Podcasts about New Economics Foundation

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  • 1WEEKLY EPISODE
  • Sep 30, 2022LATEST
New Economics Foundation

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Best podcasts about New Economics Foundation

Latest podcast episodes about New Economics Foundation

Weekly Economics Podcast
How we win a new economy - solving the cost of living and climate crises together

Weekly Economics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 44:42


Note to listeners: this episode was prerecorded in August 2022. 2022: a year of extremes. During the 40 degree summer heat, roads melted and railway lines buckled. The London Fire Brigade had its busiest day since the Blitz as record temperatures led to hundreds of fires across the city. When it finally rained a month later, the Met Office warned of flood risk. But after a dangerously hot summer, we're now worrying about whether we can afford our energy bills during a long, cold winter. This was the year that the climate crisis collided with the scandalously high cost of living. But how are the two related? Why are fossil fuel companies making bumper profits while the rest of us are worried about paying our bills? And can we stay warm while making sure oil and gas stay safely under the North Sea? Ayeisha is joined by Mika Minio-Paluello, climate and industry lead at the Trades Union Congress and Tessa Khan, environmental lawyer and founder and director of Uplift. -Want to join a union? You can find the right one for you on the TUC website: https://www.tuc.org.uk/joinunion - Get involved with the Stop Cambo/Jackdaw and Warm this Winter campaigns: https://www.stopcambo.org.uk/ and https://www.warmthiswinter.org.uk/ ----- Music by Blue Dot Sessions and Podington Bear, used under Creative Commons licence. Researched by Margaret Welsh. Produced by Becky Malone. Enjoying the show? Tweet us your comments and questions @NEF! The Weekly Economics Podcast is brought to you by the New Economics Foundation. Find out more at www.neweconomics.org

The Owen Jones Podcast
Tories Crash The Economy

The Owen Jones Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 54:12


Liz Truss' decision to wage class war on behalf of the rich - with a Budget which slashes their taxes - has crashed the British economy, throwing the pound and the markets into turmoil. Why has this happened, what will this for the economy - and what will this mean for you?We're joined by Alfie Stirling, chief economist of the New Economics Foundation.Please subscribe - and help us take on the right-wing media here: https://patreon.com/owenjones84Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/the-owen-jones-podcast. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

PhDivas
S7E1 | You Are Not Alone: Race + Mental Health w Dr Samara Linton & Rianna Walcott

PhDivas

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 62:43


Good luck with the start of another academic year: you are not alone. Mental health is often falsely presented as irrelevant to people of colour. Dr. Samara Linton and Dr. Rianna Walcott's brilliant The Colour of Madness explores mental health for and by people of colour across art, essays, poetry, and stories. Together with PhDiva Xine they discuss bridging the STEM/humanities divide through their collaboration and the uses of the book to communities, teaching, and health care professionals. The Colour of Madness https://linktr.ee/TheColourofMadness https://www.instagram.com/colourofmadness/?hl=en https://twitter.com/madnesscolourof?lang=en Support PhDivas on Patreon: www.patreon.com/phdivaspodcast Dr Samara Linton (she/her) is an award-winning writer, researcher, and multidisciplinary content producer. Her work includes The Colour of Madness: Mental Health and Race in Technicolour (2022) and Diane Abbott: The Authorised Biography (2020). Samara writes for various publications, including gal-dem, Huffington Post UK, The Metro, New Economics Foundation, Fawcett Society, and the Royal College of Psychiatrists. Her published research includes an influential report on Ebola-affected communities for the Africa All-Party Parliamentary Group (2016). She also sat on the editorial board for the British Medical Journal's award-winning Racism in Medicine special issue (2020). Samara worked as a junior doctor in east London before joining the BBC, where she worked in production. A University of Cambridge (BA Hons.) and University College London (MBBS) graduate, she is currently completing an MA in Health Humanities at University College London. You can find out more about Samara's work at www.samaralinton.com, and she tweets at @samara_linton. Rianna Walcott (she/her) is an LAHP alumna and PhD candidate at Kings College London researching Black British identity formation in digital spaces. Rianna combines digital work, decolonial studies, arts and culture, and mental health advocacy in her work, with a deep commitment to outreach work and public engagement. She co-founded projectmyopia.com, a website that promotes inclusivity in academia and a decolonized curriculum, and is the UCL writing lab's Scholar-in-Residence for 21-22. Rianna frequently writes about race, feminism, mental health, and arts and culture for publications including The Wellcome Collection, The Metro, The Guardian, The BBC, Vice, and Dazed. Rianna is co-editor of an anthology about BAME mental health - The Colour of Madness (2022), and in the time left over, she moonlights as a professional jazz singer. Rianna will be based at The Black Communication and Technology (BCaT) Lab at the University of Maryland-College Park. Research at this new lab will focus on race and technology, as well as the development of a pipeline program to introduce undergraduates and those in the wider community to the field of Black digital studies with the aim of working toward a more equitable digital future. You can find out more about Rianna's work at www.riannawalcott.com, and she tweets at @rianna_walcott.

Adrian Goldberg's Talk Show
"A Budget For The Rich"

Adrian Goldberg's Talk Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 30:05


Reaction to Kwasi Karteng's fiscal statement, his first as Chancellor in Liz Truss's new government. Was it a budget for the rich? Adrian Goldberg hears from Sam Bright from Byline Times and author of Fortress London: Why We Need to Save The Country From Its Capital; plus Jeevun Sandher head of economics at the New Economics Foundation, and NEF, and Dr Jo Michell, Associate Professor of Economics at the University of the West of England. Produced in Birmingham by Adrian Goldberg. Funded by subscriptions to Byline Times.  

BYLINE TIMES PODCAST
"A Budget For The Rich?"

BYLINE TIMES PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 30:05


Reaction to Kwasi Karteng's fiscal statement, his first as Chancellor in Liz Truss's new government. Was it a budget for the rich?Adrian Goldberg hears from Sam Bright from Byline Times and author of Fortress London: Why We Need to Save The Country From Its Capital; plus Jeevun Sandher head of economics at the New Economics Foundation, and NEF, and Dr Jo Michell, Associate Professor of Economics at the University of the West of England. Produced in Birmingham by Adrian Goldberg.Funded by subscriptions to Byline Times. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Politics Weekly
Liz Truss: making the rich richer? Politics Weekly UK

Politics Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 34:47


Scrapping the bankers' bonus cap, slashing taxes and lifting the moratorium on fracking. Liz Truss says she is prepared to be ‘unpopular' to boost the UK economy, but who really benefits? The Guardian's John Harris is joined by David Gauke, a former Conservative chief secretary to the Treasury, and Miatta Fahnbulleh, CEO of the New Economics Foundation, to discuss Truss's vision for the country. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/politicspod

Weekly Economics Podcast
How we win a new economy – a hot strike summer?

Weekly Economics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 45:54


Note to listeners: this episode was prerecorded in August 2022.  As the first week of rail strikes came to an end in June, Google searches for the phrase “join union” had increased by 184%. News channels and politicians didn't seem to know what to make of the broad public support for the striking rail workers. Inspired by the RMT union, the unrest spread: criminal barristers, BT workers, posties and teachers are just some of the people exploring strike action. After decades of union busting, wage stagnation and decimated rights, are workers finally saying enough is enough? Why has the public suddenly got behind striking workers? And what would happen if we held a general strike? Ayeisha is joined by the TUC's Sian Elliot and Sarah Jaffe, journalist and author of “Work Won't Love You Back”(@SianCElliott and @sarahljaffe on Twitter). -Find out more about Sarah's work at https://workwontloveyouback.org/ -Want to join a union? You can find the right one for you on the TUC website https://www.tuc.org.uk/joinunion ----- Music by Blue Dot Sessions and Podington Bear, used under Creative Commons licence. Researched by Margaret Welsh. Produced by Becky Malone. Enjoying the show? Tweet us your comments and questions @NEF! The Weekly Economics Podcast is brought to you by the New Economics Foundation. Find out more at www.neweconomics.org

The Inside Story Podcast
How will Liz Truss lead the UK?

The Inside Story Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 21:31


Britain's New Prime Minister is promising brighter days ahead for the UK. Liz Truss takes over from Boris Johnson after a divisive leadership contest. What will the country look like under her leadership? Join host Folly Bah Thibault. Guests: Rod Dacombe - Reader in politics at King's College London. Lydia Preig - Head of economics, New Economics Foundation. Petros Fassoulas - Secretary General, European Movement International.

The Media Show
Microsoft v The Regulator

The Media Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 28:07


We look at what may be the biggest media deal of the year – Microsoft is trying to buy one of the world's leading games producers Activision Blizzard for almost 60 billion pounds, but UK regulators have questions. The cost of living crisis is deepening, does the news media have the skill set to understand and explain a story of this scale and complexity? And who is the new Culture Secretary? With Sarah Lester, Editor of the Manchester Evening News, Sebastian Payne politics writer for the Financial Times, Miatta Fahnbulleh, Chief Executive of the New Economics Foundation, Faisal Islam, BBC Economics Editor, Jason Kingsley, Co-founder and CEO of video game developer Rebellion and Louise Shorthouse, Senior Games Analyst at Ampere Analysis. Presenter: Ros Atkins Producer: Helen Fitzhenry Studio Engineer: Tim Heffer

Weekly Economics Podcast
How we win a new economy - the end of neoliberalism?

Weekly Economics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 47:24


In this mini-series of the New Economics Podcast, we'll discover how our economy has been run over the past few years - and look at the key battlegrounds for those fighting to change the rules. Over the last few years, neoliberalism – the economic model that has dominated since Margaret Thatcher was PM – has taken a hit. Big spending and state intervention have been the name of the game, as the government scrambled to get to grips with the pandemic. While Boris Johnson gets ready to pack up his things, we still don't know who will be replacing him in Number 10. The two final contenders, Rishi Sunak and Liz Truss, have been described in the press as “channelling the blue-suited ghost of Thatcher”. So, have the last few years solidified a new kind of economic mainstream? Or will Johnsonism be swept aside once the new PM has unpacked their toothbrush? In the first episode of this special mini-series we're asking: has neoliberalism hit the buffers? Ayeisha is joined by Ellie Mae O'Hagan and Laurie Macfarlane (@elliemaeohagan and @L__Macfarlane on Twitter). -Read Laurie's piece with Christine Berry for Renewal on the Conservative's political economy: https://journals.lwbooks.co.uk/renewal/vol-30-issue-2/abstract-9553/ -More on the Race Class Narrative here: https://classonline.org.uk/pubs/item/the-uk-race-class-narrative-report ----- Music by Blue Dot Sessions and Podington Bear, used under Creative Commons licence. Researched by Margaret Welsh. Produced by Becky Malone. Enjoying the show? Tweet us your comments and questions @NEF! The Weekly Economics Podcast is brought to you by the New Economics Foundation. Find out more at www.neweconomics.org

The Owen Jones Podcast
Tory Social Catastrophe Looms in Britain

The Owen Jones Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 73:37


It is difficult to understate the scale of the social catastrophe looming in Britain, with an estimated 45 million people - a large majority of the population - facing being driven into poverty. Just what is the reality of the disaster about to unfold, what will it mean in practice - and can it be stopped?We are joined by Miatta Fahnbulleh, chief executive of the New Economics Foundation, and Lewis Ford, a public sector worker backing the Don't Pay UK campaign.Please subscribe - and help us take on the right-wing media here: https://patreon.com/owenjones84Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/the-owen-jones-podcast. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Politics Weekly
Mick Lynch on strikes and Britain's crisis – Politics Weekly UK

Politics Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 39:21


The Bank of England has predicted the country will hit a recession by the end of the year. To make matters worse, energy bills are soaring and parts of the country could be brought to a standstill over the next few weeks due to strikes. The Guardian's John Harris is joined by RMT general secretary Mick Lynch and Miatta Fahnbulleh, the chief executive of the New Economics Foundation, to talk about how to tackle this social emergency. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/politicspod

The Leader | Evening Standard daily
Interest rates rise as UK faces another recession

The Leader | Evening Standard daily

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 14:59


The UK is once again facing a recession, as the Bank of England announced its predictions for the economy, alongside a 0.5% rise in interest rates.It's the highest for 27 years, and the Bank of England has also predicted energy bills will push inflation to 13% - up from an already 40-year-high of 9.4%.The Bank has predicted the UK will go into recession in the fourth quarter of this year, which could last into 2024.Alongside that, the energy regulator Ofgem warned that customers face a “very challenging winter ahead” as it now plans to update the energy price cap quarterly instead of every six months.We speak with Economist Lukasz Krebel from the New Economics Foundation about the significance of this latest forecast from the Bank of England.Plus we speak with Grace Blakeley, Economist and Columnist for The Tribune about the effectiveness of the interest rate rise.Follow us on Twitter for more news @EveningStandard See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sky News Daily
Sunak v Truss: Examining their economic policies

Sky News Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 21:44


Amid a summer of strikes and the rising cost of living, the economic policies of the candidates vying to become the next Conservative leader and prime minister are unsurprisingly at the forefront of their campaigns. On the Sky News Daily, Niall Paterson is joined by Miatta Fahnbulleh from the New Economics Foundation, and Christopher Snowdon from the Institute of Economic Affairs, to put both candidates' plans under the microscope and look at the challenges the new occupant of Number 10 will face come the autumn. Editor – Paul Stanworth Producer - Rosie Gillott Interviews producer – Alys Bowen Digital producer - David Chipakupaku

Sky News Daily
What the interest rate rise means for homeowners and buyers

Sky News Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 14:03


The Bank of England has raised its base rate of interest from 1% to 1.25% as it tries to get a grip on soaring inflation. It's the fifth time in a row that the Bank has raised rates which means they are now at their highest since 2009. So, what will it mean for renters and homeowners? On the Sky News Daily, Vanessa Baffoe speaks to Dr Miatta Fahnbulleh, chief executive of the New Economics Foundation, and Lucian Cook, head of residential research at Savills estate agents. She also talks to Siobhan Maher, who is trying to get on to the property ladder. Producer: Soila Apparicio Interviews producer: Madeleine Drury Editor: Philly Beaumont

Iain Dale - The Whole Show
Calls for the UK to shun the ECHR, Cross Question and should we ban national train strikes?

Iain Dale - The Whole Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 146:17


Calls for the UK to shun the ECHR, Cross Question and should we ban national train strikes? Joining Iain Dale on Cross Question this evening are Lib Dem Chief Whip Wendy Chamberlain, Miatta Fahnbulleh of the New Economics Foundation, Conservative MP Daniel Kawczynksi and Albie Amankona, co-founder of Conservatives Against Racism For Equality.

Cross Question with Iain Dale
Wendy Chamberlain, Miatta Fahnbulleh, Daniel Kawczynski & Albie Amankona

Cross Question with Iain Dale

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 50:01


Joining Iain Dale on Cross Question this evening are Lib Dem Chief Whip Wendy Chamberlain, Miatta Fahnbulleh of the New Economics Foundation, Conservative MP Daniel Kawczynksi and Albie Amankona, co-founder of Conservatives Against Racism For Equality.

Climate Champions with Hattie Hartman
ACAN founding member Sara Edmonds on ramping up domestic retrofit

Climate Champions with Hattie Hartman

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 40:00


Episode 29. We speak to architect and ACAN (Architects Climate Action Network) steering group coordinator Sara Edmonds who is jumpstarting widespread conversations around domestic retrofit. Reaching beyond the bounds of architecture, Studio seARCH co-founder and Passivhaus designer Sara Edmonds is engaged in inclusive conversations across the domestic retrofit space from the political to the practical, establishing ties with the New Economics Foundation and Insulate Britain.   In this wide-ranging discussion, Sara describes what it will take to kickstart greater uptake of domestic retrofit in London and beyond: from DIY upskilling to empower householders to ensure that existing heating systems operate at maximum efficiency to lessons from Ireland's national retrofitting scheme launched in February.

Weekly Economics Podcast
How did the British Empire write the rules of today's economy?

Weekly Economics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 49:50


Outside of the frenzied headlines about woke warriors cancelling Jane Austen and stately homes, we're living in a period of renewed consideration of Britain's colonial history. The British Empire began before the English Civil War, and shaped our country for 400 years. At its height, it covered almost a quarter of the entire world's population. Beyond statues and street names, how is the empire still shaping our lives today? Ayeisha is joined by Dr Kojo Koram, lecturer in law at Birkbeck and author of Uncommon Wealth: Britain and the Aftermath of Empire. - Grab a copy of the book here: https://www.hachette.co.uk/titles/kojo-koram/uncommon-wealth/9781529338652/ - Further reading from Perry Anderson here: https://www.versobooks.com/authors/81-perry-anderson - And from Tom Nairn here: https://www.versobooks.com/authors/821-tom-nairn - More from Kojo here: https://www.plutobooks.com/9780745342047/empires-endgame/ ----- Researched by Margaret Welsh. Produced by Becky Malone. Music by Poddington Bear under Creative Commons license. Enjoying the show? Tweet us your comments and questions @NEF! The New Economics Podcast is brought to you by the New Economics Foundation. Find out more at www.neweconomics.org

Weekly Economics Podcast
Who owns the internet?

Weekly Economics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 46:25


What do you get the guy who has everything? A 44 billion dollar social media platform apparently. Elon Musk has already been accused of union busting, shot a car into space, and become the world's richest man. So what's next on his to-do list? Buying Twitter of course! From Mark Zuckerberg to Elon Musk, should we be worried that our online lives are in the hands of a few super-rich men? Will cryptocurrencies and Web3 make the internet good again? And what would a people-powered internet really look like? Ayeisha is joined by Dr James Muldoon, senior lecturer in political science at the University of Exeter and Head of Digital Research at the Autonomy think tank. You can grab a copy of James' book Platform Socialism: How to Reclaim our Digital Future from Big Tech here: http://www.plutobooks.com/9780745346977/platform-socialism/ ----- Researched by Margaret Welsh. Produced by Becky Malone. Music by Poddington Bear under Creative Commons license. Enjoying the show? Tweet us your comments and questions @NEF! The New Economics Podcast is brought to you by the New Economics Foundation. Find out more at www.neweconomics.org

Politics Weekly
Brexit is back …

Politics Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 32:56


Rafael Behr stands in for John Harris this week and is joined by Gavin Barwell, the former Conservative MP and chief of staff to Theresa May, and Miatta Fahnbulleh, the chief executive of the New Economics Foundation. With tensions resurfacing over the Brexit arrangements across the Northern Ireland border, is the UK government capable of finding a solution with EU leaders? And Keir Starmer took a political gamble this week – will it pay off?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/politicspod

World Business Report
Prince Charles delivers UK Queen's Speech

World Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 26:13


Opening Parliament on the Queen's behalf, Prince Charles announced several economic plans. But like so many other countries, the UK faces a cost of living crisis, and none of the government bills introduced directly address the problems caused by high inflation. We get reaction to what was outlined from Miatta Fahnbulleh, who is chief executive of the New Economics Foundation, and hear about the challenges faced by the nation's poorest people from Charlotte White, manager of Earlsfield Food Bank. Also in the programme, a former employee of Facebook's parent company Meta has filed a lawsuit in Kenya alleging that poor working conditions for outsourced content moderators violate the country's constitution. Billy Perrigo from Time magazine has been investigating the issue, and fills us in on the details. The BBC's Nikhil Inamdar reports on the challenge of large scale tree planting projects in India, which aim to reduce carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, but may not be going according to plan. Plus, a portrait of Marilyn Monroe by Andy Warhol has sold in New York for $195m, making it the most valuable piece of 20th century art to date. Jessica Beck is a curator at the Andy Warhol museum in Pittsburgh, and tells us what makes the portrait so valuable. Today's edition is presented by Joshua Thorpe, and produced by Ivana Davidovic and George Thomas.

The Hydrogen Podcast
Shining The Hydrogen Light On The UK's Energy Crisis And NREL Just Said Solar Thermal Chemical Hydrogen. Find Out Why That Is Remarkable

The Hydrogen Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 9:27 Transcription Available Very Popular


Welcome to The Hydrogen Podcast!In episode 113, Energy suppliers in the UK want hydrogen to replace natural gas. And a new technology from NREL could be the game changer we've all been waiting for to make cheap green hydrogen. All this on today's hydrogen podcast. Thank you for listening and I hope you enjoy the podcast. Please feel free to email me at info@thehydrogenpodcast.com with any questions. Also, if you wouldn't mind subscribing to my podcast using your preferred platform... I would greatly appreciate it. Respectfully,Paul RoddenVISIT THE HYDROGEN PODCAST WEBSITEhttps://thehydrogenpodcast.comCHECK OUT OUR BLOGhttps://thehydrogenpodcast.com/blog/WANT TO SPONSOR THE PODCAST? Send us an email to: info@thehydrogenpodcast.comNEW TO HYDROGEN AND NEED A QUICK INTRODUCTION?Start Here: The 6 Main Colors of Hydrogen

Weekly Economics Podcast
What did Covid-19 reveal about how our economy is really run?

Weekly Economics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 45:29


In the early months of the pandemic, the government shut down whole sectors of the economy and started paying the wages of a huge proportion of Brits. Some worked from home, juggling homeschooling their kids and figuring out how to use Zoom. Others risked their health to travel to work. Meanwhile Big Tech and outsourcing companies raked in money through government contracts. What can we learn from moments when the predictable rules of economic life are suspended? Who wins and who loses in these points of crisis? And has the pandemic pushed us into a new form of capitalism? Ayeisha is joined by Sahil Dutta and Nick Taylor, lecturers in political economy at Goldsmiths University to discuss their new book "Unprecedented? How Covid-19 revealed the politics of our economy" - The book written alongside Will Davies and Martina Tazzioli is out now: https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/691630/unprecedented-by-william-davies-sahil-jai-dutta-nick-taylor-and-martina-tazzioli/ - Find out more about Sahil and Nick's work here: https://www.perc.org.uk/ - Further reading on the care crisis and coronavirus by Emma Dowling here: https://www.versobooks.com/books/4031-the-care-crisis ----- Researched by Margaret Welsh. Produced by Becky Malone. Music by C. Scott and Poddington Bear under Creative Commons license. Enjoying the show? Tweet us your comments and questions @NEF! The New Economics Podcast is brought to you by the New Economics Foundation. Find out more at www.neweconomics.org

The FS Club Podcast
Nature As The Next Wave

The FS Club Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 47:17


Find out more on our website: https://bit.ly/3EN2ZVF The global economy is 100% dependent on nature, but nature has been historically mis-valued, and its economic benefits inequitably distributed. Nature has surged from the margins of market consideration to become a significant factor in assessing physical and transition risk. This session will explore this development and its implications for the investment community, given a slew of new initiatives like the Task Force on Nature related Financial Disclosure, new markets such as nature based solutions linked to voluntary carbon markets and the emergence of biodiversity credit markets, new instruments such as nature performance sovereign bonds, new supporting business such as those emerging to deliver finance relevant data, and new, frameworks and policy developments such as those being advanced by the work of the Taskforce on Nature Markets. Speakers: Dr Simon Zadek is Chair of Finance for Biodiversity, Director of Migrant Nation, and Senior Advisor to the Task Force on Nature Related Financial Disclosure. He was Head, Secretariat, UN Secretary General's Task Force on Digital Financing of the Sustainable Development Goals, Senior Advisor on Finance in the office of the UN Secretary General, and Co-Director of UNEP's Finance Inquiry. He co-Chaired China's Green Finance Task Force, and led the Green Finance Study Group secretariat under the Chinese, German and Argentinian G20 Presidencies. Prior to this, he was Senior Advisor to the World Economic Forum and the Global Green Growth Institute, founder and CEO of the international think tank, AccountAbility and Development Director of the New Economics Foundation. He was Visiting Professor at the Singapore Management University and the Copenhagen Business School, and has been a senior fellow at Tsinghua School of Economics and Management, Harvard`s Kennedy School of Government, and the University of Southern Africa. He has worked with many corporations, governments and multi stakeholder initiatives on their sustainability and broader strategies, been a member of the International Advisory Board of Generation Investment Management, and has published extensively, including the award winning book, The Civil Corporation. Dr Vian Sharif's work centres on driving the development of innovative technology solutions to catalyse the shift to more sustainable capital allocations with a focus on the natural environment. She is the founder of ESG nature insights fintech platform NatureAlpha, and heads sustainability at financial investment technology firm FNZ. Her work includes collaborating with academics at Cambridge and Oxford Universities on the development of science-based insights for investor decision-making with a focus on nature risk and impact, including the Benchmark for Nature Project, the Cambridge AI for the study of Environmental Risks Centre and as a guest researcher at the Oxford Martin School. Prior to this she spent over a decade in the global asset management industry. As part of a number of governmental and international sustainability advisory groups, she was a guest researcher at the Oxford Martin School, Member of the Taskforce for Nature Related Financial Disclosures Technical Experts Group and the U.K. Government's Business Advisory group to the Convention on Biological Diversity. Vian holds a PhD in environmental behaviour change, and a masters degree from Cambridge University.

Weekly Economics Podcast
What does the Sunak scandal tell us about our tax system?

Weekly Economics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 34:51


A few weeks ago the chancellor presided over a spring budget which ushered in the fastest drop in living standards on record, as he told us that we “can't protect everyone”. But this week it was revealed that his wife has avoided paying around £20 million in tax, due to her non-dom status. Accused of “rank hypocrisy” by Keir Starmer, Rishi Sunak's popularity has certainly been dented. The Sunak family hasn't broken the law - but what does that say about the laws that govern who has to pay tax? What's wrong with our tax system, when the chancellor can raise taxes on working people on one hand, and benefit from tax avoidance on the other? And what would fairer taxes really look like? Ayeisha is joined by Tom Peters, head of advocacy at Tax Justice UK. ----- Researched by Margaret Welsh. Produced by David Powell. Music by Poddington Bear under Creative Commons license. Enjoying the show? Tweet us your comments and questions @NEF! The New Economics Podcast is brought to you by the New Economics Foundation. Find out more at www.neweconomics.org

Politics Weekly
Will privilege and parties sink the Tories?

Politics Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 31:45


In a week when the Metropolitan police fined the former Cabinet Office's director of ethics for attending a lockdown party, and Tory MP David Warburton faces allegations of sexual harassment and cocaine use, John Harris is joined by the Guardian's Zoe Williams, and Miatta Fahnbulleh from the New Economics Foundation to talk about the return of a perception of sleaze and excess in the party. Plus, as Rishi Sunak's popularity plunges after the spring statement, Miatta, who knows him personally, gives insight into where he has gone wrong.. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/politicspod

Adrian Goldberg's Talk Show
IPPC CLIMATE REPORT PREVIEW

Adrian Goldberg's Talk Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 30:10


Chaitanya Kumar, Head of Environment and Green Transition at the New Economics Foundation, tells Adrian Goldberg what's at stake when the new IPCC Climate Report is published. Made in Birmingham by Adrian Goldberg and Harvey White. (First broadcast on Byline Radio on 4 April 2022)

Weekly Economics Podcast
The UK's response to the refugee crisis

Weekly Economics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 33:00


Since the start of the war in Ukraine, over 4 million people have fled the country. Earlier this month Priti Patel announced a visa application centre had been established en route to Calais for Ukrainians trying to come to the UK. But the centre never existed. Days later, the Home Office said it was actually in Lille, but would not reveal where. Officials then claimed that refugees in Calais could get free Eurostar tickets to travel to the centre - despite the fact that the Eurostar does not stop in Calais. A day later the centre was moved from Lille to a town 30 miles away. Why has the government response been so chaotic? What are the barriers for refugees travelling to the UK? And with an anti-refugee bill moving through Parliament, what does this mean for how we treat refugees in the future? Ayeisha is joined by Bella Sankey, director of Detention Action. Find out more about Detention Action and how you can support its work here: https://detentionaction.org.uk/ ----- Researched by Margaret Welsh. Produced by Becky Malone. Music by Ketsa and Poddington Bear under Creative Commons license. Enjoying the show? Tweet us your comments and questions @NEF! The New Economics Podcast is brought to you by the New Economics Foundation. Find out more at www.neweconomics.org

BYLINE TIMES PODCAST
IPPC CLIMATE REPORT PREVIEW

BYLINE TIMES PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 30:10


Chaitanya Kumar, Head of Environment and Green Transition at the New Economics Foundation, tells Adrian Goldberg what's at stake when the new IPCC Climate Report is published.Made in Birmingham by Adrian Goldberg and Harvey White.(First broadcast on Byline Radio on 4 April 2022) See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jacobin Radio
A World to Win: The War on the Poor w/ Alfie Stirling

Jacobin Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2022 31:29


This week, Grace and Alfie Stirling, Chief Economist of the New Economics Foundation, dissect the UK Chancellor's spring statement. It looks set to contain very few of the measures that would be necessary to tackle the cost of living crisis, which we discussed last week with Gary Stevenson. Rishi Sunak will say there's no money left to support people forced to choose between eating and heating—but have the Tories grossly underestimated the extent of this crisis, and will it come back to bite them?Check out NEF's report on the subject here: https://neweconomics.org/2022/03/23-4-million-people-unable-to-afford-the-cost-of-livingA World to Win is a podcast from Grace Blakeley and Tribune bringing you a weekly dose of socialist news, theory and action with guests from around the world. Thanks to our producer Conor Gillies and to the Lipman-Miliband Trust for making this episode possible. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Politics Weekly
Did Rishi Sunak deliver? (spoiler: no)

Politics Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 24, 2022 36:26


On the day of Rishi Sunak's spring statement, Robin Burgess from the Hope Centre in Northampton tells Guardian political columnist John Harris just how desperate the cost of living situation is. John is also joined by Miatta Fahnbulleh, the chief executive of the New Economics Foundation, and David Gauke, former chief secretary to the Treasury, to discuss why the Tories seem resistant to helping those most in need. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/politicspod

A World to Win with Grace Blakeley
The War on the Poor w/ Alfie Stirling

A World to Win with Grace Blakeley

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 31:30


Grace and Alfie Stirling, Chief Economist of the New Economics Foundation, dissect the UK Chancellor's spring statement. it looks set to contain very few of the measures that would be necessary to tackle the cost of living crisis (which we discussed last week with Gary Stevenson). Rishi Sunak will say there's no money left to support people forced to choose between eating and heating, but have the Tories grossly underestimated the extent of this crisis, and will it come back to bite them? Check out NEF's report on the subject here: https://neweconomics.org/2022/03/23-4-million-people-unable-to-afford-the-cost-of-livingYou can support our work on the show by becoming a patron. Thanks to our producer Conor Gillies and to the Lipman-Miliband Trust for making this episode possible.

Weekly Economics Podcast
Are fossil fuels funding the war in Ukraine?

Weekly Economics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2022 40:05


At the time of recording, hundreds, and possibly thousands, of civilians have been killed during Russia's invasion of Ukraine, and more than 2.5m Ukranians have fled the country. The Russian army has been accused of war crimes after bombing a maternity hospital in the south. Allies of the Ukrainian president say that Russia will only back down if Europe bans the import of Russian oil and gas. But what do oil and gas have to do with the war in Ukraine? Will banning Russian fossil fuels really make Putin reconsider? And what does all this mean for soaring energy bills in the UK? Ayeisha is joined by Svitlana Romanko, Ukrainian environmental lawyer, climate activist and strategist, and spokesperson for Stand With Ukraine, and Tessa Khan, Founder and Director of Uplift, and previous guest of the podcast. - You can sign on to the Stand with Ukraine campaign here: https://www.with-ukraine.org/ - Find out more about the Putin100 campaign: https://putin100.org/#why - Read the IEA's 10-Point Plan to Reduce the European Union's Reliance on Russian Natural Gas: https://www.iea.org/reports/a-10-point-plan-to-reduce-the-european-unions-reliance-on-russian-natural-gas - Write to your MP ahead of the spring statement to demand a Great Homes Upgrade: https://greathomesupgrade.org/campaigns/call-for-a-great-homes-upgrade-this-budget - Find out more about the Beyond Oil & Gas Alliance: https://beyondoilandgasalliance.com/ - More on the The Global Gas & Oil Network here: https://ggon.org/ - Endorse the Fossil fuel non-proliferation treaty: https://fossilfueltreaty.org/ - Visit the Reclaim Finance website: https://reclaimfinance.org/site/en/home/ - Follow Stop Cambo on Twitter: https://twitter.com/StopCambo - Tessa can be found at https://twitter.com/tessakhan ----- Researched by Margaret Welsh. Produced by Becky Malone. Music by Chris Zabriskie and Poddington Bear under Creative Commons license. Enjoying the show? Tweet us your comments and questions @NEF! The New Economics Podcast is brought to you by the New Economics Foundation. Find out more at www.neweconomics.org

Weekly Economics Podcast
Tackling the cost of living crisis

Weekly Economics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 7, 2022 44:21


2022 has been dubbed the ‘year of the squeeze' by the Resolution Foundation. In April, soaring energy bills will collide with tax increases for working people. Last month grocery prices rose at their fastest rate in eight years, and inflation is at its highest level in almost three decades. When the media talk about the ‘cost of living crisis', what do they mean? How did we end up in a country with more food banks than branches of McDonalds? And what can the government do to make sure everyone can afford life's essentials? Ayeisha is joined by NEF's Alfie Stirling and Sabine Goodwin, coordinator of the Independent Food Aid Network (IFAN). Some of the clips used in this episode are from IFAN members, supporting people in food banks across the country. Thanks to Mairi McCallum, Joyce Leggate, Charlotte White, Betty Grant and Rajesh Makwana for sharing your experiences with us. - If you'd like to get involved in NEF's campaign for income support, head over to the Living Income website: https://livingincome.org.uk/ - Read Pushed to the Edge: poverty, food banks and mental health, a new report by Tom Pollard and co-produced with the IFAN and the Joseph Rowntree Foundation: https://www.foodaidnetwork.org.uk/blog/mental-health ----- Researched by Margaret Welsh. Produced by Becky Malone. Music by Chris Zabriskie and Poddington Bear under Creative Commons license. Enjoying the show? Tweet us your comments and questions @NEF! The New Economics Podcast is brought to you by the New Economics Foundation. Find out more at www.neweconomics.org

Weekly Economics Podcast
Tackling the energy crisis

Weekly Economics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 21, 2022 41:21


Families are bracing for less and less money to get by as energy bills rise this spring. In the fifth richest country in the world, pensioners are skipping meals so they can afford their heating bills, and parents are only switching the heating on when their children are at home. At the same time, fossil fuel companies like BP and Shell made their biggest profit in years. What do these two things have to do with each other? Why are energy bills soaring? And what can the government do to make sure everyone can afford to heat their homes? We're no longer the Weekly Economics Podcast because episodes will now be coming to you every fortnight. But as always we'll be discussing the more important economic issues with a variety of interesting voices. For the first episode of the New Economics Podcast, Ayeisha is joined by Dr Joseph Baines, senior lecturer in international political economy at King's College London and Abby Jitendra, principal policy manager on energy at Citizens Advice. -If you're worried about paying your energy bills, you can get in touch with Citizens Advice on their website: https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/ -To get involved in NEF's campaign to retrofit Britain's cold and draughty homes, head over to the Great Homes Upgrade website: https://greathomesupgrade.org/ ----- Researched by Margaret Welsh. Produced by Becky Malone. Music by Bobby Richards and Poddington Bear under Creative Commons license. Enjoying the show? Tweet us your comments and questions @NEF! The New Economics Podcast is brought to you by the New Economics Foundation. Find out more at www.neweconomics.org

Bloomberg Westminster
The Agony and the Energy (with Tim Loughton MP)

Bloomberg Westminster

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 3, 2022 22:46


Conservative MP Tim Loughton says Boris Johnson isn't going quietly and 'dragging out the agony' will cause more damage. On energy, he says surging prices won't be a 'flash in the pan' but the Conservatives aren't to blame. Plus Bloomberg Westminster's Caroline Hepker and Yuan Potts speak to Dublin Bureau Chief Morwenna Coniam on the Northern Ireland Protocol breaking down. And Lydia Prieg from the New Economics Foundation on why the National Insurance hike is a bad idea. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Farmerama
71: Continuous Cropping, Land For Who and the Magic of Woodchip

Farmerama

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2022 28:48


In this month's episode, we bring you three conversations with farmers and researchers who spoke at this year's Oxford Real Farming Conference. First, we hear from John Letts - a wheat grower and crop developer living in Buckinghamshire, known for growing heritage grains. He joins us to explain Continuous cropping, something that got a lot of attention this year at the ORFC. Next, we speak to Frances Northrop, who works for the New Economics Foundation and is an associate fellow specialising in local economies. Frances talks to us about a project she worked on last year called 'Land for Who'. She also explores the concept of 'new municipalism' - a global political movement that is all about ordinary citizens claiming power in their local and city governments - and how this relates to land. Finally, we catch up with Ben Raskin to talk about his new book.‘The Woodchip Handbook' delves into the magic and potential of woodchip not only as a mulch but also as a way of building soil health and fertility through beneficially increasing the fungal content of the soil. This episode of Farmerama was made by Jo Barratt, Abby Rose and Olivia Oldham. A big thanks to the rest of the farmerama team - Katie Revell, Annie Landless, Eliza Jenkins, Fran Bailey and Dora Taylor.

exhaustedtoextraordinary's podcast
How to Be Happier at Work — In Just 7 Minutes with Nic Marks

exhaustedtoextraordinary's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 10:18


Why you've got to check out today's episode: My guest this week is Nic Marks who claims that, “Happiness is a serious business and businesses who take it seriously do better. Happier teams are more productive, more innovative, and have less churn.” Find out what it takes. Resources/Links: Take the FREE personal happiness at work test: https://fridayone.com Watch the video of this episode: https://bit.ly/extrapod   Summary Being a good leader means having a happy team which means creating the right environment for people to flourish. Nic Marks has been working in the field of happiness, wellbeing and quality of life for over 25 years, with a particular emphasis on measurement and how to create positive change.  In 2001 he founded the award-winning Centre for Wellbeing at the London-based think tank the New Economics Foundation. Over the next decade Nic and his team were highly influential in the UK and global policy arena. This included the world's first global measure of sustainable wellbeing – the Happy Planet Index - and the very popular Five Ways to Wellbeing. The latter were designed to be the mental health equivalent of five fruit and vegetables a day. They have since been used very widely in the UK and globally as a framework for promoting positive mental health.

Accidental Gods
Your money or our lives: Economics, Green New Deal and a post-COP world with James Meadway

Accidental Gods

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 65:40


Dr James Meadway is an economist whose work has focused on developing viable alternatives to neoliberalism, and has published widely on democratic ownership, environmental economics, and automation and the digital economy.He was previously economic advisor to John McDonnell when he was Shadow Chancellor, and was chief economist at the New Economics Foundation. He is currently writing a book on the British economy after the 2008 crisis, and appears regularly on broadcast media as a commentator on UK politics.James holds a PhD in economics from the University of London, masters degrees in economics and economic history, and a BSc in economics and economic history from LSE. He has taught at SOAS, City, Cambridge and Sussex Universities.In this episode, we explore the repercussions of the COP26 climate talks in Glasgow and how the world might respond - in particular, how we might respond as individuals, and as communities. LinksJames in the New Statesman: Why a green state is not enough to compensate for bad capitalists: https://www.newstatesman.com/ideas/2021/11/is-a-green-state-the-answer-to-the-climate-crisisJames just after the 2019 election: https://novaramedia.com/2019/12/17/labours-economic-plans-what-went-wrong/Aditya Chakrobortty in the Guardian: https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/nov/11/green-new-deal-bad-idea-policy-left-joe-biden-john-mcdonnell

Weekly Economics Podcast
Closing the Covid-19 vaccination gap

Weekly Economics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 45:35


Coronavirus cases are once again rising in Europe and across the world. The World Health Organisation has said that countries shouldn't be giving out booster jabs for the rest of the year, but in the UK we're offering third shots to people as young as 40. Meanwhile, only 3% of people in low-income countries have had a single dose. Covid vaccines may have prevented hundreds of thousands of deaths in the UK, but who is missing out on the global vaccine rollout? Why can't poorer countries get hold of the Covid vaccine? And how can we change the rules of our international economy so that everyone is protected during the pandemic? For the last episode of the series, Ayeisha is joined by Achal Prabhala, writer, researcher, and coordinator of the AccessIBSA project, and Saiorse Fitzpatrick, advocacy manager at STOPAIDS. - Listen to a previous episode on vaccine nationalism with Miriam Brett and Tahir Amin https://neweconomics.org/2021/02/weekly-economics-podcast-vaccine-nationalism - Read more about the WTO proposal by India and South Africa to temporarily waive intellectual property on Covid-19 vaccines, treatments and related technologies. Talks on this due to take place in Geneva on the 30th November have now been postponed. https://www.twn.my/title2/intellectual_property/trips_waiver_proposal.htm - Support the People's Vaccine https://peoplesvaccine.org/ - Follow STOPAIDS on Twitter - the hashtag for the ice cream action Ayeisha mentioned in this episode is #Iscreamvaccine https://twitter.com/STOPAIDS - For more from Achal, head to the AccessIBSA website https://accessibsa.org/ - For more on Covid-19 vaccines, the TRIPS waiver and more, go to the Third World Network website https://www.twn.my/ ----- Researched by Margaret Welsh. Produced by Becky Malone. Music by Asthmatic Astronaut and Poddington Bear under Creative Commons license. Enjoying the show? Tweet us your comments and questions @NEF! The Weekly Economics Podcast is brought to you by the New Economics Foundation. Find out more at www.neweconomics.org

Weekly Economics Podcast
The future of work

Weekly Economics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 37:15


A record number of employees have quit their jobs in recent months, in what's been dubbed the Great Resignation. Newspapers report that it's part of post-Covid demand for flexible working and better work life balance. After last year, where up to a quarter of the UK workforce was paid not to work through the furlough scheme, are we reassessing our relationship to our jobs? How does work impact our health and sense of self? And should we improve our working conditions - or try to abolish work altogether? Ayeisha is joined by Amelia Horgan, assistant lecturer at the school of philosophy and art history, University of Essex, and author of Lost in Work. - Grab a copy of Amelia's book: https://www.plutobooks.com/9780745340913/lost-in-work/ - Listen back to past episodes on outsourcing and the impacts of the economy on mental health: https://neweconomics.org/section/podcasts - Read Ayeisha's piece for the second issue of the New Economics Zine: https://neweconomics.org/2020/10/this-is-your-brain-on-neoliberalism - Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex is available here: https://www.penguin.co.uk/books/103/1038399/the-second-sex/9780099595731.html - Find out more about Lauren Berlant's Cruel Optimism: https://www.dukeupress.edu/cruel-optimism - Take a look at the Antiwork subreddit here: https://www.reddit.com/r/antiwork/ - Read Capital Realism by Mark Fisher: https://bookshop.org/books/capitalist-realism-is-there-no-alternative/9781846943171 ----- Researched by Margaret Welsh. Produced by Becky Malone. Music by Poddington Bear under Creative Commons license. Enjoying the show? Tweet us your comments and questions @NEF! The Weekly Economics Podcast is brought to you by the New Economics Foundation. Find out more at www.neweconomics.org

Té con Gotas
[Exclusivo Patreons] Rehabilitación enerxética para o desenvolvemento local

Té con Gotas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 4:39


A semana pasada dedicámoslle un programa completo á cuestión do "retrofitting", é dicir, da rehabilitación enerxética. Para este Té Sen Gotas, queremos pararnos un pouco máis na relación entre un programa ambicioso de modernización do parque de vivenda e o "community wealth building", un concepto do que tamén falamos hai unhas semanas. Ademais, revisitamos as propostas da New Economics Foundation para entender que outras opcións máis aló das axudas directas se poden usar para fomentar que os propietarios renoven as súas vivendas.

Get A Better Broadcast, Podcast and Video Voice
0319 – Intonations In Different Languages

Get A Better Broadcast, Podcast and Video Voice

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 3:03


2021.11.15 – 0319 – Intonations In Different Languages INTONATIONS IN DIFFERENT LANGUAGESEach language has its intonation and some are more musical than others. In English, a wide range is used. In some instances, intonation carries the meaning of a phrase. For example, in question tags the intonation used can indicate whether the speaker is looking for agreement. It is important for speakers of other languages to be aware of intonation. If their language does not have the same range, they can sound monotonous or even bored when speaking English. Misunderstandings can also arise between speakers who are not aware of the intonation of the other person's mother tongue. EXERCISES A series of scripts for you to use to exercise your marking up and intonation skills.· A centre-left think tank has proposed that a levy on frequent flyers should replace air passenger duty, which is charged on each ticket. Under the plan, a passenger's first holiday flight of the year would incur zero tax. But second and subsequent flights would attract progressively higher taxes. The New Economics Foundation believes this would not only curb emissions, but also make holidays cheaper for poorer households. · England's women beat India by 18 runs in last night's T20 match at Northampton. Today - England's men face Pakistan in the 2nd one-day international at Lords. · Three people have been killed and several injured in a church in the French city of Nice in what officials say was a terrorist attack. The attacker, who was shouting 'God is greatest' in Arabic, was shot by police and is being treated in hospital. The French authorities have raised the terrorist alert level.· The government says it has no plans to follow France in imposing a second national lockdown, despite evidence of a sharp rise in Covid-19 cases. Scientists at Imperial College London say the number of people in England catching the virus is doubling every nine days and is now around 96-thousand a day. · New figures show sixty per cent of contacts provided to NHS Test and Trace in England were reached and asked to isolate last week -- a performance unchanged from the previous week's low point. Performance for outbreaks managed by local health protection teams remained high at 97 per cent.· Rail companies are calling on the government to cut taxes on the electricity they use to power trains - and raise fuel taxes for airlines and motorists instead. They say this would encourage travellers to make greener choices because rail journeys cause less harm to the environment. Airlines say they're already paying the highest rate of Air Passenger Duty in Europe.· The Education Secretary, Gavin Williamson, has made last-minute changes to the way A-Level and GCSE results in England are to be decided - following the outcry in Scotland over estimated grades. He's to allow students an appeal so they can use their mock exam results for university places or jobs if they're better than their official grades. They can also opt to sit the exams in the autumn.Audio recording script and show notes (c) 2021 Peter Stewart Through these around-5-minute episodes, you can build your confidence and competence with advice on breathing and reading, inflection andprojection, the roles played by better scripting and better sitting, mic techniques and voice care tips... with exercises and anecdotes from a careerspent in TV and radio studios. If you're wondering about how to start a podcast, or have had one for a while - download every episode! And as themes develop over the weeks (that is, they are not random topics day-by-day), this is a free, course to help you GET A BETTERBROADCAST, PODCAST AND VIDEO VOICE. Look out for more details of the book during 2021. Contacts: https://linktr.ee/Peter_Stewart Peter has been around voice and audio all his working life and has trained hundreds of broadcasters in all styles of radio from pop music stations such as Capital FM and BBC Radio 1 to Heart FM, the classical music station BBC Radio 3 and regional BBC stations. He's trained news presenters on regional TV, the BBC News Channel and on flagship programmes such as the BBC's Panorama. Other trainees have been music presenters, breakfast show hosts, travel news presenters and voice-over artists. He has written a number of books on audio and video presentation and production (“Essential Radio Journalism”, “JournoLists”, two editions of “Essential Radio Skills” and three editions of “Broadcast Journalism”) and has written on voice and presentation skills in the BBC's in-house newspaper “Ariel”. Peter has presented hundreds of radio shows (you may have heard him on BBC Radio 2, BBC Radio 4, Virgin Radio or Kiss, as well as BBC regional radio) with formats as diverse as music-presentation, interview shows, ‘special' programmes for elections and budgets, live outside broadcasts and commentaries and even the occasional sports, gardening and dedication programmes. He has read several thousand news bulletins, and hosted nearly 2,000 podcast episodes, and is a vocal image consultant advising in all aspects of voice and speech training for presenters on radio and TV, podcasts and YouTube, voiceovers and videocalls. The podcast title refers to those who may wish to change their speaking voice in some way. It is not a suggestion that anyone should, or be pressured into needing to. We love accents and dialects, and are well aware that how we speak changes over time. The key is: is your voice successfully communicating your message, so it is being understood (and potentially being acted upon) by your target audience? This podcast is London-based and examples are spoken in the RP (Received Pronunciation) / standard-English / BBC English pronunciation, although invariably applicable to other languages, accents and dialects. Music credits:"Bleeping Demo" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 Licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/7012-bleeping-demoLicense: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license "Beauty Flow" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 Licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/5025-beauty-flowLicense: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license "Envision" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 Licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4706-envisionLicense: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license "Limit 70" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 Licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/5710-limit-70License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license "Rising Tide" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 Licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/5027-rising-tideLicense: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license "Wholesome" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 Licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/5050-wholesomeLicense: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Té con Gotas
64. Rehabilita a túa vivenda para salvar o planeta

Té con Gotas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 33:14


Esta semana falamos do concepto de "retrofit", é dicir, da rehabilitación de vivenda para mellorar a súa eficiencia enerxética. Este tema, que pode parecer moi seco, é unha porta aberta para reducir de xeito significativo as emisións de CO2 e, ao mesmo tempo, aforrar na factura da luz e crear milleiros de postos de traballo. Conversamos con Aydin Dikerdem, do think tank británico New Economics Foundation, e coordinador dunha campaña para promover un programa masivo de modernización da vivenda no Reino Unido. Ao outro lado do Atlántico entrevistamos a Elena Ampudia, decana do Colexio Oficial de Arquitectos de Galicia.

Intelligence Squared Business
It's The Economy - Ann Pettifor on Green Economics

Intelligence Squared Business

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 17:51


It's The Economy is an Intelligence Squared Business mini-series which breaks down the complex economic ideas we have all heard of but don't fully understand in under 15 minutes. In this episode host Nicola Walton speaks to Ann Pettifor, an economist perhaps best known for predicting the financial crisis of 2008. She is author of The Case for The Green New Deal, a fellow of the New Economics Foundation and a director of PRIME economics - a network of Keynesian macroeconomists. They discuss the green economy, green growth, impact investing and what industries can do to be more environmentally sustainable. It's The Economy is brought to you by Intelligence Squared and hosted by Nicola Walton, a financial journalist and author of ‘How To Report Economic News'. Executive Producer: Farah Jassat; Producer: Lovejit Dhaliwal; Technical Support: Mark Roberts and Catharine Hughes.  For updates on the show follow Intelligence Squared on Twitter (intelligence2) and Instagram (intelligencesquared). Let us know what you think by rating and reviewing Intelligence Squared Business on Apple Podcasts.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Mojo Sessions
EP 204: Nic Marks - A New and Refreshing View on Happiness at Work and at Play

The Mojo Sessions

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 9, 2021 64:07


Statistician Nic Marks, a fellow of the New Economics Foundation in London, asks why we measure success by productivity instead of by happiness & well-being. He developed The Happy Planet Index, a statistical method to measure, analyse and interpret happiness and then apply evidence to business, education, sustainability, healthcare and economics. He believes that our quality of life is measurable, and that true contentment comes not from the accumulation of material wealth but from our connection to others. How do we know what we are measuring in happiness is actually true? What is the best question to ask someone to get beyond the barriers to really know if they are happy? Is happiness the right metric? Is happiness the right measure or is there an argument that fulfilment is a better gauge?  Some of your research I heard has a 22% improvement in happiness why 22% not 23% or 21%? What is the association between productivity and happiness at work? Is the measure of productivity getting in the way of our genuine happiness at work? Where do happiness and wellness intersect? In Nic's first marriage he was very unhappy at home but happy at work. In hindsight what would he do differently? Nic overlooked red signals. What were the red signals and what should he have done in hindsight? Is Nic now happy? How does he know? Statistics keep Nic grounded. What personal statistics does he keep that allows him to stay grounded? As a kid Nic had a fascination with the power of two. Was that something that his Dad influenced? Nic was a self described very serious young man. How does he see himself today? As a statistician what has Nic discovered about being a man? How Manfred Max-Neef thrilled Nic with the idea that most people don't ask big enough questions. Does Nic see people setting rituals and routines to enable them to stay the course of this feeling of happiness?   LINKS   Nic Marks website https://nicmarks.org   Nic Marks TED Talk https://www.ted.com/talks/nic_marks_the_happy_planet_index   Friday Pulse https://fridaypulse.com   The Mojo Sessions website https://www.themojosessions.com   The Mojo Sessions on Patreon https://www.patreon.com/TheMojoSessions?fan_landing=true   The Mojo Sessions on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/TheMojoSessions/   Gary on Linked in https://www.linkedin.com/in/gary-bertwistle-helping-unlock-great-ideas-b5182011/   Gary on Twitter https://twitter.com/GaryBertwistle   The Mojo Sessions on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/themojosessions/   If you like what you hear, we'd be grateful for a review on iTunes -  click here. Happy listening!   © 2021 Gary Bertwistle.  All Rights Reserved.   Any products or companies discussed in the show are not paid endorsements. I am not sponsored by, nor do I have any professional or affiliate relationships of any kind with any of the companies or products highlighted in the show. It's just stuff I like, that I think is cool, that I want to share, and that I believe may be of interest to you as part of the Mojo crew.

The Schumacher Lectures
Neva Goodwin and Stewart Wallis in Conversation

The Schumacher Lectures

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 2, 2021 84:37


Neva Goodwin is co-founder and co-director of the Global Development And Environment Institute at Tufts University, where her projects have included editing a six-volume series, Frontier Issues in Economic Thought (published by Island Press) and a Michigan Press series, Evolving Values for a Capitalist World.  She has edited more than a dozen books, and is the lead author of three introductory textbooks: Microeconomics in Context, Macroeconomics in Context, and Principles of Economics in Context.Over the past decade Dr. Goodwin led the creation of a “social science library” called Frontier Thinking in Sustainable Development and Human Well-Being which contains nearly 10,000 full bibliographic references, representing seven social sciences, and including full text PDFs for a third of the referenced articles and book chapters.Stewart Wallis was the executive director of the New Economics Foundation, the UK's leading think tank for social, economic, and environmental justice, from 2003 through 2015.He graduated in Natural Sciences from Cambridge University and began his career in marketing and sales with Rio Tinto Zinc. After receiving a master's degree in business and economics at London Business School, Wallis spent seven years with the World Bank in Washington, DC, working on industrial and financial development in East Asia. He then spent nine years with Robinson Packaging (UK), the last five years as Managing Director leading a successful business turnaround.In 1992 he joined Oxfam as International Director, gradually assuming responsibility for 2500 staff in 70 countries and for all Oxfam's policy, research, development, and emergency work worldwide. In 2002 he was awarded Officer of the British Empire (OBE) for service to Oxfam.Stewart Wallis is also a board member of the New Economy Coalition (USA), Vice-Chair for the World Economic Forum's Global Agenda Council on Values, and Trustee of the Forum's Inclusive Growth Global Challenge. His expertise includes global governance, functioning of markets, links between development and environmental agendas, the future of capitalism, and the moral economy.

The Lightning Round
Episode 33: The Made Up Episode

The Lightning Round

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2020 55:45


Dan and Al get behind their microphones to recap their equally lit Halloween weekends (1:06) before discussing some of their favorite Halloween memories from years past (11:18). The duo discuss the Dodgers winning the World Series, Justin Turner's positive COVID test and the Vikings success against the Packers (16:05). After a short sports recap, Dan and Al draft the top four things that feel made up or fake to them (24:57). Dan offers up his latest Bachelorette takes (43:18) and the two round out the episode with a round of the Overrated/Underrated game (47:22). Link to the New Economics Foundation study. Intro/Outro: “Pantyhose” by TV GirlFrom the Free Music Archive CC BY NC 4.0

The Leadership Hacker Podcast
Hacking Happiness with Nic Marks

The Leadership Hacker Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2020 44:19


Nic Marks is the special guest on show 18. He is the CEO and founder of Friday Pulse, Statistician, Happiness Expert, and Ted Speaker. Learn from Nic about: What happiness is and how to measure it How feelings and emotions come before cognition Why some nations and people are happier than others What leadership activities increase happiness in the workforce How human appreciation increases happiness in us all Follow us and explore our social media tribe from our Website: https://leadership-hacker.com Music: " Upbeat Party " by Scott Holmes courtesy of the Free Music Archive FMA Transcript: Thanks to Jermaine Pinto at JRP Transcribing for being our Partner. Contact Jermaine via LinkedIn or via his site JRP Transcribing Services Find out more about Nic Marks Below:  www.fridaypulse.com Connect with Nic on LinkedIn Follow Nic on Twitter https://nicmarks.org   Full Transcript Below:    ----more----   Steve Rush: Some call me Steve, dad, husband or friend. Others might call me boss, coach or mentor. Today you can call me The Leadership Hacker.   Thanks for listening in. I really appreciate it. My job as the leadership hacker is to hack into the minds, experiences, habits and learning of great leaders, C-Suite executives, authors and development experts so that I can assist you developing your understanding and awareness of leadership. I am Steve Rush and I am your host today. I am the author of Leadership Cake. I am a transformation consultant and leadership coach. I cannot wait to start sharing all things leadership with you.   Joining me on today's show is CEO and founder of Friday Pulse. Statistician, happiness expert, and Ted speaker, its Nic Marks. Before we get to speak with Nic, It is The Leadership Hacker News.   The Leadership Hacker News   Steve Rush: In our role as leaders, we have likely to have made some significant decisions of late. Our approach to making decisions will vary from individual to individual and while some considered and thoughtful strategic decisions would have absolutely been a must at work, recent research has found using a coin toss to decide major life decisions may ultimately make you happier. The new study has found overall happiness increased after a six-month period. The study titled, The Review of Economic Studies published in the Oxford University press also found that people that rely on a coin toss to make a decision are more likely to follow through with their choice and be more satisfied as a result. To find out the impact of using a coin toss economist Professor Steven Levitt from the university of Chicago, asked people to make important decisions such as whether to quit a job, move home, end a relationship or quit smoking using affirmative and negative assigned to either heads or tails of a coin.   Users were also asked to include their own questions such as, Should I get a tattoo? And prior to the coin toss, volunteers were also instructed to help identify third party judicators to verify the outcomes and assessed independently the results. After two months participants and their third party judicators were asked to conduct a survey; which found that participants favoured the status quo, making a change less frequently than they would predicted they would before the coin toss, according to phys.org. However, a further study conducted after six months found that this bias towards the status quo had gone, according to the six month survey. Those who were interested to make certain changes regarding major decisions were more likely to do so, and be happier as a result. Participants also said that they were more likely to make the same decision if they were to choose again.   According to the researchers, the findings were inconsistent with the conventional theory of choice, which states that people who are on the margins should on average report equal happiness, regardless of where they made the decisions. Professor Levitt said, society teaches us quitters, never win and winners never quit. But in reality, the data from his experiment suggests we would all be better off if we did more quitting. He went on to say, “a good rule of thumb in decision making is whenever you cannot decide what you should do choose the action that represents change rather than continue with the status quo”. The leadership lesson here is, we often get stuck in change and we're not sure on which direction to take, and whilst tossing a coin might give us a yes or a no to a certain direction. Does that change really bring something new? So that's been The Leadership Hacker News. We would really encourage you to share with us your insights, ideas, and funny stories around leadership, leaders around the world. Please get in touch.   Start of Podcast   Steve Rush: I am joined on today's show with Nic Marks. He is the CEO and creator of Friday Pulse. He is an author, Ted speaker and a statistician. Nic, welcome to The Leadership Hacker Podcast.   Nic Marks: Thank you very much, Steve.   Steve Rush: So statistician, numbers, I guess that must have started at an early age for it to become such a big feature in your life? Tell us a little bit about that.   Nic Marks: Yeah, there is a lot of syllables in that word as well isn't there statistician? I just was, I was good at maths and was not very interested in much else at school. I mean, I did my A- levels with double mass Physics and half of Physics is mass as well. It was sort of I could do, and therefore, you know, I was top, of the year at school, pretty much all the way through and pretty much ended up at Cambridge reading mass before I made a decision about anything and actually ended up not liking maths at Cambridge. Because it is very, very pure and therefore discovering, I was really an applied statistician. I liked using numbers to solve problems rather than the sort of abstractness of mathematics, which is what you get into in that space. So yeah, was kind of, what I was good at.   Steve Rush: So the fascination really was not just about the patterns and the numbers, but actually how can you use these numbers in a positive way and how can I apply them in doing something that is relevant for people?   Nic Marks: Yeah, that was the big eye-opener. When I started sort of solving things, particularly on health statistics, you know, they start setting you problems to solve maybe in A-level and anything that sort of had a bit more human side to it. I got quite, I enjoyed those questions more and that is what I was actually able to do at Cambridge. I was able to switch into an applied statistics course and you know we did sort of industrial psychology and Queuing Theory. I accused even now if I get in a queue and I can see it is badly organized. That put me in a rage and it is partly my Queuing Theory sort of ideas, but yeah, so anything, it was very practical I got interested in.   Steve Rushs: And even more so, during lockdown where there are queue everywhere, I should imagine for you particularly that is really challenging, Right?   Nic Marks: Well actually, what I don't like about queue is when they're not fair, I don't mind a fair queue, and actually the lockdown queue are very fair, aren't they, you know, you're standing there in order and you let older people pass if you're a certain time or key workers and that all seems very fair. What I really hate is like when you come into an airport and you're queuing up and there's a big queue at the, you know, the passport control and you know, one, they haven't put enough people on, but then you can't see if the front of your queue has got one or two people on it. And so the queue go at different rates and you always end up in this lower queue. In fact, you are statistically more likely to end up in this lower queue anyway, and then it feels unfair. And I once actually had an argument with passport control guy, not an argument as a discussion. I said to him, you know, why don't you queue up in a snake? And he said, Oh, actually it makes the average queuing time go up, which is a very fair thing. And I said to him, well, the problem is the experience of queuing is related to the standard deviation, not the mean and he looked at me and went…   Steve Rush: I should imagine that when down well?   Nic Marks: …Can you put that in writing please? My kids were very embarrassed.   Steve Rush: And who would have known that queues have so much applied maths behind it; Which I guess if you look around society that we are in, there are maths and numbers behind everything.   Nic Marks: I mean, totally. I mean, if you do marketing these days, digital marketing, you've got a lot of queuing theory and mathematics in there and about friction and flow and the way you model it. There is so many ways that at least a sort of A-level understanding of mass can really, really help you. I don't think you need to go much beyond that, but well obviously some people do, but it is very interesting to me anyway.   Steve Rush: So beyond University, then you started applying your learned mathematics, what happened next?   Nic Marks: I did a Masters and then I joined a consultancy. Anderson consulting who sort of now called Accenture and did programming and things like that. I quit really, when I realized they were going to sort of move me around the country to wherever they wanted me to work. And I just got engaged and was in London and didn't really want to move around. And I also started to make more choices in my life. I mean I think some people, this comes earlier, but I started thinking actually, what do I really want to work on? And I went to work for sustainability, environmental investment company, and I started getting more interested in things which were sort of, as I say, sort of more socially useful statistics. Yeah, and I did that for a bit, but I also had a slightly kooky side, but slightly different side. I got very into sort of personal development and I used to go to sort of men's encounter groups. Cause I did not really quite understand how to be a man in the world. I found slightly misogynists, and so I just started exploring all that. And the reason for that really was my mum was a therapist and in the end I trained as a therapist as well as do math statistics, which sort of makes for, I think, a very creative mix, but then unusual mix anyway,   Steve Rush: So that creative mixture you now have, has smudged that psychotherapy and your statistician background together to create what you do now. The last 12-15 years of your life. You have been really focusing on the whole principle of happiness and how we can be more focused and understand some of the metrics and numbers that sit behind happiness. Tell us a little bit. About how that came about?   Nic Marks: Yeah, it started in about 2001. I was doing some other work with a think tank in London called New Economics Foundation. And the director then director said to me, Nic, there is this word called wellbeing coming into public policy and no one knows what it means. And can you help us, he said drive some meaning under the word? And I being a statistician, I said, well, I'd like to know how we could measure it because then, you know, policy makers might take it seriously. So we started a project which eventually became my whole work, and it became something called a centre for wellbeing, but we even started to create metrics around wellbeing that was useful for local, national, and international agencies about people's experiences with life effectively. And some people in the field were already calling that happiness and I shy away from that for a while because it sounded a bit light for the government policy.   But I started to realize that it was a much more attractive word than wellbeing and also more relatable. Ultimately, you know, whether we enjoy our lives or not in whatever basis we want to do, there is kind of, what it is about, so you know, and you can talk to anyone about whether they're happy or not. We can then discuss what that means and we can discuss, you know, whether we mean the same thing, but it makes a much more fruitful discussion, so that is kind of how I got into it. Yeah.   Steve Rush: It is really neat principle. The whole happiness thing that I have explored and there are a number of great authors that have written around the similar subject over the last sort of 10 or 15 years. It almost feels a little bit pink and fluffy and subjective, and I guess what you are seeking to do is to create some more objectivity so that leaders can be a bit more thoughtful of their personal impact around that. Would that be a kind of fair assumption?   Nic Marks: It is kind of fair, but I don't like… it is not you, but I don't like this sort of split between objective and subjective because our experience of life is sort of necessarily subjective. You know, we are the subject of that experience and actually, what a lot of statistics and data does is it objectifies things, so it will say we can measure your standard of life because we can see that and touch that. So we can touch your housing, your income, your whatever, we can measure that, but we don't know what you're feeling, so we can't measure that and actually that's not true. It is just a different type of measurement, and then you have to be careful about how you do it, but you can put numbers on it, and so there is a way we use the word subjective. Which makes it feel like it's very loose and it would change for everybody, but actually, whether people enjoy their lives or not is sort of gradable.   Steve Rush: Yeah, that makes those a sense actually. If somebody was to ask you, what does happiness mean? How would you describe it?   Nic Marks: Yeah, I have had various descriptions over the years, but so I often say its feeling good and doing well. And by that, I mean that it got a feeling element, but it's got a functional element to it and we use the word happiness very broadly in English language. So we use it as a sort of momentary feeling. I feel happy, but we also use it as what's tends to be called a cognitive assessment. You know, I feel happy with, or I am happy with, so we are sort of reflecting on a sort of judgment about something. And then there's a school of thought that thinks that happiness is a sort of capability that it's, you know, that knowing or feeding that I can deal with, anything is a feeling of happiness. It is sort of like a perceived resilience going forward that, you know, I can cope with things. So in that sense, I think that there is a functional element to an actually purely from a psychological perspective or a nuisance perspective than our feelings and emotions actually help us acts in the world. So there is a sort of, they are not just there as sort of a nice sensation actually motivate us to behave in certain ways. So that is how I tend to think of it as a, you know, feeling good and doing well.   But then there's another nuance, which I quite like, which goes actually right back to ancient Greek Philosophy, which is whether it's about pleasure and meaning. And the hedonist talk about pleasure and Aristotle and people had talked about, eudemonia thought about it as sort of meaning and virtue. Justified this idea that you can only know if you're happy when you're at the end of your life and you're looking back, which is quite harsh, but in a way I think it's both in the sense that if we have a life which is meaningful, but no fun, then we run out of energy quite quickly. And if it's all fun and pleasure and there's no meaning, then we sort of lose our way and we kind of need both of those parts and, they work in different timeframes and so there's a nice tension between them and a nice synergy between them. And obviously there are times when it get you in life, which, you know, you feel you've got lots of meaning, but no pleasure. And you can get yourself into a crisis about that. I mean, I been divorced and I have actually gotten a situation where my marriage was hugely meaningful to me, but I really did not enjoy it and that created a sort of crack in my life that I had to resolve. I think that way as well, so that's sort of two different ways of feeling good and doing well and pleasure and meaning.   Steve Rush: I quite like the whole principle of it is quite an emotional response as well isn't it. It is a personal response to what is going on around us, I guess.   Nic Mark: Yeah, Our feelings are very much about what is going on around us. They are sort of us, and our environment. In fact, the neuroscientist Antonio Damasio don't know, if you've ever read him. Have you read him?   Steve Rush: I have, I have.   Nic Marks: Have you read his most recent one? The strange order of things.   Steve Rush: Maybe give us a snippet from that.   Nic Marks: It is a funny title of a book, but basically he's talking about feelings and emotions come before cognition come before central nervous systems in our evolutionary history.   Steve Rush: Right.   Nic Markss: And, that they actually help us do three things, feelings. They help us monitor our environments. They help motivate us to act and they help us adjust those actions over time. And that first one of monitoring is sort of, you know, our feelings are actually, I have to say our feelings are data that they actually give us information about what's going on around us. And that's not just our feelings become emotions, but, you know, do we feel hot or cold? Do we feel hungry? Do we feel thirsty? It's basically telling us about, and it's motivating us to act in some sort of ways, but you know, our feeling of feeling frightened is that it feels like there's a danger out there and that we need to help avoid or get ourselves out of that threat. And we often have the feeling well before we have the cognition and that's really his argument is that the feeding comes first. Then we apply our intelligence to that feeling and deciding how we are going to act.   Steve Rush: And the cognition of course prevents us from doing crazy things, which is why the executive part of our brain slows down and stops in some cases what we will deal with those emotional reactions, of course.   Nic Marks: Yeah, I am not a total expert on the absolute specifics in it, but they absolutely are interconnected. Actually, even if you think about something positive, like happiness, which is a little bit of a sort of gateway word to a whole range of positive emotions. We can use the word very broadly, but then actually gets specifics. You know, some people would say, even if I say what happiness, mean to you? They will say contentment and other people will say joy. Contentment and joy quite different. Yeah, one is very high energy and one's quite low energy, and of course, there is actually a whole range of things in there. Like, you know, joy and enjoyment are different and amusement. And, you know, things like enjoyment, amusement, laughter are sort of very social and they are very about bonding with other people.   So when you're having a laugh with people or mucking around, you actually slow down…you shut down your executive decision making and your full intelligence because you're trying to bond, but it doesn't pay you to be your brightest, most sort of challenging self at that moment. You better to conform, so, you know, so actually, there are times when we are happy when, we are probably less intelligent, but there are other times, you know if we think about other forms of happiness, such as curiosity or interest, which are very engaging parts, that sort of positive emotion when we are absolutely fully using our intelligence. And I think it's sometimes why in business and organizations, people get worried about happiness. They try to think people be happy, clappy and not very bright. Well, there is certain forms of it, which that is true for, so they can point to it. But actually what they really want is people to be positive and safe, enthusiastic, and sometimes to have a laugh, but just maybe 5-10% of the time and other times we are doing other bits, so there's really this whole myriad of different positive emotions and we want to be agile and moving around between them.   Steve Rush: Sure. Now society also plays a massive part in this doesn't it? So over the last 10 or 15 years, if you think about it, societies describe happiness with good economies, wealth, good social wellbeing and obedience, having researched just that, all over the planet, what's your take on how that plays out?   Nic Marks: Well, it is for certain that nations have different levels of average happiness and actually different distributions of happiness in them and some that both the averages and the distribution can be explained by economic and societal factors. And, and then there's stuff more below that but you know, if we look at rank orders of nations on happiness, then Scandinavian countries tend to come top, and that's a lot to do with their social safety net. Which is, it's not really to do with the fact that that's the sort of…I was going to say the average, but by the average, I mean the media and the person in the middle is not particularly happy and Scandinavia and say in the UK or the U.S. but where they are, they do much, much better. Is that the bottom half of the distribution or the lowest 25% in terms of income are match less unhappy in Scandinavia than they are in the UK, the U.S. and places like that, so it is more that they don't have the tail of the distribution pulling the mean down. They have more equal distribution of happiness within it, and that's kind of interesting if you, you know, because people often go, oh, well, you know, you could say the Swedes are happier, but, you know, don't, they have high suicide rates, don't they have this. And, you know, I don't find the fins very extrovert, but, and that's probably all true. I mean, but there are other factors also, which is if you live in a broadly happy society and you are unhappy, you probably take it more personally, and so actually countries with a higher happiness rate may possibly have a highest suicide rate. Whereas if you live in a country such as India or Pakistan, or somewhere where there is much lower levels, you know, suicide rates are probably lower because people feel more normalized about their happiness.   Steve Rush: Less highs and lows, is that how I am reading it?   Nic Marks: Yeah, sort of. You feel less personal; you know if everyone around you is happy and you are miserable, you feel it is very much your fault. And so therefore, you know, I'm a burden on other people. Then you get into this very difficult logic where you start thinking it is actually better for you to take your own life, which is tragically, how some people get. Whereas if everybody is, you just feel like, what does that mean to all of us? Which you know, which in the current situation with the anxiety around looked down and COVID because everybody feels in the same boat, we are not sort of; we are feeling more open about our anxiety because we kind of know it's not about us feeling bad. It is about the environment, so that makes it easy to talk about.   Steve Rush: You also spent a significant amount of time pulling together, enormous research to create the Happy Planet Index. Just tell the listeners a little bit about what the Happy Planet Index is?   Nic Marks: Yeah, the Happy Planet Index is sort of a proposed alternative to GDP as a way of measuring the progress of nations. And I've always felt that GDP was a really bad measure of welfare, of the wellbeing of a nation. In fact, one of my first published bits of work is from 94 and it was an alternative to GDP, but it was very complicated. It was very objective. It was basically a huge cost benefit analysis of the economy and had a lot of assumptions in it. And I knew it was very complicated, but when I used to go talk to talks about it, rightly or wrongly, but it did show was that about the mid-seventies was about the highest in this index and it trading often. People go to me, that is how it feels to me, particularly older people would do.   Steve Rush: Right. Nic Marks: And I always thought that is interesting. It does not say anything about what you feel. It is just a whole lot of economic data put together. That started me perhaps thinking about how you measure what you feel, but when it came to the Happy Planet Index, which was released in 2006, so like 12 years after that first bit of work, I want to do something very simple and easier to agree with. I sort of learned that complexity and indicators tends to put people off, or if they get interested, they then start looking at all the assumptions and the debate gets about the detail and not the bigger picture. And so what I did with the HPI was I said, well, you know, what's the outcome you really want from a country, and I said, it's to produce good lives that don't cost the earth and the planet, but in there is the sustainability element of it.   And so I went, well, you could measure good lives by asking, by looking at the data on happiness, across nations, say the quality of people's lives, you can then adjust that for the length of our life, so life expectancy, which is a very good, reliable piece of health statistics. You've got data on from around the world, but you've also got to think about the efficiency as a nation. Like how much resources does it use to get there? So the Happy Planet Index became a, you know, environmental efficiency of delivering wellbeing, a sort of bang for your buck indicator and that is what it is. It rank ordered nations across the world and basically you have some countries which have got high wellbeing, but high environmental impact and that will be typically Western rich countries. You've got countries which have got low wellbeing, but low environmental impact, so those are sub Saharan Africa and other nations, which are really struggling. Then you've got countries which are interesting, which I've got pretty good levels of wellbeing and much lower resource use and typically they were central Latin America and, some of the islands of the world, or some of the Asian countries, which were doing well. And that became interesting to think, you know, okay, how can we create a sustainable future, which is also a good future. Because the problem with the environmental movement, which, you know, I certainly have been a part of and absolutely bought into. I think they sell very negative visions of the future with the idea that you can scare people into changing their behaviour and I think we can all see over the last 25 years that has not worked.   So, you know, how do we do it in a way which we actually say to people, actually, this could be a better future. And in some ways, some of that is going on right now with COVID in that people are thinking about, oh, I'm staying at home, I'm traveling much less. It is actually less stressful for me, and it is about identifying those positives, you know, as we come out of COVID. It would be a shame if we don't take some benefits in reducing carbon emissions and other things. I mean, that would be disappointing having had this forced on us to not, gets some positives out and not everyone welcomes COVID; we could still get some positives out of it.   Steve Rush: Almost the planet's opportunity, if you just start giving back, isn't it at this time?   Nic Marks: Yeah, I mean, there are people that go all that way and say it's in a guy's feedback and I don't go quite to that level, but it's an opportunity, isn't it? I think like any setback is an opportunity to learn, even if you didn't want to get into it.   Steve Rush: We are going to start to talk a little bit about what you're doing at the moment with Friday Pulse, but just before we do, what is the happiest place statistically on earth?   Nic Marks: Well, last year's data showed Finland as the happiest nation. Then I, the only within country data that I know very well is the UK. And the regions of the UK, and I think it always surprises people, but actually London is the least happy region because it's urban because inequalities are high there and things of that, and people are very close together. Whereas the happiest region of the UK is Northern Ireland, which is much more rural and of course, recent memories of troubles, so they've actually got sort of point to go back to.   So there's sort of different things, but at the national level, it's Finland at the moment, but it has been Norway previously and Sweden, Switzerland, Denmark have done well. Costa Rica is a very surprising one that comes through that is particularly happy compared to its GDP. So yeah, that is the way it is sort of is.   Steve Rush: Cool, and what would be the kind of one or two things that are consistent across those higher ranking, happier places?   Nic Marks: So there is income distribution, which they basically tend to be more equal countries which is what Scandinavia is, and actually even Costa Rica is more equal than such of neighbours around it, you know, Nicaragua, Guatemala and all those other places around there. So it does very well in that and there's also high levels of literacy. Gender equality in Costa Rico, which of course are things that Scandinavia is particularly good at, so equality tends to come out stronger than people think, but of course, you know, richer countries are happier. That is sort of undeniable. They are just not becoming any happier with the extra amounts of wealth we have. We are not seeing those countries on a trajectory to become happier. The countries that are on a trajectory to become happier are some of the developing countries because they are reducing poverty. They are reducing, you know, early deaths, so you know that obviously is a positive.   Steve Rush: And I wonder, is it more visible to them at the same time?   Nic Marks: Yes, it probably is. I mean, there are differences between them, like South Korea has been studied quite a lot because they have obviously been one of the Asian tigers and, you know, their happiness levels have gone up, but they are very, very materialistic there. And they haven't gone up as much as say a country like Vietnam or something like that who is slightly less so, so there were interesting differences between them. And some of them have to do with density of population as well, but there's not just sort of one straight pathway, there are differences.   Steve Rush: Makes lots of sense. Thank you very much, Nic. So the organization you lead now, Friday Pulse. Seeks to take that distillation of happiness data, but from the colleagues and customers of the organizations that you work with. To create something that leadership and other colleagues can actually use as a lens to get a sense check of how their workforce feels, how happy they are almost. Tell us a little bit, about how Friday Pulse was created?   Nic Marks: Yeah, I did my Ted talk on the Happy Planet Index and other work I have done in 2010. And obviously that's quite an honour, and I sort of came out of it, thinking it sort of allowed an opportunity to sort of bookend that part of my work and I accidentally got into policy and I done it for 10-12 years then. When you are working on something like climate change, it is quite slow moving and, you know, I thought when I have got something in and maybe do something and I was always interested in business, my dad was a businessman. He led an organization and I thought, well, this is very applicable there. You know, if leaders knew how happy you are not, teams were, that would get them useful information. So I started creating a happiness at work survey, which was a one off survey to begin with and learned a lot about how the data worked in organizations started to get my own opinion about what I thought the drivers of happiness at work were and how we could measure them. But actually hadn't created a tool that was exceptionally responsive. You know, it's like a one off survey, like most other surveys are, but started to think, well actually, what really an organization needs to know is how it's moving through time.   And so start thinking, there is a way of measurement of happiness we call. There is three ways of measuring happiness really, We can do, what is called a cognitive assessment, which is what most surveys are, which is we ask people to look overall and reflect on it. You can do something which is called experience sampling, where you basically bleed people during the day or text them or whatever. Say, how do you feel right now? It gives really nice data, but it's really annoying. So the one in between is called episodal, measurements and you get to the end of an episode, you ask people to reflect back on it. And I decided to go for that way of measuring it and started off asking people various cadences, so a month, how has the last month been. A day, how has your day been? and settled on a week because daily was a little bit too annoying.   And also you could only just ask people how happy were you or not, and nothing more. If you ask them monthly, it was not very responsive. You so much can happen in a month. As we have learned recently and weekly is the sort of sprint of work. We go; we tend to work too, so we ask people on a Friday that is why we called Friday Pulse. You know, how was your week? How did you feel this week? And that creates a very responsive, we call it happiness KPI, but a very responsive metric, which when you group at a team level, there's effectively a measure of team morale. When you group at an organizational level, it is people's experience of the culture of the organization, experience of work right now. And so you can look at that, and I mean, the good thing about a question like that is you can ask, you know, truck driver, that question, you can ask a CEO with that question and they can give you an answer to it.   Whereas if you ask people how engaged were you this week, most people don't even know how to answer that question. They have an idea of what the top of the scale is particularly. They know if they are disengaged, they know where the top of the scale is. So when you ask people how you felt and were you happy or not? They can give you an answer that is very good, reliable data in that way.   Steve Rush: And what do you notice the themes are that contribute to a happy culture at work for leaders listening to this podcast?   Nic Marks: There are some general themes across an organization, and there are ways that you can articulate it. So the way that we do is we say there were five ways to happiness at work and, and they are connect, which is relationships are the most important. They are the cornerstone of creating good experiences or undermining experience for that case, for that matter.   The second one is to be fair, which is if people feel they are treated fairly, respectfully, then they can bring themselves to work much more. The third is to empower them sort of their autonomy delegating yet and use their strengths. The fourth is to challenge them, so this is sort of misunderstanding of happiness that people are happy doing nothing. It is actually not true they board and actually, people would like it when there is a bit of stretch. Not, if you stretch them too much, challenge them too much, they go and stress. If you under challenge them, they are going into apathy and boredom. You've got to get the right sweet spot, which has always tends to be the way anyway, and then the fifth one is to inspire, which is about meaning purpose, where they feel it doing is worthwhile.   So those five things connect be fair, impact, challenge, inspire are the big drivers, but then there is specific things that go on, which has really to do with the environment and what is going on around them very locally. Which is that some people, some teams will find them in a very stressful situation or their work environments are stressful. So with people moving remote at the moment and very quickly moved remote a few weeks ago, you know, that some people were happier working at home than others and lots to do their environments, whether they got children, whether they have the right equipment at home, where they had a quiet space, you know, whatever it was. So some of those things are very, very local and some of those bigger, broader cultural things. So yeah, those two effects really.   Steve Rush: And like any business and any part of any business it is feedback, data that I am getting an also alien to that is that leadership choices to what I do with that information as I receive it. Right?   Nic Marks: Totally and in fact, the whole of Friday Pulse is really a feedback loop. And actually it's very similar to therapy in some ways, which is that in therapy. Therapist listens to their client, and they reflect back to them and then they work with them about the challenges that they are facing. And we listened to the population, the employees by asking them every Friday, how do they feel? We feed that back to them and the team leaders, and then senior leaders, you stack the data up in nice reporting, and that enables people to then work together to make better experiences. So one of the things I am very keen on this, people don't just focus on the negatives. Don't just focus on the deficits. They actually appreciate the assets and the positives going on, and so on a Friday, we don't only ask people how they felt. We also asked them, what was success for you this week? Have you got anyone you want to thank because appreciating each other, is really important for both sides of that equation. Then we give people the opportunity to share a frustration or an idea to make things better. But actually most of our clients really, really work on accentuating the positive because in lots of ways, businesses tend to focus on how do you solve problems? What comes up? And actually probably often don't take the time to go, yes, good job, and to actually get that human appreciation, which actually we all really respond well to.   Steve Rush: And hitting back to the neuroscience we talked on a little bit earlier; of course, it will release different neurotransmitters that create that self-fulfilling prophecy of getting additional positive outcomes from our thinking and our behaviours, which helps improve happiness of course.   Nic Marks: It certainly does. And I mean, all of this works together, you know, physically, but I always think about it as like, you know, if someone compliments you and your sort of head goes up and your shoulders go back and you sort of feel bigger because you're feeling confident. Whereas when someone criticizes you, you can tend to sort of hunch up and pull your shell in, you know, and protect yourself. And we're much better when we're expensive and shoulders back, and actually other people like working with us more like that as well. So there is so much to be gained from being positive, but of course you have to be realistic. You know, it does not mean to say you let people travel down into a sort of fantasy world where everyone is doing a good job. No, it was a point is, you know, really differentiating and really understanding and helping people build on their positives.   Steve Rush: So this part of the show, we are going to turn away from you being a statistician, but look at you through your leadership lens of running an organization. And at this part of the show, we like to ask our guests to share their top leadership hacks or ideas. So if you could share based on your experience as a leader, your top leadership hacks, what would they be? Nic.   Nic Marks: I think that the big thing is listening to people, you know, I don't employ people to tell them what to do. I employ people to work with them and, get the best out of them and actually learning to bring the best out of them. The main way is listening to them even when they disagree with you, so I think listening is probably the first one.   Second one is I think little and often, I think I've tried to where I've gone wrong previously would be when I've tried to do big interventions. And actually I think doing smaller ones, checking is a much better way. But consistently I definitely have had to learn that, you know, leadership is a, weekly process, maybe even a daily process, but a weekly one, you know, where you're asking questions every week and you're listening every week rather than just sort of going, right. These are our goals for the next quarter. Then checking in 2-3 months later, realizing people have gone down a different tangent or, something has emerged, maybe for good reasons, but you don't know about them so I think little and often is probably.   The next one for me, definitely, I think inspiring people, which is that I hold the vision for the company. I don't necessarily hold the solutions, but I hold the vision for where we're going and why we're doing it. And remembering to remind people about that, so reminding them of the why, but it's actually, you know, bringing that into, your weekly work. I mean, particularly with all the adjustments we have made just recently and COVID and everyone going remote, you know, I sort of had to remind myself to remind everybody why we're doing this. If that makes sense.   Steve Rush: It makes sense. One of those things that you set up a vision to start with and other things get in the way. And we, as leaders also need reminding that is our job to remind people and to make sure that, we continually talking about the journey and how are we going to get there and what's going to get in the way and remove barriers. It's part and parcel of that. Isn't it?   Nic Marks: Yeah, it definitely is and it is actually a bit of the job I really like. Some of the detail bits, I am less good at it. I mean, it is funny; I am very good at details and stats. But I can sometimes of like, you know, I probably like many people not got the longest attention span and I sometimes sort of get stopped and I have to beat myself up for it, but the inspiring bit and the listening to how they feel and what they're doing. I mean, I can do that for ages because I really liked people and I really believe in what we are doing. So those are the bits I find easier. It is keeping people on track and the detail that is always my learning edge.   Steve Rush: Thanks for being so honest and great hacks also. So when we start to think that this partnership we've really enjoyed getting into the heads of our leaders and our guests where they've maybe screwed up in the past or something's gone catastrophic wrong, and indeed they are now using that experience as a positive in their life. We call this Hack to Attack. What would yours be?   Nic Marks: Hack to Attack? Well, I mean, in some ways I've sort of pointed to it with a little bit of those last bits, but I think that I have definitely been guilty of letting things run for too long cause I wasn't confident enough to challenge people. And, and so, you know, previously had someone in the business and you know, she has some really strong qualities, but just sort of always going pear shapes. And, and I, kept on coming back to every three or four months, but really we should have partied companies at least a year before we eventually did. And that cost us a lot, and she wasn't happy. She was not doing quite what she wanted. I was trying to, I guess, force her, so there was a role that needed doing and I was wanting her to do that role and she was not quite wanting to do it and she was definitely capable of it. But it just sort of ran on far too long, and in the end it all became very messy and angry. If I dealt with it much earlier. We would have had a lot less problems and it's the same problem I had with my marriage actually, which was that, you know, I let things run too long and I should have been challenging about that earlier. I think that is my weaknesses tending to gloss over some of the negatives, my positivity overrides listening to negative feedback or negative signals. And I think that's actually really important leadership is to be able to one, hear the negative signal and two, deal with it because it doesn't go away.   Steve Rush: It is great learning, Nic and also think about the themes that you are now encouraging other leaders to talk about through Friday Pulse. There is a lot of synergies there in terms of what your learned behaviour. What you are encouraging others to learn from now, so that is super stuff. The last thing I wanted to talk to you about, and this is where we are going to ask you to do some time travel. I want you to think about if you were able to bump into Nic at 21; you are able to give him one bit of advice that would make the difference. What would it be?   Nic Marks: I quite like my life, even my mistakes. So, you know, that is not like something I would massively want to change. I mean, I think I was a little uptight as a 21. I was a little serious and I had the future weighed on me quite a lot. I sort of kind of had this feeling. I wanted to do something and I probably wanted to do it quicker than was possible. And you know, and I mean, I have actually done things which are interesting. I think I would just say, you know, relax. It will be okay. Follow what you are interested in, I mean, in some ways I have done that actually. So, but when I was 21, I was a little bit; I was a little bit still uptight, yeah.   Steve Rush: If only Nic would know the 21-year-old, Nic who might have been a little bit uptight. Still found is way to be where you are now, which is, you know, impacting the lives of many of the people, so that's great advice.   Nic Marks: It is nice to think that. The 21-year-old Nic would be horrified at the thought that that 55-year-old Nic got divorced. He would not like that at all, but apart from that, he pretty much take the rest.   Steve Rush: Good stuff. Okay, as people have been listening to you, Nic. We will make sure that we encourage him to get over to Ted and have a look at the Happy Planet Index talk, which I think is really inspiring and I love that, but where else can they find out about the work that you do with Friday Pulse and indeed some of the things that you do now?   Nic Marks: Yeah. Friday Pulse is the name of the company, so it is fridaypulse.com and it is actually, we are offering it free for organizations up to a thousand people at the moment. So they can try it for three months and see how they go with it and see how they like the data and how they can work with it. I create blog articles and posts on LinkedIn most week. Connect with me on LinkedIn; I always like meeting new people there and I have a personal website, which is more my sort of speaking musing, which is nicmark.org. Nic is no K a in that, so those are the main ways to find me.   Steve Rush: We will make sure there in the show notes to accompany this podcast as well Nic. So as people are finished listening, they can literally just click into those links and then hop over to find you.   Nic Marks: Fabulous, thank you.   Steve Rush: Nic, I just wanted to say I am incredibly happy that you have chosen to be with The Leadership Hacker Podcast. I have spoken to you a few times now and I have loved the conversations that we have had and as a result, I know we're going to get a lot of happy hackers listening to you too. So thanks for being on, The Leadership Hacker Podcast.   Nic Marks: Thank so much for having me.     Closing   Steve Rush: I genuinely want to say heartfelt thanks for taking time out of your day to listen in too. We do this in the service of helping others, and spreading the word of leadership. Without you listening in, there would be no show. So please subscribe now if you have not done so already. Share this podcast with your communities, network, and help us develop a community and a tribe of leadership hackers.   Finally, if you would like me to work with your senior team, your leadership community, keynote an event, or you would like to sponsor an episode. Please connect with us, by our social media. And you can do that by following and liking our pages on Twitter and Facebook our handler their @leadershiphacker. Instagram you can find us there @the_leadership_hacker and at YouTube, we are just Leadership Hacker, so that is me signing off. I am Steve Rush and I have been the leadership hacker.