Podcasts about Tufts University

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard

Private research university in Medford and Somerville, Massachusetts

  • 1,094PODCASTS
  • 1,591EPISODES
  • 47mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Dec 1, 2021LATEST
Tufts University

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about Tufts University

Show all podcasts related to tufts university

Latest podcast episodes about Tufts University

Purple Patch Podcast
196 Dr. Gil Blander talks Aging, Supplements, Extending your Lifespan, and How to Stave off Cognitive Decline

Purple Patch Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 54:59


This week features a conversation with Dr. Gil Blander. Dr. Blander is an expert in nutrition, biomarker analytics, athletic performance, biochemistry, and aging research.  Gil is also the Founder and CSO of InsideTracker, a personalized health and performance analytics company created by a team of scientists, physicians, nutritionists, and exercise physiologists from MIT, Harvard, and Tufts University. Today Matt and Dr. Blander discuss aging, supplements that actually help performance, homeopathy, extending your lifespan, and how to stave off cognitive decline.  They deliver insights and information to help you understand your body, apply focus, and move towards an optimized life by focusing on what matters. And, just like a deck of cards, you may be dealt a certain hand, but you can always play them well.    Episode Resources This episode is sponsored by our new collaboration with INSIDE TRACKER. Inside Tracker and Purple Patch - Receive 25% off their services with code: PURPLEPATCHPRO25 Learn more about Purple Patch Fully Customized 1:1 Coaching Learn more about Purple Patch Squad High-Performance Training Program Learn more about Purple Patch Strength Programming Stay Up-to-Date with Purple Patch News and Events Purple Patch Upcoming Webinars and Events  

Face Off Hockey Show
Chesapeake Hockey Week 11.30.21 (S4E13): Stevenson Men Sweep; Black Bears, Stevenson Women Split

Face Off Hockey Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021


This week, Scotty Wazz talks about the Black Bears return to the ice after a week off and their split with Danbury. Stevenson's Men squad swept Tufts University and got some weekly awards out of it, while Stevenson's Women split their weekend in the Codfish Bowl with a gritty come from behind win on Sunday. 

New Books in World Affairs
Elliot Ackerman and James Stavridis, "2034: A Novel of the Next World War" (Penguin, 2021)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 36:50


The next world war is 13 years away—that is, if you live in the world envisioned by Elliot Ackerman and James Stavridis, 2034: A Novel of the Next World War (Penguin, 2021). When writing about the intersection of combat and diplomacy, the co-authors draw from experience. Ackerman has worked in the White House and served five tours of duty as a Marine in Iraq and Afghanistan, where he received the Silver Star, the Bronze Star for Valor, and the Purple Heart. Stavridis, a retired United States Navy admiral, served as NATO Supreme Allied Commander Europe and, after leaving the Navy, as the dean of the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. 2034 plays out a what-if scenario, starting with an incident between the Chinese and U.S. that escalates into a major conflict. “You could certainly say right now, vis-a-vis the United States' relationship with China, that if we're not in a Cold War, we are at least in sort of the foothills of a Cold War,” Ackerman says. Told through the eyes of multiple main characters from five nations, the escalating conflict begins to seem inevitable as deceit, posturing, and a game of chicken made it harder and harder for the countries' leaders to back down. Ackerman feels that a conflict between the U.S. and China in real life is possible but not inevitable. “It's a cautionary tale. There's still time to take the exit ramp,” he says. Rob Wolf is the host of New Books in Science Fiction and the author of The Alternate Universe and The Escape. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

New Books in Literature
Elliot Ackerman and James Stavridis, "2034: A Novel of the Next World War" (Penguin, 2021)

New Books in Literature

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 36:50


The next world war is 13 years away—that is, if you live in the world envisioned by Elliot Ackerman and James Stavridis, 2034: A Novel of the Next World War (Penguin, 2021). When writing about the intersection of combat and diplomacy, the co-authors draw from experience. Ackerman has worked in the White House and served five tours of duty as a Marine in Iraq and Afghanistan, where he received the Silver Star, the Bronze Star for Valor, and the Purple Heart. Stavridis, a retired United States Navy admiral, served as NATO Supreme Allied Commander Europe and, after leaving the Navy, as the dean of the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. 2034 plays out a what-if scenario, starting with an incident between the Chinese and U.S. that escalates into a major conflict. “You could certainly say right now, vis-a-vis the United States' relationship with China, that if we're not in a Cold War, we are at least in sort of the foothills of a Cold War,” Ackerman says. Told through the eyes of multiple main characters from five nations, the escalating conflict begins to seem inevitable as deceit, posturing, and a game of chicken made it harder and harder for the countries' leaders to back down. Ackerman feels that a conflict between the U.S. and China in real life is possible but not inevitable. “It's a cautionary tale. There's still time to take the exit ramp,” he says. Rob Wolf is the host of New Books in Science Fiction and the author of The Alternate Universe and The Escape. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literature

New Books in Science Fiction
Elliot Ackerman and James Stavridis, "2034: A Novel of the Next World War" (Penguin, 2021)

New Books in Science Fiction

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 36:50


The next world war is 13 years away—that is, if you live in the world envisioned by Elliot Ackerman and James Stavridis, 2034: A Novel of the Next World War (Penguin, 2021). When writing about the intersection of combat and diplomacy, the co-authors draw from experience. Ackerman has worked in the White House and served five tours of duty as a Marine in Iraq and Afghanistan, where he received the Silver Star, the Bronze Star for Valor, and the Purple Heart. Stavridis, a retired United States Navy admiral, served as NATO Supreme Allied Commander Europe and, after leaving the Navy, as the dean of the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. 2034 plays out a what-if scenario, starting with an incident between the Chinese and U.S. that escalates into a major conflict. “You could certainly say right now, vis-a-vis the United States' relationship with China, that if we're not in a Cold War, we are at least in sort of the foothills of a Cold War,” Ackerman says. Told through the eyes of multiple main characters from five nations, the escalating conflict begins to seem inevitable as deceit, posturing, and a game of chicken made it harder and harder for the countries' leaders to back down. Ackerman feels that a conflict between the U.S. and China in real life is possible but not inevitable. “It's a cautionary tale. There's still time to take the exit ramp,” he says. Rob Wolf is the host of New Books in Science Fiction and the author of The Alternate Universe and The Escape. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/science-fiction

New Books Network
Elliot Ackerman and James Stavridis, "2034: A Novel of the Next World War" (Penguin, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 36:50


The next world war is 13 years away—that is, if you live in the world envisioned by Elliot Ackerman and James Stavridis, 2034: A Novel of the Next World War (Penguin, 2021). When writing about the intersection of combat and diplomacy, the co-authors draw from experience. Ackerman has worked in the White House and served five tours of duty as a Marine in Iraq and Afghanistan, where he received the Silver Star, the Bronze Star for Valor, and the Purple Heart. Stavridis, a retired United States Navy admiral, served as NATO Supreme Allied Commander Europe and, after leaving the Navy, as the dean of the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. 2034 plays out a what-if scenario, starting with an incident between the Chinese and U.S. that escalates into a major conflict. “You could certainly say right now, vis-a-vis the United States' relationship with China, that if we're not in a Cold War, we are at least in sort of the foothills of a Cold War,” Ackerman says. Told through the eyes of multiple main characters from five nations, the escalating conflict begins to seem inevitable as deceit, posturing, and a game of chicken made it harder and harder for the countries' leaders to back down. Ackerman feels that a conflict between the U.S. and China in real life is possible but not inevitable. “It's a cautionary tale. There's still time to take the exit ramp,” he says. Rob Wolf is the host of New Books in Science Fiction and the author of The Alternate Universe and The Escape. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

FriendsLikeUs
Democrats Message In A Bottle

FriendsLikeUs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 86:59


Christina Greer, Abbi Crutchfield, and Zainab Johnson visit Friends and discuss democrats message issue, New York's new Mayor and more with host Marina Franklin Abbi Crutchfield is the host of Up Early Tonight on Hulu and co-host of the podcast “Flameout” on Spotify. She's been on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, Full Frontal with Samantha Bee on TBS, Broad City on Comedy Central, and she hosted You Can Do Better on TruTV. Her jokes on Twitter are consistently featured on best-of lists by publications such as Paste Magazine and The Huffington Post, who named her one of the 18 comedians you must follow on Twitter. She has trained at the renowned Upright Citizen's Brigade Theatre, taught at the People's Improv Theater, and she tours nationally with her stand-up. Christina M. Greer, PhD is an Associate Professor of Political Science and American Studies at Fordham University (Lincoln Center Campus). She was the 2018 Fellow for the McSilver Institute for Poverty Policy and Research at New York University Silver School of Social Work, and co-host of the "What's in it for Us" podcast. Her primary research and teaching interests are racial and ethnic politics, American urban centers, presidential politics, and campaigns and elections. Her additional research interests also include transportation, mayors and public policy in urban centers. Her previous work has compared criminal activity and political responses in Boston and Baltimore as well as Baltimore and St. Louis. Prof. Greer's book Black Ethnics: Race, Immigration, and the Pursuit of the American Dream (Oxford University Press, 2013 ) investigates the increasingly ethnically diverse black populations in the US from Africa and the Caribbean and was the recipient of the WEB du Bois Best Book Award in 2014 given by the National Conference of Black Political Scientists. Professor Greer is currently working on a manuscript detailing the political contributions of Barbara Jordan, Fannie Lou Hamer, and Stacey Abrams. She recently co-edited Black Politics in Transition, which explores gentrification, suburbanization, and immigration of Blacks in America. She is a member of the board of The Tenement Museum in NYC, the Center for Community Change, and serves on the Advisory Board at Tufts University.  She is also an ardent supporter of FIERCE in NYC and Project South in Atlanta, GA, and a former board member of BAJI (Black Alliance for Just Immigration), the Riders Alliance of New York, and the Human Services Council.She is a frequent political commentator on several media outlets, primarily MSNBC, WNYC, and NY1, and is often quoted in media outlets such as the NYTimes, Wall Street Journal, and the AP. She is the co-host of the New York centered podcast FAQ-NYC and co-host of the Black centered podcast What's In It For Us podcast, is the politics editor at thegrio.com, is the producer and host of The Aftermath and The Contender on Ozy.com as well as their editor-at-large, is a frequent author and narrator for the TedEd educational series, and also writes a weekly column for The Amsterdam News, one of the oldest black newspapers in the U.S.Greer received her B. A. from Tufts University and her M.A., M.Phil., and Ph.D. in Political Science from Columbia University.  Zainab Johnson, a stand-up comedian, actress, and writer is quickly being propelled as one of the most unique and engaging performers on stage and screen. In 2019, Zainab was named one of Variety's Top 10 Comics To Watch. Recently, she was one of the hosts for Netflix's new show "100 Humans". You can also catch her as Aleesha on the new comedy series "Upload" on Amazon Prime. Zainab made her first late night stand up appearance on NBC's Late Night with Seth Meyers, and has also had appearances on HBO's All Def Comedy (2017), NBC's Last Comic Standing (2014), Arsenio (2014), BET's Comic View (2014), AXSTV's Gotham Comedy Live! She also just recently starred in a new web series titled Avant-Guardians. Zainab is a regular at the Improv Comedy Club in LA and the Comedy Cellar in NY, and has performed in the Montreal Just For Laughs Festival as one of the 2014 New Faces of Comedy and returned numerous times since. Always hosted by Marina Franklin - One Hour Comedy Special: Single Black Female ( Amazon Prime, CW Network), Last Week Tonight with John Oliver, Hysterical on FX, The Movie Trainwreck, Louie Season V, The Jim Gaffigan Show, Conan O'Brien, Stephen Colbert, HBO's Crashing, and The Breaks with Michelle Wolf.

Dog Cancer Answers
Euthanasia for Dogs During the Holidays: Why You Shouldn't Feel Guilty | Molly Jacobson and Kate Basedow

Dog Cancer Answers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 39:36


Losing a beloved dog is always hard, but it can be even more heartbreaking during the holiday season. But while we as humans put a lot of value in specific dates and times, our dogs do not. Your dog will not mind if you celebrate a favorite holiday with him a few weeks early because his health is failing – after all, every day spent with you is a holiday to him. You are not alone if you have had to say goodbye to a dear pet during the holiday season. The short, cold days take their toll on sick and elderly dogs, and the bustle of the holidays can be stressful. Money may also not be as plentiful as other times between heating bills and gift giving. Allow yourself the time you need to grieve, but also give yourself permission to enjoy the parts of the holidays that you enjoy. Share memories of your dog with close friends and family, and consider a thoughtful remembrance gift if a loved one has lost his or her pet. Links & Resources Mentioned in Today's Show:  Dog Cancer Support Group How to Be There for Your Dog at the End with Lori Levine The Dog Cancer Survival Guide: Full Spectrum Treatments to Optimize Your Dog's Life Quality and Longevity by Dr. Demian Dressler and Dr. Susan Ettinger Custom Pet Oil Paintings Related Links: Financial Assistance for Dogs with Cancer: Resources from The Dog Cancer Vet Team Holiday and Winter Toxins from the Pet Poison Helpline Lap of Love In-Home Euthanasia About Today's Guest, Molly Jacobson: Molly Jacobson is a writer. She is also the editor of the best-selling animal health book The Dog Cancer Survival Guide: Full Spectrum Treatments to Optimize Your Dog's Life Quality and Longevity. A lifelong dog lover and self-professed health nerd, she is all too familiar with dog cancer. She has been supporting readers of Dr. Dressler's website and book since the beginning. Molly earned a BA from Tufts University, and after a career in bookselling and book publishing attended The Swedish Institute to become a licensed massage therapist in New York State. About Today's Guest, Kate Basedow, LVT:  Kate Basedow grew up training and showing dogs, and her passion for canines has affected all parts of her life. She earned a BA in English from Cornell University and an AAS in Veterinary Science from SUNY Delhi, and is a licensed veterinary technician in the state of New York. Her writing on dog-related topics has earned numerous awards from the Dog Writers' Association of America and the Alliance of Purebred Dog Writers. Kate currently serves and adores two Belgian Tervuren and a Pembroke Welsh Corgi. Other Links:    Dog Cancer Answers is a Maui Media production in association with Dog Podcast Network  This episode is sponsored by the best-selling animal health book The Dog Cancer Survival Guide: Full Spectrum Treatments to Optimize Your Dog's Life Quality and Longevity by Dr. Demian Dressler and Dr. Susan Ettinger. Available everywhere fine books are sold. Have a guest you think would be great for our show? Contact our producers at DogCancerAnswers.com  Have an inspiring True Tail about your own dog's cancer journey you think would help other dog lovers? Share your true tail with our producers.  If you would like to ask a dog cancer related question for one of our expert veterinarians to answer on a future Q&A episode, call our Listener Line at 808-868-3200 www.dogcanceranswers.com.  Dog Cancer News is a free weekly newsletter that contains useful information designed to help your dog with cancer. To sign up, please visit: www.dogcancernews.com To join the private Facebook group for readers of Dr. Dressler's book “The Dog Cancer Survival Guide,” go to https://www.facebook.com/groups/dogcancersupport/

The Energy Gang
Innovation, Agreements and Earthshots

The Energy Gang

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 57:25


The COP26 circus has left town. Across 2 weeks of talks in Glasgow, what were the successes, and what were the failures? With current commitments putting the world on track to 2.4°C of warming, the cost of inaction on climate and health will vastly outweigh the costs of acting now, so which countries are snapping into action?Host Ed Crooks is joined by regular Melissa Lott, Director of Research at the Centre on Global Energy Policy at Columbia University, and Amy Myers-Jaffe, Managing Director of the Climate Policy Lab, at the Fletcher School at Tufts University, to give the final verdict. Also in the show, the gang looks at innovations in technology in carbon capture and storage; President Biden's infrastructure bill proposes big commitments on CCS, what do these look like? Plus, nuclear and hydrogen technologies, which could play a huge role in the energy transition, go under the microscope. The Energy Gang is brought to you by Bloom Energy. Bloom's onsite energy platform provides unparalleled control for those looking to secure clean, reliable 24/7 power that scales to meet critical business needs. It eliminates outage and price risk while accelerating us towards a zero carbon future. Visit Bloom Energy to learn how to take charge today.The Energy Gang is brought to you by Hitachi Energy. What does your energy future look like? Look to Hitachi Energy for the advanced energy technologies needed to deliver real outcomes — unlocking new revenue streams, maximizing renewable integration, and lowering carbon emissions. Learn more.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Conversation Weekly
Glasgow Climate Pact: what happened at COP26 and what it means for the world

The Conversation Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 50:15


What did the Glasgow COP26 climate change summit actually achieve? In this episode, we're joined by Jack Marley, energy and environment editor for The Conversation in the UK, as we speak to researchers from around the world to get their views on the negotiations and what needs to happen now. Featuring Saleemul Huq, director of the International Centre for Climate and Development at the Independent University Bangladesh; Richard Beardsworth, professor of international relations at the University of Leeds in England; Rachel Kyte, dean of the Fletcher School at Tufts University in the US; Anna Malos, country lead for Australia at ClimateWorks, part of Monash University in Australia; and Intan Suchi Nurhati, a senior scientist at the National Research and Innovation Agency in Indonesia.And Stephen Khan, global executive editor for The Conversation, based in London, gives us some recommended reading.The Conversation Weekly is produced by Mend Mariwany and Gemma Ware, with sound design by Eloise Stevens. Our theme music is by Neeta Sarl. You can sign up to The Conversation's free daily email here. Full credits for this episode available here.Further reading:COP26: experts react to the UN climate summit and Glasgow Pact, various authorsAfter COP26, the hard work begins on making climate promises real: 5 things to watch in 2022, by Rachel Kyte, Tufts UniversityGlasgow Climate Pact: where do all the words and numbers we heard at COP26 leave us?, by Mary Gagen, Swansea UniversityHere's how some of Cape Town's gangsters got out – and stayed out, by Dariusz Dziewanski, University of Cape TownHow to function in an increasingly polarized society, by Fiona MacDonald, University of Northern British Columbia See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Tests and the Rest: College Admissions Industry Podcast

Ready to learn the history, philosophy, and practice of an experienced independent educational consultant? MEET OUR GUEST Meet Aly Beaumont, the founder of Admissions Village, a family focused, affordable, one-on-one college guidance consultancy. Aly is deeply committed to making the college admissions process less stressful, and her success with this objective can be measured by both the growing number of referrals she receives as well as the repeat business of family siblings. Aly is also a founder and advisor to The College T, a website connecting high school students with college students and recent graduates so that first-hand information and experiences can be shared. Aly is a graduate of Tufts University where she majored in History with a concentration in Modern Women and African American History and was captain of the Equestrian Team. She lives in Wilton, CT with her husband Perry, their two dogs Buddy and Buzz, and their three sons. Two of their sons are currently in college at The University of St. Andrews in Scotland and Keyon College in Ohio, and one graduated from Santa Clara University. Aly is an Associate Member of IECA and she has her certificate as an Independent Educational Consultant from the University of California Irvine. Aly previously appeared on this podcast in episode 212 to discuss Preparation For Highly Selective College Admissions. Find Aly at https://www.admissionsvillage.com. ABOUT THIS PODCAST Tests and the Rest is THE college admissions industry podcast. Explore all of our episodes on the show page.

Finding Refuge
2.08 Reclaiming Care

Finding Refuge

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 50:38


Lama Rod Owens is an author, activist, and authorized Lama (Buddhist Teacher) in the Kagyu School of Tibetan Buddhism. Lama Rod is the co-founder of Bhumisparsha, a Buddhist tantric practice and study community. Lama Rod is visiting teacher with Inward Bound Mindfulness Education (iBme), a visiting teacher with Natural Dharma Fellowship and the Brooklyn Zen Center. Lama Rod has been a faculty member for the Harvard Graduate School of Education's professional education program in mindfulness for educators and has served as a guest faculty member for the school's course Mindfulness for Educators.He holds a Master of Divinity degree in Buddhist Studies from Harvard Divinity School where he focused on the intersection of social change, identity, and spiritual practice. He is a co-author of Radical Dharma, Talking Race, Love, and Liberation, which explores race in the context of American Buddhist communities. Lama Rod is a founding teacher for the Awaken meditation app that offers meditations and contemplations focused on social change. He has been published and featured in several publications including Buddhadharma, Lion's Roar, Tricycle, The Harvard Divinity Bulletin, Spirit Magazine. He has offered talks, retreats, and workshops in over 7 countries for many organizations including Gaia House Retreat Center, Goldsmiths University, London Insight, and Tibet House Barcelona. He has offered talks at several major universities including Yale University, Harvard University, Brown University, Harvard Law School, Columbia Law School, New York University, Tufts University, University of Vermont, and Boston College. He has presented at several important conferences including the American Academy of Religion, Summitt, the Harvard Divinity School Black Religions Conference, the Harvard Divinity School Buddhism and Race Conference, and Netroots. Lama Rod facilitates undoing patriarchy workshops for male-identified practitioners in Brooklyn and Boston. Lama Rod's book, Love and Rage: The Path of Liberation Through Anger, was released in 2020, and he is currently working on his next book.In this powerful episode we discussed:BoundariesSelf-CareMartyrdomBecoming an ElderChangeGod is ChangeLoveAnger as RevolutionaryRageMovement BuildingHow we Cannot Drag People Toward Freedom Agency and FreedomHow we are Always Held AncestorsThe AfterlifeConnect with Lama Rod Owens on his website or on Instagram @lamarodofficialPodcast music by Charles Kurtz+ Read transcript

Happy Bones, Happy Life
120. Ditch the Toxins and Feel Amazing | Wendie Trubow, MD, MBA

Happy Bones, Happy Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 38:44


“What we all want is to have some inspiration and empowerment about the ability to take care of ourselves.” -Dr. Wendie Trubow Dr. Wendie Trubow is a functional medicine gynecologist. She received her M.D. from Tufts University in 2000 and has been practicing functional medicine since 2009. After all these years, she is still passionate about helping women optimize their health and their lives. Dr. Trubow believes that there are so many different challenges in a woman's life: work, home, relationships, spirituality, health, and they all matter. Her personal struggles with mold and metal toxicity, Celiac disease, and a variety of other health issues inspired her to coauthor with her husband her new book, Dirty Girl: Ditch the Toxins, Look Great, and Feel Freaking Amazing. In this episode, we discuss common toxins that affect our bones and overall health and where to start cleansing ourselves from them. Stay tuned for this powerful interview.   Links: Get Dr. Trubow's free new book here! Website Instagram Twitter Facebook   Timestamps: [04:48] Exposure to toxins/lead and their effect on bones [12:22] Where do you begin your detox journey? [16:11] 3 Hot Tips to cleanse your lifestyle [23:44] Toxic products and deceiving advertising [28:13] Can you heal your autoimmune disorders?   DISCLAIMER – The information presented on this podcast should not be construed as medical advice. It is not intended to replace consultation with your physician or healthcare provider. The ideas shared on this podcast are the expressed opinions of the guests and do not always reflect those of Margie Bissinger and the Happy Bones, Happy Life program.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Secrets, secrets are no fun, unless...

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 164:23


Today on Boston Public Radio: Ella McDonald and Maya Mudgal begin the show by sharing their reactions to the COP26 climate summit and their thoughts on mayor-elect Michelle Wu's climate platform. McDonald is a senior at Tufts University, and communications director at Act on Mass, a non-profit working towards more transparency at the state house. Mudgal is a senior at Northeastern University, and organized for Wu during the campaign. They both have been involved with Sunrise Movement's Boston chapter. Then, we ask listeners how best they think society should tackle climate change. Charlie Sennott discusses his thoughts on the outcome of the COP26 climate summit, and the state of the Taliban today. Sennott is a GBH News analyst and the founder and CEO of The GroundTruth Project. Dan Adams reflects on five years of marijuana legalization, and what still needs to happen to make legalization just and equitable. Dan Adams is cannabis reporter for Boston Globe and author of the “This Week in Weed” email newsletter. Revs. Irene Monroe and Emmett G. Price III talk about incidents of racist bullying at schools across the region, and a top Catholic bishop calling social justice movements “pseudo-religion” and “dangerous.” Monroe is a syndicated religion columnist, the Boston voice for Detour's African American Heritage Trail and co-host of the All Rev'd Up podcast. Price is the founding pastor of Community of Love Christian Fellowship in Allston, the Inaugural Dean of Africana Studies at Berklee College of Music and co-host of the All Rev'd Up podcast. Richard Blanco reads poetry by January Gill O'Neil, Beverly resident and Associate Professor of English at Salem State University, including “On Being Told I Look Like FLOTUS, New Year's Eve Party 2014” and “In Praise of Okra.” Blanco is the fifth inaugural poet in U.S. history. His latest book, "How To Love A Country," deals with various socio-political issues that shadow America. We end the show by asking listeners what secrets they have held inside, after a Lynnfield father admitted to his bank robbing crimes right before his death.

Business Daily
What did the climate talks achieve?

Business Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 18:11


What was really at stake at the COP26 negotiations in Glasgow, and how much have the politicians done to avert a climate disaster? Justin Rowlatt speaks to two researchers on the frontline of the climate crisis. Carrie Lear, professor of earth sciences at Cardiff University, explains why she fears the Antarctic ice sheet could melt far quicker than people assume, inundating coastal cities around the globe. Meanwhile Professor Daniela Schmidt of Bristol University says the chemistry of the world's oceans is changing so fast that it could take marine ecosystems millions of years to recover. Given how high the stakes are, how significant was the progress made in the latest iteration of climate talks? Justin speaks to sustainability expert and veteran climate diplomat Rachel Kyte, dean of the Fletcher School of international affairs at Tufts University in America. (Picture: Globe balanced on the edge of a shelf; Credit: Getty Images)

The Conspiracy Show with Richard Syrett
Mysteries of Oak Island & The Culture War

The Conspiracy Show with Richard Syrett

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 106:16


MYSTERIES OF OAK ISLAND In the first half, Richard welcomes an attorney turned author who focuses on fictionalized accounts of pre-Columbian exploration of North America, including legends of lost Templar Treasure located on Nova Scotia's Oak Island. Guest: David S. Brody is an 8-time Amazon bestselling fiction writer and author of 16 novels. His children call him a

Temple Beth Am Podcasts
Communal Food Choices: A Jewish Response to Factory Farming

Temple Beth Am Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 77:15


The class, taught by Melissa Hoffman, is part of the Green Team initiative at Temple Beth Am Los Angeles (https://www.tbala.org/get-involved/green-team). Melissa Hoffman is Director of the Jewish Initiative For Animals (JIFA), a leading sustainable food and animal welfare initiative. In her role, she consults with Jewish organizations and communities across the country to develop and implement ethical food practices, as well as curriculum and programs that foster compassion for all living beings through the lens of Jewish values. Prior to working with JIFA at Farm Forward, she earned her M.S. in Animals and Public Policy from Tufts University in North Grafton, Massachusetts. The class was conducted via Zoom on November 11, 2021 and is introduced by Rabbi Avi Havivi.

Philosophy Talk Starters
534: The Social Lives of Robots

Philosophy Talk Starters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 10:13


More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/social-lives-robots. Machines might surpass humans in terms of computational intelligence, but when it comes to social intelligence, they're not very sophisticated. They have difficulty reading subtle cues—like body language, eye gaze, or facial expression—that we pick up on automatically. As robots integrate more and more into human life, how will they figure out the codes for appropriate behavior in different contexts? Can social intelligence be learned via an algorithm? And how do we design socially smart robots to be of special assistance to children, older adults, and people with disabilities? Josh and Ray read the room with Elaine Short from Tufts University, co-author of more than 20 papers on human-robot interaction, including "No fair!! An interaction with a cheating robot."

New Ideal, from the Ayn Rand Institute
America’s Stakes in Taiwan Strait: With Scott McDonald

New Ideal, from the Ayn Rand Institute

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 60:35


In this episode of the New Ideal podcast, Ben Bayer interviews Scott McDonald, an international relations PhD candidate at Tufts University and an expert on Chinese political theory and foreign policy. Among the topics covered: Scott McDonald's background and current work on the subject of Taiwan;The current state of relations between Taiwan and the People's Republic of China (PRC);The pragmatism that led to America's decision to withdraw diplomatic recognition of Taiwan;The consequences of America's betrayal of Taiwan for its broader foreign policy;How Taiwan adopted American values in spite of this betrayal;The prospects of war in the Taiwan Strait;The likely consequences of a war between the PRC and Taiwan;The influence of Chinese philosophy on PRC geopolitical decisions;The “social metaphysics” (second-handedness) of Chinese philosophy;The pragmatism and altruism of current American foreign policyAyn Rand's comments on the values betrayed by American policy on Taiwan. Mentioned in the discussion is Ayn Rand's essay “The Shanghai Gesture,” a three-part article in the Ayn Rand Letter published in March and April of 1972. In that essay, Rand analyzes Richard Nixon's historic trip to China as a philosophic defeat. Of particular relevance is the following remark about the importance of U.S.-Taiwan relations: No, this is not an appeal for another senseless, altruistic war, this time to defend Taiwan. Taiwan can take care of itself, if we do not turn deserter. It is not a policeman's gun, but his firmness that keeps peace in a neighborhood and protects it from gangsters. Our token military presence has kept Taiwan peacefully safe for twenty-two years. Our withdrawal could precipitate a war involving the entire Pacific. (Does anyone remember the consequences of the Allies' withdrawal from the Sudetenland and the Ruhr?) And whatever our view of Nationalist China, we do not have the right to bargain its lives away as pawns in secret negotiations for some undisclosed policy of our own. This podcast was recorded on October 15, 2021, and posted to YouTube on November 10, 2021. Listen to the discussion below. Listen and subscribe from your mobile device on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify or Stitcher. Watch archived podcasts here. https://youtu.be/baqwdOWhjrU Podcast audio:

The Lawfare Podcast
Susan Landau and Ross Anderson on the Going Dark Debate and the Risks of Client-Side Scanning

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 53:16


The “going dark” debate, which concerns how society and the technology industry should address the challenges that law enforcement faces in investigating crime due to the increasing use of encryption on mobile devices and by communication platforms and services, was in the news again because of Apple's recent proposal to engage in client-side scanning. Apple planned to scan iPhones for child sexual abuse material, or CSAM, before such images were uploaded to iCloud. Prior to Apple's announcement, however, a distinguished group of computer scientists and engineers were already working on a paper to explain the security and privacy risks of client-side scanning. The paper, which they have now released, is called “Bugs in our Pockets: The Risks of Client-Side Scanning.” To talk about this most recent development in the going dark debate, Stephanie Pell sat down with two of the paper's authors: Susan Landau, Bridge Professor of Cybersecurity and Policy in The Fletcher School and at the School of Engineering, Department of Computer Science, at Tufts University; and Ross Anderson, professor of security engineering at the University of Cambridge and at the University of Edinburgh. They discussed some of the most significant privacy and security risks client-side scanning creates, why client-side scanning requires a different analysis from other aspects of the discussion about government access to encrypted data, and why the authors of the paper consider client-side scanning to be a dangerous technology.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Speaking to Influence
Ep 79: Daina Trout – Chief Mission Officer, Health-Ade Kombucha: Active Listening and Collaboration

Speaking to Influence

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 34:20


On today's episode Daina Trout shares how her experience as a CEO helped her develop trust and influence within her organization when assuming a new role as Chief Mission Officer. Listen in as Laura and Daina explore the importance of focusing on brand and employee communication when sharing the mission of your organization, how thrive where no one has paved the way, and knowing what to listen for when building trust with your team. Daina Trout co-founded Health-Ade Kombucha in 2012 alongside her husband, Justin Trout, and best friend, Vanessa Dew, in Los Angeles. Trout, who has Masters' degrees in Nutrition and in Public Health from Tufts University, was working in corporate America when she decided to pursue her passion for “real” food and brew the best-tasting, highest quality kombucha on the market. Under her fearless leadership, Health-Ade has grown from a small production beverage made in her apartment and sold at local farmers markets into the fastest growing brand in the category three years in a row. When Trout is not tirelessly working to bring kombucha to every fridge in America, she is spending time with her husband and son, traveling, adventuring, cooking and enjoying outdoor life.   You can connect with Daina via LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dainatrout/   To learn more about Dr. Laura Sicola and how mastering influence can impact your success go to https://www.speakingtoinfluence.com/quickstart and download the quick start guide for mastering the three C's of influence.   You can connect with Laura in the following ways: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/drlaurasicola LinkedIn Business Page: https://www.linkedin.com/company/vocal-impact-productions/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWri2F_hhGQpMcD97DctJwA Facebook: Vocal Impact Productions Twitter: @Laura Sicola  Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/vocalimpactproductions Instagram: @VocalImpactProductions See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Fempower Health
Your Orgasm Questions Answered | Dr. Rachel Rubin

Fempower Health

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 51:03


Dr. Rachel Rubin is a board-certified urologist and sexual medicine specialist. She is one of only a handful of physicians fellowship trained in male and female sexual medicine. Dr. Rubin is a clinician, researcher, and vocal educator in the field of sexual medicine. In this episode, Dr. Rubin covers:What an orgasm actually is and whether you can have one without knowing itWhy we need to redefine foreplay, intercourse, and satisfactionHow anatomy differences between sexes impact your experienceHow porn taught us ALL.THE.WRONG.THINGSAnswers to your questions about headache, squirting, and your “struggles” in the bedroom….and most importantly - why YOU.ARE.NOT.BROKENIf you liked this episode and you're feeling generous, don't forget to leave a review on iTunes!Referenced in the podcast & related episodes:Contact Dr Rubin:  @DrRachelRubin on social media and RachelRubinMD.comFind a Doctor PageISSWSHDipsea appRosy appArticle:  A Simple Hip Operation Damaged my Nerves and Ruined by Sex LifeAnd be sure to:Follow Fempower Health on Instagram for updates and tips.Share this post with 2-3 of your friends.Shop the Fempower Health store, which has many products discussed on the podcast.Sponsors:LetsGetChecked - use FEMPOWER30 for 30% off.ReceptivaDx the sponsor of all of Season 2.  Provide code FEMPOWER-HEALTH for $75 off.More about Dr Rachel RubinDr Rubin is an assistant clinical professor of Urology at Georgetown University and works in a private practice in Washington DC.  She completed her medical and undergraduate training at Tufts University, her urology training at Georgetown University, and her fellowship training under Dr. Irwin Goldstein in San Diego. In addition to being education chair for the International Society for the Study of Women's Sexual Health (ISSWSH), she also serves as Associate Editor for the Journal Sexual Medicine Reviews.**The information shared by Fempower Health is not medical advice but for information purposes to enable you to have more effective conversations with your doctor.  Always talk to your doctor before making health-related decisions. Contains affiliate links

Naked Sunday
Episode 55 - Gary Kassabian, Because Eating Healthy Doesn't Have To Suck

Naked Sunday

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 136:33


Happy Sunday and welcome back beautiful humans, this week I am joined by Gary Kassabian owner and founder of STACK'D Nutrition. In this episode we discuss all things healthy and why eating healthy doesn't have to suck! Gary Kassabian is the owner and founder of STACK'D Nutrition and the STACK'D Cafe. STACK'D manufactures, packages and sells 100% organic high protein pancakes and protein coffee creamer online, retail and wholesale. The STACK'D Cafe located in Halfmoon, NY serves protein shakes, protein coffee, pancakes, waffles, protein powder and protein ballz. Prior to starting STACK'D Nutrition in 2014 Gary was the Managing Director of Environmental Health, Safety and Emergency Management at Harvard University. He is a graduate of Tufts University, Boston University and Harvard University. He lives at home with his wife Lisa and daughter in Clifton Park, NY Links Mentioned: STACK'D Nutrition 3 Liebich Lane Suite 11 Halfmoon, NY 12065 www.stackdnutrition.com gary@stackdnutrition.com instagram: @stackdpancakes facebook: /stackdnutrition --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/nakedsunday/support

Mind & Matter
Erik Hoel: Dreams, Sleep, Deep Learning, Evolutionary Function of Fiction & Art | #43

Mind & Matter

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 87:16


Nick talks to neuroscientist and writer Dr. Erik Hoel. Erik is a professor of biology at Tufts University. He received his PhD in neuroscience from the University of Wisconsin, where he studied under the sleep and consciousness researcher, Giulio Tononi. He did postdoctoral work at Columbia University, where he used information theory and other analytical tools to explore the biological basis of consciousness. He has come up with the so-called Overfitted Brain Hypothesis of dreaming, which explains the potential adaptive function of dreams by drawing analogies to techniques used to train Deep Neural Networks in the world of machine learning. Erik and Nick discuss the biology and phenomenology of dreams and sleep generally, including some of the various theories for why we sleep. They also discuss Deep Learning (on a very basic level) and Erik described the Overfitted Brain Hypothesis of dreaming. They also discuss fiction and the arts, including Erik's new novel and the potential evolutionary reasons for why humans create and consume fiction, as well as some technology-driven developments that are reshaping how we create and consume written work online. USEFUL LINKS:Download the podcast & follow Nick at his website[https://www.nickjikomes.com]Support the show on Patreon & get early access to episodes[https://www.patreon.com/nickjikomes]Sign up for the weekly Mind & Matter newsletter[https://mindandmatter.substack.com/]Athletic Greens, comprehensive daily nutrition (Free 1-year supply of Vitamin D w/ purchase)[https://www.athleticgreens.com/mindandmatter]Try MUD/WTR, a mushroom-based coffee alternative[https://www.mudwtr.com/mindmatter]Discount Code ($5 off) = MINDMATTEROrganize your digital highlights & notes w/ Readwise (2 months free w/ subscription)[https://readwise.io/nickjikomes/]Start your own podcast (get $20 Amazon gift card after signup)[https://www.buzzsprout.com/?referrer_id=1507198]Buy Mind & Matter T-Shirts[https://www.etsy.com/shop/OURMIND?ref=simple-shop-header-name&listing_id=1036758072§ion_id=34648633]Connect with Nick Jikomes on Twitter[https://twitter.com/trikomes]​​​Learn more about our podcast sponsor, Dosist[https://dosist.com/]ABOUT Nick Jikomes:Nick is a neuroscientist and podcast host. He is currently Director of Science & Innovation at Leafly, a technology startup in the legal cannabis industry. He received a Ph.D. in Neuroscience from Harvard University and a B.S. in Genetics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/nickjikomes)

Sustainable Dish Podcast
Dr. Tony Hampton on the Food Compass and connecting with communities of color

Sustainable Dish Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 53:53


Tufts University recently released the updated Food Compass, a nutrient profiling system to help consumers and policymakers determine the healthfulness of certain foods. You can read the full study here, (a subscription to Nature is required) read the brief overview here, or see a detailed list of the food rankings here.  Dr. Tony Hampton joins me in this episode to discuss some of the shocking and inaccurate results of the Food Compass. Spoiler alert: Cheerios scored a 94 out of 100 while beef only scored a 24. Dr. Hampton is a board certified obesity specialist, Certified Physician Executive, researcher and author. His goal is to empower his patients with knowledge in order to improve their health conditions.  Like me, Dr. Hampton is passionate about the necessity of meat in a healthy diet, and takes issue with how animal-based foods are often vilified in studies like the Food Compass. Guides like this are troubling because they serve as reference points for school lunches, food policy, and government programs like SNAP.  They claim to be intended for healthy populations but the sad fact is that many Americans are not metabolically healthy.  Along with the Food Compass report, Dr. Hampton and I discuss: How Dr. Hampton started his journey in metabolic health with his wife's diagnosis of Type 1 Diabetes The importance of bio individuality The concept of TOFI - Thin on the Outside, Fat on the Inside The importance of self-experimentation Why learning how to breakdown research papers is important, especially for clinicians The importance of a culturally appropriate diet The origins of soul food How small changes can make a big difference Resources: Tufts University Friedman School of Nutrition and Policy  Dr. Tony Hampton's book: Fix Your Diet, Fix Your Diabetes Nina Teicholz Dr. Eric Westman Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian Levels Glucose Monitor Dr Vyvyane Loh & her video on TOFI Society of Metabolic Health Practitioners Chris Masterjohn's podcast on how to read a research paper  Chicken George Connect with [Guest]: Website: Doctor Tony Hampton Instagram: @drtonyhampton LinkedIn: Tony Hampton, MD, MBA, CPE Facebook: Tony Hampton, MD, MBA, CPE Twitter: @drtonyhampton YouTube: Dr Tony Hampton Podcast: Protecting Your N.E.S.T *** Episode Credits: Thank you to all who've made this show possible. Our hosts are Diana Rodgers, Lauren Manning, and James Connelly. Our producer is Meg Chatham, and our editor is Emily Soape. And of course, we are grateful for our sponsors, Patreon supporters, and listeners. This episode is sponsored by Paleovalley, my go-to, grab-and-go source for products that prioritize nutrient density in an industry that prioritizes everything else. Their epic lineup of products includes Organic Supergreens, 100% Grass-Fed Beef Sticks, Grass-Fed Organ Complex, 100% Grass-Fed Bone Broth Protein, and low-sugar snack bars. Visit their website here and enter the code SUSTAINABLEDISH for 15% off your first order.

New Books in Anthropology
Julian Agyeman and Sydney Giacalone, "The Immigrant-Food Nexus: Borders, Labor, and Identity in North America" (MIT Press, 2020)

New Books in Anthropology

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 63:58


The Immigrant-Food Nexus: Borders, Labor, and Identity in North America (MIT Press, 2020) considers the intersection of food and immigration at both the macroscale of national policy and the microscale of immigrant foodways—the intimate, daily performances of identity, culture, and community through food. Taken together, the chapters—which range from an account of the militarization of the agricultural borderlands of Yuma, Arizona, to a case study of Food Policy Council in Vancouver, Canada—demonstrate not only that we cannot talk about immigration without talking about food but also that we cannot talk about food without talking about immigration. The book investigates these questions through the construct of the immigrant-food nexus, which encompasses the constantly shifting relationships of food systems, immigration policy, and immigrant foodways. The contributors, many of whom are members of the immigrant communities they study, write from a range of disciplines. Three guiding themes organize the chapters: borders—cultural, physical, and geopolitical; labor, connecting agribusiness and immigrant lived experience; and identity narratives and politics, from “local food” to “dietary acculturation. Julian Agyeman Ph.D. FRSA FRGS is a Professor of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning and the Fletcher Professor of Rhetoric and Debate at Tufts University. He is the originator of the increasingly influential concept of "just sustainabilities", which explores the intersecting goals of social justice and environmental sustainability. He centers his research on critical explorations of the complex and embodied relations between humans and the urban environment, whether mediated by governments or social movement organizations, and their effects on public policy and planning processes and outcomes, particularly in relation to notions of justice and equity. Julian's website is here. @julianagyeman Sydney Giacalone is a doctoral student in Anthropology at Brown University. Her work bridges environmental anthropology, political ecology, critical food and labor studies, and critical race studies. Her current research focuses on rural farmers and ranchers in the US thinking about social and environmental topics including climate change, labor equity, immigration, environmental and community resilience, and racial justice. This research seeks to learn from and contribute to alliances between actors in the food system as they build new forms of political identity and mobilize the trope of the rural American farmer toward forms of socioenvironmental justice. Sydney grew up in Charlottesville, Virginia, is an avid plant collector and cat mom, and resides in Boston, Massachusetts. Amir Sayadabdi is a lecturer in Anthropology at Victoria University of Wellington. He is mainly interested in anthropology of food and its intersection with gender studies, migration studies, and studies of race, ethnicity, and nationalism. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/anthropology

New Books Network
Julian Agyeman and Sydney Giacalone, "The Immigrant-Food Nexus: Borders, Labor, and Identity in North America" (MIT Press, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 63:58


The Immigrant-Food Nexus: Borders, Labor, and Identity in North America (MIT Press, 2020) considers the intersection of food and immigration at both the macroscale of national policy and the microscale of immigrant foodways—the intimate, daily performances of identity, culture, and community through food. Taken together, the chapters—which range from an account of the militarization of the agricultural borderlands of Yuma, Arizona, to a case study of Food Policy Council in Vancouver, Canada—demonstrate not only that we cannot talk about immigration without talking about food but also that we cannot talk about food without talking about immigration. The book investigates these questions through the construct of the immigrant-food nexus, which encompasses the constantly shifting relationships of food systems, immigration policy, and immigrant foodways. The contributors, many of whom are members of the immigrant communities they study, write from a range of disciplines. Three guiding themes organize the chapters: borders—cultural, physical, and geopolitical; labor, connecting agribusiness and immigrant lived experience; and identity narratives and politics, from “local food” to “dietary acculturation. Julian Agyeman Ph.D. FRSA FRGS is a Professor of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning and the Fletcher Professor of Rhetoric and Debate at Tufts University. He is the originator of the increasingly influential concept of "just sustainabilities", which explores the intersecting goals of social justice and environmental sustainability. He centers his research on critical explorations of the complex and embodied relations between humans and the urban environment, whether mediated by governments or social movement organizations, and their effects on public policy and planning processes and outcomes, particularly in relation to notions of justice and equity. Julian's website is here. @julianagyeman Sydney Giacalone is a doctoral student in Anthropology at Brown University. Her work bridges environmental anthropology, political ecology, critical food and labor studies, and critical race studies. Her current research focuses on rural farmers and ranchers in the US thinking about social and environmental topics including climate change, labor equity, immigration, environmental and community resilience, and racial justice. This research seeks to learn from and contribute to alliances between actors in the food system as they build new forms of political identity and mobilize the trope of the rural American farmer toward forms of socioenvironmental justice. Sydney grew up in Charlottesville, Virginia, is an avid plant collector and cat mom, and resides in Boston, Massachusetts. Amir Sayadabdi is a lecturer in Anthropology at Victoria University of Wellington. He is mainly interested in anthropology of food and its intersection with gender studies, migration studies, and studies of race, ethnicity, and nationalism. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Food
Julian Agyeman and Sydney Giacalone, "The Immigrant-Food Nexus: Borders, Labor, and Identity in North America" (MIT Press, 2020)

New Books in Food

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 63:58


The Immigrant-Food Nexus: Borders, Labor, and Identity in North America (MIT Press, 2020) considers the intersection of food and immigration at both the macroscale of national policy and the microscale of immigrant foodways—the intimate, daily performances of identity, culture, and community through food. Taken together, the chapters—which range from an account of the militarization of the agricultural borderlands of Yuma, Arizona, to a case study of Food Policy Council in Vancouver, Canada—demonstrate not only that we cannot talk about immigration without talking about food but also that we cannot talk about food without talking about immigration. The book investigates these questions through the construct of the immigrant-food nexus, which encompasses the constantly shifting relationships of food systems, immigration policy, and immigrant foodways. The contributors, many of whom are members of the immigrant communities they study, write from a range of disciplines. Three guiding themes organize the chapters: borders—cultural, physical, and geopolitical; labor, connecting agribusiness and immigrant lived experience; and identity narratives and politics, from “local food” to “dietary acculturation. Julian Agyeman Ph.D. FRSA FRGS is a Professor of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning and the Fletcher Professor of Rhetoric and Debate at Tufts University. He is the originator of the increasingly influential concept of "just sustainabilities", which explores the intersecting goals of social justice and environmental sustainability. He centers his research on critical explorations of the complex and embodied relations between humans and the urban environment, whether mediated by governments or social movement organizations, and their effects on public policy and planning processes and outcomes, particularly in relation to notions of justice and equity. Julian's website is here. @julianagyeman Sydney Giacalone is a doctoral student in Anthropology at Brown University. Her work bridges environmental anthropology, political ecology, critical food and labor studies, and critical race studies. Her current research focuses on rural farmers and ranchers in the US thinking about social and environmental topics including climate change, labor equity, immigration, environmental and community resilience, and racial justice. This research seeks to learn from and contribute to alliances between actors in the food system as they build new forms of political identity and mobilize the trope of the rural American farmer toward forms of socioenvironmental justice. Sydney grew up in Charlottesville, Virginia, is an avid plant collector and cat mom, and resides in Boston, Massachusetts. Amir Sayadabdi is a lecturer in Anthropology at Victoria University of Wellington. He is mainly interested in anthropology of food and its intersection with gender studies, migration studies, and studies of race, ethnicity, and nationalism. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/food

New Books in American Studies
Julian Agyeman and Sydney Giacalone, "The Immigrant-Food Nexus: Borders, Labor, and Identity in North America" (MIT Press, 2020)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 63:58


The Immigrant-Food Nexus: Borders, Labor, and Identity in North America (MIT Press, 2020) considers the intersection of food and immigration at both the macroscale of national policy and the microscale of immigrant foodways—the intimate, daily performances of identity, culture, and community through food. Taken together, the chapters—which range from an account of the militarization of the agricultural borderlands of Yuma, Arizona, to a case study of Food Policy Council in Vancouver, Canada—demonstrate not only that we cannot talk about immigration without talking about food but also that we cannot talk about food without talking about immigration. The book investigates these questions through the construct of the immigrant-food nexus, which encompasses the constantly shifting relationships of food systems, immigration policy, and immigrant foodways. The contributors, many of whom are members of the immigrant communities they study, write from a range of disciplines. Three guiding themes organize the chapters: borders—cultural, physical, and geopolitical; labor, connecting agribusiness and immigrant lived experience; and identity narratives and politics, from “local food” to “dietary acculturation. Julian Agyeman Ph.D. FRSA FRGS is a Professor of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning and the Fletcher Professor of Rhetoric and Debate at Tufts University. He is the originator of the increasingly influential concept of "just sustainabilities", which explores the intersecting goals of social justice and environmental sustainability. He centers his research on critical explorations of the complex and embodied relations between humans and the urban environment, whether mediated by governments or social movement organizations, and their effects on public policy and planning processes and outcomes, particularly in relation to notions of justice and equity. Julian's website is here. @julianagyeman Sydney Giacalone is a doctoral student in Anthropology at Brown University. Her work bridges environmental anthropology, political ecology, critical food and labor studies, and critical race studies. Her current research focuses on rural farmers and ranchers in the US thinking about social and environmental topics including climate change, labor equity, immigration, environmental and community resilience, and racial justice. This research seeks to learn from and contribute to alliances between actors in the food system as they build new forms of political identity and mobilize the trope of the rural American farmer toward forms of socioenvironmental justice. Sydney grew up in Charlottesville, Virginia, is an avid plant collector and cat mom, and resides in Boston, Massachusetts. Amir Sayadabdi is a lecturer in Anthropology at Victoria University of Wellington. He is mainly interested in anthropology of food and its intersection with gender studies, migration studies, and studies of race, ethnicity, and nationalism. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

Circulation on the Run
Circulation October 26, 2021 Issue

Circulation on the Run

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 26:58


Please join author Jonathan Newman and Associate Editor Sandeep Das as they discuss the article "Outcomes of Participants With Diabetes in the ISCHEMIA Trials." Dr. Carolyn Lam: Welcome to circulation on the run, your weekly podcast, summary, and backstage pass to the journal and its editors. We're your co-hosts; I'm Dr. Carolyn Lam, Associate Editor from the National Heart Center and Duke National University of Singapore. Dr. Greg Hundley: And I'm Dr. Greg Hundley, Associate Editor, Director of the Pauley Heart Center at VCU health in Richmond, Virginia. Well, Carolyn, this week's feature, a couple of weeks ago, we had that feature forum on the ischemia trial. Now we're going to explore some of the outcomes in patients with diabetes, from the ischemia trial in the feature discussion today. But, before we get to that, let's grab a cup of coffee and start in on some of the other articles in this issue. So, how about if I go first, this time? This particular paper, Carolyn, we're going to start on one of your topics. I know you're a fan of diet related interventions. So high intake of added sugar is linked to weight gain and cardio-metabolic risk. And in 2018, the U S National Salt and Sugar Reduction Initiative proposed government supported voluntary national sugar reduction targets. Dr. Greg Hundley: This intervention's potential health and equity impacts and cost effectiveness are unclear. And so Carolyn, these authors, led by Dr. Renata Micha from Tufts University, incorporated a validated micro-simulation model - CVD Predict coded in C++, and used it to estimate incremental changes in type two diabetes, cardiovascular disease, quality adjusted life years, cost and cost effectiveness of this national policy. The model was run at the individual level and the model incorporated national demographic and dietary data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey across three cycles spanning from 2011 to 2016, added sugar related diseases from meta-analysis and policy costs and health-related costs from established sources and a simulated nationally representative us population was created and followed until age 100 years or death with 2019 as the year of intervention start and findings were evaluated over 10 years and a lifetime from healthcare and societal perspectives. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Ooooh, You so got my attention, Greg, a very important topic and so, what did they find? Dr. Greg Hundley: Right, Carolyn. So achieving the NSRI sugar reduction targets could prevent 2.48 million cardiovascular death related events, 0.5 million cardiovascular disease deaths, and three quarters of a million diabetes cases, gain 6.7 million quality adjusted life years, and save $160.8 billion in net cost from a societal perspective over a lifetime. The policy became cost-effective, defined as less than $150,000 for quality adjusted life years at six years and highly cost-effective at seven years with a cost savings noted at nine years. And therefore, Carolyn, implementing and achieving the NSSRI sugar reformation targets could generate substantial health gains, equity gains, and cost savings. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Wow, thanks Greg. So, moving from a very publicly health focused paper to this paper that really focuses on hypoplastic left heart syndrome with very, very scientifically significant findings. Now, first, we know hypoplastic left heart syndrome is the most common and severe manifestation within the spectrum of left ventricular outflow tract obstruction defects occurring in association with ventricular hypoplasia. The pathogenesis is unknown, but hemodynamic disturbances are assumed to play a prominent role. Authors led by Doctors Moretti and Laugwitz from Technical University of Munich in Germany, as well as Dr. Gruber from Yale University School of Medicine, and their colleagues combined whole exome sequencing of parent offspring, trios, transcriptome profiling of cardiomyocytes from ventricular biopsies and immuno-pluripotent stem cell derived cardiac progenator or cardiomyocyte models of 2D and 3D cardiogenesis, as well as single cell gene expression analysis to decode the cellular and molecular principles of hypoplastic left heart syndrome phenotypes. Dr. Greg Hundley: Wow, Carolyn, there is a lot of data, very complex preclinical science here. So what did they find? Dr. Carolyn Lam: Indeed, Greg. As I said, scientifically incredible and rigorous, and they found that initial aberrations in the cell cycle unfolded protein response, autophagy hub led to disrupted cardiac progenator lineage commitment, consequently, impaired maturation of ventricular cardiomyocytes limited their ability to respond to growth cues. Resulting in premature cell cycle exit and increase apoptosis under biomechanical stress in 3D heart structures. Together, these studies provide evidence that the hypoplastic left heart syndrome pathogenesis is not exclusively of hemodynamic origin, and they revealed novel potential nodes for rational design of therapeutic intervention. Dr. Greg Hundley: Wow, Carolyn, we really need research in this topic and this is great preclinical science that we're getting here in our journal. Congratulations to the authors and what a great presentation of that by you. Well, Carolyn and my next paper there remain major uncertainties regarding disease activity within the Retain Native Aortic Valve, as well as bioprosthetic valve durability, following transcatheter aortic valve implantation. And these authors led by Doctor Jacek Kwiecinski, from the Institute of Cardiology, aimed in a multi-center cross-sectional observational cohort study to assess native aortic valve disease activity and bioprosthetic valve durability in patients with TAVI in comparison to subjects with bioprosthetic surgical aortic valve replacement or SAVR. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Oh, very interesting. And what were the results? Dr. Greg Hundley: An interesting comparison, Carolyn. So in patients with TAVI, native aortic valves demonstrated 18 F sodium fluoride uptake around the outside of the bioprosthesis that showed a modest correlation with the time from TAVI. Next, 18 sodium fluoride uptake in the bias prosthetic leaflets was comparable between SAVR and TAVI groups. Next, the frequencies of imaging evidence of bioprosthetic valve degeneration at baseline were similar on echo cardiography 6 and 8% respectively, CT, 15 and 14% respectively, and with PET scanning. Next, baseline 18 F sodium fluoride uptake was associated with subsequent change in peak aortic velocity for both TAVI and SAVR. And on multi-variable analysis, the 18 F sodium fluoride uptake was the only predictor of peak velocity progression. And so Carolyn, therefore, in patients with TAVI, native aortic valves demonstrate evidence of ongoing active disease and across imaging modalities, TAVI degeneration is of similar magnitude to bioprosthetic SAVR suggesting comparable midterm durability. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Very nice, important stuff. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Well, thanks, Greg. Let's tell everyone about the other papers in today's issue. There's an exchange of letters between Doctors Baillon and Blaha regarding the article very high coronary artery, calcium and association with cardiovascular disease events, non-cardiovascular outcomes and mortality from MESA. There's an ECG challenge from Dr. Bell Belhassen on a left bundle branch block, tachycardia following transcatheter aortic valve replacement. And On My Mind paper by Dr. Neeland on cardiovascular outcomes trials for weight loss interventions, another tool for cardiovascular prevention, another Research Letter by Dr. Nakamura on clinical outcomes of Rivaroxaban Mono therapy in heart failure, patients with atrial fibrillation and stable coronary artery disease. So insights from the AFIRE trial, and finally, a Research Letter from Dr. Kumoro three-dimensional visualization of hypoxia induced, pulmonary vascular remodeling in mice. Dr. Greg Hundley: Great, Carolyn, and I've got an in-depth piece from Professor Jia Sani entitled breadth of life, heart disease, linked to developmental hypoxia. Dr. Greg Hundley: Well, Carolyn, how about we get onto that feature discussion and learn more about results from the ischemia trial? Dr. Carolyn Lam: Let's go Greg. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Well, we all know how important diabetes is as a risk factor for atherosclerotic coronary disease. And we know it's a very common comorbidity among patients with chronic coronary disease, but the question is do patients with diabetes and chronic coronary disease on top of guideline directed medical therapy and lifestyle interventions, of course, do they derive incremental benefit from an invasive management strategy of their coronary disease? Well, we are going to try to answer that question today in our feature discussion. Thank you so much for joining us today. The first author and corresponding author of today's feature paper, which tells us about results from the ischemia trials. And that's Dr. Jonathan Newman from New York university Grossman School of Medicine. We also have associate editor Sandeep Das from UT Southwestern. So welcome both of you. And if I could please start with Jonathan reminding us, perhaps, what were the ischemia trials and then what you tried to answer and do in today's paper, Dr. Jonathan Newman: Of course, Carolyn, and thank you so much for having me and for the discussion with Sandeep. It's a pleasure to be here. So sure has a little bit of background, as you indicated, the ischemia trials basically enrolled and for the purposes of this discussion and this analysis, I'm referring to both the main ischemia trial and the ischemia chronic kidney disease trials. So ischemia CKD under the umbrella of the ischemia trials. Ischemia stands for the international study of comparative health effectiveness with medical and invasive approaches. And the purpose of the trial was to test to see whether a routine invasive approach on a background of intensive guideline directed medical therapy for high risk patients with chronic coronary disease and at least moderate ischemia and obstructive coronary disease documented on a blinded CCTA or computed coronary tomography angiography prior to randomization was associated with benefits for a cardiovascular composite. And we looked in this analysis at whether or not there was appreciable heterogeneity of treatment effect or a difference in treatment effect for patients compared without diabetes in the ischemia trials, in ischemia and ischemia CKD. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Great, thanks for lining that up so nicely. So what, Dr. Jonathan Newman: So the results of our analysis really highlighted a couple of things that I think you touched upon initially, the first thing that I would highlight is that diabetes was very common in this high risk cohort with chronic coronary disease, over 40% of participants in the ischemia trials, 43% with obstructive coronary disease and moderate to severe, you may have had diabetes. Perhaps not surprisingly patients with diabetes had higher rates of death or MI than those without diabetes. And the rates were highest among those patients that required insulin, had insulin treated diabetes, but using really robust methods to assess for heterogeneity using a Bassen assessment of heterogeneity of treatment effect accounting for violation of proportional hazards. The fact that there was an upfront hazard and a late benefit, we really saw no difference in death or MI, between the invasive or conservative strategies for patients with, or without diabetes over about three years of follow-up. Dr. Jonathan Newman: And the results importantly were consistent for ischemia and ischemia CKD and provided the rationale for us when we started by looking to see if the distribution of risk and characteristics allowed the trials to be combined. The study really confirms this higher risk of death or a MI for chronic coronary disease patients who have diabetes extends these findings for those patients with moderate or severe ischemia. And I think really notably also adds information about chronic coronary disease patients with diabetes and CKD. That's sort of the overall findings. And I'm happy to talk in more detail about that. Dr. Carolyn Lam: I love the way you explain that Jonathan and especially, going into detail on what was so different about the paper and the really important statistical methods that made these findings robust, very important and impactful findings. If I could ask Sandeep to share your thoughts. Dr. Sandeep Das: Thanks, Carolyn. You know, I am just a big fan of everything that's come out of the ischemia group. One of the things that I really most enjoy as a consumer of the literature is when well done studies give me results that are unexpected. And I know it's become fashionable now to say that everybody knew that all along that this is what going to be the result. But honestly, I think we all sort of are many of us thought that there's going to be a subgroup somewhere that's really going to benefit from an invasive approach in terms of preventing heart outcomes. I think the key here that really jumped out at me was that this is identifying what we typically think of is a very high risk subgroup. You know, patients with diabetes patients with multi-vessel coronary disease patients with insulin dependent diabetes. Dr. Sandeep Das: And we did see the association with mortality across the increased disease severity and the increased severity of diabetes as expected. But really we didn't see a signal that revascularization, routinely revascularizing patients, even the higher risk patients led to clinically relevant heart outcome benefits. So I thought that that was a really interesting top line finding and really that's kind of. I mean, it would have been interesting if it was the other way too, but it was, it really was kind of the hook that got me into the paper. Dr. Sandeep Das: I actually have a question for Jonathan, one of the things that I think we spend a lot of time as an editorial group thinking about and talking about, and we bounce back and forth with the authors a few times was the idea that relatively few of these patients with multi-vessel CAD ended up having CABG. So, you would typically think of diabetes multi-vessel CAD as being a pretty strong signal for patients that may benefit in terms of mortality from having bypass surgery. And here it was a relatively small group about a third, or maybe even less than a third. And I realized up front, they excluded the left main and the patients that had angina had a CTA, et cetera. But what I'd be curious as to your thoughts about, the benefits of bypass surgery and diabetes, which have been established in other trials. Dr. Jonathan Newman: It's a great question. And I think we really appreciated the questions from you and from the editors to try and get at some of the nuance with this issue. As you indicated in the ischemia and ischemia CKD trials overall, and the patients in the invasive treatment arm, it was about 25% or so 26% and 15% were revascularized with CABG. Part of the issue here is that it gets a little tricky with the use of CCTA of pre randomization CTA to define coronary artery severity, which was not required in the CKD population due to impaired renal function. But what we can say is among the patients with diabetes and multi-vessel coronary disease, 29% were revascularized surgically in their combined analysis, which is comparable to the 30% in Bery 2d that were revascularized via bypass surgery, as we've discussed. And as you know, the decision for surgical versus percutaneous revascularization in ischemia, as in Barry 2d was non-randomized though we might want to, we really tried to be very, very cautious in terms of comparing revascularization strategies on outcomes for patients with diabetes and multi-vessel CAD, which has you suggested. Dr. Jonathan Newman: And as we pointed out, the proportion with multi-vessel CAD was more common amongst in patients with diabetes compared with those patients without diabetes. The other thing I would sort of say in the framework of, the revascularization and strategies for revascularization, comparing, let's say ischemia to Barry 2d or to freedom. Basically we have very little data about revascularization approaches for those patients with creatinine with impaired renal function and, patients with the crediting greater than two were excluded from Barry 2d. So while we had about 15% or so that had severe CKD. So in the GFR, less than 30 are on dialysis. And we know that's an extremely high risk group of patients with diabetes and chronic coronary disease. And we don't have great evidence on which strategy for revascularization if at all provides additional benefit. So I think it's a really a tough question to answer, and we tried to be as judicious as possible in our comments about revascularization approaches, given the nature of the trial design. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Gee, thanks so much, Jonathan, for explaining that. So, well, I actually have a related question now, referring to the medical therapy. Can I, sort of ask you about the fact that, these days that the rage is all about GLP one receptor agonist, for example, that are known to reduce the risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and diabetes. So these ischemic trials, I assume, did not have a high usage of these medications. And what do you think would be the impact, if anything, I suppose even more for guideline directed medical therapy. Huh? Dr. Jonathan Newman: Yeah. So it's a great question, Carolyn. As you know, in strategy trials and clinical trials in general, that take a while it's always a real challenge to keep the trial contemporary with current clinical practice, whether it's revascularization strategies or changes in medical therapy. And as you indicated, the real revolution and glucose lowering therapies with profound cardiovascular benefit for patients with diabetes, we worked hard to try and stay up to date and encourage sites around the world with the use of best SGLT2 inhibitors and GLP ones. The rates were very, very low and we don't actually given the fact that the ischemia trials were conducted a real multinational and is really an international trial is over 330 sites worldwide. So we really had to balance the data that we could get from sites with the reality of collecting and running this trial across the whole world. Dr. Jonathan Newman: So we don't actually know. We know insulin use or non-use or oral medication use or non-use or no medication use or non-use, but not much more than that. From what, as, you know, unfortunately, even after now, six going on seven years of impressive data for the benefit of these agents, uptake remains low for patients with diabetes, whether it's with coronary disease or heart failure. And there was certainly the case with the trial, which started back in 2015, or sorry, before 2015, even before the results of EMPA-REG. So the rates of those agents were low. I would expect as you indicated that if we did have greater use of these beneficial therapies. Medical therapy may have performed even better and potentially given an added boost potentially for our high risk, even higher risk subgroups that we'd looked at that were available in these trials. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Oh, thanks again. I wish we could go on forever, but we've got just a little bit of time left. So I'd like to ask you both for your quick take home messages for the audience. Could I start with Sandeep and then Jonathan? Dr. Sandeep Das: Yeah. You know, I think a key take home from this is that, although it may be naively intuitive that a very aggressive invasive strategy would be superior, especially in high risk patients. You know, the data are very, very convincing that it's not. And so therefore I think in an absolute minimum, you have plenty of time and ability to think about these patients carefully, to select who, if anybody would be a great candidate for revascularization, more aggressive therapy and more invasive therapy, but the most patients will do well with conservative management. Dr. Sandeep Das: And I think that that's the, that's a real key take home here. And I think that the points that Jonathan raised about, you know, poor uptake of GLP one RAs and SGLT 2 inhibitors in the community as they're so far are key, right? So we have great medicines that we just under used, and that to me is the other sort of clarion call here is that if in the context of a nice trial, that you can see similar result for invasive conservative approaches, then lets, let's get our medical therapy where it needs to be to provide our patients the best outcomes we can Speaker 3: Love it, Jonathan. Dr. Jonathan Newman: Yeah. So I'm really glad that Sandeep brought up the issue of medical therapy in the trial. And maybe I can take a minute to sort of frame what San kind of build off of what Sandeep just said, you know, we, in the context of this clinical trial, you know, Dr. Judy Hawkman, the study chair and Dr. David Marin, the co-chair and I, we worked very hard with optimizing medical therapy across the trials, for all participants. So really getting patients on the maximum tolerated doses of high-intensity statins, lowering patient's LDL as aggressively as possible evolving our systolic blood pressure targets. And it was extremely challenging. And at the end of the day, we see that patients with diabetes were more likely than those without to get to our LDL goal. We used a threshold problematic concept that that still may be to some extent, but they were less likely to achieve their systolic blood pressure goals. Dr. Jonathan Newman: And I think Sandeep was exactly right. We have a way to go with implementing existing therapies, existing medical therapy. There may be a benefit for as demonstrated in Dr. S. for patients that remain highly symptomatic to derive symptom benefit with revascularization. The other context I would sort of add with the medical therapy issue is that despite really aggressive medical therapy, and we really did as much as we could, patients with diabetes still had, a 40, 50% greater risk of death or MI than those without diabetes. So there's still this idea of kind of residual risk. And these were patients with diabetes that were very well managed from a medical and glycemic control perspective. So we still have a lot of work to do. And I think understanding ways we can benefit our patients is really that challenge. Speaker 3: Thanks so much, Jonathan, and thank you Sandeep for joining us today. Speaker 3: And thank you audience for listening from Greg and I. This has been "Circulation On The Run", please tune in again. Next week. Dr. Greg Hundley: This program is copyright of the American Heart Association, 2021. The opinions expressed by speakers in this podcast are their own and not necessarily those of the editors or of the American Heart Association for more visit AHJjournals.org.

Faith Matters
90. 7 Ideas for Leading a Non-Racist Life: A Conversation with Charles Inouye

Faith Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 38:52


This week, Tim and Aubrey Chaves of Faith Matters welcomed back Charles Inouye. When they first spoke with Charles a couple months ago, he mentioned that he had prepared some thoughts on living a life free of racism. Given President Nelson's recent call for members of the Church to “lead out in abandoning attitudes and actions of prejudice,” we wanted to get him back on as soon as we could so he could share his impressive insights.We knew that Charles would have a unique perspective to share on this topic. As the son of Japanese parents who were held in the Heart Mountain, Wyoming internment camp during World War II, he grew up as part of the only Japanese family in the small town of Sigurd, Utah. Charles spent much of his youth working on his family's farm in Sigurd, but eventually served a mission in Japan. He later went on to earn degrees from some of the world's most prestigious universities, including a BA from Stanford and a PhD from Harvard. He's now a Professor of Japanese Literature and Visual Culture at Tufts University.

The Patrick Madrid Show
The Patrick Madrid Show: October 21, 2021 – Hour 1

The Patrick Madrid Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 51:17


Tufts University student dies after hot dog eating contest. Human remains found in Florida park amid search for Gabby Petito’s fiancé. Merrick Garland calls in FBI to counter threats against school staffers. Todd – Comment and quick prayer for his father who just died: Patrick was integral in his conversion to the faith. Terri – […] All show notes at The Patrick Madrid Show: October 21, 2021 – Hour 1 - This podcast produced by Relevant Radio

Empowering You Organically - Audio Edition
Top 6 Organic Essential Oils and their Do's & Don'ts

Empowering You Organically - Audio Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 33:23


Join us for a dive into the power of essential oils in our daily lives. The interest in essential oils is rapidly on the rise according to Google Trends. The trend line is fascinating. Why? What makes essential oils so sought after? They work! Organixx carries a line of organic and pure essential oils. Today we will share the top 3 uses of the top single essential oils in our line.   Lavender Lavender oil is believed to have antiseptic and anti-inflammatory properties. We've all heard by now that lavender promotes deeper sleep, but did you know…   There's promising research for breast health too. 2014 Iranian research published in the journal Nutrition and Cancer found that lavender oil kills breast cancer cells but leaves healthy cells unharmed. It's important to note that this study was on cells in a petri dish, not on humans. The researchers concluded that: “L. angustifolia has cytotoxic and apoptotic effects in HeLa and MCF-7 cell lines, and apoptosis is proposed as the possible mechanism of action.”1 Stops the itch and burn of insect bites. Even fire ants! Put a drop of lavender oil on a bee sting, mosquito, or other bug bite to stop pain, itching, and reduce swelling. Reapply as necessary. Lavender oil works really well for this, especially if applied immediately. Use it as a flavor booster. Add a drop of high-quality lavender oil suitable for consumption to brownie batter, chocolate icing, cookie dough, dessert recipes, raw chocolate, or even salad dressings. It's absolutely delicious.   Is Lavender Oil Safe? Using diluted lavender oil topically or in aromatherapy is generally considered safe for most adults but may not be recommended for children. Applying pure lavender oil to your skin (especially open wounds) may also cause irritation, so we recommend infusing it with a carrier oil, such as olive oil or coconut oil. Dissolving it in water also works.   Be careful not to rub lavender oil in your eyes and mucous membranes. If this happens, wash it out immediately. Lavender oil may also cause allergic reactions in people with unusually sensitive skin, so do a spot test before using it. Simply apply a drop of lavender oil to your arm and see if any reaction occurs.   The U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) also warns against using lavender oil when taking medications like barbiturates, benzodiazepines and chloral hydrate, as it may increase their sedative effects and cause extreme drowsiness and sleepiness.     Tea Tree (Melaleuca) This versatile oil possesses antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and antifungal properties.   Due to its potent anti-inflammatory benefits, tea tree oil helps to relieve inflammatory skin conditions, especially eczema and psoriasis. Dilute as necessary and apply to affected area two to three times daily. Tea tree oil has long been used as a natural bug repellent by native Australian aboriginal people. Chinese research in 2016 found tea tree to be effective against the cereal weevil, Sitophilus zeamais.3 The cereal weevil is considered to be an extremely destructive pest to stored cereals all over the world. Tea tree also helps to relieve the pain, itching, and inflammation of insect bites. If it's an extra-hot day and your deodorant has failed, apply again, but this time with a drop or two of tea tree oil to help kill bacteria. Tea tree oil's potent antibacterial properties are well proven with dozens of research studies.   Is Tea Tree Oil Safe? The answer is yes, as long as it is applied topically in appropriate doses and NOT swallowed. This oil may irritate your skin, especially if used for the first time. We recommend starting with low concentrations until you figure out your tolerance. Determine if you have an allergy to tea tree oil before using it by doing a skin test — apply a small amount to your inner arm to see if any reaction such as a rash or hives occurs.   The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) recommends avoiding oxidized oil, which has been exposed to air, because it may help trigger allergies more than fresh tea tree oil.  Avoid using undiluted tea tree oil as well and use tea tree oil-infused products instead to reduce your risk of skin irritation.   Lemon The health benefits of lemon oil can be attributed to its stimulating, calming, astringent, detoxifying, antiseptic, disinfectant and antifungal properties. *Important to note: Lemon essential oil can make your skin more sensitive to sunlight. Lemon oil has a balancing effect on the oil glands of the scalp. Massage a drop or two of lemon oil into your scalp before you go to bed at night. Wash it out in the morning. Done over a period of weeks, you will notice much less oily hair. It will make your pillow smell nice and fresh too! Diffuse lemon oil to help kill airborne bacteria. Research carried out by Dr. Jean Valnet (co-author of the book The Practice of Aromatherapy: A Classic Compendium of Plant Medicines and Their Healing Properties) shows that diffused lemon oil can rapidly kill off the bacteria that causes meningococcal infections, typhoid fever, staph infections, pneumonia, diphtheria, and tuberculosis. Several essential oils are haemostatic, i.e. they help to stop bleeding by speeding up the coagulation of the blood. The most useful of these is oil of Lemon, though Geranium and Rose have similar, though less powerful, effects.   Is Lemon Oil Safe? It is advisable not to use lemon oil without diluting it first, as it can irritate skin. It must be used with a carrier oil for direct application to the skin. Effective carrier oils include coconut oil, olive oil and jojoba oil.   There are findings showing that lemon oil may promote photosensitivity, which increases your sensitivity to the sun and may lead to sunburn and uneven darkening of the skin. We also recommend you avoid applying lemon oil and other citrus oils to your skin when outdoors, as blistering may occur.   People with sensitivities should use essential oils with caution. Reactions can vary from person to person. Some may experience skin reactions, while some may have respiratory problems. Consult your physician first before use. Pregnant women and children should also see a doctor before applying lemon oil.   Peppermint According to a review conducted by the USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, peppermint has significant antimicrobial and antiviral activities. It also works as a strong antioxidant, displays anti-tumor actions in lab studies, shows anti-allergenic potential and pain-killing effects, helps to relax the gastrointestinal tract and may be chemopreventive.4   Note: Chemoprevention is the use of a medication, vitamin or supplement to stop cancer from happening. This is most often used for people who have a high risk of developing cancer. The high menthol content of peppermint makes it great for cooling off during hot flashes. At the first sign of a hot flash developing, place a drop at the back of the neck, at the base of the skull, or on the collarbones. Breathe it in. This has an instant cooling and calming effect. Peppermint oil not only relaxes skeletal muscles, it also helps to relax the muscles of the respiratory system. Inhaling the scent of peppermint helps to relieve congestion due to allergies and counteract the effects of pollen. Especially powerful when combined with lavender and lemon to ease seasonal allergies! Peppermint oil is superb for helping to relieve indigestion and heartburn. Put just one drop of peppermint oil into a glass of water and drink. It works much more quickly than peppermint tea due to the concentrated nature of peppermint oil. If it's too strong for you, just dilute it and rub it across the tummy.   Is Peppermint Oil Safe? Peppermint oil is safe in low amounts in most adults, but it can trigger side effects in people with sensitivities. It is important for the following individuals to either avoid using this essential oil or to use it carefully only with the help of a healthcare professional. Pregnant and nursing women — Peppermint oil or other similar products may have emmenagogue and abortifacient effects, so it would be wise not to use peppermint oil without your physician's approval. Infants and children 7 years old and younger — Peppermint oil must not be used undiluted because there isn't enough information regarding its safety for them. Diabetics — Using peppermint oil may raise your risk of low blood sugar levels or hypoglycemia. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and hiatal hernia patients — Peppermint can relax the sphincter between the stomach and esophagus, and cause acid to move up to the esophagus. People with gallbladder problems — Peppermint oil may cause gallbladder inflammation; those diagnosed with gallstones should consult a physician before using peppermint oil. People taking antacids — These drugs can cause peppermint oil capsules to break down easily, increasing the risk of heartburn.   Eucalyptus The healing benefits of Eucalyptus Oil can be attributed to its anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, decongestant, deodorant, and antiseptic qualities, among other valuable properties.   Eucalyptus oil is known to be a vasodilator, meaning it dilates, or opens, blood vessels. In 1994, Austrian researchers discovered that eucalyptol, a phytochemical in eucalyptus oil (also known as 1,8-cineol) improved global blood flow to the brain, after only 20 minutes of inhalation.9 A newer study released in 2016 by Korean researchers found that eucalyptol is also able to pass through the blood-brain barrier. This research also found eucalyptol's high antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties to be helpful in the management of chronic conditions such as respiratory disease, cardiovascular disease, and degenerative nerve and brain diseases. Some studies have shown that several different species of eucalyptus may help to reduce blood sugar levels in mice. Also because eucalyptus is such an excellent vasodilator, the entire body benefits from this increase in blood circulation. To help combat poor blood circulation, dilute eucalyptus oil and massage it into the legs, hands, and feet as needed. Eucalyptus oil's anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, and anti-phlegm properties work very quickly to open congested airways. Make a steam inhalation by boiling two cups of water, pour it into a large bowl, then let it cool for five minutes. Add a drop or two of eucalyptus oil. Then create a tent from a small towel draped over your head. Place your face over the bowl and carefully breathe in the vapor until you get some relief. This should only take a couple of minutes. This is great for bronchitis, head colds, chest colds, and asthma.   Is Eucalyptus Oil Safe? Essential oils like eucalyptus oil are generally safe to use, but with specific precautions. Before using it, consult a holistic doctor to see if your condition would allow you to do so, and undergo an allergen patch test to check for possible allergic reactions and lower your risk for developing side effects. In general, adults should not take eucalyptus oil orally except under a doctor's supervision, and this oil mustn't be given to children, especially those under 2 years old.   While eucalyptus oil is generally safe when applied to adult skin, refrain from applying the oil, salve or chest rub on the face or nose of baby because of its potential side effects. Lastly, pregnant and breastfeeding women should also avoid using the oil as evidence is lacking regarding its safety for these groups of women.     Frankincense – The KING of essential oils! Frankincense essential oil is distilled from the resin of the Boswellia tree that grows in many regions within northern Africa and the Middle East. Oman, Somalia, and Ethiopia are the most prominent suppliers today.   Research shows that the natural plant chemical constituents in frankincense oil stimulate the immune system.2   But it supports so much more… Frankincense is a powerful health support for respiratory problems such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pneumonia, and bronchitis. It even helps when suffering from laryngitis. Diffuse it into the room where you intend to spend some time. For best results, use an ultrasonic cool mist diffuser. Never heat essential oils because heating them diminishes their therapeutic effects. Whether your skin is dry and mature or oily and blotched with blemishes, frankincense oil has wonderful balancing qualities. It helps to reduce lines and wrinkles by tightening and toning skin, accelerates the healing of blemishes, skin ulcers and wounds, and stimulates cell regeneration. For anti-aging benefits, put several drops into your favorite night time moisturizer. For acne and blemishes, apply it neat directly on the problem area, unless you have very sensitive skin, then dilute. Use frankincense oil to help calm and center the mind, to promote spiritual awareness, and to cultivate a sense of inner peace while meditating. Frankincense contains compounds known as sesquiterpenes which work directly on the limbic system of the brain, the center of memory and emotions. Frankincense is calming, grounding, and centering to the nervous system. Diffuse it into your room, or just inhale directly from the bottle at the start of your meditation.   Is Frankincense Oil Safe? Yes, frankincense oil is generally safe. Just make sure to undergo an allergen patch test before applying frankincense oil topically to see if you have any sensitivity to this oil.   For some groups of people, frankincense oil isn't recommended, since it may trigger adverse reactions. If you're pregnant or nursing, avoid using frankincense oil because it may trigger contractions, prompt menstruation and lead to a miscarriage. As for children, there is very limited information regarding the potential use of this oil for this age group, so if you're a parent or guardian, do not let them use this oil.   How to Dilute Essential Oils Although essential oils can be used neat (undiluted) in many cases, it is best (and more economical) to dilute essential oils before applying them to the body. Add a drop or two of your chosen oil to one-half to one teaspoonful of an organic carrier oil such as coconut, almond, hemp, or jojoba.   If using with children or pets, use even less essential oil because their smaller bodies cannot tolerate an adult dose. It's best to consult a qualified aromatherapist before using essential oils with pets or children.    A Final Word About Quality Always choose high quality, organic essential oil that has been properly distilled so that its phytochemical content is not compromised. Look for bottles labeled 100% pure oil and beware of cheap oils that may be diluted with potentially toxic chemical ingredients.   In addition to the powerful essential oils we touched on today, Organixx carries 6 more beautiful single oils just as powerful and effective to help you maintain optimal health; Orange, Grapefruit, Oregano, Geranium Rose, Rosemary, and Clove. Resources: Organixx Essential Oils - 100% Pure, Organic, Non-GMO 1 Comparative studies of cytotoxic and apoptotic properties of different extracts and the essential oil of Lavandula angustifolia on malignant and normal cells. 2 Immunomodulatory activity of biopolymeric fraction BOS 2000 from Boswellia serrata. 3 Insecticidal Activity of Melaleuca alternifolia Essential Oil and RNA-Seq Analysis of Sitophilus zeamais Transcriptome in Response to Oil Fumigation. 4 A review of the bioactivity and potential health benefits of peppermint tea (Mentha piperita L.). National Association for Holistic Aromatherapy – Safety Information 12 Top Essential Oils & 60+ Uses Non-Toxic DIY Essential Oil Mosquito Repellent Tummy Troubles? The Best Essential Oils for Digestive Problems What Are Essential Oils? 21 Facts About Essential Oils You May Not Know

Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk
Ep. 116: Nuclear Roulette and the Cuban Missile Crisis with Martin Sherwin

Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 59:38


"As Kennedy said at the United Nations, there is a 'sword of Damocles hanging by a thread over humanity,' and we're still in that same position today and will remain in that position unless we figure out how to get rid of nuclear weapons." This is a rebroadcast of Ep. 88, aired originally April 7th, 2021. Marty Sherwin died on October 6th, 2021. ----- Pulitzer-prize winning historian Martin J. Sherwin is on the podcast, discussing his new book Gambling with Armageddon: Nuclear Roulette from Hiroshima to the Cuban Missile Crisis. The book sheds new light and brings fresh insights into what was one of the most volatile, potentially catastrophic periods of time in history— a time when the fate of the world was at a precipice. Many of the questions one naturally has about this period are answered by Marty Sherwin in dramatic, detailed manner. How did it happen in the first place that the Soviet leader, Nikita Khrushchev, was storing nuclear arms in Cuba? What role, contrary to what he writes in his autobiography, did Bobby Kennedy play? Who were the real heroes here that caused the world to avoid all-out nuclear war, and how close did we really come? Perhaps, most importantly: what have we, what has the world learned? Are we any better off now than before? Marty Sherwin, the world's preeminent Cold War historian is here, and he explains our past, our future, and our tragic reliance on Nuclear Arms. Support Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk on Patreon. Martin Jay Sherwin (1937-2021) was an author and historian specializing in the development of atomic weapons and nuclear policy. Along with Kai Bird, Sherwin co-wrote American Prometheus: The Triumph and Tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer, which won the Pulitzer Prize for biography in 2006. Sherwin was born in Brooklyn and studied at Dartmouth College. After four years in the Naval Air Force, Sherwin began graduate studies at the University of California, Los Angeles, receiving a Ph.D. in history in 1971. His dissertation focused on the decision to drop the atomic bomb, and was revised and published in 1975 as A World Destroyed: The Atomic Bomb and the Grand Alliance to much acclaim. In addition to A World Destroyed and American Prometheus, Sherwin has advised a number of documentaries and television series relating to the Manhattan Project, including The Day after Trinity: A History of Nuclear Strategy, Stalin's Bomb Maker: Citizen Kurchatov, and War and Peace in the Nuclear Age. Sherwin also had a long and distinguished teaching career. In 1988, Sherwin founded the Global Classroom Project, which joined students from the United States and Russia in conversations over issues such as the nuclear arms race. Sherwin was professor emeritus in history at Tufts University and a professor of history at George Mason University. His collection of more than two dozen interviews and oral histories with Oppenheimer's colleagues and friends is available on the "Voices of the Manhattan Project" website.

Future of Fitness
Julian Barnes - The Greatest Opportunities for Boutique Fitness

Future of Fitness

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 48:42


Julian Barnes is a fitness industry veteran whose 40 year career includes being a competitive junior tennis player and certified professional tennis instructor; serving on the Investment Committee for the U.S. Tennis Assn; being a sponsorship sales consultant to Madison Square Garden; serving as the Director of Marketing for Velocity Sports Performance; teaching the Fitness Marketing and Management class in the Swedish Institute's Advanced Personal Training department; and, most recently, being the Co-Founder and CEO of Boutique Fitness Solutions (BFS), a digital media company that educates, connects and supports boutique fitness business owners to enable them to grow profitable businesses that serve the needs of their evolving fitness clients. Barnes was also the creator and Director of the inaugural NYU Institute for Entrepreneurship & Small Business Management. He earned his bachelor of arts from Tufts University and he is a graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Law.   Links:   www.futureoffitness.co https://boutiquefitnesssolutions.com/ 

The Community Cats Podcast
Dr. Nicholas Dodman, BVMS, DVA, DACVAA, DACVB, Professor Emeritus—Tufts University, Author, and Co-founder of the Center for Canine Behaviour Studies

The Community Cats Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 32:44


This episode is sponsored in part by Smalls Fresh Cat Food and Doobert.com. If dogs and cats could choose a psychiatrist it would be Dr. Nicholas Dodman. With a drive for advocacy, a gift for research, and a never-say-quit treatment philosophy, it is no surprise that he is one of the world's most noted veterinary behaviorists. Co-founder of the Center for Canine Behaviour Studies, Dr. Dodman describes himself as a “secret cat person,” as well. In this episode, Dr. Dodman and Stacy chat about enrichment for indoor cats and how clicker training with cats positively enhances their relationship with their people. Dr. Dodman takes us through behavioral conflicts that are common in cats and some that are uncommon—like separation anxiety.  He outlines how pharmaceutical solutions treat behavioral issues like territorial spraying, pica, and compulsive behavior (OCD) in cats. To learn more about Dr. Dodman's current and previous work, visit the Center for Canine Behavior Studies online, and for feline-specific content visit  Cat's Corner. Follow the CCBS on Facebook and Instagram.

Spiritual Shit
Ep. 134 How & Where Do You Find Your Sanctuary? Ft. Courtney Arrington-Baldwin & Donnell Baldwin

Spiritual Shit

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 59:24


The launch of SANCTUAIRE is a long-time dream that has now come to fruition for Courtney Arrington-Baldwin. Sanctuaire, the French word for sanctuary, is a place of refuge and consecration for the mind, body, and soul—a holy place. Founded and curated by a Black woman, SANCTUAIRE is an online destination and lifestyle brand dedicated to people of color to promote wholeness. A Tufts University graduate and civil engineer by trade, Courtney worked for more than seven years as a project engineer with the nation's largest general contractor but, Courtney experienced burnout from many years in a demanding and high-stress occupation and decided to leave her construction industry career. It was at that time that she began to focus her time on her personal wellness and life as an entrepreneur. She always had a love for nutrition and movement. It soon became a passion to determine how she could continue to find wholeness with other women like her. Her vision for SANCTUAIRE started as a physical space and in 2020 pivoted online. In addition to being partners in life as a married couple, Donnell and Courtney are business partners. Donnell, a southern-gentleman, fitness enthusiast, and former personal trainer, has worked in the fashion industry for many years with over 15 years of experience in luxury fashion and the digital marketplace. His work in fashion has included roles as the deputy style editor-US for MR PORTER (Yoox-Net-A-Porter Group), as well as, the style manager for Ralph Lauren's Wholesale Online Strategy & Marketing Division. Donnell currently co-owns and operates MR BALDWIN STYLE, a fashion styling, and creative company. Black women have played an extremely important role in Donnell's life and he is excited to support Courtney in the launch and operation of SANCTUAIRE. Their service is to provide a unique and tailored platform that ushers one another into happier and healthier lives, not only for our community but for ourselves. To us, self-care is truly an act of resistance. Find them HERE and HERE ! #blackowned #bipoc #spiritual #sanctuary #slowliving #wellness #health Find me at thelovelyalea.com or come to one of our workshops on patreon.com/thelovelyalea --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/alealovely/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/alealovely/support

Let 'Em Speak
S03E04 Beth Ridley on truth and reconciliation, curiosity, and workplace culture

Let 'Em Speak

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 54:21


Beth Ridley (https://www.linkedin.com/in/beth-ridley-a92b8b5/) believes a positive, connected and committed organizational culture is critical to business success. That's why she combined her 25 years of corporate leadership and management consulting experience with her expertise in diversity and inclusion and positive psychology to launch, The Brimful Life (https://www.thebrimfullife.com/dei/), a coaching and consulting firm that works with executives to strengthen their leadership skills and transform their leadership teams and organizational cultures to better support their vision and strategic goals. In addition, Beth's podcast series, keynote presentations and workshops inspire and equip leaders to put people and culture first. Beth has lived and worked in London, Tokyo, Johannesburg, Bangkok, Boston and New York City. She has a BA in English Literature from the University of Virginia, a MA in International Relations from Tufts University and an MBA from Columbia University. By listening to this conversation with Beth, you'll learn about:   - Post-apartheid South Africa and the Truth and Reconciliation Project - Dress codes and dressing for your day - Workplaces as a site for diversity - Approaching communication with curiosity and compassion

New Books in Gender Studies
Kemi Adeyemi et al., "Queer Nightlife" (U Michigan Press, 2021)

New Books in Gender Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 53:53


The mass shooting at a queer Latin Night in Orlando in July 2016 sparked a public conversation about access to pleasure and selfhood within conditions of colonization, violence, and negation. Queer Nightlife (U Michigan Press, 2021) joins this conversation by centering queer and trans people of color who apprehend the risky medium of the night to explore, know, and stage their bodies, genders, and sexualities in the face of systemic and social negation. The book focuses on house parties, nightclubs, and bars that offer improvisatory conditions and possibilities for “stranger intimacies,” and that privilege music, dance, and sexual/gender expressions. Queer Nightlife extends the breadth of research on “everynight life” through twenty-five essays and interviews by leading scholars and artists. The book's four sections move temporally from preparing for the night (how do DJs source their sounds, what does it take to travel there, who promotes nightlife, what do people wear?); to the socialities of nightclubs (how are social dance practices introduced and taught, how is the price for sex negotiated, what styles do people adopt to feel and present as desirable?); to the staging and spectacle of the night (how do drag artists confound and celebrate gender, how are spaces designed to create the sensation of spectacularity, whose bodies become a spectacle already?); and finally, how the night continues beyond the club and after sunrise (what kinds of intimacies and gestures remain, how do we go back to the club after Orlando?). Dr. Kemi Adeyemi is assistant professor of gender, women, and sexuality studies and director of The Black Embodiments Studio at the University of Washington. Dr. Kareem Khubchandani is the Mellon Bridge assistant professor in theater, dance, and performance studies, and women's, gender, and sexuality studies at Tufts University. Dr. Ramón Rivera-Servera is Dean of the College of Fine Arts and Professor of Theatre and Dance at the University of Texas at Austin. Isabel Machado is Research Associate with the SARChI Chair in South African Art and Visual Culture hosted by the Faculty of Art, Design & Architecture at the University of Johannesburg. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/gender-studies

New Books in Sociology
Kemi Adeyemi et al., "Queer Nightlife" (U Michigan Press, 2021)

New Books in Sociology

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 53:53


The mass shooting at a queer Latin Night in Orlando in July 2016 sparked a public conversation about access to pleasure and selfhood within conditions of colonization, violence, and negation. Queer Nightlife (U Michigan Press, 2021) joins this conversation by centering queer and trans people of color who apprehend the risky medium of the night to explore, know, and stage their bodies, genders, and sexualities in the face of systemic and social negation. The book focuses on house parties, nightclubs, and bars that offer improvisatory conditions and possibilities for “stranger intimacies,” and that privilege music, dance, and sexual/gender expressions. Queer Nightlife extends the breadth of research on “everynight life” through twenty-five essays and interviews by leading scholars and artists. The book's four sections move temporally from preparing for the night (how do DJs source their sounds, what does it take to travel there, who promotes nightlife, what do people wear?); to the socialities of nightclubs (how are social dance practices introduced and taught, how is the price for sex negotiated, what styles do people adopt to feel and present as desirable?); to the staging and spectacle of the night (how do drag artists confound and celebrate gender, how are spaces designed to create the sensation of spectacularity, whose bodies become a spectacle already?); and finally, how the night continues beyond the club and after sunrise (what kinds of intimacies and gestures remain, how do we go back to the club after Orlando?). Dr. Kemi Adeyemi is assistant professor of gender, women, and sexuality studies and director of The Black Embodiments Studio at the University of Washington. Dr. Kareem Khubchandani is the Mellon Bridge assistant professor in theater, dance, and performance studies, and women's, gender, and sexuality studies at Tufts University. Dr. Ramón Rivera-Servera is Dean of the College of Fine Arts and Professor of Theatre and Dance at the University of Texas at Austin. Isabel Machado is Research Associate with the SARChI Chair in South African Art and Visual Culture hosted by the Faculty of Art, Design & Architecture at the University of Johannesburg. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

New Books Network
Kemi Adeyemi et al., "Queer Nightlife" (U Michigan Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 53:53


The mass shooting at a queer Latin Night in Orlando in July 2016 sparked a public conversation about access to pleasure and selfhood within conditions of colonization, violence, and negation. Queer Nightlife (U Michigan Press, 2021) joins this conversation by centering queer and trans people of color who apprehend the risky medium of the night to explore, know, and stage their bodies, genders, and sexualities in the face of systemic and social negation. The book focuses on house parties, nightclubs, and bars that offer improvisatory conditions and possibilities for “stranger intimacies,” and that privilege music, dance, and sexual/gender expressions. Queer Nightlife extends the breadth of research on “everynight life” through twenty-five essays and interviews by leading scholars and artists. The book's four sections move temporally from preparing for the night (how do DJs source their sounds, what does it take to travel there, who promotes nightlife, what do people wear?); to the socialities of nightclubs (how are social dance practices introduced and taught, how is the price for sex negotiated, what styles do people adopt to feel and present as desirable?); to the staging and spectacle of the night (how do drag artists confound and celebrate gender, how are spaces designed to create the sensation of spectacularity, whose bodies become a spectacle already?); and finally, how the night continues beyond the club and after sunrise (what kinds of intimacies and gestures remain, how do we go back to the club after Orlando?). Dr. Kemi Adeyemi is assistant professor of gender, women, and sexuality studies and director of The Black Embodiments Studio at the University of Washington. Dr. Kareem Khubchandani is the Mellon Bridge assistant professor in theater, dance, and performance studies, and women's, gender, and sexuality studies at Tufts University. Dr. Ramón Rivera-Servera is Dean of the College of Fine Arts and Professor of Theatre and Dance at the University of Texas at Austin. Isabel Machado is Research Associate with the SARChI Chair in South African Art and Visual Culture hosted by the Faculty of Art, Design & Architecture at the University of Johannesburg. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Noontime Sports Podcast
Brendan Costa (Bates College Quarterback)

Noontime Sports Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 23:22


Bates College quarterback Brendan Costa joined Matt Noonan for a brand new Noontime Sports Podcast -- yes, it is Friday, so that means it is a "Football Friday" Podcast. On today's show, Costa and Noonan discuss his team's exciting win over Tufts University last weekend, which resulted in the Bates signal-caller earned the New England Gold Helmet (for Division II/III). Additionally, the two discuss Costa's final season with the Bobcats, which happens to be this fall, and his team's upcoming matchup on Saturday, October 16 against Trinity College. Stay connected with Noontime Sports on Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube, as well as follow us on Instagram at @NoontimeNation --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/noontime-sports/support

The Ortho Show
Hosted by Dr. Scott Sigman – “Olympic Gold: Dr. Chris Lee”

The Ortho Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 32:22


Dr. Christopher Lee is a board certified orthopaedic surgeon specializing in sports medicine, arthroscopy, joint and cartilage preservation as well as shoulder and knee replacements. He is in private practice in Burbank, CA. Dr. Lee is also the team physician for men and women's USA National Indoor Volleyball Team. He traveled with the team's to Tokyo for the 2021 Summer Olympics, where he was on the court with the women's team gold medal win. Topics include: -We continue to bring you the best of the best in orthopedics, including those with unique experiences. We hear about Dr. Lee's experience as a violinist since an early age. -He is part of the "Tufts University Triple Jumbo." Born and raised in Boston, Massachusetts, Dr. Lee attended Tufts University where he received awards for both academic and artistic achievements. Dr. Lee subsequently attended the Tufts University School of Medicine where he participated in the MD/MBA program. After completing the Tufts Combined Residency in Orthopaedic Surgery, he then received his fellowship training at the San Diego Arthroscopy and Sports Medicine Fellowship where he trained with international pioneers in sports medicine, arthroscopy and shoulder replacement surgery. -Dr. Lee discusses the long, arduous road to becoming the lead physician for the USA National Indoor Volleyball team for both men's and women's teams'. He gives us the insights going to Tokyo for the Olympics, the challenges while there and ultimately, being there for the women's team big gold win. Find out more about Dr. Christopher Lee here.  For MD's, capture quick reflections on each learning below & how it applies to your day-to-day to unlock a total of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 CMEs.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 10.08.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 59:38


Raspberries, ellagic acid reveal benefits in two studies Oregon State University, October 1, 2021.    Articles that appeared recently in the Journal of Berry Research report that raspberries and compounds present in the fruit could help support healthy body mass and motor function, including balance, coordination and strength.   In one study, Neil Shay and colleagues at Oregon State University fed mice a high fat, high sugar diet plus one of the following: raspberry juice concentrate, raspberry puree concentrate, raspberry fruit powder, raspberry seed extract, ellagic acid (a polyphenol that occurs in a relatively high amount in raspberries), raspberry ketone, or a combination of raspberry ketone and ellagic acid. Additional groups of animals received a high fat, high sugar diet alone or a low fat diet.   While mice that received the high fat and sugar diet alone experienced a significant increase in body mass, the addition of raspberry juice concentrate, raspberry puree concentrate or ellagic acid plus raspberry ketone helped prevent this effect. Of note, mice that received raspberry juice concentrate experienced gains similar to those of animals given a low fat diet. "We hope that the findings from this study can help guide the design of future clinical trials," Dr Shay stated.   In another study, Barbara Shukitt-Hale, PhD, and her associates at Tufts University's Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging gave 19 month old rats a control diet or a diet enhanced with raspberry extract for 11 weeks. Psychomotor behavior was assessed during week 7 and cognitive testing was conducted during weeks 9-10.   Animals that received raspberry performed better on psychomotor coordination and balance, and had better muscle tone, strength and stamina than those that received a control diet. "These results may have important implications for healthy aging," stated Dr Shukitt-Hale. "While further research in humans is necessary, animal model studies are helpful in identifying deficits associated with normal aging."       Massage doesn't just make muscles feel better, it makes them heal faster and stronger Harvard University, October 6, 2021 Massage has been used to treat sore, injured muscles for more than 3,000 years, and today many athletes swear by massage guns to rehabilitate their bodies. But other than making people feel good, do these "mechanotherapies" actually improve healing after severe injury? According to a new study from researchers at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), the answer is "yes." Using a custom-designed robotic system to deliver consistent and tunable compressive forces to mice's leg muscles, the team found that this mechanical loading (ML) rapidly clears immune cells called neutrophils out of severely injured muscle tissue. This process also removed inflammatory cytokinesreleased by neutrophils from the muscles, enhancing the process of muscle fiber regeneration. The research is published in Science Translational Medicine. "Lots of people have been trying to study the beneficial effects of massage and other mechanotherapies on the body, but up to this point it hadn't been done in a systematic, reproducible way. Our work shows a very clear connection between mechanical stimulation and immune function. This has promise for regenerating a wide variety of tissues including bone, tendon, hair, and skin, and can also be used in patients with diseases that prevent the use of drug-based interventions," said first author Bo Ri Seo, Ph.D., who is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the lab of Core Faculty member Dave Mooney, Ph.D. at the Wyss Institute and SEAS. Seo and her coauthors started exploring the effects of mechanotherapy on injured tissues in mice several years ago, and found that it doubled the rate of muscle regeneration and reduced tissue scarring over the course of two weeks. Excited by the idea that mechanical stimulation alone can foster regeneration and enhance muscle function, the team decided to probe more deeply into exactly how that process worked in the body, and to figure out what parameters would maximize healing. They teamed up with soft robotics experts in the Harvard Biodesign Lab, led by Wyss Associate Faculty member Conor Walsh, Ph.D., to create a small device that used sensors and actuators to monitor and control the force applied to the limb of a mouse. " The device we created allows us to precisely control parameters like the amount and frequency of force applied, enabling a much more systematic approach to understanding tissue healing than would be possible with a manual approach," said co-second author Christopher Payne, Ph.D., a former Postdoctoral Fellow at the Wyss Institute and the Harvard Biodesign Lab who is now a Robotics Engineer at Viam, Inc.  Once the device was ready, the team experimented with applying force to mice's leg muscles via a soft silicone tip and used ultrasound to get a look at what happened to the tissue in response. They observed that the muscles experienced a strain of between 10-40%, confirming that the tissues were experiencing mechanical force. They also used those ultrasound imaging data to develop and validate a computational model that could predict the amount of tissue strain under different loading forces. They then applied consistent, repeated force to injured muscles for 14 days. While both treated and untreated muscles displayed a reduction in the amount of damaged muscle fibers, the reduction was more pronounced and the cross-sectional area of the fibers was larger in the treated muscle, indicating that treatment had led to greater repair and strength recovery. The greater the force applied during treatment, the stronger the injured muscles became, confirming that mechanotherapy improves muscle recovery after injury. But how? Evicting neutrophils to enhance regeneration To answer that question, the scientists performed a detailed biological assessment, analyzing a wide range of inflammation-related factors called cytokines and chemokines in untreated vs. treated muscles. A subset of cytokines was dramatically lower in treated muscles after three days of mechanotherapy, and these cytokines are associated with the movement of immune cells called neutrophils, which play many roles in the inflammation process. Treated muscles also had fewer neutrophils in their tissue than untreated muscles, suggesting that the reduction in cytokines that attract them had caused the decrease in neutrophil infiltration. The team had a hunch that the force applied to the muscle by the mechanotherapy effectively squeezed the neutrophils and cytokines out of the injured tissue. They confirmed this theory by injecting fluorescent molecules into the muscles and observing that the movement of the molecules was more significant with force application, supporting the idea that it helped to flush out the muscle tissue. To pick apart what effect the neutrophils and their associated cytokines have on regenerating muscle fibers, the scientists performed in vitro studies in which they grew muscle progenitor cells (MPCs) in a medium in which neutrophils had previously been grown. They found that the number of MPCs increased, but the rate at which they differentiated (developed into other cell types) decreased, suggesting that neutrophil-secreted factors stimulate the growth of muscle cells, but the prolonged presence of those factors impairs the production of new muscle fibers. "Neutrophils are known to kill and clear out pathogens and damaged tissue, but in this study we identified their direct impacts on muscle progenitor cell behaviors," said co-second author Stephanie McNamara, a former Post-Graduate Fellow at the Wyss Institute who is now an M.D.-Ph.D. student at Harvard Medical School (HMS). "While the inflammatory response is important for regeneration in the initial stages of healing, it is equally important that inflammation is quickly resolved to enable the regenerative processes to run its full course." Seo and her colleagues then turned back to their in vivo model and analyzed the types of muscle fibers in the treated vs. untreated mice 14 days after injury. They found that type IIX fibers were prevalent in healthy muscle and treated muscle, but untreated injured muscle contained smaller numbers of type IIX fibers and increased numbers of type IIA fibers. This difference explained the enlarged fiber size and greater force production of treated muscles, as IIX fibers produce more force than IIA fibers. Finally, the team homed in on the optimal amount of time for neutrophil presence in injured muscle by depleting neutrophils in the mice on the third day after injury. The treated mice's muscles showed larger fiber size and greater strength recovery than those in untreated mice, confirming that while neutrophils are necessary in the earliest stages of injury recovery, getting them out of the injury site early leads to improved muscle regeneration. "These findings are remarkable because they indicate that we can influence the function of the body's immune system in a drug-free, non-invasive way," said Walsh, who is also the Paul A. Maeder Professor of Engineering and Applied Science at SEAS and whose group is experienced in developing wearable technology for diagnosing and treating disease. "This provides great motivation for the development of external, mechanical interventions to help accelerate and improve muscle and tissue healing that have the potential to be rapidly translated to the clinic." The team is continuing to investigate this line of research with multiple projects in the lab. They plan to validate this mechanotherpeutic approach in larger animals, with the goal of being able to test its efficacy on humans. They also hope to test it on different types of injuries, age-related muscle loss, and muscle performance enhancement. "The fields of mechanotherapy and immunotherapy rarely interact with each other, but this work is a testament to how crucial it is to consider both physical and biological elements when studying and working to improve human health," said Mooney, who is the corresponding author of the paper and the Robert P. Pinkas Family Professor of Bioengineering at SEAS. "The idea that mechanics influence cell and tissue function was ridiculed until the last few decades, and while scientists have made great strides in establishing acceptance of this fact, we still know very little about how that process actually works at the organ level. This research has revealed a previously unknown type of interplay between mechanobiology and immunology that is critical for muscle tissue healing, in addition to describing a new form of mechanotherapy that potentially could be as potent as chemical or gene therapies, but much simpler and less invasive," said Wyss Founding Director Don Ingber, M.D., Ph.D., who is also the Judah Folkman Professor of Vascular Biology at (HMS) and the Vascular Biology Program at Boston Children's Hospital, as well as Professor of Bioengineering at SEAS.   Vitamin E could help protect older men from pneumonia University of Helsinki (Finland), October 7 2021.    An article that appeared in Clinical Interventions in Aging reported a protective role for vitamin E against pneumonia in older men.   For the current investigation, Dr Harri Hemilä of the University of Helsinki, Finland analyzed data from the Alpha-Tocopherol Beta-Carotene (ATBC) Cancer Prevention Study conducted in Finland. The trial included 29,133 men between the ages of 50 to 69 years who smoked at least five cigarettes daily upon enrollment. Participants received alpha tocopherol (vitamin E), beta carotene, both supplements, or a placebo for five to eight years.   The current study was limited to 7,469 ATBC participants who started smoking at age 21 or older. Among this group, supplementation with vitamin E was associated with a 35% lower risk of developing pneumonia in comparison with those who did not receive the vitamin.  Light smokers who engaged in leisure time exercise had a 69% lower risk compared with unsupplemented members of this subgroup. The risk in this subgroup of developing pneumonia by age 74 was 12.9%.   Among the one-third of the current study's population who quit smoking for a median period of two years, there was a 72% lower risk of pneumonia in association with vitamin E supplementation. In this group, exercisers who received vitamin E experienced an 81% lower pneumonia risk.   Dr Hemilä observed that the benefit for vitamin E in this study was strongest for older subjects—a group at higher risk of pneumonia.   "The current analysis of individual-level data suggests that trials on vitamin E and pneumonia on nonsmoking elderly males are warranted," he concluded.       Toxic fatty acids to blame for brain cell death after injury New York University, October 7, 2021 Cells that normally nourish healthy brain cells called neurons release toxic fatty acids after neurons are damaged, a new study in rodents shows. This phenomenon is likely the driving factor behind most, if not all, diseases that affect brain function, as well as the natural breakdown of brain cells seen in aging, researchers say. Previous research has pointed to astrocytes—a star-shaped glial cell of the central nervous system—as the culprits behind cell death seen in Parkinson's disease and dementia, among other neurodegenerative diseases. While many experts believed that these cells released a neuron-killing molecule to "clear away" damaged brain cells, the identity of this toxin has until now remained a mystery. Led by researchers at NYU Grossman School of Medicine, the new investigation provides what they say is the first evidence that tissue damage prompts astrocytes to produce two kinds of fats, long-chain saturated free fatty acids and phosphatidylcholines. These fats then trigger cell death in damaged neurons, the electrically active cells that send messages throughout nerve tissue. Publishing Oct. 6 in the journal Nature, the study also showed that when researchers blocked fatty acid formation in mice, 75 percent of neurons survived compared with 10 percent when the fatty acids were allowed to form. The researchers' earlier work showed that brain cells continued to function when shielded from astrocyte attacks.  "Our findings show that the toxic fatty acids produced by astrocytes play a critical role in brain cell death and provide a promising new target for treating, and perhaps even preventing, many neurodegenerative diseases," says study co-senior author Shane Liddelow, Ph.D. Liddelow, an assistant professor in the Department of Neuroscience and Physiology at NYU Langone Health, adds that targeting these fats instead of the cells that produce them may be a safer approach to treating neurodegenerative diseasesbecause astrocytes feed nerve cells and clear away their waste. Stopping them from working altogether could interfere with healthy brain function. Although it remains unclear why astrocytes produce these toxins, it is possible they evolved to destroy damaged cells before they can harm their neighbors, says Liddelow. He notes that while healthy cells are not harmed by the toxins, neurons become susceptible to the damaging effects when they are injured, mutated, or infected by prions, the contagious, misfolded proteins that play a major role in mad cow disease and similar illnesses. Perhaps in chronic diseases like dementia, this otherwise helpful process goes off track and becomes a problem, the study authors say. For the investigation, researchers analyzed the molecules released by astrocytes collected from rodents. They also genetically engineered some groups of mice to prevent the normal production of the toxic fats and looked to see whether neuron death occurred after an acute injury. "Our results provide what is likely the most detailed molecular map to date of how tissue damage leads to brain cell death, enabling researchers to better understand why neurons die in all kinds of diseases," says Liddelow, also an assistant professor in the Department of Ophthalmology at NYU Langone. Liddelow cautions that while the findings are promising, the genetic techniques used to block the enzyme that produces toxic fatty acids in mice are not ready for use in humans. As a result, the researchers next plan is to explore safe and effective ways to interfere with the release of the toxins in human patients. Liddelow and his colleagues had previously shown these neurotoxic astrocytes in the brains of patients with Parkinson's, Huntington's disease, and multiple sclerosis, among other diseases.   Clinical trial for nicotinamide riboside: Vitamin safely boosts levels of important cell metabolite linked to multiple health benefits University of Iowa Health Care, October 3, 2021   In the first controlled clinical trial of nicotinamide riboside (NR), a newly discovered form of Vitamin B3, researchers have shown that the compound is safe for humans and increases levels of a cell metabolite that is critical for cellular energy production and protection against stress and DNA damage.   Studies in mice have shown that boosting the levels of this cell metabolite -- known as NAD+ -- can produce multiple health benefits, including resistance to weight gain, improved control of blood sugar and cholesterol, reduced nerve damage, and longer lifespan. Levels of NAD+ diminish with age, and it has been suggested that loss of this metabolite may play a role in age-related health decline.   These findings in animal studies have spurred people to take commercially available NR supplements designed to boost NAD+. However, these over-the-counter supplements have not undergone clinical trials to see if they work in people.   The new research, reported in the journal Nature Communications, was led by Charles Brenner, PhD, professor and Roy J. Carver Chair of Biochemistry at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine in collaboration with colleagues at Queens University Belfast and ChromaDex Corp. (NASDAQ: CDXC), which supplied the NR used in the trial. Brenner is a consultant for ChromaDex. He also is co-founder and Chief Scientific Adviser of ProHealthspan, which sells NR supplements under the trade name Tru NIAGEN®.   The human trial involved six men and six women, all healthy. Each participant received single oral doses of 100 mg, 300 mg, or 1,000 mg of NR in a different sequence with a seven-day gap between doses. After each dose, blood and urine samples were collected and analyzed by Brenner's lab to measure various NAD+ metabolites in a process called metabolomics. The trial showed that the NR vitamin increased NAD+ metabolism by amounts directly related to the dose, and there were no serious side effects with any of the doses.   "This trial shows that oral NR safely boosts human NAD+ metabolism," Brenner says. "We are excited because everything we are learning from animal systems indicates that the effectiveness of NR depends on preserving and/or boosting NAD+ and related compounds in the face of metabolic stresses. Because the levels of supplementation in mice that produce beneficial effects are achievable in people, it appears than health benefits of NR will be translatable to humans safely."   The next step will be to study the effect of longer duration NR supplementation on NAD+ metabolism in healthy adults, but Brenner also has plans to test the effects of NR in people with diseases and health conditions, including elevated cholesterol, obesity and diabetes, and people at risk for chemotherapeutic peripheral neuropathy.   Prior to the formal clinical trial, Brenner conducted a pilot human study -- on himself. In 2004, he had discovered that NR is a natural product found in milk and that there is pathway to convert NR to NAD+ in people. More than a decade of research on NR metabolic pathways and health effects in mice and rats had convinced him that NR supplementation had real promise to improve human health and wellness. After consulting with UI's institutional review board, he conducted an experiment in which he took 1 gram of NR once a day for seven days, and his team analyzed blood and urine samples using mass spectrometry. The experiment showed that Brenner's blood NAD+ increased by about 2.7 times. In addition, though he reported immediate sensitivity to flushing with the related compound niacin, he did not experience any side effects taking NR.   The biggest surprise from his metabolomic analysis was an increase in a metabolite called NAAD, which was multiplied by 45 times, from trace levels to amounts in the micromolar range that were easily detectable.   "While this was unexpected, I thought it might be useful," Brenner says. "NAD+ is an abundant metabolite and it is sometimes hard to see the needle move on levels of abundant metabolites. But when you can look at a low-abundance metabolite that goes from undetectable to easily detectable, there is a great signal to noise ratio, meaning that NAAD levels could be a useful biomarker for tracking increases in NAD+ in human trials."   Brenner notes this was a case of bidirectional translational science; having learned something from the initial human experiment, his team was able to return to laboratory mice to explore the unexpected NAAD finding in more detail.   Brenner's mouse study showed that NAAD is formed from NR and confirmed that NAAD levels are a strong biomarker for increased NAD+ metabolism. The experiments also revealed more detail about NAD+ metabolic pathways.   In particular, the researchers compared the ability of all three NAD+ precursor vitamins -- NR, niacin, and nicotinamide -- to boost NAD+ metabolism and stimulate the activity of certain enzymes, which have been linked to longevity and healthbenefits. The study showed for the first time that oral NR is superior to nicotinamide, which is better than niacin in terms of the total amount of NAD+ produced at an equivalent dose. NR was also the best of the three in stimulating the activity of sirtuin enzymes. However, in this case, NR was the best at stimulating sirtuin-like activities, followed by niacin, followed by nicotinamide.   The information from the mouse study subsequently helped Brenner's team design the formal clinical trial. In addition to showing that NR boosts NAD+ in humans without adverse effects, the trial confirmed that NAAD is a highly sensitive biomarker of NAD+ supplementation in people.   "Now that we have demonstrated safety in this small clinical trial, we are in a position to find out if the health benefits that we have seen in animals can be reproduced in people," says Brenner, who also is co-director of the Obesity Research and Education Initiative, professor of internal medicine, and a member of the Fraternal Order of Eagles Diabetes Research Center at the UI.   Protecting the ozone layer is delivering vast health benefits Montreal Protocol will spare Americans from 443 million skin cancer cases National Center for Atmospheric Research, October 7, 2021 An international agreement to protect the ozone layer is expected to prevent 443 million cases of skin cancer and 63 million cataract cases for people born in the United States through the end of this century, according to new research. The research team, by scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), ICF Consulting, and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), focused on the far-reaching impacts of a landmark 1987 treaty known as the Montreal Protocol and later amendments that substantially strengthened it. The agreement phased out the use of chemicals such as chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) that destroy ozone in the stratosphere. Stratospheric ozone shields the planet from harmful levels of the Sun's ultraviolet (UV) radiation, protecting life on Earth. To measure the long-term effects of the Montreal Protocol, the scientists developed a computer modeling approach that enabled them to look to both the past and the future by simulating the treaty's impact on Americans born between 1890 and 2100. The modeling revealed the treaty's effect on stratospheric ozone, the associated reductions in ultraviolet radiation, and the resulting health benefits.  In addition to the number of skin cancer and cataract cases that were avoided, the study also showed that the treaty, as most recently amended, will prevent approximately 2.3 million skin cancer deaths in the U.S. “It's very encouraging,” said NCAR scientist Julia Lee-Taylor, a co-author of the study. “It shows that, given the will, the nations of the world can come together to solve global environmental problems.” The study, funded by the EPA, was published in ACS Earth and Space Chemistry. NCAR is sponsored by the National Science Foundation. Mounting concerns over the ozone layer Scientists in the 1970s began highlighting the threat to the ozone layer when they found that CFCs, used as refrigerants and in other applications, release chlorine atoms in the stratosphere that set off chemical reactions that destroy ozone. Concerns mounted the following decade with the discovery of an Antarctic ozone hole. The loss of stratospheric ozone would be catastrophic, as high levels of UV radiation have been linked to certain types of skin cancer, cataracts, and immunological disorders. The ozone layer also protects terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, as well as agriculture. Policy makers responded to the threat with the 1987 Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, in which nations agreed to curtail the use of certain ozone-destroying substances. Subsequent amendments strengthened the treaty by expanding the list of ozone-destroying substances (such as halons and hydrochlorofluorocarbons, or HCFCs) and accelerating the timeline for phasing out their use. The amendments were based on Input from the scientific community, including a number of NCAR scientists, that were summarized in quadrennial Ozone Assessment reports. To quantify the impacts of the treaty, the research team built a model known as the Atmospheric and Health Effects Framework. This model, which draws on various data sources about ozone, public health, and population demographics, consists of five computational steps. These simulate past and future emissions of ozone-destroying substances, the impacts of those substances on stratospheric ozone, the resulting changes in ground-level UV radiation, the U.S. population's exposure to UV radiation, and the incidence and mortality of health effects resulting from the exposure. The results showed UV radiation levels returning to 1980 levels by the mid-2040s under the amended treaty. In contrast, UV levels would have continued to increase throughout this century if the treaty had not been amended, and they would have soared far higher without any treaty at all.  Even with the amendments, the simulations show excess cases of cataracts and various types of skin cancer beginning to occur with the onset of ozone depletion and peaking decades later as the population exposed to the highest UV levels ages. Those born between 1900 and 2040 experience heightened cases of skin cancer and cataracts, with the worst health outcomes affecting those born between about 1950 and 2000. However, the health impacts would have been far more severe without the treaty, with cases of skin cancer and cataracts rising at an increasingly rapid rate through the century.  “We peeled away from disaster,” Lee-Taylor said. “What is eye popping is what would have happened by the end of this century if not for the Montreal Protocol. By 2080, the amount of UV has tripled. After that, our calculations for the health impacts start to break down because we're getting so far into conditions that have never been seen before.” The research team also found that more than half the treaty's health benefits could be traced to the later amendments rather than the original 1987 Montreal Protocol. Overall, the treaty prevented more than 99% of potential health impacts that would have otherwise occurred from ozone destruction. This showed the importance of the treaty's flexibility in adjusting to evolving scientific knowledge, the authors said. The researchers focused on the U.S. because of ready access to health data and population projections. Lee-Taylor said that the specific health outcomes in other countries may vary, but the overall trends would be similar. “The treaty had broad global benefits,” she said.     What is Boron? The trace mineral boron provides profound anti-cancer effects, in addition to maintaining stronger bones. Life Extension, September 2021 Boron is a trace mineral found in the earth's crust and in water. Its importance in human health has been underestimated. Boron has been shown to have actions against specific types of malignancies, such as: Cervical cancer: The country Turkey has an extremely low incidence of cervical cancer, and scientists partially attribute this to its boron-rich soil.1 When comparing women who live in boron-rich regions versus boron-poor regions of Turkey, not a single woman living in the boron-rich regions had any indication of cervical cancer.2(The mean dietary intake of boron for women in this group was 8.41 mg/day.)  Boron interferes with the life cycle of the human papillomavirus (HPV), which is a contributing factor in approximately 95% of all cervical cancers.1  Considering that HPV viruses are increasingly implicated in head and neck cancers,3,4 supplementation with this ultra-low-cost mineral could have significant benefits in protecting against this malignancy that is increasing in prevalence. Lung cancer: A study conducted at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center between 1995 and 2005 found that increased boron intake was associated with a lower risk of lung cancer in postmenopausal women who were taking hormone replacement therapy. Prostate cancer: Studies point to boron's ability to inhibit the growth and spread of prostate cancer cells.  In one study, when mice were exposed to boric acid, their tumors shrank by as much as 38%.6 One analysis found that increased dietary boron intake was associated with a decreased risk of prostate cancer.7 Several human and animal studies have confirmed the important connection between boron and bone health. Boron prevents calcium loss,8 while also alleviating the bone problems associated with magnesium and vitamin D deficiency.9 All of these nutrients help maintain bone density. A study in female rats revealed the harmful effects a deficiency in boron has on bones, including:10 Decreased bone volume fraction, a measure of bone strength, Decreased thickness of the bone's spongy inner layer, and Decreased maximum force needed to break the femur. And in a study of post-menopausal women, supplementation with3 mg of boron per day prevented calcium loss and bone demineralization by reducing urinary excretion of both calcium and magnesium.8 In addition to its bone and anti-cancer benefits, there are nine additional reasons boron is an important trace mineral vital for health and longevity. It has been shown to:1 Greatly improve wound healing, Beneficially impact the body's use of estrogen, testosterone, and vitamin D, Boost magnesium absorption, Reduce levels of inflammatory biomarkers, such as high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), Raise levels of antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase, Protect against pesticide-induced oxidative stress and heavy-metal toxicity, Improve the brain's electrical activity, which may explain its benefits for cognitive performance, and short-term memory in the elderly, Influence the formation and activity of key biomolecules, such as S-adenosyl methionine (SAM-e) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+), and Potentially help ameliorate the adverse effects of traditional chemotherapeutic agents. Because the amount of boron varies in the soil, based on geographical location, obtaining enough boron through diet alone can be difficult. Supplementing with low-cost boron is an effective way to maintain adequate levels of this overlooked micronutrient.

Defense & Aerospace Report
Defense & Aerospace Daily Podcast [Oct 07, 2021] Radakin Named as UK CDS; China as Declining Power

Defense & Aerospace Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 31:12


On this episode of the DefAero Report Daily Podcast, sponsored by Bell,  Adm. Sir George Zambellas, Royal Navy Ret., the former UK First Sea Lord, discusses the appointment of Royal Navy First Sea Lord Adm. Sir Tony Radakin as the next UK Chief of Defence Staff to succeed British Army Gen. Sir Nick Carter on Nov. 30, priorities for the force, driving innovation, the AUKUS deal and how to best equip the Royal Australian Navy with nuclear-powered submarines; and Dr. Hal Brands of Johns Hopkins University's School of Advanced International Studies and the American Enterprise Institute, discusses the article he co-authored with Dr. Michael Beckley of Tufts University and AEI — “China is a declining power — and that's the problem: The United States needs to prepare for a major war, not because its rival is rising but because of the opposite“ with Defense & Aerospace Report Editor Vago Muradian.

What Even Is...?

Welcome to the What Even Is...? October Spooktacular where we talk about all things mystical, magical, and/or just plain misunderstood. In this episode, host Donna Truong talks with Salem Witch Museum Director of Education Rachel Christ about the Salem Witch Trials. They touch upon the following topics and more:Why did the Salem Witch Trials happenHow did the Salem Witch Trials beginSalem Witch Trial victimsWitch history in the United States and EuropeWhy did the Salem Witch Trials endRachel Christ has received her Bachelor of Arts in History at Clarks University and her Masters of Arts in History and Museum Studies at Tufts University. She currently works as the Director of Education at the Salem Witch Museum.Thank you to Jennifer Nakhai and Kimphuong Nguyen for suggesting this episode!Don't forget to rate, review, and follow this podcast! And, DM us on Instagram or email us at thewhatevenispodcast@gmail.com so you can let us know a topic that makes you wonder "What even is that?"

Finding Mastery
Dr. Gil Blander: Optimizing Wellness from the Inside Out

Finding Mastery

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 67:51


This week's conversation is with Dr. Gil Blander, an expert in nutrition, biomarker analytics, athletic performance, biochemistry, and aging research.Gil holds numerous patents and has published peer-reviewed articles in these fields. He received his PhD in biology from the Weizmann Institute of Science, and undertook postgraduate research on aging at MIT. Gil is also the Founder and CSO of InsideTracker, a personalized health and performance analytics company created by a team of scientists, physicians, nutritionists and exercise physiologists from MIT, Harvard, and Tufts University.InsideTracker has been a longtime partner of ours and I love the actionable insights I've gathered from the personalized data they've provided me to help optimize my health.InsideTracker has been a longtime partner of ours and I love the personalized data and actionable insights they support me with to optimize my health.I wanted to have Gil on to learn more about why he founded InsideTracker and the difference it can make for longevity.We discuss how different variables such as nutrition, movement, psychology, and genetics not only impact your life span, but more importantly your health span - the amount of time you're able to live life in a high quality manner.----Please support our partners!We're able to keep growing and creating content for YOU because of their support. We believe in their mission and would appreciate you supporting them in return!!To take advantage of deals from our partners, head to http://www.findingmastery.net/partners where you'll find all discount links and codes mentioned in the podcast.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Digital Planet
Census goes digital in India

Digital Planet

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 45:03


This decade's Indian national census will be the first to be carried out digitally. However, COVID-related delays have slowed progress and there are growing concerns about its accuracy. Dean of the Fletcher School at Tufts University, Bhaskar Chakravorti explains how data will be collected and why the census is likely to miss essential parts of the population. Getting mums coding and encouraging girls into tech in Nigeria June Angelides set up the UK's first child-friendly coding school for mums, Mums in Tech, while on maternity leave. She's now asking children to take part in the Institution of Engineering and Technology's “Super Realoes” competition to design a superhero gadget that can make a positive impact in the world around them or a piece of assistive tech to help improve someone's life. Unfinished symphony finished by AI Beethoven's 10th unfinished symphony has now been completed by AI and will be performed for audiences in Bonn later this week. Dr. Ahmed Elgammal, Professor at Rutgers University and Director of the Art and AI Lab who developed Beethoven's AI, tells us more about the process. Credit for music: Deutsche Telekom. The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Ghislaine Boddington. Studio Manager: Nigel Dix Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz (Image: Getty Images)

The Takeaway
President Biden's Foreign Policy Agenda 2021-09-24

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 50:14


President Biden's Foreign Policy Agenda On Tuesday, President Joe Biden declared a quote “new era” for U.S. diplomacy in his first speech as U.S. president to the United Nations General Assembly. President Biden repeatedly sought to reassure U.S. allies that his presidency would not echo the chaos of Trump's four years in office. For that and more, The Takeaway spoke to Robin Wright,  columnist at The New Yorker and Wilson Center Distinguished Fellow, and Daniel Drezner, professor of international politics at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. The Uproar Over Treatment of Haitian Migrants Continues According to the Department of Homeland Security, the number of Haitians in Del Rio, Texas is down to about 7,000 as deportations continue. Some Haitians have turned back to Mexico, or they've been moved to another area for processing. Patrick Gaspard, President and CEO of the Center for American Progress visited the border on Thursday and joined to discuss what he saw there. For transcripts, see individual segment pages. 

The Long View
Hal Hershfield: People Treat Their Future Self as if It's Another Person

The Long View

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 44:35


Our guest on the podcast today is Professor Hal Hershfield. Dr. Hershfield is Professor of Marketing, Behavioral Decision Making, and Psychology at UCLA's Anderson School of Management. His research concentrates on the psychology of long-term decision-making and how people's perceptions of the passage of time affect the decisions that they make. He has consulted with numerous organizations including Prudential, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, Merrill Lynch, and the Principal Financial Group. He received his B.A. at Tufts University and his Ph.D. at Stanford.BackgroundBioThe Pandemic“How Elvis Got Americans to Accept the Polio Vaccine,” by Hal Hershfield and Ilana Brody, scientificamerican.com, Jan. 18, 2021.“Should You Immerse Yourself in Bad News These Days or Ignore It Completely?” by Hal Hershfield, scientificamerican.com, May 5, 2020.“How to Craft the Vaccine Message for the Undecided,” by Bill Kisliuk, ucla.edu, May 4, 2021.“Your Messaging to Older Audiences Is Outdated,” by Hal Hershfield and Laura Carstensen, harvardbusinessreview.org, July 2, 2021.“Time Is Meaningless Now,” by Shayla Love, vice.com, April 10, 2020.Saving for the FutureDaniel Kahneman“Temporal Reframing and Participation in a Savings Program: A Field Experiment,” by Hal Hershfield, Stephen Shu, and Shlomo Benartzi, halhershfield.com, 2020.“Using Vividness Interventions to Improve Financial Decision Making,” by Hal E. Hershfield, Elicia M. John, and Joseph S. Reiff, halhershfield.com, 2018.“Increasing Saving Behavior Through Age-Progressed Renderings of the Future Self,” by Hal Hershfield, Daniel Goldstein, William Sharpe, Jesse Fox, Leo Yeykelis, Laura Carstensen, and Jeremy Bailenson, halhershfield.com, 2011. “The Future Self,” by Hal E. Hershfield and Daniel Bartels, uchicago.edu, 2018.“Beliefs About Whether Spending Implies Wealth,” by Heather Barry Kappes, Joe J. Gladstone, and Hal Hershfield, londonschoolofeconomics.com, 2020.“Seeking Lasting Enjoyment With Limited Money: Financial Constraints Increase Preference for Material Goods Over Experiences,” by Stephanie M. Tully, Hal E. Hershfield, and Tom Meyvis, halhershfield.com, 2015.“Do Images of Older Americans Reinforce Stereotypes?” by Colette Thayer and Laura Skufca, aarp.org, September 2019.Retirement and Older Adults“People Search for Meaning When They Approach a New Decade in Chronological Age,” by Adam Alter and Hal Hershfield, halhershfield.com, 2014.Mike North“You Owe It to Yourself: Boosting Retirement Saving With a Responsibility-Based Appeal,” by Christopher J. Bryan and Hal E. Hershfield, halhershfield.com, 2012.