer ratings by some guy. He was a good guy named Thomas Jech, J-E-C-H. And I said, "Damn, that should be me. I've been doing this for all these years and I didn't even know they were looking for this." So I call up on the phone. Sometimes there's a lot of luck involved. I got to talk to a guy named Bob Barbara who I believe is retired now there. He had on the phone this gruff sounding voice out of like a Grade B movie from the film, The War. "What's going on Kitty?" It sounds like he had a cigar in his mouth. Jeff Sagarin (00:13:30): I said, "Well, I do these computer ratings." [inaudible 00:13:33] Said "Well, really? That's interesting. We've already got somebody." He said, "But how would you even send it to us?" I said, "Well, I dictate over the phone." He said, "Dictate? We don't take dictation at USA Today, kid. Have you ever heard of personal computers and a modem?" I said, "Well, I have but I just do it on a mainframe at IU and I dictate over the phone to the Louisville Courier and the local..." Jeff Sagarin (00:13:58): Well, the local paper here, I gave them a printout. He said, "Kid, you need to buy yourself a PC and learn how to use a modem." So I kind of was embarrassed. I said, "Well, I'll see." So about 10 days later, I called him up and said, "Hey, what's the phone number for your modem?" He said, "Crap. You again, kid? I thought I got rid of you." He says, "All right. I'll give you the phone number." So I sent him a sample printout. He says, "Yeah, yeah, we got it. Keep in touch. We're not going to change for football. But this other guy, he may not want to do basketball. So keep in touch. Who knows what will happen for basketball?" Jeff Sagarin (00:14:31): So every month I'd call up saying, "It's me again, keeping touch." He said, "I can't get rid of you. You're like a bad penny that keeps turning up." So finally he says look, after about five of these calls, spreading out until maybe late November, "Look kid, why don't you wait... Call me up the first Sunday of the new year," which would have been like Sunday, January 6 of 1985 I believe. So I waited. I called him up. Sure enough, he said, "You again?" I said, "You told me you wanted to do college basketball." Jeff Sagarin (00:15:04): He said, "Yeah, you're kind of right. The other guy doesn't want to do it." So he said, "Well, do you mind if we call it the USA Today computer ratings? We kind of like to put our own name on everything." I said, "Well, wait a minute. During the World Series, you had Pete Rose as your guest columnist, you want not only gave his name, but you had a picture of him." He said, "God damn it." He said, "I can't..." He said, "You win again kid. Give us a bio." Jeff Sagarin (00:15:32): An old friend of both me and Wayne was on a business trip. He lived in California, but one of the companies he did work for was Magnavox, which at the time had a presence in Fort Wayne. So he had stopped off in Bloomington so we could say hi. We hadn't seen each other for many years. So he wrote my bio for me, which is still used in the agate in the USA Today. So it's the same bio all these years. Jeff Sagarin (00:15:56): So they started printing me on Tuesday, January 8 of 1985. On the front page that day and I got my editor of a couple years ago, he found an old physical copy of that paper and sent it to me and I thought that's pretty cool. And on the front page, they said, "Well, this would be the 50th birthday of Elvis Presley." I get, they did not have a banner headline at the top, "Turn to the sports and see Jeff Sagarin's debut." That was not what they did. It was all about Elvis Presley. And so people will tell me, "Wow! You got really lucky." Jeff Sagarin (00:16:30): Yeah, but I was in a position. I'd worked for 12 years since the fall of '72 to get in position to then get lucky. They told me I had some good recommendations from people. Rob Collie (00:16:42): Well, even that persistence to keep calling in the face of relatively discouraging feedback. So that conversation took place, and then two days later, you're in the paper. Jeff Sagarin (00:16:54): Well, yeah. He said, "Send us the ratings." They might have needed a time lag. So if I sent the ratings in on a Sunday night or Monday morning, they'd print them on Tuesday. They're not as instant. Now, I update every day on their website. For the paper, they take whatever the most recent ones they can access off their website, depending on I've sent it in, which is I always send them in early in the morning like when I get up. So they print on a Tuesday there'll be taking the ratings that they would have had in their hands Monday, which would be through Sunday's games. Rob Collie (00:17:26): That Tuesday, was that just college basketball? Jeff Sagarin (00:17:28): Then it was. Then in the fall of 85. They began using me for college football, not that they thought I was better or worse one way or the other than Thomas Jech who was a smart guy, he was a math professor at the time at Penn State. He just got tired of doing it. He had more important things to do. Serious, I don't mean that sarcastically. That was just like a fun hobby for him from what I understand. Rob Collie (00:17:50): I was going to ask you if you hadn't already gone and answered the question ahead of time. I was going to ask you well, what happened to the other guy? Did you go like all Tonya Harding on him or whatever? Did you take out your rival? No, sounds like Nancy Kerrigan just went ahead and retired. Although I hate to make you Tonya Harding in this analogy and I just realized I just Hardinged you. Jeff Sagarin (00:18:10): He was just evidently a really good math professor. It was just something he did for fun to do the ratings. Rob Collie (00:18:17): Opportunity and preparation right where they intersect. That's "luck". Jeff Sagarin (00:18:22): It would be as if Wally Pipp had retired and Lou Gehrig got to replace him in the analogy, Lou Gehrig gets the first base job but actually Wally Pipp in real life did not retire. He had the bad luck to get a cold or something or an injury and he never got back in the starting lineup after that. Rob Collie (00:18:38): What about Drew Bledsoe? I think he did get hurt. Did we ever see him again? Thomas LaRock (00:18:43): The very next season, he was in Buffalo and then he went to Dallas. Rob Collie (00:18:46): I don't remember this at all. Thomas LaRock (00:18:47): And not only that, but when he went to Dallas, he got hurt again and Tony Romo came on to take over. Rob Collie (00:18:53): Oh my god! So Drew Bledsoe is Wally Pipp X2. Thomas LaRock (00:18:58): Yeah, X2. Rob Collie (00:19:02): I just need to go find wherever Drew Bledsoe is right now and go get in line behind him. Thomas LaRock (00:19:08): He's making wine in Walla Walla, Washington. I know exactly where he is. Rob Collie (00:19:12): I'm about to inherit a vineyard gentlemen. Okay, so Wayne's already factored into this story. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:19:23): A little bit. Rob Collie (00:19:23): A bit part but an important one. We would call you Mr. Narrative Hook in the movie. Like you'd be the guy that's like, "Jeff, you've got to get a copy of USA Today and turn to page 10. You're going to be sick." Jeff Sagarin (00:19:37): Well, I was I'm glad Wayne told me to do it. If I'd never known that, who knows what I'd be doing right now? Rob Collie (00:19:44): Yeah. So you guys are longtime friends, right? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:19:47): Yeah. Jeff, should take this. Jeff Sagarin (00:19:49): September 1967 in the TV room at Ashdown Graduate's House across from the dorm we lived, because the graduate students there had rigged up, we call it a full screen TV that was actually quite huge. It's simply projected from a regular TV onto a maybe a 10 foot by 10 foot old fashioned movie projector screen. We'd go there to watch ballgames. Okay, because better than watching on a 10 inch diagonal black and white TV in the dorm. And it turned out we both had a love for baseball and football games. Thomas LaRock (00:20:26): So just to be clear, though, this was no ordinary school. This is MIT. Because this is what people at MIT would do is take some weird tech thing and go, "We can make this even better, make a big screen TV." Jeff Sagarin (00:20:38): We didn't know how to do it, which leads into Wayne's favorite story about our joint science escapades at MIT. If Wayne wants to start it off, you might like this. I was a junior and Wayne was a sophomore at the time. I'll set Wayne up for it, there was a requirement that MIT no matter what your major, one of the sort of distribution courses you had to take was a laboratory class. Why don't we let Wayne take the ball for a while on this? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:21:05): I'm not very mechanically inclined. I got a D in wood shop and a D in metal shop. Jeff's not very mechanically inclined either. We took this lab class and we were trying to figure out identifying a coin based on the sound waves it would produce under the Scylla scope. And so the first week, we couldn't get the machine to work. And the professor said, "Turn it on." And so we figured that step out and the next week, the machine didn't work. He said, "Plug it in." Jeff can take it from there. Jeff Sagarin (00:21:46): It didn't really fit the mathematical narrative exactly of what metals we knew were in the coin. But then I noticed, nowadays we'd probably figure out this a reason. If we multiplied our answers by something like 100 pi, we got the right numbers. So they were correctly proportional. So we just multiplied our answers by 100 pi and said, "As you can see, it's perfectly deducible." Rob Collie (00:22:14): There's a YouTube video that we should probably link that is crazy. It shows that two boxes on a frictionless surface a simulation and the number of times that they collide, when you slide them towards a wall together, when they're like at 10X ratio of mass, the number of times that they impact each other starts to become the digits of pi. Jeff Sagarin (00:22:34): Wow. Rob Collie (00:22:35): Before they separate. Jeff Sagarin (00:22:36): That's interesting. Rob Collie (00:22:36): It's just bizarre. And then they go through explaining like why it is pi and you understand it while the video is playing. And then the video ends and you've completely lost it. Jeff Sagarin (00:22:49): I'm just asking now, are they saying if you do that experiment an infinite amount of times, the average number of times they collide will be pi? Rob Collie (00:22:57): That's a really good question. I think it's like the number of collisions as you increase the ratios of the weight or something like that start to become. It's like you'll get 314 collisions, for instance, in a certain weight ratio, because that's the only three digits of pi that I remember. It's 3.14. It's a fascinating little watch. So the 100 pi thing, you said that, I'm like, "Yeah, that just... Of course it's 100 pi." Even boxes colliding on a frictionless surface do pi things apparently. Jeff Sagarin (00:23:29): Maybe it's a universal constant in everything we do. Rob Collie (00:23:29): You just don't expect pi to surface itself. It has nothing to do with waves, no wavelength, no arcs of circles, nothing like that. But that sneaky video, they do show you that it actually has something to do with circles and angles and stuff. Jeff Sagarin (00:23:44): Mutual friend of me and Wayne, this guy named Robin. He loves Fibonacci. And so every time I see a particular game end by a certain score, I'll just say, "Hey, Robin. Research the score of..." I think it was blooming to North against some other team. And he did. It turned out Bloomington North had won 155-34, which are the two adjacent Fibonacci, the two particular adjacent Fibonacci. Robin loves that stuff. You'll find a lot of that actually. It's hard to double Fibonacci a team though. That would be like 89-34. Rob Collie (00:24:18): I know about the Fibonacci sequence. But I can't pick Fibonacci sequence numbers out of the wild. Are you familiar with Scorigami? Jeff Sagarin (00:24:26): Who? I'd never heard of it obviously. Rob Collie (00:24:29): I think a Scorigami is a score in the NFL that's never happened. Jeff Sagarin (00:24:32): There was one like that about 10 years ago, 11-10, I believe. Pittsburgh was involved in the game or 12-11, something like that. Rob Collie (00:24:40): I think there was a Scorigami in last season. With scoring going up, the chances of Scorigami is increasing. There's just more variance at the higher end of the spectrum of numbers, right? Jeff Sagarin (00:24:50): I've always thought about this. In Canada, Canadian football, they have this extra rule that I think is kind of cool because it would probably make more scores happen. If a punter kicks the ball into the end zone, it can't roll there. Like if he kicks it on the fly into the end zone and the other team can't run it out, it's called a rouge and the kicking team gets one point for it. That's kind of cool. Because once you add the concept of scoring one point, you make a lot more scores more probable of happening. Rob Collie (00:25:21): Oh, yeah, yeah, yeah, totally. You can win 1-0. Thomas LaRock (00:25:25): So the end zone is also... It's 20 yards deep. So the field's longer, it's 110 yards. But the end zone's deeper and part of it is that it's too far to kick for a field goal. But you know what? If I can punt it into the end zone and if I get a cover team down there, we can get one point out. I'm in favor of it. I think that'd be great. Jeff Sagarin (00:25:43): I think you have to kick out on the fly into the end zone. It's not like if it rolls into it. Thomas LaRock (00:25:47): No, no, no. It's like a pop flop. Jeff Sagarin (00:25:50): Yeah. Okay. Rob Collie (00:25:50): If you punt it out of the end zone, is it also a point? Thomas LaRock (00:25:52): It's a touch back. No, touch back. Jeff Sagarin (00:25:54): That'd be too easy of a way to get a point. Rob Collie (00:25:57): You've had a 20 yard deep target to land in. In Canadian fantasy football, if there was such a thing, maybe there is, punters, you actually could have punters as a position because they can score points. That would be a really sad and un-fun way to play. Rob Collie (00:26:14): But so we're amateur sports analytics people here on the show. We're not professionals. We're probably not even very good at it. But that doesn't mean that we aren't fascinated by it. We're business analytics people here for sure. Business and sports, they might share some techniques, but it's just very, very, very different, the things that are valuable in the two spaces. I mean, they're sort of spiritually linked but they're not really tools or methods that provide value. Rob Collie (00:26:39): Not that you would give them. But we're not looking for any of your secrets here today. But you're not just writing for USA Today, there's a number of places where your skills are used these days, right? Jeff Sagarin (00:26:51): Well, not as much as that. But I want to make a favorable analogy for Wayne. In the world of sports analytics, whatever the phrases are, I consider myself to be maybe an experimental applied physicist. Wayne is an advanced theoretical physicist. I do the grunt work of collecting data and doing stuff with it. But Wayne has a large over-viewing of things. He's like a theoretical physicist. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:27:17): Jeff is too modest because he's experimented for years on the best parameters for his models. Rob Collie (00:27:27): It's again that 10-year, 20-year overnight success type of thing. You've just got to keep grinding at it. Do the two of you collaborate at all? Jeff Sagarin (00:27:35): Well, we did on two things, the Hoops computer game and Win Val. I forgot. How could I forget? It was actually my favorite thing that we did even though we've made no money doing the randomization using Game Theory of play calling for football. And we based it actually and it turned out that I got great numerical results that jive with empirical stuff that Virgil Carter had gotten and our economist, named Romer, had gotten and we had more detailed results than them. Jeff Sagarin (00:28:06): But in the areas that we intersected, we had the same as them. We used a game called Pro Quarterback and we modeled it. We had actually, a fellow, I wasn't a professor but a fellow professor of Wayne's, a great guy, just a great guy named Vic Cabot, who wrote a particular routine to insert the FORTRAN program that solved that particular linear programming problem that would constantly reoccur or else we couldn't do it. That was the favorite thing and we got to show it once to Sam White, who we really liked. And White said, "I like this guy. I may have played this particular game," we told him what we based it on, "when I was a teenager." Jeff Sagarin (00:28:46): He said, "I know exactly what you want to do." You don't make the same call in the same situation all the time. You have a random, but there's an optimal mix Game Theory, as you probably know for both offense and defense. White said, "The problem is this is my first year here. It was the summer of '83." And he said, "I don't really have the security." Said, "Imagine it's third and one, we're on our own 15 yard line. And it's third and one. And the random number generator says, 'Throw the bomb on this play with a 10% chance of calling up but it'll still be in the mix. And it happens to come up.'" Jeff Sagarin (00:29:23): He said, "It was my eight year here. I used to play these games myself. I know exactly." But then he patted his hip. He said, "It's mine on the line this first year." He said, "It's kind of nerve wracking to do that when you're a rookie coach somewhere, to call the bomb when it's third and one on your own 15. If it's incomplete, you'll be booed out of the stadium." Rob Collie (00:29:46): Yeah, I mean, it's similar to there's the general reluctance in coaches for so long to go for it on fourth and one. When the analytics were very, very, very clear that this was a plus expected value, +EV, move to go for it on fourth and one. But the thing is, you've got to consider the bigger picture. Right? The incentives, the coaches number one goal is actually don't get fired. Jeff Sagarin (00:30:14): You were right. That's what White was telling us. Rob Collie (00:30:14): Yeah. Winning a Super Bowl is a great thing to do. Because it helps you not get fired. It's actually weird. Like, if your goal is to win as many games as possible, yes, go for it on fourth and one. But if your goal is to not get fired, maybe. So it takes a bit more courage even to follow the numbers. And for good reason, because the incentives aren't really aligned the way that we think they are when you first glance at a situation. Jeff Sagarin (00:30:41): Well, there's a human factor that there's no way unless you're making a guess how to take it into account. It may be demoralizing to your defense if you go for it on fourth and one and you're on your own 15. I've seen the numbers, we used to do this. It's a good mathematical move to go for it. Because you could say, "Well, if you're forced to punt, the other team is going to start on the 50. So what's so good about that? But psychologically, your defense may be kind of pissed off and demoralized when they have to come out on the field and defend from their own 15 after you've not made it and the numbers don't take that into account. Rob Collie (00:31:19): Again, it's that judgment thing. Like the coach hung out to dry. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:31:22): Can I say a word about Vic Cabot, that Jeff mentioned? Jeff Sagarin (00:31:26): Yeah, He's great. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:31:27): Yeah. So Vic was the greatest guy any of us in the business school ever knew. He was a fantastic person. He died of throat cancer in 1994, actually 27 years ago this week or last week. Jeff Sagarin (00:31:43): Last week. It was right around Labor Day. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:31:46): Right. But I want to mention, basically, when he died, his daughter was working in the NYU housing office. After he died, she wrote a little book called The Princess Diaries. She's worth how many millions of dollars now? But he never got to see it. Jeff Sagarin (00:32:06): He had a son, a big kid named Matt Cabot, who played at Bloomington South High School. I got a nice story about Matthew. I believe the last time I know of him, he was a state trooper in the state of Colorado. I used to tell him when I was still young enough and Spry enough, we'd play a little pickup or something. I'd say, "Matthew, forget about points. The most important thing, a real man gets rebounds." Jeff Sagarin (00:32:32): They played in the semi state is when it was just one class. In '88, me and Wayne and a couple of Wayne's professor buddies, we all... Of course, Vic would have been there but we didn't go in the same car. It was me, Wayne and maybe [inaudible 00:32:48] and somebody else, Wayne? Jeff Sagarin (00:32:49): They played against Chandler Thompson's great team from Muncie Central. In the first three minutes, Chris Lawson, who was the star of the team went up for his patented turn around jumper from six feet away in the lane and Chandler Thompson spiked it like a volleyball and on the run of Muncie Central player took it with no one near him and laid it in and the game essentially ended but Matt Cabot had the game of his life. Jeff Sagarin (00:33:21): I think he may have led the game of anyone, the most rebounds in the game. I compliment him. He was proud of that. And he's played, he said many a pickup game with Chandler Thompson, he said the greatest jumper he's ever been on the court within his entire life. You guys look up because I don't know if you know who Chandler Thompson. Is he played at Ball State. Look up on YouTube his put back dunk against UNLV in the 90 tournaments, the year UNLV won it at all. Look up Chandler Thompson's put back dunk. Rob Collie (00:33:52): Yeah, I was just getting into basketball then, I think. Like in the Loyola Marymount days. Yeah, Jerry Tarkanian. Does college basketball have the same amount of personalities it used to like in the coaching figures. I kind of doubt that it does. Rob Collie (00:34:06): With Tark gone, and of course, Bob Knight, it'll be hard to replace personalities like that. I don't know. I don't really watch college basketball anymore, so I wouldn't really know. But I get invited into those pick'em pools for the tournament March Madness every year and I never had the stamina to fill them out. And they offer those sheets where they'll fill it out for you. But why would I do that? Jeff Sagarin (00:34:28): I've got to tell you a story involving Wayne and I. Rob Collie (00:34:31): Okay. Jeff Sagarin (00:34:31): In the 80 tournament, I had gotten a program running that would to simulate the tournament if you fed in the power ratings. It understood who'd play who and you simulate it a zillion times, come up with the odds. So going into the tournament, we had Purdue maybe the true odds against him should have been let's say, I'll make it up seven to one. Purdue and Iowa, they had Ronnie Lester, I remember. Jeff Sagarin (00:34:57): The true odds against them should have been about 7-1. The bookmakers were giving odds of 40-1. So Wayne and I looked at each other and said, "That seems like a big edge." In theory, well, odds are still against them. Let's bet $25 apiece on both Purdue and Iowa. The two of them made the final four. Jeff Sagarin (00:35:20): In Indianapolis, I'll put it this way, their consolation game gave us no consolation. Rob Collie (00:35:30): Man. Jeff Sagarin (00:35:31): And then one of the games, Joe Barry Carroll of Purdue, they're down by one they UCLA. I'm sure he was being contested. I don't mean he was all by himself. It's always easy for the fan who can't play to mock the player. I don't mean... He was being fiercely contested by UCLA. The net result was he missed with fierce contesting one foot layup that would have won the game for Purdue, that would have put them into the championship game and Iowa could have beaten Louisville, except their best player, Ronnie Lester had to leave the game because he had aggravated a bad knee injury that he just couldn't play well on. Jeff Sagarin (00:36:11): But as I said, no consolation, right Wayne? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:36:14): Right. Jeff Sagarin (00:36:15): That was the next to the last year they ever had a consolation game. The last one was in '81 between LSU and Virginia. Rob Collie (00:36:23): Was it the '81 tournament that you said that you liked Indiana to win it? Jeff Sagarin (00:36:28): Wait, I'm going to show you how you get punished for hubris. I learned my lesson. The next year in '82, I had gotten a lot of notoriety, good kind of notoriety for having them to win in '81. People thought, "Wow! This is like the Oracle." So now as the tournament's about to begin in '82, I started getting a lot of calls, which I never used to do like from the media, "Who do you got Jeff?" I said confidently, "Oregon State." I had them number one, I think they'd only lost one game the whole year and they had a guy named Charlie Sitting, a 6'8 guy who was there all American forward. Jeff Sagarin (00:37:06): He was the star and I was pretty confident and to be honest, probably obnoxious when I'd be talking to the press. So they make the regional final against Georgetown and it was being held out west. I'm sort of confidently waiting for the game to be played and I'm sure there'll be advancing to the final four. And they were playing against freshmen, Patrick Ewing. Jeff Sagarin (00:37:29): In the first 10 seconds of the game, maybe you can find the video, there was a lob pass into Ewing, his back was to the basket, he's like three feet from the basket without even looking, he dunks backwards over his head over Charlie Sitton. And you should see the expression on Charlie Sitton's face. I said, "Oh my god! This game is over." The final score was 68-43 in Georgetown's favor. It was a massacre. It taught me the lesson, never be cocky, at least in public because you get slapped down, you get slapped down when you do that. Rob Collie (00:38:05): I don't want to get into this yet again on this show. But you should call up Nate Silver and maybe talk to him a little bit about the same sort of thing. Makes very big public calls that haven't been necessarily so great lately. Just for everyone's benefit, because even though I'd live in the state of Indiana, I didn't grow up here. Let's just be clear. Who won the NCAA tournament in 1981? Jeff Sagarin (00:38:29): Indiana. Rob Collie (00:38:30): Okay. All right, so there you go. Right. Jeff Sagarin (00:38:33): But who didn't win it in 1982? Oregon State. Rob Collie (00:38:38): Yeah. Did you see The Hunt for Red October where Jack Ryan's character, there's a point where he guesses. He says, "Ramy, as always, goes to port in the bottom half of the hour with his crazy Ivan maneuvers and he turns out to be right." And that's how he ends up getting the captain of the American sub to trust him as Jack Ryan knew this Captain so well, even knew which direction he would turn in the crazy Ivan. But it turns out he was just bluffing. He knew he needed a break and it was 50/50. Rob Collie (00:39:08): So it's a good thing that they were talking to you in the Indiana year, originally. Not the Oregon State year. That wouldn't be a good first impression. If you had to have it go one way or the other in those two years, the order in which it happened was the right order. Jeff Sagarin (00:39:22): Yeah, nobody would have listened to me. They would have said, "You got lucky." They said, "You still were terrible in the Oregon State year." Rob Collie (00:39:28): But you just pick the 10th rated team and be right. The chances of that being just luck are pretty low. I like it. That's a good story. So the two of you have never collaborated like on the Mark Cuban stuff? On the Mavs or any of that? Jeff Sagarin (00:39:43): We've done three things together. The Hoops computer game, which we did from '86-'95. And then we did the Game Theory thing for football, but we never got a client. But we did get White to kind of follow it. There's an interesting anecdote, I won't I mentioned the guy who kind of screwed it up. But he assigned a particular grad assistant to fill and we needed a matrix filled in each week with a bunch of numbers with regarding various things like turnovers. Jeff Sagarin (00:40:13): If play A is called against defense B, what would happen type of thing? The grad assistant hated doing it. And one week, he gave us numbers such that the computer came back with when Indiana had the ball, it should quick kick on first down every time it got the ball. We figured it out what was going on, the guy had given Indiana a 15% chance of a turnover, no matter what play they called in any situation against any defense. Jeff Sagarin (00:40:44): So the computer correctly surmised it were better to punt the ball. This is like playing Russian roulette with the ball. Let's just kick it away. So we ended up losing the game in real life 10-0. White told us then when we next saw him, we used to see him on Monday or Tuesday mornings, real early in the day, like seven o'clock, but that's when you could catch him. And he kind of looked at us and said, "You know what? We couldn't have done any worse said had we kicked [inaudible 00:41:14]." Rob Collie (00:41:13): That's nice. Jeff Sagarin (00:41:14): And then we did Mark Cuban. That was the last thing. We did that with Cuban from basically 2000-2011 with a couple of random projects in the summer for him, but really on a day to day basis during a season from 2000-2011. Rob Collie (00:41:30): And during that era is when I met Wayne at Microsoft. That was very much an active, ongoing project when Wayne was there in Redmond a couple of times that we crossed paths. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:41:43): And we worked for the Knicks one year, and they won 54 games. Jeff Sagarin (00:41:47): Here with Glen Grunwald. So they won more games than they'd ever won in a whole bunch of years. And like three weeks before the season starts or so in mid September, the next fire, Glen Grunwald. Let's put it this way, it didn't bother us that the Knicks never made the playoffs again until this past season. Rob Collie (00:42:10): That's great. You were doing, was it lineup optimization for those teams? Jeff Sagarin (00:42:15): Wayne knows more about this than I do. Because I would create the raw data, well, I call it output, but it needed refinement. That was Wayne's department. So you do all the talking now, Wayne. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:42:26): Yeah. Jeff wrote an amazing FORTRAN program. So basically, Jeff rated teams and we figured out we could rate players based on how the score of the game moved during the game. We could evaluate lineups and figure out head to head how certain players did against each other. Now, every team does this stuff and ESPN has Real Plus-Minus and Nate Silver has Raptor. But we started this. Jeff Sagarin (00:42:58): I mean, everybody years ago knew about Plus-Minus. Well, intuitively, let's say you're a gym rat, you first come to a gym, you don't know anyone there and you start getting in the crowd of guys that show up every afternoon to play pickup. You start sensing, you don't even have to know their names. Hey, when that guy is on the court, no matter who his teammates are, they seem to win. Jeff Sagarin (00:43:20): Or when this guy's on the court, they always seem to lose. Intuitively since it matters, who's on the court with you and who your opponents are. Like to make an example for Rob, let's say you happen to be in a pickup game. You've snuck into Pauley Pavilion during the summer and you end up with like four NBA current playing professionals on your team and let's say an aging Michael Jordan now shows up. He ends up with four guys who are graduate students in philosophy because they have to exercise. You're going to have a better plus-minus than Michael Jordan. But when you take into account who your teammates were and who's his were, if you knew enough about the players, he'd have a better rating than you, new Michael Jordan would. Jeff Sagarin (00:44:08): But you'd have a better raw plus-minus than he would. You have to know who the people on the court were. That was Wayne's insight. Tell them how it all started, how you met ran into Mark Cuban, Wayne, when you were in Dallas? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:44:20): Well, Mark was in my class in 1981, statistics class and I guess the year 1999, we went to a Pacers Maverick game in Dallas. Jeff Sagarin (00:44:31): March of 2000. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:44:33): March of 2000, because our son really liked the Pacers. Mark saw me in the stands. He said, "I remember you from class and I remember you for being on Jeopardy." He had just bought the team. And he said, "If you can do anything to help the Mavericks, let me know." And then I was swimming in the pool one day and I said, "If Jeff rates teams, we should rate players." And so we worked on this and Jeff wrote this amazing FORTRAN program, which I'm sure he could not rewrite today. Jeff Sagarin (00:45:04): Oh, God. Well, I was motivated then. Willingness to work hard for many hours at a time, for days at a time to get something to work when you could use the money that would result from it. I don't have that in me anymore. I'm amazed when I look at the source code. I say, "Man, I couldn't do that now." I like to think I could. Necessity is the mother of invention. Rob Collie (00:45:28): I've many, many, many times said and this is still true to this day, like a previous version of me that made something amazing like built a model or something like that, I look back and go, "Whoo, I was really smart back then." Well, at the same time I know I'm improving. I know that I'm more capable today than I was a year ago. Even just accrued wisdom makes a big difference. When you really get lasered in on something and are very, very focused on it, you're suddenly able to execute at just a higher level than what you're typically used to. Jeff Sagarin (00:46:01): As time went on, we realized what Cuban wanted and other teams like the next would want. Nobody really wanted to wade through the monster set of files that the FORTRAN would create. I call that the raw output that nobody wanted to read, but it was needed. Wayne wrote these amazing routines in Excel that became understandable and usable by the clients. Jeff Sagarin (00:46:26): The way Wayne wrote the Excel, they could basically say, "Tell us what happens when these three guys are in the lineup, but these two guys are not in the lineup." It was amazing the stuff that he wrote. Wayne doesn't give himself the credit that otherwise after a while, nobody would have wanted what we were doing because what I did was this sort of monstrous and to some extent boring. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:46:48): This is what Rob's company does basically. They try and distill data into understandable form that basically helps the company make decisions. Rob Collie (00:46:58): It is a heck of a discipline, right? Because if you have the technical and sort of mental skills to execute on something that's that complex, and it starts down in the weeds and just raw inputs, it's actually really, really, really easy to hand it off in a form that isn't yet quite actionable for the intended audience. It's really fascinating to you, the person that created it. Rob Collie (00:47:23): It's not digestible or actionable yet for the consumer crowd, whoever the target consumer is. I've been there. I've handed off a lot of things back in the day and said, "The professional equivalent of..." And it turned out to not be... It turned out to be, "Go back and actually make it useful, Rob." So I'm familiar with that. For sure. I think I've gotten better at that over the years. As a journey, you're never really complete with. Something I wanted to throw in here before I forget, which is, Jeff, you have an amazing command of certain dates. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:47:56): Oh, yeah. Jeff Sagarin (00:47:57): Give me some date that you know the answer about what day of the week it was, and I'll tell you, but I'll tell you how I did it. Rob Collie (00:48:04): Okay, how about June 6, 1974? Jeff Sagarin (00:48:08): That'd be a Thursday. Rob Collie (00:48:10): Holy cow. Okay. How do you do that? Jeff Sagarin (00:48:11): June 11th of 1974 would be a Tuesday, so five days earlier would be a Thursday. Rob Collie (00:48:19): How do you know June 11? Jeff Sagarin (00:48:19): I just do. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:48:23): It's his birthday. Rob Collie (00:48:24): No, it's not. He wasn't born in '74. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:48:27): No, but June 11th. Jeff Sagarin (00:48:29): I happen to know that June 11 was a Tuesday in 1974, that's all. Rob Collie (00:48:34): I'm still sitting here waiting what passes for an explanation. Is one coming? Jeff Sagarin (00:48:39): I'll tell you another way I could have done it, but I didn't. In 1963, John Kennedy gave his famous speech in Berlin, Ich bin ein Berliner, on Wednesday, June 26th. That means that three weeks earlier was June 5, the Wednesday. So Thursday would have been June 6th. You're going to say, "Well, why is that relevant?" Well, 1963 is congruent to 1974 days of the week was. Rob Collie (00:49:07): Okay. This is really, really impressive. Jeff, you seem so normal up until now. Thomas LaRock (00:49:16): You want throw him off? Just ask for any date before 1759? Jeff Sagarin (00:49:20): No, I can do that. It'll take me a little longer though. Thomas LaRock (00:49:22): Because once they switch from Gregorian- Jeff Sagarin (00:49:25): No, well, I'll give it a Gregorian style, all right. I'm assuming that it's a Gregorian date. The calendar totally, totally repeats every possible cycle every 400 years. For example, if you happen to say, "What was September 10, of 1621?" I would quickly say, "It's a Friday." Because 1621 is exactly the same as 2021 says. Rob Collie (00:49:52): Does this translate into other domains as well? Do you have sort of other things that you can sort of get this quick, intuitive mastery over or is it very, very specific to this date arithmetic? Jeff Sagarin (00:50:02): Probably specific. In other words, I think Wayne's a bit quicker than me. I'm certain does mental arithmetic stuff, but to put everybody in their place, I don't think you ever met him, Wayne. Remember the soccer player, John Swan? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:50:14): Yeah. Jeff Sagarin (00:50:15): He had a friend from high school, they went to Brownsburg High School. I forgot the kid's name. He was like a regular student at IU. He was not a well scholar, but he was a smart kid. I'd say he was slightly faster than me at most mental arithmetic things. So you should never get cocky and think that other people, "Oh, they don't have the pedigree." Some people are really good at stuff you don't expect them to be good at, really good. This kid was really good. Rob Collie (00:50:45): As humans, we need to hyper simplify things in order to have a mental model we can use to navigate a very, very complicated world. That's a bit of a strength. But it's also a weakness in many ways. We tend to try to reduce intelligence down to this single linear number line, when it's really like a vast multi dimensional coordinate space. There are so many dimensions of intelligence. Rob Collie (00:51:11): I grew up with the trope in my head that athletes weren't very bright. Until the first time that I had to try to run a pick and roll versus pick and pop. I discovered that my brain has a clock speed that's too slow to run the pick and roll versus pick and pop. It's not that I'm not smart enough to know if this, than that. I can't process it fast enough to react. You look at like an NFL receiver or an NFL linebacker or whatever, has to process on every single snap. Rob Collie (00:51:45): It's amazing how much information they have the processor. Set aside the physical skill that they have, which I also don't have and never did. On top of that, I don't have the brain at all to do these sorts of things. It's crazy. Jeff Sagarin (00:52:00): With the first few years, I was in Bloomington from, let's say, '77 to '81, I needed the money, so I tutored for the athletic department. They tutored math. And I remember once I was given an assignment, it was a defensive end, real nice kid. He was having trouble with the kind of math we would find really easy. But you could tell he had a mental block. These guys had had bad experiences and they just, "I can't do this. I can't do this." Jeff Sagarin (00:52:25): I asked this defensive end, "Tell me what happens when the ball snap, what do you have to do?" I said, "In real time, you're being physically pulverized, the other guy's putting a forearm or more right into your face. And your brain has to be checking about five different things going on in the backfield, other linemen." I said, "What you're doing with somebody else trying to hurt you physically is much more intellectually difficult, at least to my mind than this problem in the book in front of you and the book is not punching you in the face." Jeff Sagarin (00:52:57): He relaxed and he can do the problems in the room. I'd make sure. I picked not a problem that I had solved. I'd give him another one that I hadn't solved and he could do it. I realized, my God, what these guys they're doing takes actually very quick reacting brainpower and my own personal experience in elementary school, let's say in sixth grade after school, we'd be playing street football, just touch football. When I'd be quarterback, I'd start running towards the line of scrimmage. Jeff Sagarin (00:53:26): If the other team came after me, they'd leave a receiver wide open. I said, "This is easy." So I throw for touchdown. Well, in seventh grade, we go to junior high. We have squads in gym class, and on a particular day, I got to be quarterback. Now, instead of guys sort of leisurely counting one Mississippi, two Mississippi, they are pouring in. It's not that you're going to get hurt, but you're going to get tagged and the play would be over. It says touch football, and I'd be frantically looking for receivers to get open. Let's just say it was not a good experience. I realized there's a lot more to be in quarterback than playing in the street. It's so simple. Jeff Sagarin (00:54:08): They come after you and they leave the receivers wide open. That's what evidently sets apart. Let's say the Tom Brady's from the guys who don't even make it after one year in the NFL. If you gave them a contest throwing the ball, seeing who could throw it through a tire at 50 yards, maybe the young kid is better than Tom Brady but his brain can't process what's happening on the field fast enough. Thomas LaRock (00:54:32): As someone who likes to you know, test things thoroughly, that student of yours who was having trouble on the test, you said the book wasn't hitting him physically. Did you try possibly? Jeff Sagarin (00:54:45): I should have shoved it in his face. Thomas LaRock (00:54:49): Physically, just [crosstalk 00:54:50]. Rob Collie (00:54:50): Just throw things at him. Yeah. Thomas LaRock (00:54:52): Throw an eraser, a piece of chalk. Just something. Jeff Sagarin (00:54:56): I'll tell you now, I don't want to name him. He's a real nice guy. I'll tell you a funny anecdote about him. I had hurt my knuckle in a pickup basketball game. I had a cast on it and I was talking to my friend. And he had just missed making a pro football team the previous summer and he was on the last cut. He'd made it to the final four guys. Jeff Sagarin (00:55:18): He was trying to become a linebacker I think. They told him, "You're just not mean enough." That was in my mind. I thought, "Well, I don't know about that." He said, "Yeah, I had the same kind of fractured knuckle you got." I said, "How'd you get it?" "Pick up [inaudible 00:55:32]. Punching a guy in the face." But he wasn't mean enough for the NFL. And I heard a story from a friend of mine who I witnessed it, this guy was at one point working security at a local holiday inn that would have these dances. Jeff Sagarin (00:55:47): There was some guy who was like from the Hells Angels who was causing trouble. He's a big guy, 6'5, 300 whatever. And he actually got into an argument with my friend who was the security guy. Angel guy throws a punch at this guy who's not mean enough for the NFL. With one punch the Jeff Sagarin tutoree knocked the Hell's Angels guy flat unconscious. He was a comatose on the floor. But he wasn't mean enough for the NFL. Rob Collie (00:56:17): Tom if I told my plus minus story about my 1992 dream team on this show, I think maybe I have. I don't remember. Thomas LaRock (00:56:24): You might have but this seems like a perfect episode for that. Rob Collie (00:56:27): I think Jeff and Wayne, if I have told it before, it was probably with Wayne. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:56:31): I don't remember. Rob Collie (00:56:32): Perfect. It'll be new to everyone that matters. Tom remembers. So, in 1992, the Orlando Magic were a recent expansion team in the NBA. Sometime in that summer, the same summer where the 1992 Dream Team Olympic team went and dominated, there was a friend of our family who ran a like a luxury automotive accessories store downtown and he basically hit the jackpot. He'd been there forever. There was like right next to like the magic practice facility. Rob Collie (00:57:09): And so all the magic players started frequenting his shop. That was where they tricked out all their cars and added all the... So his business was just booming as a result of magic coming to town. I don't know this guy ever had ever been necessarily terribly athletic at any point in his life. He had this bright idea to assemble a YMCA team that would play in the local YMCA league in Orlando, the city league. Rob Collie (00:57:35): He had secured the commitment of multiple magic players to be on our team as well as like Jack Givens, who was the radio commentator for The Magic and had been a longtime NBA star with his loaded team. And then it was like, this guy, we'll call this guy Bill. It's not his real name. So it was Bill and the NBA players and me and my dad, a couple of younger guys that actually I didn't know, but were pretty good but they weren't even like college level players. Rob Collie (00:58:07): And so we signed up for the A league, the most competitive league that Orlando had to offer. And then none of the NBA players ever showed up. I said never, but they did show up one time. But we were getting blown out. Some of the people who were playing against us were clearly ex college players. We couldn't even get the ball across half court. Jeff Sagarin (00:58:33): Wayne, does this sound familiar to you? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:58:35): Yes, tell this story. Jeff Sagarin (00:58:38): Wayne, when he was a grad student at Yale, and I'm living in the White Irish neighborhood called Dorchester in Boston, I was young and spry. At that time, I would think I could play. Wayne as a grad student at Yale had entered a team with a really intimidating name of administration science in the New Haven City League, which was played I believe at Hill House high school at night. So Wayne said, "Hey Jeff, why don't you take a Greyhound bus down. We're going to play against this team called the New Haven All Stars. It ought to be interesting." Rob Collie (00:59:14): Wayne's voice in that story sound a little bit like the guy at USA Today for a moment. It was the same voice, the cigar chomping. Anyway, continue. Jeff Sagarin (00:59:25): They edged this out 75-31. I thought I was lined up against the guy... I thought it was Paul Silas who was may be sort of having a bus man's holiday playing for the New Haven all-stars. So a couple weeks later, Paul Silas was my favorite player on the Celtics. He could rebound, that's all I could do. I was pitiful at anything else. But I worked at that and I was pretty strong and I worked at jumping, etc. Jeff Sagarin (00:59:53): So a few weeks later, Wayne calls me up and says, "Hey Jeff, we're playing the New Haven All-Stars again. Why don't you come down again and we'll get revenge against them this time?" Let's just say it didn't work out that way. And I remember one time I had Paul Silas completely boxed out. It was perfect textbook and I could jump. If my hands were maybe at rim level and I could see a pair of pants a foot over mine from behind, he didn't tell me and he got the rebound and I'm at rim level. Jeff Sagarin (01:00:24): We were edged out by a score so monstrous, I won't repeat it here. I'm not a guard at all. But I ended up with the ball... They full court pressed the whole game. Rob Collie (01:00:34): Of course, once they figure out- Jeff Sagarin (01:00:36): That we can't play and I'm not even a guard. It was ludicrous. My four teammates left me in terror. They just said, "We're going down court." So I'm all alone, they have four guys on me and my computer like my thought, "Well, they've got four guys on me. That must mean my four teammates are being guarded by one guy down court. This should be easy." I look, I look. They didn't steal the ball out of my hands or nothing. I'm still holding on to it. They're pecking away but they didn't foul me. I give them credit for that. I was like, "Where the hell are my teammates?" Jeff Sagarin (01:01:08): They were in terror hiding in single file behind the one guy and I basically... I don't care if you bleeping or not, I said, "Fuck it." And I just threw the ball. Good two overhand pass, long pass. I had my four teammates down there and they had one guy and you can guess who got the ball. After the game I asked them, I said, "You guys seem fairly good. Are you anybody?" The guy said, "Yeah, we're the former Fairfield varsity we were in the NIT about two years ago." Jeff Sagarin (01:01:39): I looked it up once. Fairfield did make the NIT, I think in '72. And this took place in like February of '74. It taught me a lesson because I looked up what my computer rating for Fairfield would have been compared that to, let's say, UCLA and NC State and figured at a minimum, we'd be at least a 100-200 point underdog against them in a real game, but it would have been worse because we would never get the ball pass mid-court. Rob Collie (01:02:10): Yeah, I mean, those games that I'm talking about in that YMCA League, I mean, the scores were far worse. We were losing like 130-11. Jeff Sagarin (01:02:19): Hey, good that's worse than New Haven all-stars beat us but not quite that bad. Rob Collie (01:02:24): I remember one time actually managing to get the ball across half court and pulling up for a three-point shot off of the break. And then having the guy that had assembled the team, take me aside at the next time out and tell me that I needed to pass that. I'm just like, "No. You got us into this embarrassment. If I get to the point where like, there's actually a shot we can take like a shot, we could take a shot. I'm not going to dump it off to you." Thomas LaRock (01:02:57): Not just a shot, but the shot of gold. Rob Collie (01:03:00): The one time we did get those guys to show up, we were still kind of losing because those guys didn't want to get hurt. It didn't make any sense for them to be there. There was no upside for them to be in this game. I'm sure that they just sort of been guilted into showing up. But then this Christian Laettner lookalike on the other team. He was as big as Laettner. Rob Collie (01:03:25): This is the kind of teams we were playing against. There was a long rebound and that Laettner lookalike got that long rebound and basically launched from the free throw line and dunked over Terry Catledge, the power forward for the Magic at the time. And at that moment, Terry Catledge scored the next 45 points in the game himself. That was all it was. Rob Collie (01:03:50): He'd just be standing there waiting for me to inbound the ball to him, he would take it coast to coast and score. He'd backpedal on defense and he would somehow steal the ball and he'd go down and score again. He just sent a message. And if that guy hadn't dunked over Catledge, we would have never seen what Catledge was capable of. So remember, this is a team th

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Inverse Podcast
Nonviolent Atonement Series: Mako Nagasawa

Inverse Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 65:33


Mako Nagasawa joined Dr. Drew Hart and Jarrod McKenna to talk about Nonviolent Atonement. Mako Nagasawa grew up in Cerritos, CA, and went north to Stanford, where he studied Industrial Engineering and Public Policy, with a focus on education. He worked at Intel Corp for 6 years while serving a Spanish-speaking ministry to Mexican immigrants in East Palo Alto, CA. He married Ming in May 1999 and moved to Boston, MA. He then worked for two startup companies trying to bring technology and jobs to inner-city communities. Mako earned a Master’s in Theological Studies from Holy Cross Greek Orthodox Seminary in May 2019. Since 2000, Mako, Ming, and their two children John and Zoe have lived among friends in a Christian intentional community house in a Black and Brown neighborhood in Dorchester. Mako has done campus ministry since 2001 and founded The Anástasis Center in 2014 (then called New Humanity Institute). Follow Mako on Instagram @makonagasawa Follow Drew Hart on Instagram and Twitter @druhart. Follow Jarrod McKenna on Instagram and Twitter @jarrodmckenna. Discover our global community on Twitter and Instagram @inversepodcast. Become a Patron of Inverse at https://www.patreon.com/InVerse Inverse Podcast is produced by Jen Kinney @iamjenkinney With thanks to David Andrew (@davidjandrew) for the ongoing use of his music in this podcast.

Nightside With Dan Rea
What to Do at Mass and Cass... Part 2 (9 p.m.)

Nightside With Dan Rea

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 38:05


It is National Recovery Month and in Boston the opioid epidemic has reached the level of a public health emergency. District 3 City Councilor from Dorchester, Frank Baker, joins Dan to discuss the conundrum of what has become the city's epidemic center, the intersection of Massachusetts Avenue and Melnea Cass Boulevard. Recently the “comfort station” at Mass and Cass, a center for addicts and the homeless to find toilets, handwashing, and tents, was permanently closed. What should be done to assist Boston's afflicted?

Nightside With Dan Rea
What to Do at Mass and Cass... Part 1 (8 p.m.)

Nightside With Dan Rea

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 40:24


It is National Recovery Month and in Boston the opioid epidemic has reached the level of a public health emergency. District 3 City Councilor from Dorchester, Frank Baker, joins Dan to discuss the conundrum of what has become the city's epidemic center, the intersection of Massachusetts Avenue and Melnea Cass Boulevard. Recently the “comfort station” at Mass and Cass, a center for addicts and the homeless to find toilets, handwashing, and tents, was permanently closed. What should be done to assist Boston's afflicted?

Boston Confidential Beantown's True Crime Podcast
Kimberly Rae Harbor 1990- On Halloween night Kim, was fatally savaged by her neighbors

Boston Confidential Beantown's True Crime Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 36:09


Kimberly had a host of issues, crack cocaine chief among them. She was trying to get her life in order, so her seven year old child could have a future. She was walking with a friend Halloween night, when a pack of gang members ran them both down and beat them with a tree branch, they were robbed of one dollar and then Kimberly suffered what can only be described as nazi level torture. Kim was stabbed and slashed over 130 times. stomped and kicked countless times, but that wasn't enough for this rampaging gang, six of eight men raped her as well. She was left to die in Franklin Field, Dorchester, Ma. Eight men and boys, members of the Franklin Field Pistons Gangs were ultimately charged. The level of depravity shocked the City of Boston as the perpetrators were her neighbors. A shocking and senseless murder.Commonwealth v William C. Jameshttps://bit.ly/3AuNCyeMass Parole Boardhttps://bit.ly/3hPEP2kOrlando Newspaper https://bit.ly/3Asup02

WBZ NewsRadio 1030 - News Audio
Bullet Grazes Seven-Year-Old Girl In Dorchester

WBZ NewsRadio 1030 - News Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 0:26


WBZ's Drew Moholland tells us the girl is expected to be okay

The GetUp Crew
GetUp Crew : What's Hot and Trending (Friday,9/17)

The GetUp Crew

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 10:29


Close call for a 7 year old being grazed by a bullet in Dorchester, Lil' Nas X is a proud parent of…Montero (new album is out)  

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Preliminary-Palooza

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 166:51


On today's Boston Public Radio, we bring listeners a day full of mayoral coverage: Adam Reilly kicks off election day by weighing in on why voter turnout tends to be low and which candidates he thinks has an advantage. He also talks about how sometimes having too many good candidates can depress voter turnout. Reilly is co-host of GBH's Politics podcast, “The Scrum.” Then, we hear from all the major candidates in the mayoral primary.  Boston City Councilor Annissa Essaibi George discusses her years as an educator and small business owner as qualifications for the city's top job. City Councilor Essaibi George is running for mayor of Boston. Boston City Councilor Andrea Campbell highlights her focus on affordable housing, public school policies and the opioid crisis as key parts of her background in running for mayor. Campbell is a Boston City Council member representing District 4, including parts of Dorchester, Mattapan, Jamaica Plain and Roslindale. She is running for mayor of Boston. Boston City Councilor Michelle Wu points to her stake in the city, with her children in public schools and mother receiving mental health care, as well as her years of experience in City Hall, as her strengths as potential mayor. Wu is a Boston City Councilor At-Large running for mayor of Boston. John Barros talks about his passion for environmental justice and neighborhood improvement work in Boston as reasons why voters should elect him. Barros most recently served as Boston's chief of economic development in the Walsh administration, and is running for mayor of Boston. Acting Mayor Kim Janey emphasizes her experience growing up in Boston, her non-profit work with children and families and service as acting mayor as qualifications for the job. Janey is the Acting Mayor of Boston, and is running for mayor of Boston. Throughout the show, we also take listener calls about who they're voting for and why. John King ends the show by putting the Boston mayoral race in a national context. He talks about voter turnout patterns across the country, California's recall election of Governor Gavin Newsom and worries about Republican claims of rigged elections following the 2020 presidential election. King is CNN's Chief National Correspondent and anchor of "Inside Politics,” which airs weekdays and Sunday mornings at 8 a.m.

Toucher & Rich
Felger & Mazz's Personal Workstations // Red Sox Lose 5-4 // Monday Night Football - 9/14 (Hour 1)

Toucher & Rich

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 41:55


(00:00) Fred discovers Felger and Mazz workstations at the Sports Hub. The guys also discuss their excitement of moving out of Dorchester to the brand new studios in Waltham next summer. (17:36) WHAT HAPPENED LAST NIGHT: Boston's costly error sealed the Mariners' 5-4 win over the Red Sox on Monday night. Derek Carr and the Las Vegas Raiders rallied for a dramatic overtime win. Watch Toucher & Rich every morning on Twitch! Watch them live or whenever you want: Twitch.tv/thesportshub

Strange New England
The Living Machine of John Murray Spear

Strange New England

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 22:17


It looks like a small desk without any legs, just sitting there on a table, a well-fashioned rectangular wooden box containing within it a drawer that pulls out to reveal a crucifix, a journal, a spoon, bottle of white powder and sundry other items that, when attached to the device on top of the box, did something very special, or at least, that's what was claimed. The device is symmetrical and in its center is a glass column surmounted by a small cast iron skull wearing a helmet and within the glass column one can glimpse a brass bell suspended on a chain. On either side of the glass column are two black horns, much like the ones you would later see on Edison's talking machines and to their sides, a set of brass balance scales, connected to weights. Near the rear on each side are two glass Crookes solar radiometers, those little glass spheres you can still buy with a metal spinner in the center, moved by the sunlight and photons. There are other strange contrivances attached to this peculiar amalgam of technology, but exactly what the purpose of this device is was made clear by its inventor over a hundred years ago and it was so famous and its purpose so spectacular that it made the national papers and was the talk of the nation. This was purported by its inventor and his followers to be a ‘living machine,' designed and created by angels for the sole purpose of….well, we're getting ahead of ourselves. It would be best to begin at the beginning and tell the story. If you look closely at this curious device, you will see engraved in a small brass plate the words, “New Motive Power” and the name John Murray Spear. In the summer of 1818, a young woman named Mary Shelley was spending an unsettling vacation with her husband, Percy Bysshe Shelley and Lord Byron in a villa on Lake Geneva in Switzerland. During a bout of cold weather the poets decided to have a contest to see who could come up with the strangest spooky story from among them. In a fit of creative energy seldom seen in literature, 18 year old Mary Shelley created what most people consider to be the founding work of science fiction, Frankenstein. From an assemblage of dead tissue and body parts, Doctor Victor Frankenstein creates a new being, the first and only one of his kind, known only as ‘the monster'. The work was fiction, of course, but it was timely. Science was the new frontier and people, though fascinated with it, knew very little about it. Indeed, science seemed to promise everything that magic used to describe. Her work became famous on both sides of the Atlantic and in all probability fed the imagination of the protagonist of our tale, John Murray Spear. His interest in electricity, to be specific, would lead to a contraption that would be part perpetual motion machine and part Frankenstein's monster and it would all happen with the help of Heaven above. John Murray Spear was born in Boston on September 16, 1804. By all accounts, and there are many, he was brought up to be thoughtful, compassionate and mindful of his fellow man. Named after the actual founder of the movement known as Universalism, he was destined to be connected with Heavenly pursuits for his entire life, even though life wasn't easy for John and his brother Charles who had to fend for their mother and grandmother while still children after their father died. There was work in the factories of Dorchester where they worked impossible hours to make ends meet, but through the ministration of their Sunday school teacher, both the brothers learned to read and write, giving John a way out of the factory and into the position of apprentice shoemaker. Things began to look up for him, but looking up was about to change his life forever. Like his namesake, John Murray Spear felt a calling to become a preacher. He was kind, gentle, thoughtful and full of love and generosity and though he was self-taught and never attended seminary, he began preaching and was well-received. He became an ordained Universalist minister in 1830. He married and the couple had five children. Not bad for a poor boy from Dorchester. He was particularly concerned with the abolitionist movement and he gave help to those people of color who had made it north and to freedom, only to find themselves also desperately poor and in need of assistance. Spear had a reputation for doing the work on the ground, walking among the poor, and he became very respected in his community. But something happened to John Murray Spear, something dreadful. During the winter of 1844-1845, Spear was speaking out in Portland,Maine to a mass of people who raged into a mob and beat him senseless. Spear was saved by an old friend, Oliver Dennett who also carefully nursed him back to health. To what extent his injuries included some kind of brain damage, we can never know, but something was changed in the mind of Spear, and he was not in tune with other places, other beings… Shortly after Spear recovered, his friend Dennett died. One can imagine the sense of loss Spear must have felt, but even stranger what sense of wonder must have pervaded his mind when he sat and watched his hand - seemingly of its own accord and without his own volition, picked up a pen and began to write message to him from, of all people, his dead compatriot - Oliver Dennett. The first note Spear received in this way instructed him to find a man named David Vining and help him. Even stranger, the note was signed by none other than Oliver. There is a condition known to modern medicine as Alien Hand Syndrome. It occurs when a person's hand seems to have a mind of its own and cannot be controlled by the owner of the hand. It is often the left hand and according to the U.S. National Institutes of Health, there are a variety of causes to this frightening condition: temporal lobe epilepsy, brain surgery, stroke, infection, tumors, aneurysm, among others. Given the fact that Spears had been beaten by an angry mob, is it possible that he had some kind of event or damage that initiated this syndrome? As with many who have suffered from it, it eventually faded and Oliver stopped writing letters, but before he did, Spears became convinced that he was in contact with the dead and that this automatic writing that was occurring came straight from the spiritual realm. But what is so strange is that David Vining was real. Time after time, Oliver directed Spear to people who needed his help. Spear was indefatigable - willing to travel far on these missions from the dead. Word of his connection to the spirit realm and his good works began to spread. In 1848, the Fox sisters, Catherine and Mararetta, began the Spiritualist movement in the United States. While still children, the sisters began to witness strange rappings in their house in the hamlet of Hydesville, New York. One thing led to another and soon, the nation was introduced to the idea that it was possible to talk to the dead, and that almost everybody could do it. Mediums could act as connections to those who had passed on and great comfort could be had about the life of the world to come simply by attending a seance and witnessing the demonstrations of the mediums. Of course John Murray Spear was aware of the movement - he had to have been. It was all the rage. And as he wondered about the actions of his hand and how the process was working, he could find no better explanation than that of being possessed by a kindly spirit, a goodly being who had taken care of him, still working from beyond the grave. Of course, we would have had no idea about anything as modern as Alien Hand Syndrome. To that end, Spear dove into the spiritualist movement. He gave spontaneous lectures where he allowed himself to be the medium through which other voices spoke. Already well-known and well-thought of, he became a celebrity of sorts. He attended seances and came to believe that he was not only dealing with the spirits of the dead, but also with spirits of a different sort altogether - angels...angels of electricity… During a deep trance among his followers, he willingly surrendered by body to that of seven spirits whose task it was to use his body as a vessel with which to construct the new motive power of the age, an age of enlightenment and of power that would flow directly from Heaven in the form of… well, we really don't know. An aficionado of magnetism and electricity, his angelic engineers conceived of a machine that would have analogues to a heart, to lungs, to all of the systems of the living body, but they would be mechanical in nature and would, once animated, move forward without any further input of energy. The machine would be built, but the spark of life would need to be imbued by another sort of power altogether. And so his followers donated over $2000, a huge sum of money in his time, and he spent the better part of a year building the Heavenly Machine from which the greatest gift of Heaven would flow. There were no blueprints. It was built from day to day, like Mrs. Winchester's house, with plans abandoned or changed or dropped at the whim of the celestial voices speaking through John Murray Spear. There was a revolving steel arm surmounted by two steel balls, both with embedded magnets. There are obvious positive and negative aspects to the machine, with zinc and copper plates - this was an electrical child being built by a man touched by...well, again, we're not sure. But as the months passed and word of his wondrous machine reached the masses, the newspapermen followed its evolution. He promised that this device would be Heaven's greatest gift to Man, a kind of Christlike telephone from which we might speak to God or at the very least, it would provide unlimited power to move the world into a new, more perfect state. The world had heard all of this kind of thing before with one singular exception: John Murray Spear had nothing of the charlatan about him. In fact, he was singularly unassailable because he had put himself on the front line for those in need, had championed for just causes and had even suffered at the hands of unruly mobs when standing for what was right. All those who came into contact with him truly believed that he was in earnest and that he was a good man who had the spiritual health of the nation in his heart. He made no money from his project. All of the funds raised went toward the construction of the device. His prayer gatherings were widely attended and for all the people knew, this man was in touch with the angels, and how the world needed such a thing was clear to them all. But the machine just kind of sat there and did nothing. No trouble, he insisted. It is but a vessel, like a human body, and it needed to be imbued with life. For that, he explained, people needed to remember that in nature, life was not perpetuated unless male met female. For this new Prometheus to come to life, a female influence would need to ignite it and for that, he searched for and wide for the child's mother. Two newspaper editors seized the opportunity to help Spear search for her. S. Crosby Hewitt and Alonzo Newton knew a good story when they saw one and they made sure there were headlines as the search progressed. It wasn't long before the angels told the world the name of the new Mary: Mrs. Semantha Mettler, the wife of a Boston doctor. She was also, not coincidentally, a medium. When she joined the room, Spear went into one of his trance states and she, like those in the room, had to ask themselves if they were in the presence of the Heavenly host itself when he spoke. The newspapers chronicle what he said that day when the mother met her child. In his trance state, the angels spoke: “How fondly, how constantly, how widely is this one beloved! How beautiful is the influence this woman exerts! Wherever she is she attracts In this particular she possesses a most remarkable character. Her friends know no bounds to their affection for this one; and there is nothing which they would leave undone to gratify her. There passes from this woman a very marked influence. It is not precisely the religious influence; it is not precisely the moral influence, it is not precisely the practical influence; but it is, so to speak, a compost of all; and these are charmingly intermingled, imparting a most adhesive influence. This medium has been commissioned to widely instruct this woman for a high purpose. There is before this woman a new and beautiful labor. At 10 o'clock tomorrow the purpose of his mission to this place will be unfolded. Let this woman be in the region of the tranquilities at that hour.” Beautiful labor: these were the words spoken by Spear while under the influence of the angels. And that was her purpose for this woman was supposed to be the conduit that would shunt the power of life from the celestial realm to the machine, spurring it into life, and in a sense, she was to give birth to it. After all, Spears had worked on the machine for nine months... The next morning, at 10 o'clock, Mrs. Mettler was brought into the chamber with the machine and went into her own trance, all while being witnessed by Spear and his followers. Soon, she began to experience all of the symptoms of labor. It was as though she was undergoing the full gestation of a child in the matter of an hour and the mechanism was designed to absorb her maternal influence. As she moved and writhed and moaned, the witnesses observed something no less than marvelous. As reported that evening in the Boston's New Era newspaper, “THE THING MOVES!” That day, the world changed. In Lynn, Massachusetts, a thing made of metal, chemicals and wood, began to pulsate like a heart. The monster had been given the spark. According to Spear, this living child would grow and soon would move the wheels of the world, replacing all other means of moving machinery. It would take over all. How strange it must have been there that day to watch the machine move. One must wonder, though, if these people had any idea how electricity worked and how copper and zinc react when a current is applied to them? The basic dynamics of a simple electric motor was not known to the world yet, but Spear may have touched upon something that a fellow from Vermont did in 1834, not many years before. Thomas Davenport invented the first battery powered electric motor to power a small printing press. A well-read man like Spear may have heard of Davenport's achievement, but may not have understood the forces involved. Electricity seemed magical, moving things with unseen forces. Perhaps Spear was correct in that one day, electricity would power the world, overwhelmingly moving the machines of industry, replacing water power and that of the steam engine. Certainly this extraordinary claim seems pretty commonplace today, but in his day, no one knew that. Perhaps it was nothing more than the movement of a metal plate responding to a magnetic field. People believed that invisible spirits could rap and tap and communicate through mediums. Why not build a machine to channel the power of God? News of the movement of the new machine spread throughout the land, but those who did not take to communicating with the dead and the ways of the spiritualists had no use for such practices. To a mainstream religious American audience, this might even have hinted of witchcraft and magic. Instead of being divinely inspired by the angels, was this some Devil's work? Reports claim that John Murray Spears' machine was destroyed by an angry mob, tearing it to pieces and trampling it beneath their feet. Spears faded into obscurity after that. He never thought to rebuild the machine and his hope to tap into an invisible power that might move the machines of the world was forgotten. Except it wasn't. An invisible force does move the machines of the world - electricity. He must have believed it would work and in his own way, he was right. It wasn't a hoax, as far as the idea goes. Given the knowledge of his age, we might even look back upon him, strange as his sensibilities seem to us today, he really did want to gift the world a very real power. Just not what he thought it was. And his machine? We thought it was destroyed - it was reported as such, but in 2019, in Greely, Colorado, a Miss Akerman passed away and her home, full of hoarded objects, was being cleared when the machine showed up resting in her attic. It must have sat there for one hundred and fifty-six years. If it isn't the real machine, even though it is clearly labeled, it certainly looks like the God machine of John Murray Spears. Whether or not it works remains a mystery, but then again, such things as this beg for speculation and make us wonder, “what makes it tick?” For that matter, what makes one want to know? Better to ask how a persons' hand might write messages of its own volition and how this alien hand could lead to a machine that claimed to be a robotic body for God. Sources John Murray Spear https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Murray_Spear https://uudb.org/articles/johnmurrayspear.html http://www.danbaines.com/blog/john-murray-spears-mechanical-messiah-discovered-in-colorado-attic/3/7/2019 Alien Hand Syndrome The National Library of Medicine - Alien Hand Syndrome

Strange New England
The Living Machine of John Murray Spear

Strange New England

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 22:17


It looks like a small desk without any legs, just sitting there on a table, a well-fashioned rectangular wooden box containing within it a drawer that pulls out to reveal a crucifix, a journal, a spoon, bottle of white powder and sundry other items that, when attached to the device on top of the box, did something very special, or at least, that's what was claimed. The device is symmetrical and in its center is a glass column surmounted by a small cast iron skull wearing a helmet and within the glass column one can glimpse a brass bell suspended on a chain. On either side of the glass column are two black horns, much like the ones you would later see on Edison's talking machines and to their sides, a set of brass balance scales, connected to weights. Near the rear on each side are two glass Crookes solar radiometers, those little glass spheres you can still buy with a metal spinner in the center, moved by the sunlight and photons. There are other strange contrivances attached to this peculiar amalgam of technology, but exactly what the purpose of this device is was made clear by its inventor over a hundred years ago and it was so famous and its purpose so spectacular that it made the national papers and was the talk of the nation. This was purported by its inventor and his followers to be a ‘living machine,' designed and created by angels for the sole purpose of….well, we're getting ahead of ourselves. It would be best to begin at the beginning and tell the story. If you look closely at this curious device, you will see engraved in a small brass plate the words, “New Motive Power” and the name John Murray Spear. In the summer of 1818, a young woman named Mary Shelley was spending an unsettling vacation with her husband, Percy Bysshe Shelley and Lord Byron in a villa on Lake Geneva in Switzerland. During a bout of cold weather the poets decided to have a contest to see who could come up with the strangest spooky story from among them. In a fit of creative energy seldom seen in literature, 18 year old Mary Shelley created what most people consider to be the founding work of science fiction, Frankenstein. From an assemblage of dead tissue and body parts, Doctor Victor Frankenstein creates a new being, the first and only one of his kind, known only as ‘the monster'. The work was fiction, of course, but it was timely. Science was the new frontier and people, though fascinated with it, knew very little about it. Indeed, science seemed to promise everything that magic used to describe. Her work became famous on both sides of the Atlantic and in all probability fed the imagination of the protagonist of our tale, John Murray Spear. His interest in electricity, to be specific, would lead to a contraption that would be part perpetual motion machine and part Frankenstein's monster and it would all happen with the help of Heaven above. John Murray Spear was born in Boston on September 16, 1804. By all accounts, and there are many, he was brought up to be thoughtful, compassionate and mindful of his fellow man. Named after the actual founder of the movement known as Universalism, he was destined to be connected with Heavenly pursuits for his entire life, even though life wasn't easy for John and his brother Charles who had to fend for their mother and grandmother while still children after their father died. There was work in the factories of Dorchester where they worked impossible hours to make ends meet, but through the ministration of their Sunday school teacher, both the brothers learned to read and write, giving John a way out of the factory and into the position of apprentice shoemaker. Things began to look up for him, but looking up was about to change his life forever. Like his namesake, John Murray Spear felt a calling to become a preacher. He was kind, gentle, thoughtful and full of love and generosity and though he was self-taught and never attended seminary, he began preaching and was well-received. He became an ordained Universalist minister in 1830. He married and the couple had five children. Not bad for a poor boy from Dorchester. He was particularly concerned with the abolitionist movement and he gave help to those people of color who had made it north and to freedom, only to find themselves also desperately poor and in need of assistance. Spear had a reputation for doing the work on the ground, walking among the poor, and he became very respected in his community. But something happened to John Murray Spear, something dreadful. During the winter of 1844-1845, Spear was speaking out in Portland,Maine to a mass of people who raged into a mob and beat him senseless. Spear was saved by an old friend, Oliver Dennett who also carefully nursed him back to health. To what extent his injuries included some kind of brain damage, we can never know, but something was changed in the mind of Spear, and he was not in tune with other places, other beings… Shortly after Spear recovered, his friend Dennett died. One can imagine the sense of loss Spear must have felt, but even stranger what sense of wonder must have pervaded his mind when he sat and watched his hand - seemingly of its own accord and without his own volition, picked up a pen and began to write message to him from, of all people, his dead compatriot - Oliver Dennett. The first note Spear received in this way instructed him to find a man named David Vining and help him. Even stranger, the note was signed by none other than Oliver. There is a condition known to modern medicine as Alien Hand Syndrome. It occurs when a person's hand seems to have a mind of its own and cannot be controlled by the owner of the hand. It is often the left hand and according to the U.S. National Institutes of Health, there are a variety of causes to this frightening condition: temporal lobe epilepsy, brain surgery, stroke, infection, tumors, aneurysm, among others. Given the fact that Spears had been beaten by an angry mob, is it possible that he had some kind of event or damage that initiated this syndrome? As with many who have suffered from it, it eventually faded and Oliver stopped writing letters, but before he did, Spears became convinced that he was in contact with the dead and that this automatic writing that was occurring came straight from the spiritual realm. But what is so strange is that David Vining was real. Time after time, Oliver directed Spear to people who needed his help. Spear was indefatigable - willing to travel far on these missions from the dead. Word of his connection to the spirit realm and his good works began to spread. In 1848, the Fox sisters, Catherine and Mararetta, began the Spiritualist movement in the United States. While still children, the sisters began to witness strange rappings in their house in the hamlet of Hydesville, New York. One thing led to another and soon, the nation was introduced to the idea that it was possible to talk to the dead, and that almost everybody could do it. Mediums could act as connections to those who had passed on and great comfort could be had about the life of the world to come simply by attending a seance and witnessing the demonstrations of the mediums. Of course John Murray Spear was aware of the movement - he had to have been. It was all the rage. And as he wondered about the actions of his hand and how the process was working, he could find no better explanation than that of being possessed by a kindly spirit, a goodly being who had taken care of him, still working from beyond the grave. Of course, we would have had no idea about anything as modern as Alien Hand Syndrome. To that end, Spear dove into the spiritualist movement. He gave spontaneous lectures where he allowed himself to be the medium through which other voices spoke. Already well-known and well-thought of, he became a celebrity of sorts. He attended seances and came to believe that he was not only dealing with the spirits of the dead, but also with spirits of a different sort altogether - angels...angels of electricity… During a deep trance among his followers, he willingly surrendered by body to that of seven spirits whose task it was to use his body as a vessel with which to construct the new motive power of the age, an age of enlightenment and of power that would flow directly from Heaven in the form of… well, we really don't know. An aficionado of magnetism and electricity, his angelic engineers conceived of a machine that would have analogues to a heart, to lungs, to all of the systems of the living body, but they would be mechanical in nature and would, once animated, move forward without any further input of energy. The machine would be built, but the spark of life would need to be imbued by another sort of power altogether. And so his followers donated over $2000, a huge sum of money in his time, and he spent the better part of a year building the Heavenly Machine from which the greatest gift of Heaven would flow. There were no blueprints. It was built from day to day, like Mrs. Winchester's house, with plans abandoned or changed or dropped at the whim of the celestial voices speaking through John Murray Spear. There was a revolving steel arm surmounted by two steel balls, both with embedded magnets. There are obvious positive and negative aspects to the machine, with zinc and copper plates - this was an electrical child being built by a man touched by...well, again, we're not sure. But as the months passed and word of his wondrous machine reached the masses, the newspapermen followed its evolution. He promised that this device would be Heaven's greatest gift to Man, a kind of Christlike telephone from which we might speak to God or at the very least, it would provide unlimited power to move the world into a new, more perfect state. The world had heard all of this kind of thing before with one singular exception: John Murray Spear had nothing of the charlatan about him. In fact, he was singularly unassailable because he had put himself on the front line for those in need, had championed for just causes and had even suffered at the hands of unruly mobs when standing for what was right. All those who came into contact with him truly believed that he was in earnest and that he was a good man who had the spiritual health of the nation in his heart. He made no money from his project. All of the funds raised went toward the construction of the device. His prayer gatherings were widely attended and for all the people knew, this man was in touch with the angels, and how the world needed such a thing was clear to them all. But the machine just kind of sat there and did nothing. No trouble, he insisted. It is but a vessel, like a human body, and it needed to be imbued with life. For that, he explained, people needed to remember that in nature, life was not perpetuated unless male met female. For this new Prometheus to come to life, a female influence would need to ignite it and for that, he searched for and wide for the child's mother. Two newspaper editors seized the opportunity to help Spear search for her. S. Crosby Hewitt and Alonzo Newton knew a good story when they saw one and they made sure there were headlines as the search progressed. It wasn't long before the angels told the world the name of the new Mary: Mrs. Semantha Mettler, the wife of a Boston doctor. She was also, not coincidentally, a medium. When she joined the room, Spear went into one of his trance states and she, like those in the room, had to ask themselves if they were in the presence of the Heavenly host itself when he spoke. The newspapers chronicle what he said that day when the mother met her child. In his trance state, the angels spoke: “How fondly, how constantly, how widely is this one beloved! How beautiful is the influence this woman exerts! Wherever she is she attracts In this particular she possesses a most remarkable character. Her friends know no bounds to their affection for this one; and there is nothing which they would leave undone to gratify her. There passes from this woman a very marked influence. It is not precisely the religious influence; it is not precisely the moral influence, it is not precisely the practical influence; but it is, so to speak, a compost of all; and these are charmingly intermingled, imparting a most adhesive influence. This medium has been commissioned to widely instruct this woman for a high purpose. There is before this woman a new and beautiful labor. At 10 o'clock tomorrow the purpose of his mission to this place will be unfolded. Let this woman be in the region of the tranquilities at that hour.” Beautiful labor: these were the words spoken by Spear while under the influence of the angels. And that was her purpose for this woman was supposed to be the conduit that would shunt the power of life from the celestial realm to the machine, spurring it into life, and in a sense, she was to give birth to it. After all, Spears had worked on the machine for nine months... The next morning, at 10 o'clock, Mrs. Mettler was brought into the chamber with the machine and went into her own trance, all while being witnessed by Spear and his followers. Soon, she began to experience all of the symptoms of labor. It was as though she was undergoing the full gestation of a child in the matter of an hour and the mechanism was designed to absorb her maternal influence. As she moved and writhed and moaned, the witnesses observed something no less than marvelous. As reported that evening in the Boston's New Era newspaper, “THE THING MOVES!” That day, the world changed. In Lynn, Massachusetts, a thing made of metal, chemicals and wood, began to pulsate like a heart. The monster had been given the spark. According to Spear, this living child would grow and soon would move the wheels of the world, replacing all other means of moving machinery. It would take over all. How strange it must have been there that day to watch the machine move. One must wonder, though, if these people had any idea how electricity worked and how copper and zinc react when a current is applied to them? The basic dynamics of a simple electric motor was not known to the world yet, but Spear may have touched upon something that a fellow from Vermont did in 1834, not many years before. Thomas Davenport invented the first battery powered electric motor to power a small printing press. A well-read man like Spear may have heard of Davenport's achievement, but may not have understood the forces involved. Electricity seemed magical, moving things with unseen forces. Perhaps Spear was correct in that one day, electricity would power the world, overwhelmingly moving the machines of industry, replacing water power and that of the steam engine. Certainly this extraordinary claim seems pretty commonplace today, but in his day, no one knew that. Perhaps it was nothing more than the movement of a metal plate responding to a magnetic field. People believed that invisible spirits could rap and tap and communicate through mediums. Why not build a machine to channel the power of God? News of the movement of the new machine spread throughout the land, but those who did not take to communicating with the dead and the ways of the spiritualists had no use for such practices. To a mainstream religious American audience, this might even have hinted of witchcraft and magic. Instead of being divinely inspired by the angels, was this some Devil's work? Reports claim that John Murray Spears' machine was destroyed by an angry mob, tearing it to pieces and trampling it beneath their feet. Spears faded into obscurity after that. He never thought to rebuild the machine and his hope to tap into an invisible power that might move the machines of the world was forgotten. Except it wasn't. An invisible force does move the machines of the world - electricity. He must have believed it would work and in his own way, he was right. It wasn't a hoax, as far as the idea goes. Given the knowledge of his age, we might even look back upon him, strange as his sensibilities seem to us today, he really did want to gift the world a very real power. Just not what he thought it was. And his machine? We thought it was destroyed - it was reported as such, but in 2019, in Greely, Colorado, a Miss Akerman passed away and her home, full of hoarded objects, was being cleared when the machine showed up resting in her attic. It must have sat there for one hundred and fifty-six years. If it isn't the real machine, even though it is clearly labeled, it certainly looks like the God machine of John Murray Spears. Whether or not it works remains a mystery, but then again, such things as this beg for speculation and make us wonder, “what makes it tick?” For that matter, what makes one want to know? Better to ask how a persons' hand might write messages of its own volition and how this alien hand could lead to a machine that claimed to be a robotic body for God. Sources John Murray Spear https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Murray_Spear https://uudb.org/articles/johnmurrayspear.html http://www.danbaines.com/blog/john-murray-spears-mechanical-messiah-discovered-in-colorado-attic/3/7/2019 Alien Hand Syndrome The National Library of Medicine - Alien Hand Syndrome

CWTFB Radio
Episode 88: "King's Crescendo" (w/ Dre Robinson)

CWTFB Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 104:33


Hailing from one of the most notorious areas of Dorchester is the well known, lyrically sharp, witty spitting MC who comes from Jamaican descent known by none other than Dre Robinson! With a tenure in rap and a catalog as extensive as his, it's fair to say that Dre is one of the most experienced guests we've ever had a sit down with. Having started his rap career over 20 years ago, the "Golden in My State" artist has made a lot of connections within the industry and has even made records with big name artists. Tenure in rap also means to adapt and stay relevant in a very quickly changing genre. Dre Rob has always been successful at re-inventing himself and staying ahead of the curve when it comes to bars and a very polished sound. As Dre is gearing up to release his upcoming album "King's Crescendo" we felt the timing was perfect to finally have this hometown hero come give us some game. This also comes shortly after Dre Robinson gave us some of the most intense bars of our #RedCupsAndRapCypher!!! Once again he left the pod while the mic was still smoking with some more heat for this week's #RedCupsAndRap Freestyle! Join us as we have a very raw and transparent conversation with Dre Robinson about his rap career, being a father to a young black man, what he's learned on his musical journey, AND SO MUCH MORE!!! BE SURE TO CHECK OUT DRE ROBINSON's FULL CATALOG OF MUSIC AVAILABLE ON ALL DSPs! CHECK OUT ALL OF OUR CONTENT: http://www.linktr.ee/CWTFBradio

Touré Show
James Blake-I Beat Federer

Touré Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 47:08


On the day of the US Open Finals let's throwback to my 2018 convo with James Blake the tennis star who was once #4 in the world and #1 in America with wins over Federer and Nadal. But what's most amazing is that he played his best tennis after breaking his neck in a freak injury and contracting shingles and losing his dad—all in one year. He's tough, smart (Harvard), humble, and cool. And the best Black male player since Arthur Ashe. I interviewed him at the tennis club where I grew up, Sportsmen's Tennis Club in Dorchester, Massachusetts, in front of a few hundred people. James is an amazing person. It's really interesting to see how he thinks. Patreon.com/toureshow Instagram: @toureshow Twitter: @toure Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Coronavirus 4 1 1  podcast
Coronavirus, COVID-19, coronavirus variants, and vaccine updates for 9-10-2021

Coronavirus 4 1 1 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 5:16


This is Coronavirus 411, the latest COVID-19 info and new hotspots… Just the facts… for September 10th, 2021.In the U.S., the administration announced new steps, including mandates to tackle the pandemic. Those steps include mandating vaccines for federal workers, contractors and certain health care workers, mandates for employees at companies with 100 or more workers to be vaccinated or tested weekly, and a recommendation large venues require proof of vaccination or a negative COVID test. The Los Angeles board of education voted to mandate students 12 and older be vaccinated in order to be allowed to come to school. The Los Angeles Unified School District, which has more than 600,000 mostly Latino students, already tests all students and employees weekly, requires masking indoors and outdoors, and has ordered employees to be vaccinated. If we want to know what happens when you vaccinate even younger kids, we can watch Cuba. That government has begun to vaccinate children as young as two. They are using Cuban vaccines and say it's safe for young children but have provided little data to outside observers to confirm this. If you think the pandemic hasn't been confusing enough, throw this into the mix. The CDC changed the definitions of vaccine and vaccinated. The changes mostly involve backing away from the word “immunity” and saying it offers “protection,” so as not to raise expectations. A CDC spokesperson said changing the words of a definition doesn't change the definition.Here's some good news considering it's never healthy to hold it in. Peer-reviewed research has found public toilets pose little risk of catching the virus. No evidence of airborne transmission for pathogens was found there. Yes, there was some risk of aerosolization from flushing and those hand blowers, but nothing that increased the chances of transmission.In the United States cases were down 2%, deaths are up 32%, and hospitalizations are up 3% over 14 days. Keep in mind this week's statistics are affected by changes in reporting over the Labor Day holiday. The 7-day average of new cases has been trending down since September 2. There are 9,141,650 active cases in the United States.With not all states reporting daily numbers, the five states with the biggest increase in hospitalizations per capita: North Dakota 106%, South Dakota 64%, West Virginia 49%, Alaska 39%, and Virginia and Ohio 38%. The top 10 counties with the highest number of recent cases per capita according to The New York Times: Perry, KY. Rusk, TX. Russell, KY. Taylor, FL. Clay, KY. Dorchester, SC. Nolan, TX. Hendry, FL. Sequatchie, TN. And Monroe, TN. There have been at least 654,576 deaths in the U.S. recorded as Covid-related.The top 3 vaccinating states by percentage of population that's been fully vaccinated: Vermont unchanged at 68.3%, Connecticut at 66.7%, and Massachusetts and Maine at 66.5%. The bottom 3 vaccinating states are Alabama at 39.5%, and Wyoming and Mississippi at 39.6%. The percentage of the U.S. that's been fully vaccinated is 53.3%.The 5 countries with the largest recent 24-hour increase in the number of fully vaccinated people: Bangladesh up 31%. Vietnam 9%. Thailand 4%. Sri Lanka 3%. And Argentina 2%.Globally, cases were down 11% and deaths were down 9% over 14 days, with the 7-day average trending down since August 27. There are 18,792,324 active cases around the world.The five countries with the most new cases: The United States 157,827. India 43,406. The U.K. 38,797. Iran 26,854. And Turkey 23,914. There have now been at least 4,604,426 deaths reported as Covid-related worldwide. For the latest updates, subscribe for free to Coronavirus 411 on your podcast app or ask your smart speaker to play... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Vaccine 4 1 1 - News on the search for a Covid 19 Coronavirus Vaccine
Coronavirus vaccine and Delta variant updates for 9-10-2021

Vaccine 4 1 1 - News on the search for a Covid 19 Coronavirus Vaccine

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 5:14


This is Vaccine 411, the latest coronavirus vaccine information for September 10th, 2021.In the U.S., the administration announced new steps, including mandates to tackle the pandemic. Those steps include mandating vaccines for federal workers, contractors and certain health care workers, mandates for employees at companies with 100 or more workers to be vaccinated or tested weekly, and a recommendation large venues require proof of vaccination or a negative COVID test. The Los Angeles board of education voted to mandate students 12 and older be vaccinated in order to be allowed to come to school. The Los Angeles Unified School District, which has more than 600,000 mostly Latino students, already tests all students and employees weekly, requires masking indoors and outdoors, and has ordered employees to be vaccinated. If we want to know what happens when you vaccinate even younger kids, we can watch Cuba. That government has begun to vaccinate children as young as two. They are using Cuban vaccines and say it's safe for young children but have provided little data to outside observers to confirm this. If you think the pandemic hasn't been confusing enough, throw this into the mix. The CDC changed the definitions of vaccine and vaccinated. The changes mostly involve backing away from the word “immunity” and saying it offers “protection,” so as not to raise expectations. A CDC spokesperson said changing the words of a definition doesn't change the definition.Here's some good news considering it's never healthy to hold it in. Peer-reviewed research has found public toilets pose little risk of catching the virus. No evidence of airborne transmission for pathogens was found there. Yes, there was some risk of aerosolization from flushing and those hand blowers, but nothing that increased the chances of transmission.In the United States cases were down 2%, deaths are up 32%, and hospitalizations are up 3% over 14 days. Keep in mind this week's statistics are affected by changes in reporting over the Labor Day holiday. The 7-day average of new cases has been trending down since September 2. There are 9,141,650 active cases in the United States.With not all states reporting daily numbers, the five states with the biggest increase in hospitalizations per capita: North Dakota 106%, South Dakota 64%, West Virginia 49%, Alaska 39%, and Virginia and Ohio 38%. The top 10 counties with the highest number of recent cases per capita according to The New York Times: Perry, KY. Rusk, TX. Russell, KY. Taylor, FL. Clay, KY. Dorchester, SC. Nolan, TX. Hendry, FL. Sequatchie, TN. And Monroe, TN. There have been at least 654,576 deaths in the U.S. recorded as Covid-related.The top 3 vaccinating states by percentage of population that's been fully vaccinated: Vermont unchanged at 68.3%, Connecticut at 66.7%, and Massachusetts and Maine at 66.5%. The bottom 3 vaccinating states are Alabama at 39.5%, and Wyoming and Mississippi at 39.6%. The percentage of the U.S. that's been fully vaccinated is 53.3%.The 5 countries with the largest recent 24-hour increase in the number of fully vaccinated people: Bangladesh up 31%. Vietnam 9%. Thailand 4%. Sri Lanka 3%. And Argentina 2%.Globally, cases were down 11% and deaths were down 9% over 14 days, with the 7-day average trending down since August 27. There are 18,792,324 active cases around the world.The five countries with the most new cases: The United States 157,827. India 43,406. The U.K. 38,797. Iran 26,854. And Turkey 23,914. There have now been at least 4,604,426 deaths reported as Covid-related worldwide. For the latest updates, subscribe for free to Vaccine 411 on your podcast app or ask your smart speaker to play the Vaccine 411... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Stark Reflections on Writing and Publishing
EP 210 - Facing Creative Block with Morgan Rhodes

Stark Reflections on Writing and Publishing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 40:40


A keynote from Morgan Rhodes (Michelle Rowen) about her writer journey and facing creative block. The keynote is from the When Words Collide August 2021 Virtual Conference. Prior to the main content, Mark shares comments from recent episodes, shares a personal update, and a word about this episode's sponsor. This episode is sponsored by Findaway Voices. You can learn more about how you can get your work distributed to retailers and library systems around the world at starkreflections.ca/Findaway.   Links of Interest: Morgan Rhodes Michelle Rowen Video of WWC Keynote Talks (Que'd to Morgan's talk) Empire Builder's Summit The Relaxed Author Buy eBook Direct Buy Audiobook Direct Publishing Pitfalls for Authors Patreon for Stark Reflections An Author's Guide to Working with Libraries & Bookstores Wide for the Win Mark's Canadian Werewolf Books This Time Around (Short Story) A Canadian Werewolf in New York Stowe Away (Novella) Fear and Longing in Los Angeles Fright Nights, Big City     Morgan Rhodes is a psuedonym for Michelle Rowen. Under Morgan Rhodes she has published 6 books in the Falling Kingdons series, and her Razorbill (Penguin Teens) novel Echoes and Empires, comes in January 2022. Michelle Rowen is the bestselling and award-winning author of over two dozen novels. She has written for Penguin, Grand Central, Harlequin, Dorchester, and Bloomsbury. A former president of Toronto Romance Writers, Michelle lives in Mississauga, Ontario, where she refills her creative well by watching trashy reality TV and drinking a lot of delicious coffee.   The introductory, end, and bumper music for this podcast (“Laser Groove”) was composed and produced by Kevin MacLeod of www.incompetech.com and is Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

Game of Her Own
77. Conquer Your Limiting Beliefs with Boston Red Sox' Vice President of Fan Services & Entertainment, Stephanie Maneikis

Game of Her Own

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 46:29


Have you ever thought about trying to get a job and thought to yourself, why would they want me? If you have, you're not alone. Stephanie Maneikis, Vice President of Fan Services & Entertainment, battled that limiting belief when she was going after her first job with the Red Sox. Luckily she didn't let it stop her and has gone from a part-time Ambassador to an Executive.    Listen in as we talk about:  When she finally felt like she was bringing value to the organization How she advocated for herself to go from hourly to salary What advice she would give her younger self about approaching leading a team for the first time  All the things that went wrong when she asked for a salary increase  The best advice she got when it came to raising a family while working (I promise it will make you laugh)    Connect with Jahaan:  Learn more about working with Jahaan and see if it's the right fit for you: https://JahaanBlakeAppointmentScheduling.as.me/LetsTalk Join Jahaan's VIP Email List: https://bit.ly/3yccwAP  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jahaanblake/ Email: jblake@jahaanblake.com Website: https://jahaanblake.com/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jahaanblake/   Links: Episode 26: Keeping it Real with Senior Vice President of Fan Services and Ballpark Entertainment for the Boston Red Sox, Sarah McKenna: https://apple.co/3BPHnFd  Book: Knowing Your Value by Mika Brzezinski: https://amzn.to/3BOyI5T    Connect with Stephanie:  Email: smaneikis@redsox.com  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/stephmgregg/    A Chinese-American from Dorchester, Massachusetts, Stephanie Maneikis joined the Boston Red Sox in 2006 as a Fenway Ambassador.  She currently serves as Vice President of Fan Services & Entertainment, overseeing the fan experience at the ballpark, pre-game ceremonies, and the club's annual Winter Weekend fanfest event. She is the mother of 2 boys, Ollie and Sammy.   

Coronavirus 4 1 1  podcast
Coronavirus, COVID-19, coronavirus variants, and vaccine updates for 9-9-2021

Coronavirus 4 1 1 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 5:01


This is Coronavirus 411, the latest COVID-19 info and new hotspots… Just the facts… for September 9th, 2021.The World Health Organization is again calling for a moratorium on booster shots, saying rich countries with large supplies should not offer shots through the end of the year so first doses can go to poorer countries. So far that request has been ignored by countries like the United States. The Director General added, “We do not want to see widespread use of boosters for healthy people who are fully vaccinated."Novavax has initiated an early-stage study to test a combined flu and COVID-19 vaccine. The trial will be conducted in Australia. A spokesman said, "Combination of these two vaccines may lead to greater efficiencies and achieve high levels of protection against COVID-19 and influenza with a single regimen.”Some good news for young adult COVID survivors. Research presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress shows the disease doesn't appear to have affected lung function. Even patients with asthma showed no statistically significant deterioration. The investigators measured the volume of air in the lungs that can be exhaled after a taking the deepest breath possible and a ratio that's an indicator of narrowed airways. An analysis shows the pace of new vaccinations in rural America increased for the fourth consecutive week last week. Rural counties reported just over 318,000 rural Americans completed their vaccine regimen last week. That's 9% higher than the number who were newly vaccinated two weeks ago. 39% of the total rural population is completely vaccinated, up 0.7 percentage points from two weeks ago. Another country has decided it's going to have to learn to live with COVID and is preparing to do just that. South Korea's working up a plan on returning life to normal by late October, when 80% of adults are expected to be fully vaccinated. The strategy will be implemented in phases.In the United States cases were up 1%, deaths are up 34%, and hospitalizations are up 4% over 14 days. Keep in mind this week's statistics are affected by changes in reporting over the Labor Day holiday. The 7-day average of new cases has been trending up since July 5. There are 9,058,897 active cases in the United States.With not all states reporting daily numbers, the five states with the biggest daily volume of deaths per capita: Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana, the US Virgin Islands, and South Carolina. The top 10 counties with the highest number of recent cases per capita according to The New York Times: Perry, KY. Rusk, TX. Dorchester, SC. Sequatchie, TN. Monroe, TN. Taylor, FL. Clay, KY. Marion, TN. Richland, LA. And Hendry, FL. There have been at least 652,647 deaths in the U.S. recorded as Covid-related.The top 3 vaccinating states by percentage of population that's been fully vaccinated: Vermont at 68.3%, Connecticut at 66.6%, and Massachusetts at 66.5%. The bottom 3 vaccinating states are Wyoming unchanged at 39.3%, Alabama at 39.4%, and Mississippi at 39.6%. The percentage of the U.S. that's been fully vaccinated is 53.2%.The 5 countries with the largest recent 24-hour increase in the number of fully vaccinated people: Georgia and Thailand up 4%. And Sri Lanka, Argentina, and Bangladesh 3%.Globally, cases were down 9% and deaths were down 5% over 14 days, with the 7-day average trending down since August 27. There are 18,876,631 active cases around the world.The five countries with the most new cases: The United States 115,776. India 38,130. The U.K. 37,326. Iran 27,138. And Turkey 23,638. There have now been at least 4,594,805 deaths reported as Covid-related worldwide. For the latest updates, subscribe for free to Coronavirus 411 on your... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Coronavirus 4 1 1  podcast
Coronavirus, COVID-19, coronavirus variants, and vaccine updates for 9-8-2021

Coronavirus 4 1 1 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 5:27


This is Coronavirus 411, the latest COVID-19 info and new hotspots… Just the facts… for September 8th, 2021. Idaho public health leaders have activated “crisis standards of care.” That lets hospitals in the northern part of the state ration health care since there are more patients than they can handle. Residents have been warned they may not get the care they'd normally expect if they need to be hospitalized. Hawaii's Governor signed an order last week releasing hospitals and health care workers from liability if they must ration health care. Who wouldn't want “super immunity”? A series of studies has found some people mount an extraordinarily powerful immune response against the coronavirus that causes COVID-19. Their bodies produce very high levels of antibodies and make antibodies with great flexibility that can fight off current and future variants. Who's most likely to achieve such a thing? People who were infected in 2020 then immunized with mRNA vaccines in 2021. Reports say "those people have amazing responses to the vaccine." It's question and answer time. What are the chances you'll get COVID-19 if you're fully vaccinated? According to new data reported by the New York Times, it's 1 in 5,000. What are the chances you'll be hospitalized from COVID if you're fully vaccinated? The same report suggests that number is 1 in every 1 million. Malaysia will be the first country to declare Covid-19 an endemic as opposed to a pandemic. This change will happen around the end of October. Covid would be endemic when the virus that causes the disease becomes permanent in the community and keeps circulating among the population. Other endemics include flu, dengue, and malaria. An ABC News poll asked unvaccinated workers whose employers haven't imposed a vaccine mandate yet what they'd do if it became mandatory. 16% would get vaccinated, 35% would ask for a medical or religious exemption and 42% would quit. Asked what they'd do if they couldn't get an exemption, the number who would quit goes up to an astonishing 72%. In the United States cases were flat, deaths are up 34%, and hospitalizations are up 4% over 14 days. Keep in mind this week's statistics are affected by changes in reporting over the Labor Day holiday. The 7-day average of new cases has been trending up since July 5. There are once again over 9 million active cases in the United States, at 9,015,387. With not all states reporting daily numbers, the five states with the biggest 14-day increase in hospitalizations: North Dakota up 103%. South Dakota 72%. West Virginia 47%. Maine 38%. And Wyoming and Virginia 37%. The top 10 counties with the highest number of recent cases per capita according to The New York Times: Perry, KY. Rusk, TX. Dorchester, SC. Sequatchie, TN. Monroe, TN. Taylor, FL. Clay, KY. Marion, TN. Richland, LA. And Hendry, FL. There have been at least 650,511 deaths in the U.S. recorded as Covid-related. The top 3 vaccinating states by percentage of population that's been fully vaccinated was not updated and remain: Vermont at 68.1%, Connecticut at 66.4%, and Massachusetts at 66.3%. The bottom 3 vaccinating states are Alabama at 39.1%, Wyoming at 39.3%, and Idaho at 39.5%. The percentage of the U.S. that's been fully vaccinated is 53%. The 5 countries with the largest recent 24-hour increase in the number of fully vaccinated people: Vietnam, Guatemala, and South Korea up 4%. And Pakistan and Morocco 3%. Globally, cases were down 11% and deaths were down 8% over 14 days, with the 7-day average trending down since August 27. There are 18,888,092 active cases around the world. The five countries with the most new cases: The United States 114,626. The U.K. 41,088. India 30,184. Iran 27,579. And the Philippines 22,380. There... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Coronavirus 4 1 1  podcast
Coronavirus, COVID-19, coronavirus variants, and vaccine updates for 9-7-2021

Coronavirus 4 1 1 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 5:33


This is Coronavirus 411, the latest COVID-19 info and new hotspots… Just the facts… for September 7th, 2021. Like healthcare workers, they are most at risk. And like many healthcare workers, they are reluctant to get the vaccine. No national statistics show the vaccination rate for America's entire population of first responders, but police and fire departments report figures far below the national rate of adults who have had at least one dose. Increasingly, mandates are putting jobs at risk for refusal to take the shots. You really have to wonder what's going on behind the scenes. Now, the CDC says masks are no longer required indoors or outdoors in most settings if you're fully vaccinated. The news came as a shock after a steady drumbeat of guidance that the fully vaccinated can get Covid, spread Covid, and host new variants of Covid. Regardless, the White House is promoting the new guidance on social media. There are reports researchers recently discovered antibodies that can neutralize a range of variants and coronaviruses. This could lead to better post-infection treatments if true. They studied survivors, looking for antibodies that may be resistant to losing their effectiveness against variants and new viruses. One antibody showed a high breadth of effectiveness. Another bound well with all respiratory viruses and prevented COVID-19 infections in animal subjects. How bad is the nursing shortage? Right now, close to 15,000 RN positions are available in North Carolina alone. And there are 5,500 job openings for nursing assistants and LPNs. There's also a shortage of school nurses. In fact, that was happening even before the pandemic. The CDC says there should be a nurse for every 750 students, but nearly a fourth of all schools in the US don't have one at all. You want to get tough on people who put others at risk of the virus but, do you want to get communist country tough? Vietnam put a 28-year-old man in jail for five years Monday for breaking quarantine rules. His trial lasted one day. Despite that severity, Vietnam's outbreak is worsening, with the vast majority of its 13,385 deaths happening in the last few months. In the United States cases were down 12%, deaths are up 31%, and hospitalizations are up 9% over 14 days. But keep in mind that for this and most of today's statistics, there's an artificial dip due to lack of reporting over the Labor Day holiday. The 7-day average of new cases has been trending up since July 5. There are 8,863,957 active cases in the United States. With not all states reporting daily numbers, the five states with the biggest 14-day increase in hospitalizations: North Dakota up 379%. South Dakota 79%. West Virginia 52%. Tennessee 50%. And Maine 42%. The top 10 counties with the highest number of recent cases per capita according to The New York Times: Rusk, TX. Dorchester, SC. Taylor, FL. Russell, KY. Uvalde, TX. Hendry, FL. Butte, SD. Hardee, FL. Pike, OH. And Wayne, MS. There have been at least 649,023 deaths in the U.S. recorded as Covid-related. The top 3 vaccinating states by percentage of population that's been fully vaccinated: Vermont at 68.1%, Connecticut at 66.4%, and Massachusetts at 66.3%. The bottom 3 vaccinating states are Alabama at 39.1%, Wyoming at 39.3%, and Idaho at 39.5%. The percentage of the U.S. that's been fully vaccinated is 53%. The 5 countries with the largest recent 24-hour increase in the number of fully vaccinated people: Panama up 3%. And Oceana, Bangladesh, Argentina, and India 2%. Globally, cases were down 16% and deaths were down 10% over 14 days, with the 7-day average trending down since August 27. There are 18,811,819 active cases around the world. The five countries with the most new cases: The U.K. 41,192. The United States 39,644. India 30,184.... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Coronavirus 4 1 1  podcast
Coronavirus, COVID-19, coronavirus variants, and vaccine updates for 9-6-2021

Coronavirus 4 1 1 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 4:52


This is Coronavirus 411, the latest COVID-19 info and new hotspots… Just the facts… for September 6th, 2021. Full steam ahead in the U.S. with booster shots, even though the EU, the World Health Organization, and even the CDC says it could be premature and possibly unnecessary right now. It's believed boosters will be available September 20 for Pfizer, with Moderna's rolling out a couple weeks later. The President said Americans should consider getting a booster 8 months after their second shot. Israel is so bought into boosters they're actually getting ready to administer fourth doses of the vaccines. Cases are soaring there despite world-leading vaccinations. Their national coronavirus czar said new injections could better protect against new variants of the virus and could be needed every few months. He said, “This is our life from now on.” There's nothing yet to suggest the current vaccines won't work against the new Mu variant. But as always, science doesn't seem to know for sure. What is known is it's already made its way to nearly every state in the U.S. and 39 countries. And it's been here awhile. It was first detected in Colombia in January. Right now, the variant only accounts for less than 1% of all Covid-19 samples sequenced in the U.S. Some vaccine passport news. They'll be required in indoor venues in England starting the end of this month. There are critics but the Health Minister said this is the way to keep the economy open. And Japan will issue vaccination certificates starting mid-December. Those are mostly meant for overseas travel via a QR code on smartphones. Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback Tom Brady confirmed he tested positive for Covid-19 in February, soon after the team's boat parade that celebrated their Super Bowl win. He's since been vaccinated. In the United States cases were up 8%, deaths are up 55%, and hospitalizations are up 11% over 14 days. The 7-day average of new cases has been trending up since July 5. There are 8,823,289 active cases in the United States. With not all states reporting daily numbers, the five states with the biggest 14-day increase in hospitalizations: North Dakota up 331%. South Dakota 88%. West Virginia 56%. Maine 53%. And Wyoming and Tennessee 51%. The top 10 counties with the highest number of recent cases per capita according to The New York Times: Russell, KY. Perry, KY. Rusk, TX. Uvalde, TX. Bell, KY. Marion, TN. Clay, KY. Dorchester, SC. Glynn, GA. And Taylor, FL. There have been at least 648,467 deaths in the U.S. recorded as Covid-related. The top 3 vaccinating states by percentage of population that's been fully vaccinated: Vermont at 68%, Connecticut unchanged at 66.2%, and Massachusetts at 66.1%. The bottom 3 vaccinating states are Mississippi at 38.5%, Alabama at 38.6%, and Wyoming at 39.1%. The percentage of the U.S. that's been fully vaccinated is 52.7%. The 5 countries with the largest recent 24-hour increase in the number of fully vaccinated people: Panama and Kosovo up 3%. And Sri Lanka, Argentina, and Australia 2%. Globally, cases were down 9% and deaths were down 7% over 14 days, with the 7-day average trending down since August 27. There are 18,924,449 active cases around the world. The five countries with the most new cases: India 39,521. The U.K. 37,011. The United States 35,586. Iran 25,870. And Malaysia 20,396. There have now been at least 4,566,726 deaths reported as Covid-related worldwide. For the latest updates, subscribe for free to Coronavirus 411 on your podcast app or ask your smart speaker to play the Coronavirus 411 podcast. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Coronavirus 4 1 1  podcast
Coronavirus, COVID-19, coronavirus variants, and vaccine updates for 9-3-2021

Coronavirus 4 1 1 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 4:56


This is Coronavirus 411, the latest COVID-19 info and new hotspots… Just the facts… for September 3rd, 2021.The CDC says if you're not vaccinated, you should cancel any travel plans you might have for the long Labor Day weekend. Holidays have always been worrisome to health officials because they often result in spikes. But this spike would occur on top of the Delta surge. Last year, even without vaccines available, more than 3 million airline passengers were screened over the Labor Day holiday.More than 500,000 children in the US tested positive from August 5 to August 26, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. Since kids under 12 can't get vaccinated, an increasing number of states and school districts are imposing mask mandates. Others are trying to limit exposure among the unvaccinated. A new study of breakthrough infections in the UK finds vaccines not only reduce the risk of severe disease and hospitalization, but they can lower the odds you'll have long-term symptoms. They found the odds of having symptoms for 28 days or more after a post-vaccination infection were just about cut in half. The European Medicines Agency is joining the World Health Organization in going against the United States where booster shots are concerned. It said there's no urgent need for booster shots for fully vaccinated people and the emphasis and supply should stay focused on primary vaccinations. If you think people who are against the vaccine aren't serious, observe how many are willing to give up their careers over it. We've seen it in healthcare, law enforcement, fire departments, and now America's pastime. Longtime Washington Nationals Vice President Bob Boone has chosen to resign rather than comply with orders to vaccinate. Two scouts are also leaving the team for that reason. Boone joined the Nationals in 2005, and as a player was with the Phillies, Cardinals, and Royals.In the United States cases were up 14%, deaths are up 67%, and hospitalizations are up 16% over 14 days. The 7-day average of new cases has been trending up since July 5. There are 8,650,330 active cases in the United States.With not all states reporting daily numbers, the five states with the biggest 14-day increase in hospitalizations: North Dakota up 304%. South Dakota 105%. Wyoming 65%. And New Hampshire, West Virginia, and Delaware 59%. The top 10 counties with the highest number of recent cases per capita according to The New York Times: Perry, KY. Taylor, FL. Clinton, KY. Marion, TN. Hardee, FL. Bell, KY. Dorchester, SC. Glynn, GA. Bledsoe, TN. And Sequatchie, TN.There have been at least 643,594 deaths in the U.S. recorded as Covid-related.The top 3 vaccinating states by percentage of population that's been fully vaccinated: Vermont again unchanged at 67.9%, Connecticut at 66.2%, and Massachusetts at 66%. The bottom 3 vaccinating states are Mississippi and Alabama at 38.4%, and Wyoming at 38.7%. The percentage of the U.S. that's been fully vaccinated is 52.6%.The 5 countries with the largest recent 24-hour increase in the number of fully vaccinated people: Sri Lanka up 6%. Nepal 5%. Vietnam 4%. And South Korea and Argentina 3%.Globally, cases were down 7% and deaths were down 20% over 14 days, with the 7-day average trending down since August 27. There are 18,803,773 active cases around the world.The five countries with the most new cases: The United States 177,568. India 45,482. The U.K. 38,154. Iran 30,279. And Brazil 26,497. There have now been at least 4,550,984 deaths reported as Covid-related worldwide. For the latest updates, subscribe for free to Coronavirus 411 on your podcast app or ask your smart speaker to play the Coronavirus 411 podcast. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Post to Post Podcast
Post to Post Podcast Ep.39: Pacific Division Breakdown

Post to Post Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 67:11


Welcome to another episode of the Post to Post Podcast!! This week we dive into what the Pacific Division will look like for each team this coming season and More! If you want to Support the Families of Caleb Reimer, Ronin Sharma, and Parker Magnuson Please visit the Link below! https://www.gofundme.com/f/legacy-for-ronin-caleb-and-parker

Drinks After Work
Episode 37 - Tips for First-Time Home Buyers with Zack Aicardi

Drinks After Work

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 68:32


This week on the show, Shannen and Abby talk to real estate agent, construction manager, and investor, Zack Aicardi! They ask him about the do's and don'ts of renting and buying property and his opinions on what to look out for. The three of them also shared hilarious stories from their past and discussed relationships/dating life in the city. Follow Drinks After Work on IG : @drinksafterwork_ Follow Aicardi Construction on IG : @aicardi.construction

Locked On Boston College - Daily Podcast On Boston College Eagles Football & Basketball

Jimmy Hayes, a Dorchester boy and proud Boston College hockey star, died unexpectedly on Monday at the age of 31. We talk about the shocking news, and look back at his life at BC, and in the NHL. We also talk about his impact on the BC hockey program, and his life as a family man. In addition we talk about the upcoming football season, especially in the ACC, and give you some predictions for the conference. Who will win the Atlantic and the Coastal? You will want to hear our comments. Finally, the defensive line of Boston College is one of the biggest question marks heading into this season. We look at the position and talk about it's potential and where the concerns lie. Follow host AJ Black on Twitter @AJBlack_BC, or the podcast @LockedonBC We are also on Facebook, click here and make sure to like the page. And become a premium member on BC Bulletin Watch our show on Youtube! Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! SweatBlock Get it today for 20% off at SweatBlock.com with promo code LockedOn, or at Amazon and CVS. Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. StatHero StatHero, the FIRST Ever Daily Fantasy Sportsbook that gives the PLAYER the ADVANTAGE. Go to StatHero.com/LockedOn for 300% back on your first play. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Police Off The Cuff
Cliff Moylan an actor from Boston who played the famous Watertown Massachusetts police sergeanbt Njohn McClellan who famously shot it out with Boston Martathon Bombers, the Tsarnaev brothers.

Police Off The Cuff

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 65:09


Cliff Moylan hails from Boston, Massachusetts. Born to an Irish father from County Clare and an Irish-American mother from County Detroit. He spent his first twenty two years between Back Bay, Scituate, Dorchester, Plymouth, Falmouth, Hyannis, Lynn and the Fenway. Though he credits all his former haunts as being formative, it is Lower Mills, St. Gregory's Parish, that he holds closest to his heart, and where he spent the most time. With it's abandoned Baker Chocolate Factory repurposed as a venue for keg parties and it's Guiness Book renowned trolley that traverses through Cedar Grove Cemetery used for rooftop joy rides, Lower Mills was a place Cliff could develop his imagination with all the other hooligan Tom Sawyers'. At twenty two, after a year of waiting tables at Cafe Florentine in The North End and saving money, Cliff moved to New York with a heart full of dreams and a U-Haul full of crap. No sooner did he unpack, did he read in the Village Voice that somebody made a movie set in South Boston. Halfway through Good Will Hunting at the Angelika Film Center, Cliff said to himself, “It's possible.” Years went by, restaurant work continued and acting training remained a priority when Cliff got a call to be featured background, playing Charlotte's doorman in Sex in the City. “That's me! That's me! Did you see me? I delivered the dog!” Cliff's friends and family were proud though his grandmother was never told the actual name of the show. This role put wind in his sails to try things out West where he lived in Hollywood for fours years. Aside from eating crappy pizza nothing really happened for Cliff so back to New York he went, but he didn't quit. Two years after his return, at thirty four years old, Cliff finally started speaking on television. His debut being made on the second season of HBO's Boardwalk Empire. The subsequent ten years brought more film and television work and more training. He's been directed by Martin Scorsese, Stephen Soderbergh, Jodie Foster, Peter Berg and Steve Zaillian among others. He's swapped dialogue with estemed actors like Jon Voight, John Turturro, Laura Linney, JK Simmons, Liev Schreiber and Giancarlo Esposito. His training includes conservatory programs at The Atlantic Theater Company Acting School and The William Esper Studio. Cliff has also been the student of Kathleen Turner, Bob Krakower and most extensively Chazz Palminteri, of A Bronx Tale fame. Cliff's signature role to date has been his portrayal of real life hero, Sergeant John MacLellan in the Mark Wahlberg starring/ Peter Berg directed Patriot's Day. “Welcome to Watertown motherf#%*ker!”, he can be seen shouting over a fence while firing his service automatic in the portrayal of the famous shootout with The Boston Marathon Bombers. Cliff and John MacLellan are still friends today. Cliff's most recent role and only other portrayal of a Bostonian is in the yet to be released, Ray Donovan full length feature film. When not auditioning Cliff is walking his dog, Hagler, named after the great middleweight champ, writing his memoir about his Lower Mills adolescence, training in Muay Thai and working on his recovery with over nine years sober. Cliff lives in The Lower East Side. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/otcpod1/support

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Jumping the Line

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 161:38


Today on Boston Public Radio: Chuck Todd updates us on the latest political headlines, from President Joe Biden's handling of U.S. troop withdrawal from Afghanistan to California's recall election. Todd is the moderator of “Meet The Press” on NBC, host of “Meet The Press Daily” on MSNBC and the political director for NBC News. Then, we open the phone lines, talking with listeners about COVID-19 booster shots. Andrea Cabral discusses the death of Stephanie Gerardi, who was shot and killed by a Saugus Police officer responding to a mental health call. She also talks about the verbal altercation between Larry David and Alan Dershowitz in Martha's Vineyard. Cabral is the former Suffolk County sheriff and Massachusetts secretary of public safety. She's currently the CEO of the cannabis company Ascend. Nancy Schön shares the process behind her latest sculpture, which is based on Edward Lear's poem, “The Owl and the Pussy Cat.” Schön's latest public art installation is titled “Diversity — The Owl and the Pussy Cat.” It's at the Nonquit Street Green at Upham's Corner in Dorchester. Her latest book is “Ducks on Parade!” Paul Reville explains how schools are preparing for the upcoming school year amid the rise of the Delta variant, arguing that schools should have multiple contingency plans in place. Reville is the former Massachusetts secretary of education, and a professor at Harvard University's Graduate School of Education, where he also heads the Education Redesign Lab. His latest book, co-authored with Elaine Weiss, is: "Broader, Bolder, Better: How Schools And Communities Help Students Overcome The Disadvantages Of Poverty.” Rep. Richard Neal discusses President Biden's response to the Taliban toppling the Afghan government, and the fate of the infrastructure bill as it heads to the House of Representatives. Rep. Neal is Chair of the House Ways and Means Committee. He represents Massachusetts' 1st Congressional District. We end the show by asking listeners how they felt about Disney's Genie+, which allows Disney park visitors to pay for the ability to skip lines.