Podcasts about boston public radio

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  • 12PODCASTS
  • 489EPISODES
  • 2h 3mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 20, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about boston public radio

Latest podcast episodes about boston public radio

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Jeopardy!

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 164:25


Today on Boston Public Radio: Chuck Todd updates listeners on all things politics, including the failure of Democrats to pass voting rights legislation and the state of President Joe Biden's term. Todd is the moderator of “Meet the Press,” host of “Meet the Press Daily” on MSNBC and the political director for NBC News. Then, we ask listeners their thoughts on Attorney General Maura Healey's announcement that she is running for governor. Andrea Cabral tells the story of a con artist from Rhode Island arrested after faking his own death, and discusses debates over the efficacy of road tests for driving while high. Cabral is the former Suffolk County sheriff and the former Massachusetts secretary of public safety. She is currently the CEO of the cannabis company Ascend. Paul Reville explains how things are going in schools amid the Omicron surge and mental health crisis. Reville is the former Massachusetts secretary of education and a professor at Harvard University's Graduate School of Education, where he also heads the Education Redesign Lab. His latest book, co-authored with Lynne Sacks, is “Collaborative Action for Equity and Opportunity: A Practical Guide for School and Community Leaders.” Shirley Leung discusses the state overpaying unemployment and asking for money back, and the latest news from Mass. and Cass. Leung is a business columnist for The Boston Globe and a Boston Public Radio contributor. Tom Nichols shares tips on competing in Jeopardy and why he thinks long running winning streaks are antithetical to the show's character. Nichols is a Contributing Writer and proprietor of “Peacefield” newsletter at The Atlantic, a professor of national security affairs at the US Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island and a five-time Jeopardy winner. We end the show by asking listeners for stories of grudges they still hold.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Mayor Michelle Wu calls vaccine mandate rollout "very smooth"

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 164:18


Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners their experiences with Massachusetts overpaying jobless claims and asking for money back. Trenni Kusnierek talks about Novak Djokovic's expulsion from Australia, Naomi Osaka's return to tennis and the state of the Patriots. Kusnierek is a reporter and anchor for NBC Sports Boston, and a weekly Boston Public Radio contributor. Mayor Michelle Wu takes questions from listeners, including on the response to the first few days of the city's vaccine mandate, protests she faces outside her home and issues with the MBTA. Wu is mayor of Boston. Tiffani Faison shares why she closed her iconic Boston restaurant Tiger Mama, her upcoming new ventures and how she has stayed resilient during a challenging time for the industry. Faison is an award-winning chef and restaurateur. She plans to open in March three new eateries: Dive Bar, Tenderoni's and Bubble Bath. Vivian and Elisa Girard tell the story of what inspired them to take housing issues into their own hands, building small affordable housing units in Dorchester. Vivan and Elisa Gergard are the husband and wife duo behind a coming apartment complex in the Field's Corner district of Dorchester. John King updates listeners on all things national politics, including the faltering state of voting rights legislation and polarization in the U.S. King is CNN's Chief National Correspondent and anchor of “Inside Politics,” which airs weekdays and Sunday mornings at 8 a.m. We end the show by asking listeners their ideas for lowering the cost of housing in the city.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Rep. Ayanna Pressley calls on Biden to cancel student debt

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 164:13


Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners if they think the lies of the 2020 election will repeat themselves in the 2022 midterms and 2024 presidential race. Rep. Ayanna Pressley calls for President Joe Biden to cancel student loan debt, criticizes Governor Charlie Baker's pandemic response and pushes for urgent action on voting rights. Pressley is the U.S. Representative for Massachusetts 7th District. Rep. Mike Connolly weighs in on state debates over rent control, and whether he thinks there is enough momentum to get Mayor Michelle Wu's housing plan passed. Connolly is a Massachusetts State Representative and co-sponsor of the Tenant Protection Act. Shirley Leung talks about today's tent demolitions at Mass. and Cass, and luxury apartment buildings providing access to rapid tests. Leung is a business columnist for The Boston Globe and a Boston Public Radio contributor. Corby Kummer updates listeners on changes to SNAP benefits that would allow people to purchase hot meals and from restaurants, and Taco Bell's new subscription service. Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. Art Caplan discusses the first heart transplant using a genetically modified pig heart, and debates over the severity of Omicron. Caplan is director of the division of medical ethics at the New York University School of Medicine. We end the show by talking with listeners about whether they have attended large events or made other risky pandemic decisions they regret.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
Food stamp benefits could soon be used to purchase restaurant meals, prepared foods

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 20:25


Numerous states are looking into extending food stamp use to restaurants and prepared meals to keep up with what academics are calling the lack of time, skills, resources, and physical abilities of some SNAP users. Award-winning food writer Corby Kummer joined Boston Public Radio on Wednesday to share why more states are looking into joining the SNAP Restaurant Meals Program, and where food policy needs to change. “When it comes down to it, realistically, the people who need and rely on nutrition assistance often work two jobs, they're supporting families, and they have no time at all to cook and prepare the wholesome food that SNAP was originally designed to restrict them to buying,” Kummer said. When Restaurant Meals started in 2003, 19 states participated in the program. That number shrank to just four states by 2018. Now, six states — Arizona, California, Maryland, Michigan, Rhode Island, and Virginia — let some people who receive SNAP benefits use food stamps at restaurants. Illinois and New York are both in the process of applying to the Restaurant Meals Program. Kummer told Boston Public Radio that states have to prove that there are enough high need residents — such as “adults over 60, people with disabilities, and those who are homeless and their spouses” — to get exemptions in the Restaurant Meals Program and SNAP. While the Restaurant Meals Program has been applauded by food equity advocates and anti-hunger organizations, small restaurants have been slow to participate in the program due to lengthy bureaucratic processes. Instead, large chains like McDonald's and Subway are often state-certified for the program. “It's a lot of paperwork on the part of the restaurant, and so this in the beginning seemed like it was going to be a boon for for smaller restaurants, especially with [something like a] high volume, local sandwich shop that opens,” Kummer noted. “But [the paperwork] turned out to be so cumbersome that it discouraged all but the largest chains.” Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: To bike or not to bike

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 164:26


Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners about the debate between in person and remote learning as Omicron surges. Michael Curry updates listeners on how community health centers are responding to Omicron, and the state of schools as cases rise. Curry is the president and CEO of the Massachusetts League of Community Health Centers and a member of Gov. Charlie Baker's COVID-19 vaccine advisory group. He's also a member of the national NAACP board of directors and chair of the board's advocacy and policy committee. Trenni Kusnierek talks about a U.S. speedskater giving her winter olympics spot to a teammate, and the Yankees promoting Rachel Balkovec to manager of their minor league Tampa team, becoming the first woman working as full-time manager of a major league affiliated team. Kusnierek is a reporter and anchor for NBC Sports Boston, and a weekly Boston Public Radio contributor. Ali Noorani discusses why President Joe Biden hasn't been able to take action on former President Donald Trump's Remain in Mexico policy, and population slowdown in the U.S. Noorani is the president and chief executive officer of the National Immigration Forum. His forthcoming book is “Crossing Borders: The Reconciliation of a Nation of Immigrants.” Cindy Hughes shares the impact of eliminating parking spots in favor of bike lanes on her business in Cambridge. Cindy Hughes is co-founder of Fast Phil's barbershop on Mass Ave in Cambridge. Then, we ask listeners their thoughts on bike lanes versus parking spots in Cambridge. John King updates listeners on the latest national politics headlines, including the state of voting rights legislation and opinions on term limits. King is CNN's Chief National Correspondent and anchor of "Inside Politics,” which airs weekdays and Sunday mornings at 8 a.m. We end the show by asking listeners their opinions on term limits.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
Boston Public Radio Full Show: Testing the Waters

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 161:22


Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by opening phone lines, talking with listeners about whether they're continuing to be cautious as COVID-19 cases rise. E.J. Dionne previews what's in store for the Democratic Party in 2022, and talks about the one-year anniversary of the Jan. 6 Capitol riots. Dionne is a columnist for The Washington Post and a senior fellow at The Brookings Institution. His latest book is "Code Red: How Progressives And Moderates Can Unite To Save Our Country.” Dr. Renee Crichlow discusses COVID-19 rates across Mass., and the burnout healthcare providers are facing as the world nears its third year of the pandemic. Crichlow is the Chief Medical Officer at Codman Square Health Center and the Vice Chair of Health Equity at the Boston University Department of Family Medicine. Next, we ask listeners for their tips and tricks on finding COVID-19 rapid tests. Dr. Irene Bosch shares her story of creating a COVID-19 rapid test in the early weeks of the pandemic, only to face red-tape from the FDA despite meeting 2021 standards. Bosch is the founder of the diagnostic company E25Bio. She's also a visiting professor at MIT, and adjunct professor of medicine at Mount Sinai University in New York. Revs. Irene Monroe and Emmett G. Price III talk about Pope Francis' letter of support to LGBTQ+ Catholic advocate Sister Jeannine Gramick. They also weigh in on Judge Timothy Walmsley's minute of silence before he sentenced Gregory McMichael, Travis McMichael, and William Bryan Jr. to life in prison for the killing of Ahmaud Arbery. Monroe is a syndicated religion columnist and the Boston voice for Detour's African American Heritage Trail. Emmett G. Price III is founding pastor of Community of Love Christian Fellowship in Allston, the Inaugural Dean of Africana Studies at Berklee College of Music. Together, they host GBH's All Rev'd Up podcast. We wrap up the show by asking listeners whether an honor-system approach to store check-outs through Venmo or tip jars could help with retail labor shortages.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
Boston Public Radio Full Show: Snow Day!

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 164:34


Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners their favorite snow day activities. Shirley Leung updates listeners on the state of Mass. and Cass, and which New England businesses continue to donate to election-denying politicians a year after Jan. 6. Leung is a business columnist for The Boston Globe and a Boston Public Radio contributor. Callie Crossley talks about the death of Sidney Poitier, the first Black man to win the Oscar for best actor, bomb threats at HBCUs and a Black-owned startup incubator based in Roxbury. Crossley hosts GBH's Under the Radar and Basic Black. Andy Ihnatko discusses Winnie the Pooh's freedom from copyright and updates from the world of car technology and foldable laptops. Ihnatko is a tech writer and blogger, posting at Ihnatko.com. Tracy Chang weighs in on vaccine requirements for restaurants and the state of the food industry. Chang is the chef and owner of Cambridge's PAGU, as well as the co-founder of two non-profits: Off Their Plate, which empowers local female and minority-owned kitchens to provide free meals communities across the country, and Project Restore Us, which provides grocery supplies to struggling restaurant workers.  Sue O'Connell talks about tennis star Novak Djokovic's detention in Australia due to his vaccination status and Betty White's legacy. O'Connell is the co-publisher of Bay Windows and the South End News, as well as NECN's political commentator and explainer-in-chief. We end the show by asking listeners their reaction to Pope Francis chastising couples for choosing pets over kids.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
‘No More Pussyfooting Around': Food Writer Corby Kummer Cheers Starbucks' Latest Employee Vaccination Effort

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 24:36


On Tuesday's Boston Public Radio, food writer Corby Kummer said he's hoping more companies follow in the heels of coffee behemoth Starbucks, which is now requiring proof-of-vaccination for its hundreds of thousands of U.S. employees. Workers who opt out of vaccines will have to submit weekly tests, conducted at the employee's expense.  “This is an example of a big company saying ‘we've had it, we just have to get vaccinated, this is the wave of the future – no more pussyfooting around,' and I think it's great,” Kummer told hosts Jim Braude and Margery Eagan.  He did, however, raise concerns that public perception of Starbucks as a “liberal” corporation might dissuade business leaders on the conservative side of the political spectrum to shirk responsibility for getting employees vaccinated against COVID-19.  “I think that we all wish that it wasn't a seeming political litmus test,” he lamented. “‘Oh, Starbucks must be Democratic, they must be liberal!'” Kummer went on to list Tyson Foods as an instance of a corporation with a perceived conservative bent taking steps to protect workers from infection. “If there were more and more right wing-perceived companies mandating this, it would really help,” he said. “But Starbucks is big [and] publicly influential, and I hope this will have the effect of causing many others to impose mandates.” Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Circling back to unpacking the pivot

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 164:22


Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners how they're faring as students, teachers and parents figure out back to school plans amid Omicron spread. Trenni Kusnierek talks about Antonio Brown walking off the field mid-game and getting fired from the Buccaneers, and a hockey fan saving an NHL staffer from cancer by spotting a mole from the stands. Kusnierek is a reporter and anchor for NBC Sports Boston, and a weekly Boston Public Radio contributor. Carol Rose discusses the ACLU's national and local priorities in 2022, including work on voting rights, police reform and facial recognition software. Rose is the Executive Director of the ACLU of Massachusetts. A.C. Thompson previews his documentary on the Jan. 6 insurrection, and weighs in on the state of far-right extremism in the U.S. Thompson is a senior reporter at ProPublica and a FRONTLINE correspondent. His documentary, “American Insurrection,” airs at 10 p.m. eastern on PBS and will be available to stream on Frontline's website, YouTube, and the PBS video app. Corby Kummer talks about the Biden Administration's push to aid small meat producers, Starbucks requiring all U.S. employees to get vaccinated and a pastry program in an Italian prison. Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. John King weighs in on the status of Build Back Better and the state of media and democracy in the U.S. King is CNN's Chief National Correspondent and anchor of "Inside Politics,” which airs weekdays and Sunday mornings at 8 a.m. We end the show by asking listeners what phrases they would like to get rid of in 2022.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Imani Perry, Lindy West, Howard Bryant and more

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 164:43


Today on Boston Public Radio we're on tape, bringing you some of our favorite conversations from recent years: Imani Perry talks about parenthood, and how Black parents talk to their children about race. Perry is a professor of African American Studies at Princeton University. Her latest book is "Breathe: A Letter To My Sons.” Richard Blanco reads his favorite “aubade” poems — about lovers departing at dawn — including “Aubade with Burning City” by Ocean Vuong and “Ghosting Aubade” by Amie Whittemore. Blanco is the fifth inaugural poet in U.S. history. His latest book, "How To Love A Country," deals with various sociopolitical issues that shadow America. Lizzie Post weighs in on cannabis culture in her new book, “Higher Etiquette: A Guide to the World of Cannabis, From Dispensaries to Dinner Parties.” Post is a writer, co-director of The Emily Post Institute and great-great-granddaughter of etiquette writer Emily Post. Christopher Kimball previews his latest cookbook “Vegetables,” sharing his favorite ways to bring vegetables to the center of the plate. Chris Kimball co-founded America's Test Kitchen, and now runs Christopher Kimball's Milk Street in Boston. His latest cookbook is “Vegetables.” Farah Stockman talks about how class divides manifest themselves culturally and politically in the United States, and why higher-class, well-educated communities struggle to understand and represent the majority of Americans. Farah Stockman is a member of the New York Times editorial board, and a Pulitzer Prize–winning reporter. Her latest book is “American Made: What Happens to People When Work Disappears.” Howard Bryant discusses his new book, "The Heritage: Black Athletes, a Divided America, and the Politics of Patriotism." Bryant is a columnist and commentator for ESPN. Lindy West previews her latest book, "The Witches are Coming," a collection of essays about feminism in the #MeToo moment. West is a writer, comedian and activist. Joshua Foer talks about the latest edition of “Atlas Obscura: An Explorers Guide To The World's Hidden Wonders.” Foer is a freelance journalist and author of "Moonwalking With Einstein: The Art And Science Of Remembering Everything.”

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Don Lemon, Chasten Buttigieg, Nancy Schön and more

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 164:43


Today on Boston Public Radio we're on tape, bringing you some of our favorite conversations from recent months: Don Lemon tells stories from his book, “This Is The Fire: What I Say To My Friends About Racism." Lemon anchors “CNN Tonight with Don Lemon,” airing weeknights at 10 p.m. He's also a #1 bestselling New York Times author. Chasten Buttigieg discusses his memoir, “I Have Something to Tell You,” and the challenges facing LGBTQ+ communities in the U.S. Buttigieg is a teacher and the husband of U.S. Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg. Sy Montgomery dives into the world of hummingbirds with her latest book, “The Hummingbirds' Gift: Wonder, Beauty And Renewal On Wings.” Montgomery is a journalist, naturalist and a BPR contributor. David Byrne talks about the film adaptation of his tour, “American Utopia,” and his accompanying illustrated book. Byrne is a singer, songwriter and guitarist, and founding member of the Talking Heads. Nancy Schön discusses her recent work and the mysteries behind the decoration of her iconic “Make Way For Ducklings” sculpture in Boston's Public Garden. Schön is a sculpture artist, and her latest book is “Ducks on Parade!” Derek DelGaudio weighs in on the roles identity and illusion play in his work, along with the thought process behind his film “In & Of Itself.” DelGaudio is a writer and artist. His latest book is “Amoralman: A True Story And Other Lies,” and his film, “In & Of Itself,” is on Hulu. Gish Jen highlights differences between individualistic and collectivistic cultures in her new book, “The Girl At The Baggage Claim: Explaining the East-West Culture Gap.” Jen is a novelist and nonfiction writer. Richard Blanco reads his favorite “aubade” poems — about lovers departing at dawn — including “Aubade with Burning City” by Ocean Vuong and “Ghosting Aubade” by Amie Whittemore. Blanco is the fifth inaugural poet in U.S. history. His latest book, "How To Love A Country," deals with various socio-political issues that shadow America.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Botox for Camels

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 164:32


Today on Boston Public Radio: Senator Elizabeth Warren talks about her experience with COVID-19 and the state of Build Back Better and voting rights. Warren is senator of Massachusetts. Then, we ask listeners for their last minute gift suggestions. Tori Bedford updates listeners on the latest slew of unionization pushes, including among Kellogg's workers, Starbucks baristas and local Somerville coffeeshop workers. Bedford covers Boston's neighborhoods, including Dorchester, Roxbury and Mattapan for GBH News. Andrea Cabral weighs in on the trial of ex-police officer Kim Potter, who fatally shot Duante Wright in a traffic stop. Cabral is the former Suffolk County sheriff and the former Massachusetts secretary of public safety. She is currently the CEO of the cannabis company Ascend. Andy Ihnatko gives tips on how to prevent iPhone delivery theft, and his favorite tech gifts for the holidays. Ihnatko is a tech writer and blogger, posting at Ihnatko.com. Shirley Leung discusses the racist backlash facing Mayor Michelle Wu after her latest vaccine requirement announcement. Leung is a business columnist for The Boston Globe and a Boston Public Radio contributor. Sy Montgomery talks about camels disqualified in beauty pageants for having botox, and snakes found in Christmas trees. Montgomery is a journalist, naturalist and BPR contributor. Her latest book is "Becoming A Good Creature." We end the show by opening phone lines to hear final hopes, dreams and worries ahead of this coming Christmas.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Tales of regifting gone wrong

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 164:16


Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners their reactions to Mayor Michelle Wu's announcement yesterday of new vaccine requirements in restaurants, theaters and other venues. Trenni Kusnierek weighs in on Wu's decision to exempt athletes from her new vaccine mandates, and Patriots Manager Bill Belichick apologizing after a curt post-game press conference Saturday. Kusnierek is a reporter and anchor for NBC Sports Boston, and a weekly Boston Public Radio contributor. Ali Noorani talks about what the first few days of the Remain in Mexico policy resuming means for immigrants and advocates. Noorani is the president and chief executive officer of the National Immigration Forum. His forthcoming book is “Crossing Borders: The Reconciliation of a Nation of Immigrants.” Charlie Warzel explains how the pandemic has affected the state of work, and how to make remote work better in a hybrid world. Charlie Warzel is a contributing writer at the Atlantic and the author of Galaxy Brain, a newsletter about technology, politics and culture. He co-authored ‘Out of Office' with Anne Helen Petersen. Juliette Kayyem weighs in on President Joe Biden's pandemic policy as Omicron spreads throughout the country, and the latest in the Jan. 6 investigation. Kayyem is an analyst for CNN, former assistant secretary at the Department of Homeland Security and faculty chair of the homeland security program at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government. Christopher Muther reviews the Boston hotel scene, tells stories from his latest travels to the Caribbean and shares his favorite and least favorite Christmas songs. Muther is a Boston Globe travel columnist and travel writer. We end the show by hearing stories from listeners of regifting gone wrong.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Dash for Cash

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 161:48


Today on Boston Public Radio: Chuck Todd updates listeners on the latest from Washington D.C., including Republicans' outlook on COVID-19 and the state of voting rights legislation. Todd is the moderator of “Meet the Press,” host of “Meet the Press Daily” on MSNBC and the political director for NBC News. Andrea Cabral discusses an upcoming movie about the Boston strangler, and the state of democracy in the U.S. Cabral is the former Suffolk County sheriff and the former Massachusetts secretary of public safety. She is currently the CEO of the cannabis company Ascend. Paul Reville critiques a South Dakota “dash for cash” event that had teachers on their hands and knees grabbing money for their classrooms. He also talks about parents serving as substitute teachers amid a teacher shortage and the future of learning pods. Reville is the former Massachusetts secretary of education and a professor at Harvard University's Graduate School of Education, where he also heads the Education Redesign Lab. His latest book, co-authored with Lynne Sacks, is “Collaborative Action for Equity and Opportunity: A Practical Guide for School and Community Leaders.” Shirley Leung shares insights from her interview with Mayor Michelle Wu, and discusses the Globe's picks for Bostonians of the year. Leung is a business columnist for The Boston Globe and a Boston Public Radio contributor. Catherine Peterson weighs in on vaccine requirements at venues in the city, and what she thinks of the amount of American Rescue Plan Act funds directed towards the arts sector. She also talks about a new mentorship program for BIPOC arts leaders. Catherine Peterson is the Executive Director of ArtsBoston. Jon Gruber explains the state of inflation in the U.S., why it's happening and possible solutions. Gruber was instrumental in creating both the Massachusetts health care reform and the Affordable Care Act, and his latest book is “Jump-Starting America: How Breakthrough Science Can Revive Economic Growth And The American Dream.” Christopher Kimball previews his latest cookbook “Vegetables,” sharing his favorite ways to bring vegetables to the center of the plate. Chris Kimball co-founded America's Test Kitchen, and now runs Christopher Kimball's Milk Street in Boston. His latest cookbook is “Vegetables.” Then, we replay our conversation with listeners about whether they would be open to becoming chattier on the T following Wu's invitation for riders to talk with her.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Chance Encounters

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 122:14


Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners whether they would be open to becoming chattier on the T, following Mayor Michelle Wu's invitation for riders to talk with her. Trenni Kusnierek discusses the $380 million settlement reached between USA Gymnastics and the victims of Larry Nassar. Kusnierek is a reporter and anchor for NBC Sports Boston, and a weekly Boston Public Radio contributor. Corby Kummer talks about the latest news on a potential statewide egg shortage, and the fifteen-minute grocery delivery start-ups opening up in downtown Boston. Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. Meredith Goldstein answers listeners' questions on romance and relationships, and shares advice from her recent columns. Goldstein is an advice columnist and features writer for the Boston Globe. Her advice column, “Love Letters,” is a daily dispatch of wisdom for the lovelorn that has been running for more than a decade. She also hosts the “Love Letters” podcast. John King updates us on the latest political headlines, focusing on the texts from Trump allies to former White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows surrounding the Jan. 6 Capitol riots. King is CNN's Chief National Correspondent and anchor of "Inside Politics,” which airs weekdays and Sunday mornings at 8 a.m.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Full of hot air

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 164:29


Today on Boston Public Radio: Chuck Todd weighs in on the status of Arizona Senator Kyrsten Sinema and West Virginia Senator Joe Manchin on Build Back Better, and Hillary Clinton reading her would-be 2016 victory speech. Todd is the moderator of “Meet the Press,” host of “Meet the Press Daily” on MSNBC and the political director for NBC News. Then, we ask listeners how they feel about President Joe Biden and the Democrats' domestic agenda and performance so far. Andrea Cabral talks about the overturned murder conviction of James Lucien, who spent 26 years in prison on a wrongful conviction by a corrupt police detective. Cabral is the former Suffolk County sheriff and the former Massachusetts secretary of public safety. She is currently the CEO of the cannabis company Ascend. Shirley Leung discusses Governor Charlie Baker's legacy regarding Massachusetts businesses, and what businesses are doing to retain workers during the great resignation. Leung is a business columnist for The Boston Globe and a Boston Public Radio contributor. Elizabeth Turnbull Henry talks about the future of environmental action and Baker's legacy on climate after the Transportation Climate Initiative and the New England Clean Energy Connect fell apart. Henry is president of the Environmental League of Massachusetts. Jon Gruber explains why the U.S. lags behind other developed nations in maternal health and infant mortality, and what Build Back Better could do to improve things. Gruber was instrumental in creating both the Massachusetts healthcare reform and the Affordable Care Act, and his latest book is “Jump-Starting America: How Breakthrough Science Can Revive Economic Growth And The American Dream.” We end the show by talking with listeners about a recent study that showed that men and loud talkers spread COVID-19 at higher rates.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
"Nothing Should Be Forbidden": Corby Kummer on Guy Fieri's Kitchen + Bar

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 28:08


Ahead of the opening of Guy Fieri's Kitchen + Bar in the Theater District, food writer Corby Kummer joined Boston Public Radio to share his thoughts on the celebrity chef's second restaurant in Boston. Fieri, known for his eccentric taste in food, included menu items from his other restaurants, such as trash can nachos from Guy Fieri's Tequila Cocina and Guy's Famous BBQ Bloody Mary. Diners can also order specialties like Cajun chicken Alfredo, hot pastrami grinders, and candy apple sangrias. “It's like somebody has said, ‘let me think of everybody's secret food desires, and I'm gonna let it run rampant,'” Kummer said. “‘Here it all is, come on and let let loose your secret desires.'” Restaurant critics have largely panned Fieri's restaurants, though Kummer notes that Bostonians should give Guy Fieri's Kitchen + Bar a chance. “Enjoy yourself: nothing should be forbidden,” Kummer said. “This is about being libertine and being indulgent, which everybody needs to be every so often or else the food police are really going to be out of business.” Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: The Return of Crocs

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 164:14


Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners whether Boston should implement indoor vaccine mandates like those in New York City. Trenni Kusnierek discusses what the U.S. diplomatic boycott of the Beijing Olympics means for the winter games and the Patriots' win last night. Kusnierek is an anchor and reporter for NBC Sports Boston, as well as a Boston Public Radio contributor. Tito Jackson previews his latest venture, a seven story complex housing marijuana food, drink and more. Jackson is a former city councilor, one-time mayoral candidate, and now marijuana entrepreneur. His business Apex Noire is expected to open in Boston early next year. Dr. Michael Mina updates listeners on the state of COVID-19 testing, including the reliability of at-home testing and why the U.S. should distribute more. Michael Mina is the Chief Science Officer at e-Med, a company that provides a plethora of at-home diagnostic testing. He most recently was an assistant professor of epidemiology at Harvard's  T. H. Chan School of Public Health. Carol Rose weighs in on recent Supreme Court hearings, including last week's debate on abortion and an upcoming case on free speech involving flag poles at City Hall. She also talks about the city's public health approach to homelessness at Mass. and Cass. Rose is the Executive Director of the ACLU of Massachusetts. John King goes over the latest political headlines, including the status of West Virginian Democratic Senator Joe Manchin's support for the Build Back Better Bill, and former President Donald Trump's role in Republican political endorsements. King is CNN's chief national correspondent and anchor of “Inside Politics,” which airs weekdays at noon and Sundays at 8 a.m. We end the show by asking listeners their thoughts on the rise of crocs and the rise of other comfortable fashion choices during the work from home era.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Senator Ed Markey Pushes Build Back Better

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 164:25


Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners whether they have picked up new health habits during the pandemic. Trenni Kusnierek talks about the potential impact of the Omicron variant on the Winter Olympics in Beijing, and Turkish Boston Celtics player Enes Kanter Freedom celebrating his new U.S. citizenship by changing his last name to Freedom. Kusnierek is an anchor and reporter for NBC Sports Boston, as well as a Boston Public Radio contributor. Shirley Leung discusses the ramifications of the state legislature failing to allocate billions of American Rescue Plan Act funding before going on recess. Leung is a business columnist for The Boston Globe and a Boston Public Radio contributor. Senator Ed Markey shares his work with senate democrats to reach consensus on the social infrastructure package, and emphasizes the need for filibuster reform to pass voting rights legislation. Markey is a senator of Massachusetts. Then, we ask listeners their thoughts on the Build Back Better plan. Christopher Kimball previews his latest cookbook “Vegetables,” sharing his favorite ways to bring vegetables to the center of the plate. Chris Kimball co-founded America's Test Kitchen, and now runs Christopher Kimball's Milk Street in Boston. His latest cookbook is “Vegetables.”  John King weighs in on the latest political headlines, including the status of the Build Back Better plan, why he thinks rapid tests are not more accessible and the power of extreme Republicans like Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene. King is CNN's chief national correspondent and anchor of “Inside Politics,” which airs weekdays at noon and Sundays at 8 a.m. We end the show by continuing our conversation with listeners about Build Back Better.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: On Animals, Pastry Love and other favorites

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 159:30


Today on Boston Public Radio we're on tape, bringing you some of our favorite conversations. Susan Orlean previews her latest book about animals, including the history of the movie “Free Willy,” her relationship with turkeys and her Valentine's Day spent with a lion. Orlean is a staff writer for the New Yorker, and an author; her latest book is “On Animals.” Joanne Chang talks about her latest book inspired by her baking journals, “Pastry Love: A Baker's Journal of Favorite Recipes.” Chang is a James Beard award–winning pastry chef. Richard Blanco reads fall-themed poetry, including “Nothing Gold Can Stay” by Robert Frost, “The Blower of Leaves” by January Gill O'Neil, “November 2: Día de los muertos” by Alberto Ríos and “Autumn Begins in Martins Ferry, Ohio” by James Wright. Blanco is the fifth inaugural poet in U.S. history. His latest book, "How To Love A Country," deals with various socio-political issues that shadow America. Howard Mansfield previews his latest book, "Chasing Eden: A Book of Seekers," about communities throughout American history that sought freedom, happiness and utopia. Mansfield is an author who writes about history, architecture and preservation. Malcolm Gladwell discusses his new book, "Talking to Strangers: What We Should Know about the People We Don't Know." Gladwell is a New Yorker staff writer and host of the “Revisionist History” podcast. Sy Montgomery explains how songbirds find mates for life in other birds who literally sing their tune and discussed vampire bats who adopt vampire bat pups. Montgomery is a journalist, naturalist and BPR contributor. Her latest book is "Becoming A Good Creature." Arthur C. Brooks discusses the key to happiness, drawing from his social science work and latest podcast, “How to Build a Happy Life.” Brooks is the William Henry Bloomberg professor of the practice of public leadership at the Harvard Kennedy School, a professor of management practice at the Harvard Business School, the happiness correspondent at The Atlantic and host of the podcast series “How to Build a Happy Life.” Spencer Buell and Erica Walker talk about the rise of noise complaints in Boston, as well as what — and if — residents and politicians should do about it. Spencer Buell is a staff writer for Boston Magazine. Erica Walker is a noise researcher who founded Noise and the City. She is an assistant professor of epidemiology at Brown. Daniel Leader discusses his latest book, "Living Bread." Leader is a pioneer in the American baking world.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
Corby Kummer on the Space-grown, ISS New Mexican Hatch Chiles

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 26:30


The galaxy's first space-grown New Mexican hatch chile peppers have been harvested from the International Space Station (ISS). Award-winning food writer Corby Kummer joined Boston Public Radio in studio Wednesday to discuss the space-grown chiles, and what these chiles could mean for the future of indoor farming. NASA employees brought 48 chile seeds aboard a spacecraft at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida for growth on the ISS. This past October —- the end of New Mexico's hatch chile season — the ISS crew harvested 7 mature hatch chiles. ISS crewmembers celebrated the growth of the peppers by throwing a taco party. “It's been very good for the mental health and psychology of the people in the space station, no doubt, to tender these plants and smell the leaves and smell the green,” Kummer said. The hatch chile seeds used in the ISS gardens were NuMex Española Improved, a hatch chile variety known for its early-maturity and medium-heat profile. The seeds were planted in an “oven-sized growth chamber” on the ISS, with NASA and ISS crew controlling lighting, temperature, trimming, and irrigation. The contained growth of these hatch chiles is big news for the future of indoor farming as well, Kummer notes. “There are billions of venture capital dollars being put into these indoor farms,” Kummer said. “This is like a very high profile, highly publicized example of growing things [indoors] if you control the humidity and the ultraviolet light.” Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Mayor Michelle Wu's First Ask the Mayor

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 161:45


Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show asking listeners their thoughts on the traditional Thanksgiving turkey, and whether it's time for something different. Trenni Kusnierek updates listeners on the latest headlines in sports, including Boston Celtics player Enes Kanter criticizing Michael Jordan and LeBron James, and Patriots General Manager Bill Belichick sharing his favorite Thanksgiving food. Kusnierek is an anchor and reporter for NBC Sports Boston, as well as a Boston Public Radio contributor. Mayor Michelle Wu answers questions from constituents in her first ever Ask the Mayor, including about her environmental platform, vaccine requirements and Mass. and Cass. Wu is mayor of Boston. Dan Shaughnessy tells anecdotes from his latest book about covering the Celtics during the Larry Bird era. Shaughnessy is a sports writer at the Boston Globe. His new book is “Wish It Lasted Forever: Life With The Larry Bird Celtics.” John King previews the latest political headlines, including the status of Build Back Better and the Jan. 6 investigation. King is CNN's chief national correspondent and anchor of “Inside Politics,” which airs weekdays at noon and Sundays at 8 a.m. We end the show by continuing our conversation with listeners about how they like their Thanksgiving turkey.

Black Like Me
S6 Ep141: Joy Is The Refusal To Be Devalued. It Is Resistance: A Conversation With Professor Kellie Carter Jackson

Black Like Me

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 67:18


Dr. Gee continues to lead the conversation on the role of Black people in American history. On this episode, he talks with Kellie Carter Jackson about how she teaches Black history and the discourse around race in education happening in America right now. Carter Jackson breaks down Critical Race Theory (CRT) and how we actually view history, whether it is through facts or memory. Kellie Carter Jackson is an Associate Professor in the Department of Africana Studies at Wellesley College. She was also the 2019-2020 Newhouse Faculty Fellow for the Center of the Humanities at Wellesley College. Carter Jackson's research focuses on slavery and the abolitionists, violence as a political discourse, historical film, and black women's history. She earned her B.A at her beloved Howard University and her Ph.D from Columbia University working with the esteemed historian Eric Foner. Her book, Force & Freedom: Black Abolitionists and the Politics of Violence (University of Pennsylvania Press), examines the conditions that led some black abolitionists to believe slavery might only be abolished by violent force. Force and Freedom was a finalist for the Frederick Douglass Book Prize, winner of the James H. Broussard Best First Book Prize given by SHEAR (Society for Historians of the Early American Republic) and a finalist for the Museum of African American History (MAAH) Stone Book Prize Award for 2019. The Washington Post listed Force and Freedom as one of 13 books to read on the history of Black America for those who really want to learn. Her interview, “A History of Violent Protest” on Slate's What's Next podcast was listed as one of the best of 2020. Carter Jackson is also co-editor of Reconsidering Roots: Race, Politics, & Memory (Athens: University of Georgia Press). With a forward written by Henry Louis Gates Jr., Reconsidering Roots is the first scholarly collection of essays devoted entirely to understanding the remarkable tenacity of Alex Haley's visual, cultural, and political influence on American history. Carter Jackson and Erica Ball have also edited a Special Issue on the 40th Anniversary of Roots for Transition Magazine (Issue 122}. Together, Ball and Carter Jackson have curated the largest collection essays dedicated to the history and impact of Roots. Carter Jackson was also featured in the History Channel's documentary, Roots: A History Revealed which was nominated for a NAACP Image Award in 2016. Carter Jackson is a co-host on the podcast, “This Day in Political Esoteric History” with Jody Avirgan and Nicole Hemmer. Her essays have been featured in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Atlantic, The Los Angeles Times, NPR, The Guardian, The Conversation, Boston's NPR Blog Cognoscenti, Black Perspectives, and Quartz. She has also been interviewed for her expertise for MSNBC, SkyNews (UK) New York Times, PBS, Time, Vox, The Huff Post, the BBC, Boston Public Radio, Al Jazeera International, Slate, The Telegraph, Reader's Digest, CBC, and Radio One among other news outlets. She has been featured in a host of documentaries and podcasts on history and race in the United States. Carter Jackson is a commissioner for the Massachusetts Historical Commission. She sits on the scholarly advisory board for the Gilder Lehrman Institute for American History. Carter Jackson is also Historian-in-Residence for the Museum of African American History in Boston. She is currently at work on two book manuscripts, one on Black response to white supremacy and Losing Laroche: The Story of the Only Black Passenger on the Titanic. She traces how Joseph Laroche allows us to better understand the possibilities and limitations of black travel in the Titanic moment and our global love affair with whiteness and wealth. Carter Jackson represented by the indefatigable Tanya McKinnon and her team at McKinnon Literary. She currently resides outside of Boston with her husband and three children. alexgee.com patreon.com/blacklikeme

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Psychedelic honey, illegal cheese and other delicacies

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 164:18


Today on Boston Public Radio: Chuck Todd begins the show with the latest news from Washington D.C., including the latest from the Jan. 6 committee, and a House vote to censure Republican Rep. Paul Gosar of Arizona for sharing an altered anime video of him killing Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. Todd is the moderator of “Meet the Press,” host of “Meet the Press Daily” on MSNBC and the political director for NBC News. Then, we ask listeners their Thanksgiving plans as COVID cases rise. Andrea Cabral discusses the latest in the trial of Kyle Rittenhouse, including Judge Bruce Schroeder dismissing the gun charge against Rittenhouse. She also talks about the state of marijuana legalization at the federal level. Cabral is the former Suffolk County sheriff and the former Massachusetts secretary of public safety. She is currently the CEO of the cannabis company Ascend. Paul Reville updates listeners on the latest news from schools, including how schools are doing when it comes to COVID-19, and the latest slew of racist incidents. Reville is the former Massachusetts secretary of education and a professor at Harvard University's Graduate School of Education, where he also heads the Education Redesign Lab. His latest book, co-authored with Lynne Sacks, is “Collaborative Action for Equity and Opportunity: A Practical Guide for School and Community Leaders. Dylan Thuras tells stories of strange food from around the world, including psychedelic honey, the anti-masterbatory origins of graham crackers and the great molasses flood in Boston in 1919. Dylan Thuras is the co-founder and creative director of Atlas Obscura, and the co-author of the New York Times bestseller “Atlas Obscura: An Explorer's Guide to the World's Hidden Wonders.” His latest book is “Gastro Obscura: A Food Adventurer's Guide.” It was co-authored with Cecily Wong. Shirley Leung weighs in on the State House's inability to pass legislation to distribute the American Rescue Plan Act funds, and the future of Boston's downtown in an era of hybrid work. Leung is a business columnist for The Boston Globe and a Boston Public Radio contributor. We end the show by talking with listeners about their strange food stories.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
Corby Kummer: The Tuna Story That Keeps On Giving

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 24:07


The Subway tuna sandwich saga continues: Food writer Corby Kummer joined Boston Public Radio to discuss new claims in a lawsuit against the sandwich chain that its tuna subs don't contain tuna at all. “This is one of the best stories ever,” he said. “Everybody wants to test Subway tuna sandwiches and find out what's in it.” Earlier this year, the New York Times sent out samples of Subway tuna sandwiches to a laboratory, only to find that “no amplifiable tuna DNA was present” and the species couldn't be identified. Subway has repeatedly denied the allegations. Corby Kummer is executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Michelle Wu is ready to get to work

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 170:02


Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners their reactions to the latest slew of racist incidents at local schools. Trenni Kusnierek discusses New York Marathon runners coming to the aid of a competitor who had a heart attack during the race, and family members meddling in the lives of professional athletes. Kusnierek is an anchor and reporter for NBC Sports Boston, as well as a Boston Public Radio contributor. Then, we broadcast the live swearing in of Boston's newest mayor Michelle Wu, and ask listeners for their reactions to history in the making, as Wu becomes the first woman and first person of color elected as mayor of the city. Farah Stockman talks about how class divides manifest themselves culturally and politically in the United States, and why higher class, well educated communities struggle to understand and represent the majority of Americans. Farah Stockman is a member of the New York Times editorial board, and a Pulitzer prize winning reporter. Her latest book is “American Made: What Happens to People When Work Disappears.” John King updates listeners on the latest political headlines, including why Republicans have an advantage moving into midterm elections following the latest wave of gerrymandering, and what it means for Democrats. King is CNN's chief national correspondent and anchor of “Inside Politics,” which airs weekdays at noon and Sundays at 8 a.m. We end the show by continuing our conversation about Wu and what her election means for Boston.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Skate Hags, dickies and the art of baton twirling

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 161:21


Today on Boston Public Radio: Shirley Leung talks about what GE's split will mean for Massachusetts, and Tito Jackson's seven-story cannabis venture near Faneuil Hall. Leung is a business columnist for The Boston Globe and a Boston Public Radio contributor. Then, we ask listeners about if the latest surge in COVID-19 cases is changing their behavior at this point in the pandemic. Bill McKibben reports back from the COP26 climate summit in Glasgow, and why the summit did not rise to his hopes without a strong climate agenda passed from the U.S. McKibben is co-founder of 350.org and the author of numerous books about climate change. His latest book is “Falter: Has the Human Game Begun to Play Itself Out?” Andy Ihnatko updates listeners on the latest news from the tech industry, including new accessibility tools in development for speech-impaired smartphone users, and smartphone features that allow users to designate people to access their data when they die. Ihnatko is a tech writer and blogger, posting at Ihnatko.com. Sue O'Connell talks about the US Navy launching a ship named for gay rights leader Harvey Milk, and long-time anchor Brian Williams announcing his exit from NBC. O'Connell is the co-publisher of Bay Windows and the South End News, as well as NECN's political commentator and explainer-in-chief. Octavia Bennett, Jen McMahon and Jen Millis share the meaning behind their group name, Skate Hags, and how they built community around roller skating during the pandemic. Bennett, McMahon and Millis are the founders of the roller skating collective Skate Hags. We end the show by talking with listeners about what vintage trends – in addition to roller skating – have made a comeback in recent years. 

Boston Public Radio Podcast
Corby Kummer on the Dining Shed Dilemma

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 21:58


Award-winning food writer Corby Kummer joined Boston Public Radio on Wednesday to explain why outdoor dining could destroy neighborhoods, following a recent New York Times article on issues with outdoor dining sheds in the Lower East Side. Small business owners in the neighborhood have lodged complaints about high noise levels, increasing rat populations, and trash generated from restaurants' outdoor dining sheds, claiming that the area has become “unlivable.” “It's other businesses that are trying to keep alive next to [outdoor dining sheds] now,” Kummer said. “I hope that Boston will do a better job of responding to complaints. [Small businesses] are on margins as thin as a lot of the restaurants.” While outdoor dining has served as a boon for restaurants throughout the pandemic, Kummer notes that long-term solutions for both restaurants and local businesses must be found. “Cambridge, for example, has been so ahead of other cities in terms of bike-friendly lanes and pedestrian zones,” Kummer said. “I think the answer is going to be a great parking lot behind Central Square — just making things pedestrian zones over the long run.” Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show:

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 164:25


Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners their reactions to a recent wave of harassment in youth sports, after Danvers school officials faced calls to resign amid reports of hazing on a boys hockey team. Trenni Kusnierek discusses recent reporting on hazing rituals on a boys hockey team in Danvers, including sexual misconduct and pressure to use racist and antisemitic epithets. Kusnierek is an anchor and reporter for NBC Sports Boston, as well as a Boston Public Radio contributor. Lyndia Downie talks about the wake of last week's tent clearing at Mass. and Cass, and why it's so hard for people to get into long term treatment for drug addiction. Downie is the president and executive director of Pine Street Inn, one of the largest agencies serving homeless people in New England. Will Fitzgibbon and Evan Williams previews their reporting on the Pandora Papers, which showed how some of the wealthiest people across the globe hide their wealth from authorities and the public. Williams is a reporter and producer with Frontline. Fitzgibbon is a senior reporter with the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists. Jim Aloisi and Stacy Thompson talk all things transportation, including Beacon Hill's response to Mayor-elect Michelle Wu's plan to free the T. Aloisi is the former Massachusetts transportation secretary, a member of the Transit Matters board and a contributor to Commonwealth Magazine. Thompson is executive director of Livable Streets. John King updates listeners on the latest political headlines, including Republican Rep. Paul Gosar of Arizona sharing an altered anime video of him killing Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and going after President Joe Biden. King is CNN's chief national correspondent and anchor of “Inside Politics,” which airs weekdays at noon and Sundays at 8 a.m. We end the show by asking listeners their opinion on Wu's proposal to make the MBTA free.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Jim Braude versus daylight savings

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 164:14


Today on Boston Public Radio: Shirley Leung discusses what Mayor-elect Michelle Wu's win means for the Asian American community, and her latest piece on how female entrepreneurs secure venture funding in a male-dominated industry. Leung is a business columnist for The Boston Globe and a Boston Public Radio contributor. Then, we ask listeners about whether they plan to vaccinate their children aged 5-11. Callie Crossley talks about Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers lying about his vaccination status following his COVID-19 diagnosis. She also critiques the omnipresence of pink products for breast cancer awareness, as a form of “pinkwashing” in which companies fail to actually contribute to breast cancer research. Crossley hosts GBH's Under the Radar and Basic Black. Andy Ihnatko criticizes Mark Zuckerberg and Facebook's rebranding as Meta, and tells listeners how to proactively maximize their phone's emergency features. Ihnatko is a tech writer and blogger, posting at Ihnatko.com. Sue O'Connell discusses Katie Couric's memoir “Going There,” and the Senate confirmation of Justice Beth Robinson, the first openly LGBTQ+ woman to serve on any federal district court. O'Connell is the co-publisher of Bay Windows and the South End News, as well as NECN's political commentator and explainer-in-chief. Thato Mwosa previews her latest film, “Memoirs of a Black Girl,” a coming of age story about a Black girl growing up in Roxbury up for a city-wide scholarship, and the decisions she must make to survive high school. Mwosa is an award-winning illustrator, screenwriter, playwright, filmmaker, and film teacher at Brookline High. “Memoirs of a Black Girl,” is available to stream online through Prime Video, Apple TV, Google Play and other video on demand services. We end the show by asking listeners their opinions on daylight savings time, as clocks turn back an hour this Sunday.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
Corby Kummer: “It's Going to Get Worse Before It Gets Better” for Restaurant Industry, Closures

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 19:56


Craigie on Main, The Asgard, Tiger Mama, The Kinsale — these are just a few examples from a long list of Boston-area restaurants that have shuttered during the pandemic. With the end to outdoor dining this winter and uncertainty around the future of COVID, more restaurants could meet the same fate. “It's going to get worse before it gets better,” Corby Kummer told Boston Public Radio on Tuesday. “There's so many factors, all of them precipitated by the close downs of the pandemic.” Long-term, industry-wide issues, such as low profit margins and low pay for restaurant staff, were exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. At the same time, restaurants are facing new pandemic-era challenges in the high number of staffers leaving the industry and “fights over rent,” as was the case of Eastern Standard and Island Creek Oyster Bar in Kenmore Square. Kummer notes that some restaurants, however, may have closed due to inadequate business planning. “Some very sharp business people are saying [that] there are so many restaurant business people who shouldn't have been in business in the first place, if they didn't have three months of reserves or if they didn't know how to write a business plan,” he said. “That means there should be more assistance to restaurant owners on how to run businesses.” Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Election Day

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 165:43


Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners about their experiences with election day, and talking with Michelle Wu and Annissa Essaibi George about their final pitches for their candidacy as voters head to the polls. Tenni Kusnierek discuss former Chicago Blackhawks Kyle Beach's accusations against the team for mishandling his report of sexual assault by former Assistant Coach Brad Aldrich. She also previews the U.S. Curling Team's journey to the 2022 Winter Olympics. Kusnierek is an anchor and reporter for NBC Sports Boston, as well as a Boston Public Radio contributor. Carol Rose weighs in on the Supreme Court's consideration of the Texas abortion law, and how she thinks Boston's government should approach the crisis at Mass. and Cass. Rose is the Executive Director of the ACLU of Massachusetts. Then, we talk with listeners about a recent Boston Globe report showing how racial segregation persists in Boston. Corby Kummer update listeners on all things food, including the carbon footprint of coffee and his thoughts on Fluffernutter. Kummer is the executive director of the food and society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. John King gives an election day politics update, including the stakes of Virginia's gubernatorial election, and the fate of President Joe Biden's spending bill. King is CNN's chief national correspondent and anchor of “Inside Politics,” which airs weekdays at noon and Sundays at 8 a.m. We end the show by asking listeners whether they love or hate fluffernutter, which Merriam-Webster Dictionary recently made an official word.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Naptime

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 164:34


Today on Boston Public Radio: Shirley Leung weighs in on clashes between activists and the government over clearing tents at Mass. and Cass, and debates over sports betting and a proposed footbridge between Somerville and the Encore Casino in Everett. Leung is a business columnist for The Boston Globe and a Boston Public Radio contributor. Then, we ask listeners about whether President Joe Biden should compromise or call Senators Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema's bluffs in negotiations over the spending bill. Dr. Trisha Pasricha tells stories of the sexism she has faced in the field of medicine, and emphasizes the importance of the COVID-19 vaccine for pregnant people. Pasricha is a gastroenterologist at Mass General Hospital, a physician at Harvard Medical School and a health contributor at the Washington Post. Andy Ihnatko talks about how to protect technology from storms, in the wake of this week's nor'easter. Ihnatko is a tech writer and blogger, posting at Ihnatko.com. Arthur Brooks discusses the key to happiness, drawing from his social science work and latest podcast, “How to Build a Happy Life.” He's the William Henry Bloomberg professor of the practice of public leadership at the Harvard Kennedy School, a professor of management practice at the Harvard Business School, the happiness correspondent at The Atlantic and host of the podcast series How to Build a Happy Life. Jon Gruber talks through proposals to tax billionaires and corporations, and the likelihood that they would pass in Congress. Gruber teaches economics at MIT. He was instrumental in creating both the Massachusetts health-care reform and the Affordable Care Act, and his latest book is “Jump-Starting America: How Breakthrough Science Can Revive Economic Growth And The American Dream. We end the show by asking listeners about times they have dropped the ball at crucial moments, after a Massachusetts doctor was fined for falling asleep in his car and missing a surgery.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
Corby Kummer: Restaurant Industry Wage Theft Has Worsened During the Pandemic

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 12:35


Award-winning food writer Corby Kummer joined Boston Public Radio on Tuesday to discuss a pandemic-era increase of wage theft in the restaurant industry, following a recent report by the nonprofit restaurant advocacy group One Fair Wage. “[Forty-three] states still allow a tipped minimum wage, which means as low as $2.13 an hour,” Kummer said. “Employees who are waitstaff have the liberty to take home all their tips based on that. The catch is that it's on the restaurant manager to look to see, ‘what's the average hourly earning of those tipped minimum wage staff members of mine,' and ‘did it equal or better the state's minimum wage.' And if it didn't, they — the managers — have to make up for it by paying them enough money to make them whole.” “There's never been much enforcement of this, and there's less than ever enforcement now,” Kummer added. “There's evidence that there's more of this failure to make up for any of these losses than there was before the pandemic.” Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Say Cheese!

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 164:27


Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners how they feel about President Joe Biden's spending bill shrinking as it nears finalization. Trenni Kusnierek updates listeners on all things sports, including anti-vaccine protesters storming barricades at Barclays Center to support Kyrie Irving, and Tom Brady's 600th touchdown ball. Kusnierek is an anchor and reporter for NBC Sports Boston, as well as a Boston Public Radio contributor. Ali Noorani talks about why despite the United States' declaration of China's policies against its Uyghur community as a genocide, the government has not provided anyone refugee status. Noorani is the President & Chief Executive Officer of the National Immigration Forum. His forthcoming book is “Crossing Borders: The Reconciliation of a Nation of Immigrants.” Gov. Charlie Baker talks about how he thinks the state is doing on vaccinations following his mandates, and how he plans to approach housing issues. Baker is the governor of Massachusetts. Corby Kummer discusses the growing issue of wage theft in the restaurant industry, when waitstaff fail to make minimum wage off tips and their employer fails to pay the difference. Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. John King weighs in on Virginia's mayoral race and the state of the Democrats' spending plan. King is CNN's Chief National Correspondent and anchor of “Inside Politics,” which airs weekdays and Sunday mornings at 8 a.m. We end the show by asking listeners if bad photos are dead in the age of iPhones.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Speak Now or Forever Hold Your Peace

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 164:26


Today on Boston Public Radio: Stacey Abrams talks about what voters and politicians need to do to safeguard democracy, after Republicans blocked the Democrats' voting rights bill in Congress. She also weighs in on the status of Democratic negotiations over President Joe Biden's spending bill. Abrams is a voting rights activist, former Georgia State Representative and author. Then, we ask listeners how they approach compromise and negotiation following Stacey Abrams' conversation about political compromise. Shirley Leung pushes for ending tent encampments and providing housing for those at Mass. and Cass and weighs in on rent control, in her latest column on the Mass. and Cass crisis. Leung is a business columnist for The Boston Globe and a Boston Public Radio contributor. Sue O'Connell discusses one of the first rural health clinics by and for transgender people located in Northampton, and weighs in on when celebrities who commit harm can return to the public eye. O'Connell is the co-publisher of Bay Windows and the South End News, as well as NECN's political commentator and explainer-in-chief. Then, we ask listeners their thoughts on marriage, following a New York Times article about how the married may soon become the minority. Andy Ihnatko updates listeners on the latest tech headlines, including Facebook's upcoming rebranding, Donald Trump's new social media platform, Google's new signature phone and issues with Tesla's self-driving cars. Ihnatko is a tech writer and blogger, posting at Ihnatko.com.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
Is There Such Thing as an Eco-Friendly Steakhouse?

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 19:35


When diners visit Seattle steakhouse Bateau, they'll find steakhouse staples such as prime rib and filet alongside more obscure cuts like ranch and coulotte. Award-winning food writer Corby Kummer joined Boston Public Radio on Wednesday to share his thoughts on Bateau's efforts to become an environmentally sustainable steakhouse, following New York Times contributor Brett Anderson's profile on the restaurant. “[Bateau is] only offering the cuts of meat that their farmers, who use pasture-raised cattle and practices they approve of, have available,” Kummer said. “So if it's out for the night, you have to have something else at the restaurant.” “This restaurant is also experimenting with different ways of cooking meat, so it's tender and palatable,” Kummer added. Kummer noted that the chefs and owners of Craigie on Main in Central Square and Alden & Harlow in Harvard Square are just two examples of the “many local chefs who've been into this method.” “The whole idea for them is, ‘we want to support local farmers — local farmers aren't corn finishing on huge meat lots in Texas. It's grass-fed — often that needs a sharp knife — and we're going to show you, the diner, how delicious it can be,'” Kummer said. “It's just not what you'd get at a national steakhouse chain that subscribes to environment-destroying animal raising.” Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Club Sandwich

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 128:04


Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners what Massachusetts' paid family and medical leave means to them, as the program comes under threat at the federal level in Congress. Trenni Kusnierek talks about the Washington State University's firing of football coach Nick Rolovich after his refusal to get the COVID-19 vaccine, and updates listeners on the Red Sox' progression through the playoffs. Kusnierek is an anchor and reporter for NBC Sports Boston, as well as a Boston Public Radio contributor. Christopher Muther previews New Hampshire's hottest club, a live music venue in a barn owned by John Davidson in Sandwich. He also discusses the results of J.D. Power's annual airport satisfaction survey, where Boston Logan Airport ranked third to last among mega airports. Muther is a Boston Globe travel columnist and travel writer. Then, we talk with listeners about whether or not they would pay extra to fly on an all-vaccinated flight. Jonathan Martinis updates listeners on the status of Brittany Spears' case as she seeks to end her conservatorship, and discusses the importance of using her case to raise awareness of other instances of conservatorship abuse. Martinis is Senior Director for Law and Policy with the Burton Blatt Institute at Syracuse University, and was the lawyer in the 2012 Jenny Hatch guardianship case. John King weighs in on the latest political headlines, including updates on Democratic negotiations over President Joe Biden's spending bill, and what the Virginia's mayoral race means for Democrats. King is CNN's Chief National Correspondent and anchor of “Inside Politics,” which airs weekdays and Sunday mornings at 8 a.m. We end the show by continuing our conversation with listeners about what they would do to fly on a fully-vaccinated flight.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Phone Users Anonymous

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 129:04


Today on Boston Public Radio: Rep. Katherine Clark discusses President Joe Biden's spending plan, including the importance of childcare funding, and updates listeners on the state of Democratic negotiations. Clark is assistant house speaker and represents the Fifth District of Massachusetts. Then, we ask listeners about their thoughts on vaccine mandates in Massachusetts and the politicization of vaccines, as New Hampshire residents push back against public health efforts. Sue O'Connell talks about Texas' child welfare agency removing resources for LGBTQ youth from its webpage, and an upcoming walkout by transgender Netflix employees over Dave Chappelle's latest comedy special. O'Connell is the co-publisher of Bay Windows and the South End News, as well as NECN's political commentator and explainer-in-chief. Shirley Leung breaks down latest proposals to address the crisis at Mass. and Cass, and tells the story of a woman from New Jersey who drove north to look for her son there. Leung is a business columnist for The Boston Globe and a Boston Public Radio contributor. Andy Ihnatko talks about how iPhones can now track location even when turned off, so that the Find my iPhone feature can locate the device. He also discusses bipartisan efforts in Congress to bar tech companies from giving preferential treatment to their own products. Ihnatko is a tech writer and blogger, posting at Ihnatko.com. We end the show by asking listeners for their tips on tackling phone addiction.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Will He or Won't He?

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 164:30


Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners whether or not they think Donald Trump will run in the 2024 Presidential Election. Trenni Kusnierek updates listeners on the latest sports news, including Jon Gruden's resignation as coach of the Las Vegas Raiders following the release of homophobic, racist and misogynistic emails, and the FBI's failure to investigate Larry Nassar. Kusnierek is an anchor and reporter for NBC Sports Boston, as well as a Boston Public Radio contributor. Ali Noorani discusses the scientific achievements of immigrants to the United States amid recent Nobel Prize announcements, and critiques the conditions at the border and treatment of Haitian migrants. Noorani is the President & Chief Executive Officer of the National Immigration Forum. His forthcoming book is Crossing Borders: The Reconciliation of a Nation of Immigrants. Rick Steves reports back from his latest travels to Paris and Mont Blanc, and shares his hopes for his next trip to Europe. Steves is an author, television and radio host and the owner of the Rick Steves' Europe tour group. You can catch his television show, "Rick Steves' Europe," weeknights at 7:30 p.m. on GBH 2 and his radio show, “Travel With Rick Steves,” Sundays at 4 p.m. on GBH. Revs. Irene Monroe and Emmett G. Price III talk about the significance of Indigenous People's Day and the effect of Facebook's outage on religious communities. Monroe is a syndicated religion columnist, the Boston voice for Detour's African American Heritage Trail and co-host of the All Rev'd Up podcast. Price is the founding pastor of Community of Love Christian Fellowship in Allston, the Inaugural Dean of Africana Studies at Berklee College of Music and co-host of the All Rev'd Up podcast. John King weighs in on the latest political headlines, including Democratic infighting in Washington D.C. and the possibility of Trump running again. King is CNN's Chief National Correspondent and anchor of "Inside Politics,” which airs weekdays and Sunday mornings at 8 a.m. We end the show by continuing the conversation with listeners about the possibility of a Trump 2024 campaign.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Food on Tape

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 148:33


Today on Boston Public Radio we're on tape, replaying some of our favorite conversations about food and cooking: Joanne Chang talks about her latest book inspired by her baking journals, “Pastry Love: A Baker's Journal of Favorite Recipes.” Chang is a James Beard award winning pastry chef. Bren Smith shares different ways to eat kelp in his book “Eat Like a Fish: My Adventures Farming the Ocean to Fight Climate Change.” Smith is a former commercial fisherman and executive director of the non-profit GreenWave, focused on regenerative farming in water ecosystems. Dolores Huerta talks about why her work as a labor leader for farm workers' rights remains as relevant today as it was in the 1960s, and about coining the phrase “Sí, se puede.” Huerta is an activist and co-founder of the National Farmworkers Association alongside Cesar Chaves. Andrew Li and Irene Li share food and tips from their latest cookbook, which they wrote with their sister Margaret Li: “Double Awesome Chinese Food: Irresistible and Totally Achievable Recipes from Our Chinese-American Kitchen.” Andrew Li and Irene Li are co-founders of the restaurant Mei Mei, along with their sister Margaret Li.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Senator Elizabeth Warren Calls In

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 165:11


Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by talking with listeners – including Senator Elizabeth Warren – about the country's child care crisis, as families struggle to pay for care and centers downsize due to lack of staff.  Shirley Leung discusses a proposal to house Mass. and Cass' homeless population in an empty detention center, and the state of fundraising in the mayor's race. Leung is a business columnist for The Boston Globe and a Boston Public Radio contributor. Callie Crossley talks about Tesla's $137 million payment to a former Black employee for racial discrimination at work, the quilt exhibit at the Museum of Fine Arts and Georgia's youngest farmer, a six year old girl. Crossley hosts GBH's Under the Radar and Basic Black. Sue O'Connell weighs in on the New York Times' article and subsequent Twitter controversy, “Who is the Bad Art Friend?”, and criticism of Dave Chappelle's latest Netflix stand-up special. O'Connell is the co-publisher of Bay Windows and the South End News, as well as NECN's political commentator and explainer-in-chief. Andy Ihnatko breaks down Monday's Facebook outage and the latest criticism facing the company following accusations by whistleblower Frances Haugen. Ihnatko is a tech writer and blogger, posting at Ihnatko.com. We end the show by asking listeners about their experiences with the Boston Marathon, as the race returns this Monday.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
Corby Kummer: "There's Not Going to Be An Egg Shortage" in Massachusetts

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 20:04


Massachusetts state legislators may revise a 2016 ballot law on animal welfare to prevent a potential statewide egg shortage. Award-winning food writer Corby Kummer joined Boston Public Radio on Thursday to share his thoughts on this, and more. “First of all, there's not going to be an egg shortage,” Kummer said. “It's only an economic measure to protect farmers.” While the law also contains enclosure standards for pigs and calves, legislators are concerned with rules on acceptable enclosure space for egg-laying hens. According to the bill, egg-laying hens must be given at least 1.5 square feet of floor space and be able to fully extend both wings without touching the sides of the enclosure. In a measure to counteract the potential egg shortage, lawmakers are attempting to amend the enclosure requirements from 1.5 square feet to 1 square foot, following enclosure laws in other states. Unless legislators pass this amendment, the law will go into effect as written on Jan. 1, 2022. Representatives for egg farmers, supermarkets, and some animal rights activists support changes to the law, noting that vertical or multi-tiered aviary systems that allow hens to fly upwards, perch, and roost within 1 square foot. While Kummer acknowledged that some farmers may struggle economically to adjust enclosure spaces to fit this new rule, he believes that the idea of an egg shortage caused by enclosure regulations is an “excuse.” “This is another way for the industry to protect itself at the expense of animal welfare,” Kummer said. “But, if the country has enacted 1 square foot, then maybe Massachusetts should be consistent with that.” Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Happy Graduation, 18 Months Later

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 164:12


Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners where the boundaries of protest lie, after activists followed Arizona Senator Kyrsten Sinema into the bathroom to protest her centrist policies. Trenni Kusnierek previews tonight's wild card game between the Yankees and Red Sox and the return of the Boston Marathon. Kusnierek is an anchor and reporter for NBC Sports Boston, as well as a Boston Public Radio contributor. Carol Rose talks about the status of the Texas abortion law and how the government should respond to internet privacy issues for users, and previews the U.S. Supreme Court's upcoming agenda. Rose is the Executive Director of the ACLU of Massachusetts. Michael Curry weighs in on vaccine mandates to combat the pandemic, and the debate over safe injection sites as a solution to the crisis at Mass. and Cass. Curry is the president and CEO of the Massachusetts League of Community Health Centers and a member of Gov. Charlie Baker's COVID Vaccine Advisory Group. He's also a member of the National NAACP Board of Directors and chair of the board's advocacy and policy committee. Stephanie Leydon previews the launch of GBH's new multi-platform project, “The Big Quit,” which profiles people who used the pandemic to quit aspects of their life for something new. Leydon is the Director of Special Projects at GBH. John King updates listeners on all things politics, including Sinema's centrist politics, and the persisting gridlock in Congress. He also talks about Donald Trump's political ambitions for the 2024 presidential election. King is CNN's Chief National Correspondent and anchor of "Inside Politics,” which airs weekdays and Sunday mornings at 8 a.m. Then, we talk with listeners about whether they found meaning in postponed graduations and life-cycle events during the pandemic, or whether the moment had passed.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
Oh Deer! Is Venison the Most Eco-Friendly Food?

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 22:41


That deer in your garden? It might just be the most eco-friendly dinner to eat — provided you kill it yourself. Award-winning food writer Corby Kummer joined Boston Public Radio on Thursday to discuss Washington Post columnist Tamar Haspell's proposal that venison is “unequivocally the single most ecologically friendly food you can eat.” “If you get farm-raised venison in a restaurant, it's not really addressing this [environmental] issue, because the only thing that's legal to sell is farm-raised venison,” Kummer said. “You have to go out and kill it.” Haspell argued that due to invasive deer populations posing threats to native animals and plants, the spread of Lyme disease by deer ticks, and the greenhouse gas emissions deer produce, wild venison could be considered the most eco-friendly food to consume. In her piece, Haspell noted that a Connecticut town reversed its no-hunting ordinance in 2000 after being overrun by deer. Scientists who monitored the situation found that in the seven following years, deer density dropped by 87%, and Lyme disease cases in the community dropped as well. “The minute I see cute deer in a backyard — which we do a lot in Jamaica Plain — I think, ‘ticks! Lyme disease!'” Kummer joked. “So there are a lot of advantages to thinning deer [populations].” Both Haspell and Kummer believe, however, that some people will refuse to hunt and eat wild venison despite its eco-friendliness. “As the Haspell column in the Post makes clear, the farther you are from the animal, the more comfortable you are eating it,” Kummer said. “The closer you are, and you see that it's cute — or if you ever name an animal that you raise, there is a shibboleth against things that you see. So there's absolutely no problem with inhumanely-raised slaughtered chickens, but when it comes to a deer that's invading your garden and giving you Lyme disease, ‘no, no, no — don't do it.'” Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Tom Brady's Homecoming

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 164:35


Today on Boston Public Radio: We start the show by asking listeners their thoughts on vaccine mandates and people threatening to quit their jobs before getting the shot. Trenni Kusnierek updates listeners on all things sports, including rifts in the NBA over vaccines and Tom Brady's return to Gillette Stadium. Kusnierek is an anchor and reporter for NBC Sports Boston, as well as a Boston Public Radio contributor. Dr. Renee Crichlow calls out remaining healthcare workers who are not yet vaccinated, and talks about latest data on vaccine efficacy months after vaccination. Crichlow is the Chief Medical Officer at Codman Square Health Center and the Vice Chair of Health Equity at the Boston University Department of Family Medicine. Bill McKibben discusses what it would mean for the plant if President Joe Biden fails to pass his economic agenda, and previews his new project, Third Act, which seeks to engage older individuals with climate activism. McKibben is co-founder of 350.org and the author of numerous books about climate change. His latest book is “Falter: Has the Human Game Begun to Play Itself Out?” Nia Grace opens up about her newest restaurant at Northeastern, The Underground Café, and talks about the challenges of keeping restaurants afloat during the pandemic. Grace is the owner and operator of Darryl's Corner Bar and Kitchen in the South End, and one of the founders of the Boston Black Hospitality Coalition. She is also the owner of The Underground Café and Lounge, which opened last week on the campus of Northeastern University. John King goes through top political headlines, including Republican threats to Biden's economic agenda and persisting allegiances to Donald Trump. King is CNN's Chief National Correspondent and anchor of "Inside Politics,” which airs weekdays and Sunday mornings at 8 a.m. We end the show by asking listeners about their thoughts on Tom Brady's upcoming return to Boston Sunday night.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
Corby Kummer: Business as Usual? Not for the Restaurant Industry

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 22:39


Award-winning food writer Corby Kummer joined Boston Public Radio on Wednesday to share his thoughts on the movement within the restaurant industry to raise wages and foster better working environments in order to recruit workers. “There's a worker shortage. But more than that, there's a wage shortage,” Kummer said. “If you offer people more money, they will apply for jobs.” That's no easy feat for restaurant owners, Kummer noted. “Pay people more, give them paid time off, try to give them health insurance, all the stuff that's very expensive,” Kummer said. “Very expensive means you have to have a better business plan. That sounds easy, but it actually has been a huge challenge for restaurant owners before and after the pandemic.” Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Sharing is Caring

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 164:28


Today on Boston Public Radio: Michelle Singletary talks about the effect of COVID-19 on Social Security Retirement funds, and her recent column on the financial impact of vaccine refusal on unvaccinated individuals. Singletary is a nationally syndicated columnist for The Washington Post, whose award-winning column "The Color of Money" provides insight into the world of personal finance. Then, we take calls from listeners about their thoughts on sharing desks as workplace protocols change throughout the pandemic. Michael Curry discusses latest efforts to combat vaccine hesitancy, and the importance of considering racial and socioeconomic equity when thinking about vaccine mandates. Curry is the president and CEO of the Massachusetts League of Community Health Centers and a member of Gov. Charlie Baker's COVID Vaccine Advisory Group. He's also a Member of the National NAACP Board of Directors and chair of the board's Advocacy & Policy Committee. Trenni Kusnierek gives an update on all things sports, including the Boston Bruins' fully vaccinated status and the Red Sox' lack thereof. She also discusses the Anti-Doping Agency's announcement that they will reconsider marijuana as a banned substance, following runner Sha'Carri Richardson's suspension amid the summer Olympics. Kusnierek is an anchor and reporter for NBC Sports Boston, as well as a Boston Public Radio contributor. Attorney General Maura Healey answers questions from listeners in this month's Ask the AG, including about lack of access to Real ID licenses for immigrants and combatting overdose deaths in Black and Brown communities. Maura Healey is the Massachusetts Attorney General.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
Corby Kummer: Biden's "Big Almond" Pick for U.S. Trade Representative's Office Won't "Sit Well With Any Kind of Environmental Activist"

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 27:22


Award-winning food writer Corby Kummer joined Boston Public Radio on Friday, explaining the controversy surrounding President Joe Biden's pick of almond-industry lobbyist Elaine Trevino for chief agricultural negotiator at the U.S. Trade Representative's office. Trevino is the president of the Almond Alliance of California. “Why do we care and why are we angry about this in particular?” Kummer said. “Because there's no effective limits on how irrigation controls and who shares water and who parcels out how much water various agriculture industries within California are able to use.” Kummer noted that up to 70% of California almond production is exported to Europe and China, and that the industry depends on these exports to maintain price supports. “This is kind of a sign that the Biden administration wants to help out industries that rely enormously on foreign purchases to keep up their price supports, how they manage U.S. trade pacts with different countries, so that the enormous amount of exports, in this case to almonds, can go,” Kummer explained. “But until there's effective and concurrent regulation of methane for the [National] Cattlemen's Beef Association, allotted resources for the almond industry, it's not going to sit well with any kind of environmental activist.” Other topics discussed in this wide-ranging interview include the legal groups looking into the companies fraudulently using “natural” and “sustainable” labels, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's research on food insecurity levels during the pandemic. Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Rats!

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 161:10


Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners for their wildest rat stories, after a report showed that Boston's rat population is on the rise. Trenni Kusnierek discusses the Senate testimonies of four elite gymnasts, who said they blamed the FBI for failing to protect them against former USA team doctor and convicted sex offender Larry Nassar. She also talks about the pay gap in men and women's soccer. Kusnierek is an anchor and reporter for NBC Sports Boston, as well as a Boston Public Radio contributor. Rep. Ayanna Pressley talks about what it means for Boston to have two women in its mayoral election, following the historic win of Boston City Councilor Michelle Wu and Boston City Councilor Annissa Essaibi George in the preliminary election. She also makes an urgent call for supporting Haitian refugees in Texas. Pressley is the U.S. Representative for Massachusetts 7th District. Corby Kummer critiques how buzzwords like “healthy,” “all natural” and “sustainable” have no clear definitions in the food industry, and the ties between the “Big Almond” industry and the U.S. government with President Joe Biden's chief agricultural negotiator appointment at the United States Trade Representative's office. Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. Shirley Leung updates listeners on all-things business, including how Republican New Balance Chairman Jim Davis' $495,000 contribution to a pro-Essaibi George SuperPAC paid off in the mayoral preliminary election. Leung is a business columnist for The Boston Globe and a BPR contributor. Andy Ihnatko discusses the latest Wall Street Journal report that revealed Facebook's internal probe of Instagram's detrimental effects on teenage girl's mental health and self-image. He also weighs in on Epic Games, the company that makes Fortnite, and its lawsuit against Apple. Ihnatko is a tech writer and blogger, posting at Ihnatko.com. Ryan Landry ends the show by sharing memories from his all-expenses paid trip through Italy as a canned tomato influencer. Ryan Landry is a playwright, lyricist, actor and founder of the Gold Dust Orphans theatrical company. His new album is “The Vamps.”