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Publicly-funded healthcare systems in the United Kingdom

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Best podcasts about nhs

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Latest podcast episodes about nhs

Today in Focus
Will the Omicron Covid variant cancel Christmas?

Today in Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 24:32


A new Covid variant first identified in South Africa is spreading around the world, with leaders rushing to respond. Our science correspondent Nicola Davis outlines what we know so far about the Omicron variant. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus

Best of Today
When can I get my Covid booster vaccine?

Best of Today

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 16:26


The NHS in England is gearing up for a major expansion of the Covid-19 booster programme to tackle the threat posed by the omicron variant. On Monday, Prime Minister Boris Johnson said that vaccination centres will be “popping up like Christmas trees”. The BBC's correspondent John Kay visits one centre in Bristol that has experienced a huge rush of visitors in the past few days. After that, Today's Mishal Husain asks the Health Secretary Sajid Javid about the scale of the logistical challenge facing the government and whether people should continue to wait for a call from the NHS or go to a vaccination centre. (Picture Credit: Press Association)

Chris Thrall's Bought the T-Shirt Podcast
From CLAPPING To SACKING! | NHS Paramedic Lilith |#226

Chris Thrall's Bought the T-Shirt Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 34:27


NHS100k.com brings together NHS, Care, and social work colleagues, including more than 111,000 NHS staff who have exercised their basic human right of informed consent regarding a medical intervention. NHS paramedic Lilith, chats with Chris Thrall regarding her co-worker's fight to keep their jobs. Read 'Eating Smoke: One Man's Descent into Crystal Meth Psychosis in Hong Kong's Triad Heartland.' Paperback UK: https://amzn.to/2YoeaPx Paperback US: https://www.amazon.com/dp/0993543944 Support the podcast at: https://www.patreon.com/christhrall (£2 per month plus perks) https://www.gofundme.com/f/support-our-veterans-to-tell-their-story https://paypal.me/TeamThrall Sign up for my NON-SPAM newsletter and FREE books: https://christhrall.com/mailing-list/ Social media Links: https://facebook.com/christhrall https://twitter.com/christhrall https://instagram.com/chris.thrall https://linkedin.com/in/christhrall https://youtube.com/christhrall https://discord.gg/yqvHRUN https://christhrall.com 

In Touch
National Clinical Director for Eye Care; Two Mayors, Same Household

In Touch

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 18:49


Parliament has revealed their plans to recruit a National Clinical Director for Eye Care, which could help transform services for patients. Until now, there's been no national clinical representation for eye care within NHS England and NHS Improvement, despite ophthalmology being the biggest out-patient department in the NHS. Last week, Minister Maria Caulfield announced that recruitment is now underway. We speak to the Chief Executive of the Macular Society, Cathy Yelf about this important development for eye care services and what she hopes the new recruit will achieve. And you may have heard of a visually impaired Mayor before, but how about two in the same household? We're joined by Richard and Sue Lees who have both been Mayor of Taunton in Summerset; Sue is the current Mayor and Richard was elected in 2005. We talk to them about what the role entails, what led them to the post and their responses to our third item about access to Santander's bank cards. Presenter: Peter White Producer: Beth Hemmings Website image description: the image shows a woman getting an eye examination. Her head is leant toward a retinal camera, while the optometrist pulls down her bottom eye lid for closer inspection. A yellow light is being shone in her eye. The image represents eye care and that this element of the practice could potentially be transformed with the introduction of the new National Clinical Director for Eye Care.

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes
Think big (and don't be an idiot) - Dr. Partha Kar on the future of diabetes care

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 32:53


When you have a national lead on diabetes who really seems to listen to patients and delivers on some big ideas, you get our attention. Dr. Partha Kar is the diabetes co-lead of NHS England. We talk about access, getting more out of your doctor's visits and what he sees in the future of diabetes tech. Dr. Kar's announcement (after our interview was taped) that CGM or Flash Glucose Monitoring will be available to all people in England with type 1 diabetes  This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider. Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom! Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group! Sign up for our newsletter here ----- Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners! ----- Get the App and listen to Diabetes Connections wherever you go! Click here for iPhone      Click here for Android Episode Transcription Below:   Stacey Simms  0:00 Diabetes Connections is brought to you by. Dario Health – Manage your blood glucose levels. Increase your possibilities. By Gvoke HypoPen, the first pre-mixed autoinjector for very low blood sugar. And By Dexcom. Take control of your diabetes and live life to the fullest with Dexcom This is Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms. This week when you're a national leader on diabetes, and you really seem to listen to patients and you deliver on some big ideas, you get our attention. Dr. Partha Kar says it shouldn't be that unusual.   Partha Kar  0:39 And I also feel that clinicians sometimes believe that people living with type 1 diabetes won't be able to handle the truth, so to speak, oh, you can't tell them when you can. They're all adults are surrounded by adults, and they deal with tough calls in their lives all the time. You know,   Stacey Simms  0:57 Dr. Kar is the diabetes co-lead of NHS England. Yes, this is a US centric show. But I've followed him on social media for a long time. And I've loved what he has to say. We'll talk about access, getting more out of your doctor's visits, and what he sees in the future of diabetes tech. This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider. Welcome to another week of the show, I am your host, Stacey Sims, and we aim to educate and inspire about diabetes with a focus on people who use insulin. If you're part of our mostly American audience, I hope you had a really good Thanksgiving, I hope the travel was safe. If you had to go anywhere, I hope the food was great. And I hope the family was okay to really hope you had a great holiday. If you're part of our international audience, which is still pretty big, I would expect it to be bigger this week, just because of who we're talking to. And that is Dr. Partha Kar, national specialty advisor for diabetes with NHS England. And this is one of those times where I just was interested to see what somebody had to say, as I mentioned in that the opening teaser, I followed him online for quite a while. And I thought you might be interested as well. And boy, when I put it in the Facebook group, you all were thrilled. So I hope you enjoy the interview. He didn't have a ton of time to talk to me. But that is to be expected. But I'm really happy with the questions I was able to ask. And you know, just the fact that he was able to share some information with us, even though his his health system is is markedly different than ours here in the States. Before we jump in, I do want to take a moment this is a little self promoting. But gosh, guys, I got such exciting news recently. And that is that I won this huge book price. Yes, I know the book came out a while ago, but I won best new non fiction in the American Book fest. This was of course for the world's worst diabetes mom real life stories of raising a child with type 1 diabetes. And it kind of took me didn't kind of it really took me by surprise. I had entered it earlier this year, I had forgotten about it. When we got the email, my publisher kind of emailed me quickly and said, you know, being a finalist is really nice. And then she said no, no, wait a minute, you. That was kind of my reaction to it was laughing. But I won. So I know you're asking, Okay, the world's worst diabetes mom came out in 2019. How did we win an award in 2021. The book fest the American Book, festival boards are kind of rolling. So you're eligible for almost three years. So this year's books were from certain dates in 2120 20 in 2019. This was our first time entering the book, and it was actually our last chance to enter. So boy, I'm so excited. I'm really proud of the book. And I have some news coming in December. I have some more book news that was already planned before this award. But thank you for letting me indulgent, do a little patting myself on the back. It was not easy to write and get it out and do everything we needed to do for it. And boy, you all have been so supportive, considering I haven't been able to do any kind of book tour at all right? I mean, it came out at the end of 2019. I think I went to two or three places. And that was it. And just like everybody else in 2020. It hasn't been the same since I'm hardly alone in that. So more book news coming up, and Dr. Partha Kar in just a moment I should probably tell you just a little bit more about him if you're not familiar. He has been a consultant in Diabetes and Endocrinology on the national level there in the UK since 2008, clinical director of diabetes from 2009 to 2015. And here's the full title national specialty advisor diabetes with NHS England. And there are so many things that he's been involved with, most recently, very prominently getting the FreeStyle Libre being available across the country over there and I will talk about that specifically. Being very involved in language matters. Getting CGM available to all t one D pregnant patients. And he hinted this week that a big announcement was coming. So I will link that up in the show notes so you can find out we talked The week before Thanksgiving here in the States, so timing wise full bit tricky, but he was announcing something big and I will include that to the best of my ability. Okay, Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Gvoke Hypopen. Almost everyone who takes insulin has experienced a low blood sugar – and that can be scary.  A very low blood sugar is really scary. And that's where Gvoke HypoPen comes in. Gvoke is the first autoinjector to treat very low blood sugar.  Gvoke HypoPen is premixed and ready to go, with no visible needle. That means it's easy to use. How easy is it? You pull off the red cap and push the yellow end onto bare skin – and hold it for 5 seconds. That's it. Find out more – go to diabetes dash connections dot com and click on the Gvoke logo. Gvoke shouldn't be used in patients with pheochromocytoma or insulinoma – visit gvoke glucagon dot com slash risk. Partha Kar Welcome to Diabetes Connections. Thanks so much for making some time for me and my listeners. Absolute pleasure. Thank   Partha Kar  5:55 you for asking.   Stacey Simms  5:56 I gotta tell you, I'm a little nervous. I'm a huge fan. I'm just following you on social media. And then I put into my Facebook group like I always do. You know, do you have any questions for this guest? We've got a part of the car coming up. I have very few questions from the group. But I have lots of oh my gosh, I love him. Tell him we love him. Tell him. Thank you. Thank you. And I'll tell you specifically why they're thanking you in a moment. But you do have a quite a big fan club over here. So going in, I guess I'm trying to butter you up. But going in, you should know that.   Partha Kar  6:24 No, it's very quiet, very kind. I always see this, you know, at the end of the day, it's my job to do as well. But you know, the love and blessings you get is just makes it stronger. So yeah, no, absolutely. Thank you.   Stacey Simms  6:35 You're welcome. Let me just start off by asking you, you do not live with diabetes? How did you get into the position that you were in today? Why this field for you. So I think   Partha Kar  6:43 a lot of it was, you know, when we are when we are training, you pick your subjects as you go along. And then I sort of gravitated towards Diabetes and Endocrinology because I thought there was an opportunity here to talk to a lot of people, you know, be a part of their journey throughout life. So it was quite good. And I like talking, and then sort of more towards type one, because I think I get got to realize the more senior I got a lot of attention, quite understandably, was into type two diabetes. And that's, you know, the bigger volume number, etc. But I think what I found that there's not a lot of things being done for type one as a trade back of that. So it's been more of a, let's see what we can do in the space. Let's try and help people. And I think just being an advocate, so to speak. So yeah, that's probably how it's graduated over the course of time. One of   Stacey Simms  7:31 the things that we've observed, just following your social media here in the US, is the adoption and use of libre for many more people, can you talk a little bit about how that came about?   Partha Kar  7:41 So I think Libre, I'm in freestyle Libre first came into the market on 2014 2015. And I think it started to sort of gradually make its way into the UK setting and the sort of people would buy it funded. And I think it sort of started taking off in 2016 2017. And that's when I sort of got into the job. And for me, people are always asking why this particular device, I think it's not the device, I think it's more of a mass device. And I think there'll be more competition coming along. But to me, it's be a very good example of what self management can do. I mean, simply put, if you see more of your numbers and more of your trends, you tend to intervene more and do better. So that's been the device and it's been a battle to try and get it into people's lives as you go along. As you're the system here is slightly different. You have to justify every single thing you do, because you're saying, Well, this is why we're trying to do it. And it's a funny place to be in because you know, you're you're sort of fighting, so to speak against other conditions, that doesn't feel right, either trying to justify why you needed more compared to X or Y. And I think that's the challenge. And then people start looking at well, actually, there isn't a randomized control trial, which showed y or Zed and I can't fund it. And I try and explain to people it's not just about the RCTs, or the randomized control trials all the time. It's not just about doing one see, it's about the quality of life and what it does do so yeah, I think I think that's how it came about. And then driving it through, pick up or take up around the country sort of battling with regions. So yeah, it's it's been a journey in the half, so to speak. Can you   Stacey Simms  9:14 get a little bit more specific in terms of how many people now in your system do have access and do use the freestyle?   Partha Kar  9:20 Yeah, I mean, I think we got I mean, given round, figure wise, we've got about 200, we got a quarter of a million people with type 1 diabetes, and I think about 53% of them are on it right now across the country, and of all our cards land. Well, I think it should be available, either, you know, Libre or its equivalent should be available to everybody, everybody, very soon.   Stacey Simms  9:42 So yeah, I mean, the reason I wanted to ask that is because first of all, it's already such a big number comparatively speaking too much for the rest of the world. Certainly, I've got to imagine you're starting to see better outcomes too. Yeah,   Partha Kar  9:53 absolutely. I mean, it's coming through your h1 HB ones is a better I mean, I can tell you from my own clinical practice, people are huge changes. We're seeing it across the country and the data we're collecting and guess what admission levels are down. People feel happier your HP once he's down, it's doing what it says on the tin.   Stacey Simms  10:08 What would be the ultimate goal? Is it with that device? Is it then moving on to other CGM? Or do you want to kind of get as many people as possible in this one?   Partha Kar  10:15 Oh, no, absolutely. I've always maintained I'm a Libre or freestyle Libre is has been the tip of the spear. I think there was a lot of things there, which was about showing people the what is possible, because before that, in the world of the NHS technology has always been seen as a Okay, well, let's see what we can do. I mean, for example, insulin pumps have been around for so long. We even had nice guidance on it available since 2008. But the pickup rate really low 15% 16%. Really many reasons behind it. And CGM for isn't traditional CGM like Dexcom. Really low again, 4% 5%, or there abouts. But I think this was about showing what could be done if you really pushed on it hard. And I think it's opened up many, many doors. You know, subsequently, because of that, we're looking at competition coming along, we're looking at every single pregnancy with type 1 diabetes not having access to a Dexcom, or Medtronic device, we're doing trials and closed loop, suddenly, it has become a flagship, and due to luck, serendipity or default, it's worked out as one of the projects, which has really, really played out well in the NHS. And so a lot of people are looking at it. And for me, that was always the purpose. It's the tip of the spear. If you can show you could do it with one, there's no reason you can't. And it's definitely not the end goal never has been. I think the end goal would be that every every person with type 1 diabetes, irrespective of the age has the ability to choose whatever technology they so can, whether it's flash, whether it's traditional CGM, whether it's a pump, or whether it's a closed loop, partnership salutely.   Stacey Simms  11:44 And I'm just a little bit more about the Libre, I'm curious to obviously the biggest objection many people would have had would have been cost. But inside your organization or external critics, what were their objections thinking going into something like this,   Partha Kar  11:57 I think the NHS always is a very traditional setup. And I think they're very good when it comes to drugs to pharmaceutical products. For example, pharmaceutical companies will do massive randomized control trials to show Okay, here is the drop in HBO and see, and thereby you can calculate it. The problem is with technology company, they necessarily haven't done that. If you look at Frisco Librem, the initial studies that came out, they never showed any change in HB one C, primarily because they chose a lot of people's age 20 with the excellent to begin with. And you're sitting there going, Well, that was a mistake, I think, for companies not to take up the trials, because straightaway to a lot of policymakers, you don't have any room to maneuver, because you're banking yourself completely on the ability that will show improvement of hypos and quality of life. Now, the other problem, I suspect has been there nice, which is our governing body, so to speak, who you know, looks at evidence, they're quite slow at coming off the blocks. Sometimes it can be too late in the technology world by the time you assess, you know, right now they're assessing Libre one you are Libre 123 out. So what are you assessing? There's got to be nimble and quick. That's been that was the obstacle people saying that. So I think there were that level of obstacle Well, nice having said so so why should be, there's also a lot of people who fundamentally believed that this was just a gizmo and this was just shiny toy, and we shouldn't give it to people with diabetes, they should or for example, they had to earn it, you know, they have to either have complications to have it, or they should be testing 10 times a day to get it, which I think is pretty silly. Because you know, the whole point of doing this exercise is to target people are finding it difficult to test and find giving it to people to stop them from having complications. But there you go, it's a very traditional set of thinking, which is what has been the challenge trying to break through?   Stacey Simms  13:39 Yeah, do we have similar issues in the states where they're doing trials? And you always see like, well, they're a one see went from 7.3 to 6.9. And that's wonderful. But you know, we need to reach the people who's a one sees our 10.5 100%, right, because of either education or access, or whatever it is. I know, I know, you're struggling with that as well. Yeah,   Partha Kar  13:58 So, for example, you know, we have learned from that, you know, we, when we collected the real world data with Libre, we showed exactly what he said, the higher the higher your starting age, we want to see the better your outcomes. And you're like, Well, that's obvious. So what we're doing with those with Kevin, so what you're doing with closed loops right now, so we're running a real world trial evaluation throughout the country, it's about 34, five centers around the country, adults and pediatrics doing it. And guess what we see, again, the higher your agency, the better you're a flattening of your agency. So it's not rocket science. And I always am flabbergasted when people doing trials go like, no, let's just pick the people's controller really good. And as you said, but that goes against the whole deprivation thing that we discuss about because we know people who come from very deprived backgrounds will have worse control. So if you really want to tackle deprivation, you need to control that and you need to tackle that. So the thinking needs to be far more refined than what it is at the present moment. And hopefully we're trying to show some ways of doing so.   Stacey Simms  14:54 So one of my listeners said, I want you to please let parked the car know how much I appreciate In his posts, she goes on to say, there's not much I appreciate more than medical professionals who treat us like real people and don't talk down to us. Where did you learn your bedside manner your style or what you know what we as as not your patients see on social media because that's one of the things I think that very much resonates with people is that you're you're very plain spoken and you don't talk down to people with diabetes   right back to our conversation, but first Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dario health. And you know, over the years, I find we manage diabetes better when we're thinking less about all the stuff of diabetes tasks. That's why I love partnering with people who take the load off things like ordering supplies, so I can really focus on Benny, the Dario diabetes success plan is all about you, all the strips and lancets you need delivered to your door, one on one coaching. So you can meet your milestones, weekly insights into your trends with suggestions for how to succeed, get the diabetes management plan that works with you. And for you. Dario is published studies demonstrate high impact clinical results, find out more go to my dario.com forward slash diabetes dash connections. Now back to Dr. Kar, talking about how he has developed a good bedside manner and respect for his patients.   Partha Kar  16:20 I think it's come with time, if I'm very honest, and most likely, it's not like a suddenly over a bed. And one day I decided to become like this. And I think what I've realized over the course of time is their Medical School doesn't teach us consultations, kills diseases, a lot of stuff, right? It's just teaches us what the book said, which is my Insulet physiology, how it works, doesn't really teach us a lot about interaction with human beings, which is what we did with some things like the language matters and stuff and people found language matters. Interesting. I found that just human sense, you know, common sense, human, it's not that difficult to be nice to people. And we somehow are not we somehow, and I think social media teaches me a lot of stuff. I think my patients teach me a lot. And I don't say that in a glib way, because things like, you know, I will do transitional or young adults clinic. And I remember these words from this young girl who sat there looked at me and said, If he took an exam sometimes, you know, and I want to watch that. And she said that, I don't know. It just feels like I'm going to be asked what I'm doing with judgment, what I'm doing, you know, when I sat down, but like, that's not right, that's wrong. Why are we making people feel like that way? And then we are wondering why they're not coming back to our clinics. So a lot of my consultations were very honest, not about diabetes, with my patients they're very much about could be a football or movies. I mean, yesterday, when just watch the internals and today in clinic, we were talking about one of my patients, and that was the conversation, what did you think about that paid the post credits, what was it, and I think you build a rapport with people, they trust you more, you get along more. So I like to keep it very plain. And I also feel that clinicians sometimes believe that people living with type 1 diabetes won't be able to handle the truth, so to speak. Oh, you can't tell them when you can. They're all adults and or, or in or surrounded by adults, and they deal with tough calls in their lives all the time, you know, how to get a mortgage, you know, how to get your car or dealing with ups and downs, or the Why wouldn't they be able to they live with it. So I've always benefited that by turning around and saying I can't do this for you. It's outside my expertise. And I think finally, I'm also trying with my other role trying to deconstruct the myth, and the and the whole thing that doctors are built around them so that there's some sort of, you know, material human beings here for to burn themselves to the altar, normally not, you know, we trained professionals, like a fireman or a policeman and trying to do my best. And sometimes I'll get it wrong, sometimes I'll get it right. But at least I want to portray across that I'm trying and trying my best. And we'll see where we go from there.   Stacey Simms  18:50 You know, it brings up an interesting point, because I consider myself a very strong advocate with my doctors, for myself and for my children. But I still hear you get intimidated, you do very much respect my doctors, any advice for patients who who want to have a difficult conversation with their physician who want to start broaching that, hey, treat me like a partner and may not know how to start?   Partha Kar  19:12 Yeah, I mean, I think it's really difficult. It's really difficult to do that. Because I think this is why it's a bit like I always give the example of let's say, sexism. Now. It's not the it's not just the job of women to go and solve sexism, is it. I mean, it's men have got an equal part, you will not understand nuance as a man or a woman goes through, but you know, when it's wrong, and you can turn around and say, Nah, guys don't do that. Right. So I think what I would encourage rather my clinical colleagues to say that, look, it's not tricky to sort of have that feedback and saying your approach may not be the right thing. And I think this younger generation coming through which does that. So my advice to patients who would like to do that would be to, I think doctors feel very challenged as soon as you challenge them. It's an ego thing. Don't forget that we have been taught in medical school that we are the top of the top there is no Nobody better than us, right? When you're told that for five years, seven years, eight years, 10 years of your life that there was nobody better than you, it's very difficult to then sit in a space. And if somebody challenges you to actually take that on board, so there is a bit of that complex that has happened over the course of time. So the way to approach that would be to probably do it from a slightly different angle. And rather than pointing out the mistake and say, What would you say? What do you think if we did this? Do you feel like so I think you try and do that there'll be some people who are open to the idea of saying, I don't agree with that, and you go with it. But I think the biggest advice I can give is find an ally, was also a clinician who will do that for you. So in meetings, when I go to, I always see myself as that sort of advocacy role return rentable. And now I don't agree with that. Because I know I've spoken to a lot of people who want to agree with that. So that is the sort of fine balance to strike, it will change, doctors are changing. And you know, if you've been long enough in the system, the 90s, were different to 1000s were different, and now is different, but doctors are evolving slowly takes a long time to get you got good get rid of you got complex.   Stacey Simms  21:02 Another question from one of my listeners who wanted to know, Brexit to will, or already has had an impact on diabetes care or supplies,   Partha Kar  21:11 hasn't affected supplies, because we actually knew there was going to be a problem. So we planned and we worked with the industry to make sure we had good suppliers. And there will always be teething trouble as we go along with this. But no, we don't expect, he says Fingers crossed. We have some plans in place in case of anything, but Brexit is one of those political things in life, isn't it? So we just have to ride the storm with it as we go along. So   Stacey Simms  21:34 this is an American based podcast, mostly because I'm American, we do have listeners all over the world, which I'm very, very grateful for. But our healthcare systems are so different. I'm curious if you have any advice, or any lessons that you think we could learn from how how you all do it?   Partha Kar  21:53 Yeah, I mean, so I think the debate about healthcare becomes incredibly emotive on both sides of the Atlantic. I think that's the problem. So when you turn around, people start saying, so for example, if you challenge the NHS, people go like, well, you don't like the NHS, because you want to make it privatized to you. And you will? Um, no, not really, I'm just saying that there are gaps in the prison system as we fund it, for example, we say it's equal to all well, not really, if you come from a deprived community. Right, now we've got issues with race. So as I've said, if you're a black child, your chance of getting a continuous glucose monitor is half of that of a wide shot. This isn't the NHS which professes to be equal to everybody. It's not right. So the challenge is there, even however, the funding is, I think my advice to in the US setting would be it's so vast and so big. Taking aside the politics, which is so difficult to do, obviously, I think too much attention is focused when it comes to chronic disease on the to the three parts, which I think of type 1 diabetes, I think I see it as self management, peer support, and access to train professionals. That's the three things on which good type 1 diabetes care sets. And the US system is incredibly good about doing number three, too, it makes it more and more expensive, because we don't have any trained professionals. And so you end up having to really top load that bit. If you switched a lot of the attention to one and two, self management with technology of peer support, you probably will have better outcomes, I don't think it's about the make of the system. And it's insurance based or public funded. And that's where the politics comes in. It's about the switching of that mentality where you get peer support and self management as being a main key focus and investment into but the US system, partly the UK as well. But the US system hinges heavily on number three. And that's why you the costs are so out of control. That's my view, at least   Stacey Simms  23:38 we've seen it in our own experiences. And people who listen to this podcast know that that peer community matters immensely with camps and communities and meetups. And it's incredible. It makes such a difference. Absolutely. You mentioned language matters. Can you speak a little bit about that for people who aren't familiar? Yeah, I   Partha Kar  23:55 mean, I think there's a fair few versions of that. I'm the principal of that was built in Australia in 2012. And again, it's nothing dramatic. It's not I mean, became it basically saying just be nice to people. You know, I think you've got embroiled in this whole debate for a bit of time. Because it was done in the States. There was papers out of him that we picked up in the UK, different countries have done it and people get stuck up in the Oh, is it is it about calling somebody a diabetic or a person with diabetes, it's not lots of people don't mind being called diabetic, some people do mind being called diabetic, that's not about that what the document is about. The document is very, very simply about trying to be less judgmental about people whose lives you don't leave. Right? If you're saying to somebody, or you know, I'm not sure you're you should be doing that in the morning, when you don't know what like the lead. You don't know that they're having to, you know, rush to drop off their kid to school and do this and do that. It's not easy to then go you should have a very structured breakfast and take your insulin on time. Well, that's fine for you to say, but that for that individual. They might have two kids to drop off and then go to work while trying to make sure you know their husbands had their work. It's It's not easy. So I think that's what it's about don't don't try and judge others whose lives you don't leave lid. So that that was pretty much it.   Stacey Simms  25:08 I think that the libre goal that you have I know you're not done with and you wouldn't call it a an ultimate success yet has been tremendous. What is next? Is it trying to get more pumps covered? Is it trying to get more equality as you've already mentioned, racial and economic lines,   Partha Kar  25:23 closed loops, I think I think is, is the is the next target, I think more more access to closed loops, more access to all the types of different loops that are available, and you touched upon it, irrespective of your deprivation, ethnicity, that's going to be huge for because going ahead, I want more people to have access to technology, because I think technology is an enabler sort of ticks, that box of self management, it also encourages more peer support. So if we did that, together well, and did more standardized training for healthcare professionals that I think that's the sort of ultimate goal. But I think closed loops are going to be the thing I suspect the focus and target on as we go ahead.   Stacey Simms  26:01 Fabulous. And I'll let you go. I know you got to run. But we are speaking during Diabetes Awareness Month, and you put out a video very plain spoken as you do, saying, basically, be nice. Don't judge, don't be an idiot. And you have a two minute long video explaining this. What was the reaction? I mean, it's a very plain statement, but at the same time, it's quite blunt. Yeah, I   Partha Kar  26:21 mean, I think I see the debates between and it's so silly, some of the stuff that goes on, on social media and wider and I can understand people do it because they have a book to sell, or a podcast or blog or whatever they want to do, or Twitter likes, but the simplistic narratives and never helped people, you know, we could we could turn around and say, Well, if you eat too many cakes, you will have type two diabetes, there is not a single evidence base that will support that statement. Yes, people say that right? You know, and I think that's the problem. And then that rolls into how did your child have diabetes? You give them too many cakes, and you sitting there going like what how uneducated Are you didn't come up with a statement like that. And it's so frustrating to see that. So I think the reaction has been good. I mean, I've always been known for my and I genuinely think when people don't know something, I'm very happy to explain it to them in today's day and age. If people say that, Oh, I didn't know that type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder has got nothing to do with your diet or your lifestyle, then I'm sorry, you were just uneducated. And that's my bottom line to that. So you haven't even made the simple effort to open Google. So things like that. And I think that was the that was the idea of that is Diabetes Awareness Month. Just be aware of different types. Be nice to people don't judge others and you know, at least at least do some research and you've got Google on your smartphone. So simple.   Stacey Simms  27:41 Okay, last question. You mentioned the eternal is no spoilers. I haven't seen it. But I know you're a big Marvel fan. How was the movie?   Partha Kar  27:47 Oh, it's good. I really enjoyed it. It's as a standalone, it works really well. And my only big tip also is mistake for the after credits. Very good, especially the last one. Very, very good. All right.   Stacey Simms  27:58 Well, thank you so much for spending so much time with me. I really appreciate you being here. Thanks very much. Partha Kar Pleasure.   You're listening to Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms. More information at diabetes connections.com. Of course, there's always a transcript as well. I will link up how to follow Dr. Kar on social media, I highly recommend his Twitter feeds. And he is just very informative, very straightforward. And he's always willing to admit when he makes a mistake or something funny happens. I mean, he's just let's face it. He's just a human being online, which is why I think so many of us respond to him so well, that I liked a lot of the advice he gave there for us to take to our doctors, we really have to be straightforward with them. So many times they don't even realize what they're doing or how they're talking to us. Sometimes they do and they're they're just jerks. But most of the time, I think they want to have a good relationship with us. At least that has been my experience. There's only been one doctor, in my my experience. I'm not talking about Benny, because we've been very lucky with him. There's only been one doctor that I have fired. And I fired him from my hospital room because oh my gosh, was he talking down to me? So don't be afraid to do it. Alright, Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dexcom. And we were watching TV the other night. My husband and I are really into the expanse now, which is a sci fi show that's been out for a while. We are totally binging it, we're going through every season. So we're watching that. And the Dexcom went off the alert on my phone and Benny was upstairs in his room. And you know, for some reason, it took me back to the days when we basically had blood sugar checks on a timer. If you're of a certain age you remember this we would check doing a finger stick the same time every day at home and at school and whenever extra we needed to. It's really amazing to think about how much our diabetes management has changed with share and follow. I didn't stop the movie to check on him. I knew what was going on. I mean, I could decide whether to text him or go up and help out for this instance. I did absolutely nothing because I didn't need to using the share and follow apps have really helped us talk less about diabetes. which I never thought would happen with a teenager. Trust me Benny loves that part too. That's what's so great about the Dexcom system. I think for the caregiver or the spouse or the friend, you can help the person with diabetes manage in the way that works for your individual situation. Internet connectivity is required to access Dexcom follow separate follow app is required. learn more, go to diabetes connections.com, click on the Dexcom logo. If you're listening as this episode goes live, Happy Hanukkah, we will be marking night three as you're listening again, if you're listening when the episode first airs, and Paul hits early this year, that my daughter's already packing school, but that's how it goes. I hope your life because they're yummy and your Hanukkah guilt is delicious. And you're not stressing out too much about diabetes, and you're able to enjoy what the holiday has to offer. Looking ahead. I mean, what am I going to say? Here? We are December. Oh my goodness. So we've got some great shows coming up. We've got a conversation next week with the folks at convatec. They make all of the insets except for Omni pod. But if you use a Tandem Medtronic, yep, so mid, those pumps, they make your insets. So we had a really good conversation about how to make those better, some good information for the community from them. And I'm hoping that'll be an ongoing conversation. And we have a lot of good stuff in the works for the rest of this year. Going into January, does he I would ask is if you have listened to this far and you are not signed up for our newsletter, please make sure to do that I send out an email every week along with the show. And quite often there is more information in there than just a week's episode. We do surveys, we do research opportunities that I get from companies. There's a lot of info in that. And as we move forward next year, and I'm branching off into other projects, I'm gonna be using that newsletter to communicate more and more about things, not just the podcasts that I think are of your interest, but I don't spam you or anything dumb like that. So go ahead, you go to diabetes connections.com a little pop up will come up. If you don't see it, just scroll down. There's a little newsletter thingy that'll help you sign up there. Thank you to my editor John Bukenas from audio editing solutions. Thank you so much for listening. We are back on track for our newscast this week. So I will see you back here Wednesday on Facebook or YouTube Live for in the news. And then on Friday, we turn that into an audio, podcast whatever works better for you. Feel free to join me in whatever way is the best. I'm Stacey Simms Until then be kind to yourself.   Benny  32:24 Diabetes Connections is a production of Stacey Simms media. All rights reserved. All wrongs avenged

University of Adversity
Dimple Thakrar - Bringing Your Body And Energy Into Alignment

University of Adversity

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 64:24


There is a reason why Dimple Thakrar is the 'go-to' Alignment Coach for global brands, executives, corporations and CEOs... and that is her BS-free approach that ensures results. With 25 years of experience in helping people who are about to lose their loved ones, Dimple's experience is built on hard earned background as a respected NHS clinician across multiple health sectors including top level Neuro Rehab management. It's this hands-on experience that makes Dimple such an in-demand strategist; most of Dimple's client base is the very top 0.1% in their industries; they've nailed finances, they're leading huge teams, they manage massive businesses, they shoulder enormous responsibilities; the only place they are not winning is within their relationships. IN THIS EPISODE, YOU WILL LEARN:  5:58 Growing in the art of decision making 15:33 Awake your awareness of masculine and feminine energy 28:04 Learning to shift the flow of energy in your body 43:38 Mastering your inner critic  47:55 Trusting and understanding your intuition

The Nine Club With Chris Roberts
#209 - Bod Boyle

The Nine Club With Chris Roberts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 185:28


Bod Boyle discusses growing up in London, skating vert in the early 80's, getting hooked up with G&S, turning pro for Santa Cruz, transitioning from being a pro skater to doing sales for NHS, working for Giant Distribution, leaving Giant for Dwindle Distribution, how to navigate photo incentive in the digital world, what moves the needle nowadays for board sales, how Dwindle is taking steps to reducing waste and making sustainable products and much more!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Dope Black Dads Podcast
Every Mind Matters - Taking Care of Your Mental Health

Dope Black Dads Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 53:07


*TW: mention of suicide* The Office for Health Improvement and Disparities is launching a new Better Health - Every Mind Matters campaign, heroing the little things we can all do to look after our mental health and how they can add up to make a big difference; helping us to lead happier, healthier lives and cope with life's challenges. At the heart of the campaign is the free, NHS-approved Mind Plan. By answering five simple questions online, you get a personalised mental health action plan with practical tips to help deal with stress and anxiety, boost your mood, sleep better and feel more in control. Having good mental health helps us to relax more, achieve more and enjoy our lives more. Search Every Mind Matters to see what works for you. Dope Black Dads is a place where we are changing the narrative and having progressive conversations about black fathers and creating a safe digital space for the community.  Join the conversation and the community online through our social channels: Twitter: @DopeBlackDads Instagram: @DopeBlackDads Facebook Page: @DopeBlackDads If you want to get in touch with us, email us at hello@dopeblackdads.org or follow our conversations in-depth on our Facebook Group by searching 'Dope Black Dads'.

Resiliency in Running
Running from Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) in the Holiday Season

Resiliency in Running

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 19:51


I am not a doctor, just sharing what's helped me (as well as some helpful research from the NHS)! ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Support my fundraiser: www.justgiving.com/resiliencyinrunning NHS Source: https://www.nhs.uk/mental-health/conditions/seasonal-affective-disorder-sad/overview/ ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Questions? Comments? Shoot me a message! Podcast IG: @resiliencyinrunning Personal IG: @liznewcomer www.resiliencyinrunning.com linktr.ee/resiliencyinrunning www.youtube.com/resiliencyinrunning Canva Free Trial: https://www.canva.com/join/lkc-rsl-fgc Headliner Free Trial: https://make.headliner.app/referral/elizabeth.newcomer_HV4fOz £10 off Huel: https://huel.mention-me.com/m/ol/du7ci-9e112bab35 --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/support

eGPlearning Podblast
Blueprint for General Practice 2021

eGPlearning Podblast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 21:30


This is a response to Gandhi's 2015 article – “A further Blueprint for general practice”Find out what I liked and didn't like and how it can be brought up to date for 2021!Link to the 2015 Blueprint - https://egplearning.co.uk/a-further-blueprint-for-primary-care/  Join us for the first NHS focused MS Teams user conference from Redmoor Health and eGPlearning from 09:30am-3pm on 2nd Dec 2021https://bit.ly/MSTEAMSNHSHear and see demonstrations from fellow users of MS Teams in the NHS and how it can help your patients, your team, and your area including:+ How to use MS Teams+ The benefits of using MS Teams+ Video Group consultations+ How to chair a meeting using MS Teams+ What are

The Dr. Tyna Show
20: Analysis of the Psychological Meltdown of the World with Seerut Chawla

The Dr. Tyna Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 48:20


On this episode of The Dr. Tyna Show, I am delighted to interview my new friend Seerut K Chawla. Originally from India, Seerut is a Psychotherapist who lives in London. She's practiced in the NHS, and now runs her own private practice. She has a special interest in personal responsibility & resilience and now teaches that in an online membership. You can see why I adore her. I'm a huge fan and have followed her for some time on Instagram and we finally got to sit down for a candid conversation.  The best part is that we don't live in the same echo chamber and don't agree on all things, but having interesting and thoughtful conversation with intelligent and emotionally mature people is the BEST. And we both thoroughly enjoyed ourselves. I hope you enjoy this episode as well. As always, if you have any questions for the show please email us at podcast@drtyna.com.  And if you like this show, please rate, review and subscribe on your podcast app.   Follow Seerut: https://www.seerutkchawla.com https://www.instagram.com/seerutkchawla/ Sponsored By: https://store.drtyna.com and https://drtynahemp.com BLACK FRIDAY SALE (til November 29th) 20% off with Code: BLACKFRIDAY20 Follow Dr. Tyna: Instagram https://www.instagram.com/drtyna/ Download my FREE book and get on my email list: https://courses.drtyna.com/book Shop my stores: https://store.drtyna.com and https://drtynahemp.com

New Frontiers in Functional Medicine
Maladaptive Stress Response, Personality Patterns, and Fatigue with Alex Howard

New Frontiers in Functional Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 57:21


Living in a pandemic era filled with political, environmental, and social turmoil is tiring – downright exhausting. So is it any wonder the number of chronic fatigue cases has crept up to 1.5 million people in the US? In this episode of New Frontiers, guest host Dr. Patrick Hanaway talks with Alex Howard, the creator of the Therapeutic Coaching methodology and Founder of The Optimum Health Clinic, one of the world's leading integrative clinics specializing in chronic fatigue syndrome. Alex has published several research articles and books on the topic, with his latest book, Decode Your Fatigue: A Clinically Proven 12-Step Plan to Increase Your Energy, Heal Your Body and Transform Your Life - just published. In addition, he is currently working on a randomized control trial with the UK national health service, NHS, as a follow-up to a preliminary study on his integrative approach to chronic fatigue syndrome. Dr. Hanaway and Alex discuss the key factors contributing to fatigue, using personalized mapping to untangle the picture and the importance of intervention sequencing to create positive, long-term shifts in patients' well-being. I'm so proud to have these two incredible humans sharing what they know with all of us on New Frontiers – it's an amazing conversation and I could listen to them talk all day! Please leave a review, rating, and share this episode far and wide! ~DrKF

The Richie Allen Show
Episode 1370: The Richie Allen Show Wednesday November 24th 2021

The Richie Allen Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 112:33


Richie is joined by Hayden Hewitt and Gerald Celente.Hayden Hewitt co-founded the legendary liveleak.com. These days he runs free speech platforms Triggerwarning.tv and altfeed.org. Hayden has recently begun producing independent films for Black Octopus Productions. On today's show, Hayden discusses the horror of forced vaccination, the destruction of the NHS, the Online Harms Bill and more.www.blackoctopusproductions.comGerald Celente has published the legendary Trends Journal for nearly three decades. Gerald and his writing staff used the pages of The Journal to warn us that we were rushing headlong towards totalitarianism. Today, Gerald and Richie discuss anti-lockdown protests, America's opioid crisis, vaccine mandates and much more. Subscribe to The Trends Journal here:www.trendsjournal.com  

When Belief Dies
When Belief Dies #77 - 'Carts, Horses & Certainty' with Roger Bretherton

When Belief Dies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 91:17


This week Sam sits back down with Roger Bretherton to look at certainty and what Roger holds as his bedrock to his faith. The video version of this conversation can be found here on our YouTube channel 12 hours after the audio version goes live. Is a relational faith enough? Can it be pinned down? What would undermine this? Is there a circle that one can enter to start to know God? Is it someone's fault if they can't or don't believe in God? We close with a challenge for Roger to complete to push into this more effectively in the next conversation. *Note* I was wrong about where the verses about a hanged man being cursed are found in the OT, it's actually within Deuteronomy 21:22-23. *Note* Roger's Bio: Dr Roger Bretherton is Principal Lecturer for Enterprise in the School of Psychology at the University of Lincoln. He worked as a clinician, manager and trainer in the NHS for over a decade, and joined the University of Lincoln in 2007, where he specialises in coaching and positive psychology. You can find/follow Roger here: Website University Page The GOD Lab - 8 Spiritual Experiments You Can Try at Home Twitter (hermit) We hope you enjoy our show. When Belief Dies aims to honestly reflect on faith, religion and life. Your support via Patreon enables us to cover the costs of running this show and look to the future to make things even better as we build upon what we already have in the works. Please take a look and consider giving. Alternatively, you can support the show with a one-off gift via PayPal or Bitcoin. Use the following link to navigate to the website, to find us on social media and anywhere else we might be present online. #Podcast #Deconstruction #God #Agnostic #Christian #Atheism #Apologetics #Audio #Question #Exvangelical #Deconversion #SecularGrace #Exchristian

Stories of our times
Can the NHS cope this winter?

Stories of our times

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 30:26


The NHS is under intense pressure, but since the peak of the pandemic public attention has largely moved elsewhere. Today we catch up with The Times' health editor – and with the doctors we spoke to in January, during the peak of the pandemic – to find out how the NHS is coping.This podcast was brought to you thanks to the support of readers of The Times and The Sunday Times. Subscribe today and get one month free at: thetimes.co.uk/storiesofourtimes. Guests: - Kat Lay, health editor, The Times.- Dr Pushpo Babul Hossain, junior doctor.- Dr Adrian Boyle, emergency physician and Vice President of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine.- Anonymous respiratory doctor in south London.Host: David Aaronovitch.Clips: ITV News, 5 News. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

In the Key of Q
Oli Spleen

In the Key of Q

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 43:06


‘After I got the diagnosis I start having lots of unprotected sex because I thought, “Well why did I even bother to be careful if I still managed to have this?”. In retrospect, I should have just enjoyed it.' Oli Spleen comes this week from the ever-sunny seaside shores of Brighton in England. His first album was released in 2013. Titled ‘Fag Machine' it was a Velvet Underground-tinged take on Queer life. His most recent album is 2020's ‘Night Sweats and Fever Dreams' and is a complex and moving work inspired by the HIV / AIDS epidemic. Oli discusses in the episode how HIV brought him dangerously close to dying and the effect that crystal meth addiction has had on his personal life. This episode also contains discussion of suicide, so listener discretion is advised. Useful links: Help for suicidal thoughts from the UK's https://www.nhs.uk/mental-health/feelings-symptoms-behaviours/behaviours/help-for-suicidal-thoughts/ (NHS). Oli's pages at https://olispleen.bandcamp.com/ (Bandcamp) and https://www.youtube.com/user/OliSpleen (YouTube). Help for crystal meth addiction at https://dean.st/chemsex/chems-crystal-meth/ (56 Dean Street). Useful info about HIV AIDS from https://www.lgbthero.org.uk/Pages/Category/hiv (GMFA). Compilation of death references in Fraggle Rock via https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uBA2tokFOsk (YouTube). Domestic violence and abuse, support resources from https://www.stonewall.org.uk/domestic-violence-and-abuse-resources-lgbt-people (Stonewall). The podcast can be financially supported at https://www.patreon.com/inthekeyofq (patreon.com/inthekeyofq) where for as little as five US dollars a month subscribers can access exclusive interview contact with every guest. Keywords: #HIVAIDS #HIVDiagnoses #CrystalMethAddiction #CrystalMeth #VelvetUnderground #QueerSon #FraggleRock #JimHenson #Queercore #BoysInMakeUp #BoysInDrag #FraggleRock #DeathObsession Support this podcast

Novara Media
TyskySour: The Tory Plan to Privatise The NHS

Novara Media

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 61:15


MPs will vote tomorrow on Sajid Javid’s Health and Care Bill. Does it threaten to privatise the NHS by the back door? We speak to Dr Bob Gill. With Michael Walker and Aaron Bastani.

Best of Today
‘My incredible doctor brother'

Best of Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 8:32


Dr Irfan Halim took ill in September, after spending much of the last 18 months on the NHS frontline during the pandemic. Nine weeks later, he died after contracting Covid-19. He had dedicated 25 years of work to the NHS as a surgeon. His brother, Amir, speaks to Mishal Husain about the loss of not just Irfan, but also of their father Kamal, who also died from complications of the virus.

The Untold
The Dentist Van

The Untold

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 27:20


Nick has an unbearable tooth ache and has tried, and failed, to extract the bad tooth himself. He's homeless and, like many others, can't access NHS dental care. When a mobile dentist van arrives at a homeless support centre, Nick joins the queue. He's desperate but he was too late putting his name on the list. Will he get an appointment? The charity van roams Britain with a dedicated brigade of volunteer dentists, filling in wherever the need is greatest. As it parks up outside the support centre in Hastings, we hear the stories of those seeking help. There are many hoping to be seen. Presented by Grace Dent and produced for BBC Audio in Bristol by Eliza Lomas.

Deep Breath In
The GP crisis with Gareth Iacobucci and Lucy Martin

Deep Breath In

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 49:43


Primary care in the UK is in crisis. General practice was already under huge strain, as a result of the pandemic, high levels of seasonal respiratory viruses, as well as chronic understaffing and underfunding, but recent negative media campaigns against GPs, amidst the health secretary's plans to publish ‘league tables' of GP practices, have added to this and have led to increased demoralisation among doctors. In this week's episode, we discuss the current political climate affecting the NHS, perceptions of our healthcare system, and how this has changed over the last 10-20 years. If GP ‘league tables' are not the answer, what creative solutions are needed in order to encourage new GPs into primary care, and to retain doctors in the workforce? Our guests: Gareth Iacobucci is the assistant news editor for ‘The BMJ'. Lucy Martin is a GP, working in Dudley, as well as the acting medical director for Dudley Integrated Health & Care NHS Trust.

Hormones in Harmony
#147 How Pelvic Health Physio Supports Conditions Including Endo, Incontinence & Pain with Natalia Vàsquez

Hormones in Harmony

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 79:19


Natalia Vásquez is a passionate and committed physiotherapist with experience and great interest in pelvic health and neurological pelvic dysfunction. After graduating with a First Class degree in Physiotherapy, Natalia gained a Master's in Clinical Neuroscience at University College London and immediately started her clinical research into neurogenic bladder and pelvic dysfunction. Following her research Natalia has continued to take part in the academia and has presented her work in numerous national and international meetings. Her research, training and academic experience led her to successfully implement and consolidate a Specialist Pelvic Physiotherapy Clinic at the London Spinal Cord Injury Centre, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital where she treats a wide range of complex pelvic dysfunction cases. Natalia's multi-disciplinary experience in pelvic dysfunction due to neurological injury and disease motivated her to extend her practice to the general population in the private sector. Whether in the NHS or in the private sector, Natalia has a holistic and compassionate approach which go along with her recent love and training in Functional Medicine  She focuses in re-education and manipulation of the abdominal and lumbo-pelvic  musculature for men and women suffering from a wide range of conditions including bladder and chronic pelvic pain, idiopathic and neurogenic bladder dysfunction, urinary and/or faecal incontinence and ano-rectal and sexual dysfunction. Outside of work, Natalia loves to practice Yoga and meditation which she also uses and practices with her patients. She also enjoys cooking for family and friends. Most of all, Natalia cherishes spending quality time with her daughter.   We discuss: Some things that can affect the neurological system Importance of posture What the pelvic floor is & what we need to know Exercise Benefits of pelvic health physiotherapy, what a consultation may involve (examination - internal & external) How to improve things like incontinence Effects of mental emotional stress or traumatic events like rape/sexual assault Thoughts on yoni eggs + menstrual cups Where can people find a good practitioner in the UK.   Mentioned: #42 Chronic Pelvic Pain with Jessica Drummond #135 All About Vaginal Health Squeezy App Finding a Physio Vaginal Moisturiser Bump to Beyond, Manchester, UK Connect with Natalia - www.nataliavasqiez.co.uk   -------   MY LINKS:   Try my favourite ORGANO KING coffee   Grab my favourite BluBlox glasses   Buy Queen of the Thrones CASTOR OIL PACK with 10% discount using code HORMONES10 -    -------   Got a podcast question? Send you emails to hormonesinharmony@gmail.com    Enjoyed this episode? Leave me a rating and review so that I can share this podcast with more women   Want more from me? You can find me online…   Website www.vivanaturalhealth.co.uk   Instagram www.instagram.com/vivanaturalhealth   Facebook www.facebook.com/vivanaturalhealth   Email enquiries@vivanaturalhealth.co.uk   Tune in now on iTunes, Spotify, my website or watch on Youtube (Viva Natural Health)   If you are enjoying the podcast, please leave me a rating and review, as this helps me to reach more women and continue to interview awesome guests!   Make sure you hit subscribe so that you never miss an episode!

Reasons to be Cheerful with Ed Miliband and Geoff Lloyd
218. FIRST THEY IGNORE YOU: part one—- the creation of the NHS

Reasons to be Cheerful with Ed Miliband and Geoff Lloyd

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 56:44


We're doing a little shimmy, into the past. In the first part of our mini-history series on how progressive victories were won, we're looking at the NHS. How did this complex institution, that's beloved in the UK and revered around the world, manage to even get off the ground? Who were the key players? How did they win over opposition (and why was some of that from doctors)? And what role did the crisis of world war play in shifting hearts and minds?To help us unpick the past we're joined by historians and experts on policy Sally Sheard from the University of Liverpool and Nick Timmins, author of The Five Giants, A biography of the Welfare State, then to help understand where the NHS goes from here is Jennifer Dixon, Chief Executive of the Health Foundation.Plus, find out about Ed's latest sartorial swimming accessory as we welcome him back to earth from planet Cop and spare a thought for Geoff as he very publicly misjudges his choice of outfit. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Godless Spellchecker Podcast
Taking The Myth - November 2021 Edition

The Godless Spellchecker Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 67:30


This week on Taking The Myth, Stephen Knight (@GSpellchecker) and Iram Ramzan of sedaa.org (@Iram_Ramzan) discuss the big topics. 0:00 Intro 0:26 Food! 3:03 The attempted terrorist bombing at a Liverpool hospital 16:40 Plans to make vaccination compulsory for NHS staff in the UK 27:19 Jeremy Corbyn takes legal action against Conservative Councillor for a satirical Twitter image. 33:59 The Kyle Rittenhouse Trial and Verdict 50:12 Audience Questions 52:12 Stonewall and the changing tide on the gender ID debate 1:00:10 Ghostbusters Afterlife Review (no spoilers) & the 2016 reboot controversy 1:05:02 Iram talks about Ricky Gervais's ‘Afterlife'. Support the podcast at www.patreon.com/gspellchecker Also available on iTunes, Stitcher, YouTube & Spotify.  

5 live Science Podcast
Climate Change and Covid

5 live Science Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 53:56


As pressure on the NHS intensifies, are covid vaccine passports on the cards? Plus, the scientists using nanotechnology to make silk shirts that cool you down when the sun shines on them! And We look back on what was and wasn't said at the COP-26 climate change summit, and ask how is climate change already taking its toll on all of us.

eGPlearning Podblast
General Practice update- The new GPC chair and more

eGPlearning Podblast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 51:11


New GPC Chair - WelcomeDr Farah Jameel – First Female GPC Chair“Reset the relationship” messageGPC's executive team, chair of Camden LMC.Lets explore the role of the GPCWhat's currently in the air for them and the profession and what are & should be the priorities going forwardWhat would be your priorities for the GOC?About us...We've taken a step back, conferencesSign up for content GP5T2 2021 Trainers conference https://egplearning.podia.com/gp5t2-2021 MS Teams Conference 2/12/21 https://hopin.com/events/nhs-ms-teams-user-conference Busy busy at work and…Shop - Iceberg https://www.egplearning.co.uk/shopBut first….What is the GPC? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iX9D4wNVS-U What is the role of the BMA for that matter?What has the GPC ever done for us??Dr Farah Jameel – First Female GPC ChairBackground: https://www.pulsetoday.co.uk/news/breaking-news/dr-farah-jameel-elected-as-first-female-bma-gpc-chair She became the youngest negotiator on the BMA GP Committee's England executive team when she was appointed in 2017 at the age of 34 and was one of the four executive team members of the GPC who negotiated the landmark five-year contract.She has been leading on workload issues for the GPC, including changes to the NHS standard contract to prevent secondary care from dumping workload on general practice.As a member of the executive team, she supported work on IT, leading on the BMA's successful campaign to delay the controversial ‘General Practice Data for Planning and Research' scheme, labelled a ‘data grab' by campaigners.Dr Jameel has also supported the GPC's clinical and prescribing policy group, where she turned her attention to issues such as how referral management systems are rejecting GP referrals following an outcry from GPs on social media.She was previously a council member at Medical Women's Federation, deputy chair of the BMA's Equality and Inclusion Committee and a national executive member of the British International Doctor's Association.She is also former Chair of the South Thames Regional Junior Doctors Committee in 2012 and was a member of the BritJoin us for the first NHS focused MS Teams user conference from Redmoor Health and eGPlearning from 09:30am-3pm on 2nd Dec 2021https://bit.ly/MSTEAMSNHSHear and see demonstrations from fellow users of MS Teams in the NHS and how it can help your patients, your team, and your area including:+ How to use MS Teams+ The benefits of using MS Teams+ Video Group consultations+ How to chair a meeting using MS Teams+ What are

Sustainable(ish)
[121] CLIMATE AND HEALTH – A WIN-WIN SITUATION

Sustainable(ish)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 67:28


At first glance, healthcare and the NHS might not seem to be linked to the climate crisis. And doesn't the NHS have enough on it's plate at the moment without being expected to 'green' itself?Tune in to this great episode with GPs Dr Fran Cundill and Dr Matthew Sawyer discussing how sustainability and healthcare and […]

Today in Focus
Covid is surging in Europe. What does it mean for the UK?

Today in Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 25:04


As the days get shorter and we huddle indoors, memories of 2020's catastrophic winter are close at hand. Now a new surge of coronavirus cases is spreading across Europe. But as well as notes of caution, there are good reasons to hope that the UK will avoid the lows of last year – from lower hospitalisation rates to exciting treatments on the verge of approval. How optimistic should we be – and can we still go to Christmas parties?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus

Path 11 Podcast
364 Throwback Thursday with Monica Williams M.D.

Path 11 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 18:04


Monica Williams, MD, is an award-winning writer and board-certified emergency physician with expertise in Death and Dying and medical directives. She practices in one the largest Emergency Departments in the nation at Huntsville Hospital, where she also serves the community as the Medical Director for Advanced Care Planning and End of Life Education and has lectured coast to coast in the US. Additionally, she has served on the board of directors for multiple not-for-profit hospices. She is Faculty for the University of Alabama at Birmingham's School of Medicine, and is an appointee to the American College of Emergency Physicians End-of-Life taskforce. Her writing, speaking and advocacy focuses on empowering patients and families in critical and end-of-life decision-making and her consulting work centers on the same, although the future direction of her work will incorporate more spiritual elements. Her book, "It's OK to Die" and companion website are tools for transforming the end of life into a time of peace, closure, and healing. Dr. Williams has appeared in local and national media as a Medical Expert, including the Emmy Award-winning show, THE DOCTORS., the Washington Post, and her blog has also appeared in the New York Times, Health Around the Web Column. Her end-of-life preparation checklists have been adopted by UCLA's Center for Integrative Oncology and the UK's NHS campaign, Be Ready for It! endorsed by the Norfolk and Suffolk Palliative Care Academy. In 2013, she was a winner of the national Costs of Care essay contest. To buy the book and learn more about Dr. Williams's work, visit www.oktodie.com. ------------------------------------ Check out Molly Mandelberg's Wild Hearts Rise Up Oracle Deck & Guidebook ------------------------------------

CCO Infectious Disease Podcast
Tackling Racial Disparities in HCV Care: Global Edition

CCO Infectious Disease Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 40:05


In this episode, Prof Ashley Brown, BSc, MD, FRCP, and Ahmed M. Elsharkawy, PhD, FRCP(UK), discuss key racial inequities of care that lead to undertreatment for migrant populations and other racial minorities globally with or at risk for hepatitis C.Topics include:HCV Burden and Care Disparities in Specific PopulationsGenotypes and Length of Infection in Ethnic MinoritiesPrimary Care Education and System-Related BarriersSolutions to Overcome Barriers to HCV CareFirst-hand Patient StoriesProf Ashley Brown, BSc, MD, FRCPProfessor of Practice, Viral HepatitisDivision of Metabolism, Digestion and ReproductionImperial College LondonConsultant HepatologistLiver & Antiviral UnitImperial College Healthcare NHS TrustLondon, United KingdomAhmed M. Elsharkawy, PhD, FRCP(UK)Consultant Hepatologist and Honorary Senior LecturerLiver Unit and Biomedical Research CentreUniversity Hospitals BirminghamUniversity of BirminghamBirmingham, United KingdomContent based on a CME program supported by educational grants provided by AbbVie; Gilead Sciences, Inc.; and Janssen Therapeutics, Division of Janssen Products, LP To follow along, download the slides at:https://bit.ly/36UDLViLink to full program:https://bit.ly/3kKIb9a

eGPlearning Podblast
General Practice Access guide by Healthy London Partnership

eGPlearning Podblast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 57:37


How can the General Practice Access guide by Healthy London partnerships help practices and patients? Guide: https://www.healthylondon.org/our-wor...Find out in this session with:✅ Dr Minal Bakhai, GP and National Clinical Director for Digital First Primary Care NHS England and Improvement✅ Dr Siân Howell, Chair of Access Guide Development Group✅ Dr Tom Margham, Clinical Lead Enabling Quality Improvement In Practice (EQUIP), Tower Hamlets CCGand me as we share the guide, views and your chance to ask questions too.Join us for the first NHS focused MS Teams user conference from Redmoor Health and eGPlearning from 09:30am-3pm on 2nd Dec 2021https://bit.ly/MSTEAMSNHSHear and see demonstrations from fellow users of MS Teams in the NHS and how it can help your patients, your team, and your area including:+ How to use MS Teams+ The benefits of using MS Teams+ Video Group consultations+ How to chair a meeting using MS Teams+ What are

The Cannabis Conversation | Medical Cannabis | CBD | Hemp
EPISODE #140 Cannabis Testing Labs with Connor Jensen Murphy and Justin Ihnken, Co-founders at QNTM Labs

The Cannabis Conversation | Medical Cannabis | CBD | Hemp

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 41:54


This week's episode comes to you from Odense in Denmark, where we're joined by Connor Jensen Murphy and Justin Ihnken from Danish full service cannabis testing and analysis lab, QNTM Labs.We examine the importance of continuity, standardisation, and frameworks with the context of cannabis laboratory testing, and how QNTM Labs are helping to bring pharmaceutical testing standards to the European medical cannabis industry.About QNTM LabsQNTM Labs is an advanced analytical laboratory providing research, development, and regulatory compliance services for pharmaceutical companies.Founded in 2020 and headquartered in Odense, Denmark, QNTM is dedicated to developing innovative analytical methods while maintaining the highest quality levels to forge new industry standards.As global sentiment is increasingly focused on quality data, QNTM Labs is determined to improve transparency and access to robust scientific analysis, working hand-in-hand with global cultivators, API manufacturers, and pharmaceutical industry stakeholders through analytical testing, contract research and clinical trials support.About Justin IhnkenJustin Ihnken is the Chief Executive Officer and Co-founder of QNTM Labs, a state-of-the-art GMP-certified laboratory dedicated to supporting plant-based pharmaceuticals. Outside of QNTM Labs, Justin also currently sits on the Board of Directors for the American Club of Copenhagen.Prior to founding QNTM Labs, Justin worked in Copenhagen for Danish global shipping conglomerate, A.P. Møller-Mærsk, where he was responsible for interest rate portfolio management and derivative trading, as a part of the company's global treasury team. Before moving to Denmark in 2018, Justin built his professional career in institutional banking in New York City, within fixed income trading and interest rates.  Justin completed his education at Seton Hall University's Stillman School of Business where he studied Mathematical Finance. About Connor Jensen MurphyConnor Jensen Murphy co-founded QNTM Labs in March 2020 and is currently the company's Chief Operating Officer.  Connor has spent his career advising middle-market and founder-owned companies in corporate restructuring and M&A transactions.Prior to starting QNTM, Connor was a VP on EY's Investment Banking team in Copenhagen focused on M&A transactions. Before moving to Copenhagen, he was based in San Francisco, California and also worked with EY's Investment Banking group. Connor holds a B.A. from Colgate University where he studied Environmental Economics.ResourcesFollow QNTM Labs on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/qntmlabs/QNTM Labs Website: https://qntmlabs.com/Connect with Connor on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/connor-jensen-murphyConnect with Justin on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/justin-ihnken

Consummate Athlete Podcast
The Cyclist's Cookbook - Nigel Mitchell RD

Consummate Athlete Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 56:48


Nigel Mitchell RD has been a Team Chef for Pro Tour Cyclists, Olympians and as a Registered Dietician, his career has included providing nutritional support for NHS patients, university lecturing and research. His book the Cyclist's Cookbook is available now.  SUPPORT THE SHOW: Use the link https://amzn.to/3Aej4jl to shop amazon and support the show for free! Get a 100% Made for you Training Plan: https://consummateathlete.com/training-plans/ Book a Call or Skills session - https://calendly.com/smartathlete Get one of Molly Hurford's Books - Shred Girls, Fuel Your Ride, Sponsorship Guide for Athletes, or Becoming a Consummate Athlete https://amzn.to/3bOztkN   Show Notes & Services: ConsummateAthlete.com Listen on Spotify  https://open.spotify.com/show/3eK9nI1Rmr7o9WvUcwCR2b Listen on Apple Podcast - https://podcasts.apple.com/ca/podcast/consummate-athlete-podcast/id1100471297

Best of Today
NHS Boss: Pressures 'significant' as winter approaches

Best of Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 20:49


After a difficult eighteen months for the NHS, hospitals throughout the UK have been bracing themselves for what could be the toughest winter in living memory. Today's Martha Kearney visits The Royal Victoria Infirmary in Newcastle upon Tyne, where last Friday, doctors had to put elective surgery on pause. She speaks to staff and patients there about the pressure for beds. Martha also speaks to Amanda Pritchard, Chief Executive of NHS England in her first full length interview since her appointment in August. (Image: NHS Surgeons, Credit: Press Association / Andrew Parsons)

Wake Up to Money
Work and Reward

Wake Up to Money

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 49:57


Felicity Hannah looks at the jobs market and wage growth, as well as the future of high speed rail in the North of England. Plus, Shell plans to move its HQ to the UK. And, what financial pressures is the NHS under at the moment?

Real Vision Presents...
Analyzing the U.S.-Canadian Dollar, European Lockdowns, Tesla's Stock, & Musk's Twitter Tantrum

Real Vision Presents...

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 29:15


DB-Nov 15,2021: Dave Floyd, founder of Aspen Trading, joins Maggie Lake to talk about the U.S. dollar against the Canadian dollar, Austria's enforcement on a lockdown on the unvaccinated, and why Boris Johnson, who until now has been resistant to more lockdowns, warns that one may soon be possible given the struggling NHS. Floyd discusses the implications of these European lockdowns on supply chains and the market. Floyd also analyzes Tesla's stock and why Musk got into a Twitter brawl with U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders over the weekend when Bernie tweeted about the rich paying their fair share of taxes. Want to submit questions? Drop them right here on the Exchange: https://rvtv.io/3ouTmD5 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Best of Today
The history of reform and the NHS

Best of Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 13:03


Across the UK, the NHS is struggling to cope, despite not experiencing the predicted surge of Covid cases. Today's Nick Robinson looks back and examines how the NHS has come to dominate our national conversation. He speaks to writer, Frank Cottrell-Boyce, about the tribute to the NHS in the opening ceremony of the London 2012 Olympic Games. Nick also speaks to Ken Clarke, former Conservative Chancellor, as well as Alan Johnson, former Labour Health Secretary, and Jeremy Hunt, former Conservative Health Secretary, and Camilla Cavendish, former Director of Policy for Prime Minister David Cameron. (Image: Doctor wearing stethoscope, Credit: Lynne Cameron/PA Wire)

Marketing for Coaches
The Single Biggest Result You Give Your Clients

Marketing for Coaches

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 20:57


Whenever you meet somebody at a cocktail party, how do you introduce yourself and explain what you do in your coaching business? Do you tell people that you're someone who helps “people who are tired of thinking small and guide them into unleashing their fullest potential”? Or do you say you're a management consultant who “helps executives increase stakeholder engagement through increased inter-departmental synergy”? How would you feel if a complete stranger introduced themselves that way to you? Chances are, you'd feel very confused. And confusing people is the last thing coaches would want to do. So reserve those flowery words for your LinkedIn profile or the cover of your book and instead, offer your potential clients your Single Biggest Result. In this episode, I discuss why putting into words what you do for a living is of utmost importance if you want people to understand what you offer in your coaching business. I explain why my father says he's a departmental head at the NHS when, specifically, he's a hospital chaplain. I reveal critical errors beginner coaches make when they introduce themselves as a coach. I also highlight the impact of specializing your business and emphasize the power of anchoring on the Single Biggest Result you can offer to your clients.  “Ensure that the Single Biggest Result that you offer to your clients is measurable, externally verifiable, and tangible.” - Matthew Kimberley  This week on Book Yourself Solid® Marketing For Coaches Podcast: The critical importance of having a well-defined target market for your business Identifying a target market's specific set of urgent needs and compelling desires The “Supermarket Checkout Line Test” and the struggles of beginner coaches in talking about what they do The problem with using a generic label to describe what you do as a coach How defining your Single Biggest Result can help you avoid being a commodity in your business Avoiding the use of industry jargon when selling yourself to people Helping empowered goddesses step into their greatness...and why you shouldn't try to sound ethereal Why you shouldn't use branding sentences when talking about your coaching business Hanging our hats on something tangible, measurable, and verifiable The impact of specializing your business and associating other benefits to your Single Biggest Result Resources Mentioned: Book Yourself Solid Get More Clients in 60 Days! Did you know there are five simple things you can do each morning that can help you get more client enquiries, book yourself solid, and skyrocket your bottom line? My free e-book: Five Things You Need To Do Every Morning To Get You More Clients In 60 Days walks you through 5 easy, straight-forward, and effective marketing strategies that I recommend to every coach. These five simple techniques will almost guarantee you achieve increased impact, opportunity, and prospect flow. So, if you're ready to get more clients, reduce stress, and increase your bottom line, claim your free copy of the Five Things You Need To Do Every Morning To Get You More Clients in 60 Days by visiting my website. Get More Leads, Prospects & Clients Thanks for tuning into this week's episode of Book Yourself Solid's Marketing for Coaches podcast, the show that talks about marketing...for coaches. If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe to the show and leave a review wherever you get your podcasts. Apple Podcasts | TuneIn | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeartRadio | GooglePlay Be sure to share your favorite episodes on social media to help me reach more coaches, like you. Join the Book Yourself Solid Facebook Group, follow me on Instagram and LinkedIn. And for more exclusive content and great freebies, visit my website.

Inner-driven Leaders
Ep 72 - Women with Influence with Monique Carayol

Inner-driven Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 39:22


Women with Influence is my LinkedIn Live series where I interview inspirational and influential women leaders on their career journey so far.  This podcast episode is a recording of my interview with Monique Carayol, a Leadership & Talent Development Consultant, Coach and an ambitious, award-winning change maker. Monique started her career in healthcare as a PA and navigated her way up to a high-profile board executive director role. Monique and I discuss: Her successful career progression in the NHS and how she made it happen How to be proactive and create opportunities to be seen, given more responsibility and promoted The benefits of managing upwards and being in the room with senior managers for your confidence and profile Advice for women progressing in middle and senior management roles Monique also shares the challenges of being a woman of colour and a Mum at Director level and how she inspired and supported others to see what's possible for them. CONNECT WITH MONIQUE Monique is the host of leadership podcast 'Be Yourself, Back Yourself & Make it Happen with Monique Carayol' and shares practical insights and advice to help leaders at all levels. Listen to her podcast: https://redcircle.com/shows/be-yourself-back-yourself-and-make-it-happen-with-monique-carayo Connect on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/monique-carayol/ MAXIMISE YOUR LEADERSHIP IMPACT Download my free workbook "3 Steps To Maximise Your Leadership Impact This Week" and in just 10 minutes, learn practical ways you can make more impact and get your voice heard at work this week. Inside are some of my favourite coaching exercises to help you determine what type of leader you want to be, a checklist of how you could be giving your power away at work and three ways to boost your presence in meetings.  Download it here: https://www.carlamillertraining.com/maximise INFLUENTIAL LEADER MASTERCLASS You're invited to my free masterclass - How To Be An Influential Leader without Self-Doubt Holding You Back! Learn how to avoid the 3 big influencing mistakes that keep many female leaders feeling stuck and frustrated, the steps you can take to become a more influential leader within your organisation and what you can do to turn down the volume on your inner critic.  Join the masterclass here: https://carlamiller.lpages.co/leader/ CONNECT WITH ME: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/carlamiller1/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thisiscarlamiller/ Website: https://www.carlamillertraining.com/ HOW CAN I SUPPORT THE PODCAST? Subscribe Share this episode with a friend Leave a review on Apple Podcasts I would love to hear your feedback on this week's podcast. Please leave a review or come say hello on social! Thank you for listening, see you next week!      

For the Many with Iain Dale & Jacqui Smith
296. The Trials of Jacqui's Scarf

For the Many with Iain Dale & Jacqui Smith

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 91:49


Iain Dale and Jacqui Smith discuss parliamentary scandals, COP26, Migrants, Iain's new book The Presidents, Covid rates across Europe, Compulsory vaccinations for NHS staff and why Portugal is banning employers from texting staff after hours plus some very funny Nun (monk) jokes. Smut quota: Middling to high.

Today in Focus
A day with the paramedics on the frontline of the UK's ambulance crisis

Today in Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 27:54


If you dial 999, you might expect an ambulance to come in minutes – but in reality, the pandemic has pushed an already creaking service to its limits. This is the story of one shift, and how the people charged with saving our lives are navigating a system on the brink of collapse. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus

History Homos
BONUS EP. 62 UNLOCKED - I'm Not Into That, Schlomo ft. JB Beverley

History Homos

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 104:24


We are proud to present to you this EXCLUSIVE paywalled Bonus episode from the week of 11-4-21 to entice you to seek more such content at our channel on Rokfin at www.rokfin.com/historyhomos If you subscribe for small monthly fee, you receive access to a weekly episode in audio and video per week where we discuss whatever we feel like, as opposed to a historical topic. You also receive access to all of the premium content of all the other creators on Rokfin such as Jay Dyer, Whitney Webb, Sam Tripoli and much more. This week we proudly welcome back friend of the show and legendary musician JB Beverley for our weekly hellride through the wastelands of the apocalypse. We start off by discussing William's "friend's mom's" problems with the NHS and some of the broader problems of socialized healthcare. We also discuss the recent US Elections and the Let's Go Brandon meme and JB relates an anecdote about brushing up against Hollywood degeneracy. We finish up discussing the ongoing Charlottesville and Rittenhouse trials. Don't forget to join our Telegram channel at T.me/historyhomos and to join our group chat at T.me/historyhomoschat The video version of the show is available on Youtube, bitchute, odysee and our telegram channel and all of those can be reached through the Link.tree in any of our social media bios. Any questions comments concerns or sticker requests can be leveled at historyhomos@gmail.com Later homos --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/historyhomos/support

Six O'Clock News
11/11/2021 Record number of 999 calls in England

Six O'Clock News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 30:36


NHS leaders have warned that the strain England's health service is facing is unsustainable. One think tank said the NHS was on its knees

Tales to Inspire
Creating a Wellbeing Farm and Standing Up Against Adversity with Celia Gaze

Tales to Inspire

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 55:12


Celia Gaze is the founder and managing director of the wellbeing farm and wellbeing corporate. During her childhood Celia felt that school was a bit of a waste of time and from an early age had that entrepreneurial spirit, selling toys and clothes outside of her parents house (not always with their permission).  After graduating school, Celia struggled to get a job and ended up getting some work experience working within the NHS, which in turn materialised into a 14 year career. However, things got overwhelming and Celia's mental health got too much and she was unable to return to the stresses of commiting her life to something where she did not see the achievements for her hard work. That is when Celia came up with the idea to convert her husband's farm into a wellbeing farm, which now has developed into a wedding venue and wellbeing farm in Edgworth. Celia has won awards for her brilliant space that she has created and has even become the author of the book ‘Why Put a Bow Tie on a Llama?' Celia's journey is one of inspiration and a true spirit to never give up on the better side of humanity. Resources:

Planet Normal
Sleaze, statistics and a sing-song

Planet Normal

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 60:00


It's the 75th voyage to Planet Normal, but our co-pilots Allison Pearson and Liam Halligan aren't popping corks just yet. On this week's episode, they have strong words for the head of NHS England Amanda Pritchard, whose recent error on Covid admissions statistics had them putting their heads in their hands. Luckily Planet Normal's resident hospital bed occupancy expert (AKA Ms Pearson) is on hand to set the record straight. Plus, our co-hosts disagree entirely respectfully on the NHS "jab for jobs" announcement.Joining us on the rocket of right-thinking is Oxford emeritus fellow Professor Lawrence Goldman, who doesn't hold back on the problems in UK university fundraising in the wake of the Mosley money row. But it's not just Oxford accepting money from dubious sources. He tells Allison and Liam why he believes the problem is 'systemic', with institutions throwing 'academic principles and common sense out of the window'.And brace yourselves, co-pilot Halligan treats listeners to a special musical performance...Allison will be replying to comments beneath this article on Thursday 11th of November 11am-12pm: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/opinion/2021/11/11/planet-normal-money-common-sense-uk-universities/ |Read more from Allison: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/authors/allison-pearson/ |Read more from Liam: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/authors/liam-halligan/ |Listen to Bed of Lies: https://www.playpodca.st/bedoflies |Need help subscribing or reviewing? Read more about podcasts here: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/radio/podcasts/podcast-can-find-best-ones-listen/ |Email: planetnormal@telegraph.co.uk |For 30 days' free access to The Telegraph: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/normal |See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Best of Today
Sajid Javid: We need compulsory vaccines for health workers

Best of Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 14:14


Sajid Javid talks to Justin Webb about NHS and Health and Social workers in England requiring a vaccination from April to keep their jobs. Javid also discusses some Conservative MPs having second jobs.

MoneyBall Medicine
Why AI-based computational pathology detects more cancers

MoneyBall Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 49:36


Chances are you or someone you love has had a biopsy to check for cancer. Doctors got a tissue sample and they sent it into a pathology lab, and at some point you got a result back. If you were lucky, it was negative and there was no cancer. But have you ever wondered exactly what happens in between those steps? Until recently, it's been a meticulous but imperfect manual process where a pathologist would put a thin slice of tissue under a high-powered microscope and examine the cells by eye, looking for patterns that indicate malignancy. But now the process is going digital—and growing more accurate.Harry's guest this week is Leo Grady, CEO of, Paige AI, which makes an AI-driven test called Paige Prostate. Grady says that in a clinical study, pathologists who had help from the Paige system accurately diagnosed prostate cancer almost 97 percent of the time, up from 90 percent without the tool. That translates into a 70 percent reduction in false negatives—nice odds if your own health is on the line. This week on the show, Grady explains explain how the Paige test works, how the company trained its software to be more accurate than a human pathologist, how it won FDA approval for the test, and what it could all mean for the future of cancer diagnosis and treatment.Please rate and review The Harry Glorikian Show on Apple Podcasts! Here's how to do that from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch:1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. 2. Navigate to The Harry Glorikian Show podcast. You can find it by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode.3. Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews."4. Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review."5. Next, select a star rating at the top — you have the option of choosing between one and five stars. 6. Using the text box at the top, write a title for your review. Then, in the lower text box, write your review. Your review can be up to 300 words long.7. Once you've finished, select "Send" or "Save" in the top-right corner. 8. If you've never left a podcast review before, enter a nickname. Your nickname will be displayed next to any reviews you leave from here on out. 9. After selecting a nickname, tap OK. Your review may not be immediately visible.That's it! Thanks so much.Full TranscriptHarry Glorikian: Hello. I'm Harry Glorikian. Welcome to The Harry Glorikian Show, the interview podcast that explores how technology is changing everything we know about healthcare.Artificial intelligence. Big data. Predictive analytics. In fields like these, breakthroughs are happening way faster than most people realize. If you want to be proactive about your own health and the health of your loved ones, you'll need to learn everything you can about how medicine is changing and how you can take advantage of all the new options.Explaining this approaching world is the mission of my new book, The Future You. And it's also our theme here on the show, where we bring you conversations with the innovators, caregivers, and patient advocates who are transforming the healthcare system and working to push it in positive directions.Chances are you or someone you love has had a biopsy to check for cancer. Doctors got a tissue sample and they sent it into a pathology lab, and at some point you got a result back. If you were lucky it was negative and there was no cancer.But have you ever wondered exactly what happens in between those steps?Well, until recently, it's been an extremely meticulous manual process. A pathologist would create a very thin slice of your tissue, put it under a high-powered microscope, and examine the cells by eye, looking for patterns that indicate malignancy. But recently the process has started to go digital. For one thing, the technology to make a digital scan of a pathology slide has been getting cheaper. That's a no-brainer, since it makes it way easier for a pathologist to share an image if they want a second opinion.But once the data is available digitally, it opens up a bunch of additional possibilities. Including letting computers try their hand at pathology. That's what's happening at a company called Paige AI, which makes a newly FDA-approved test for prostate cancer called Paige Prostate.The test uses computer vision and machine learning to find spots on prostate biopsy slides that look suspicious, so a human pathologist can take a closer look.So why should you care?Well, in a clinical study that Paige submitted to the FDA, pathologists who had help from the Paige system accurately diagnosed cancer almost 97 percent of the time, up from 90 percent without the tool.That translates into a 70 percent reduction in false negatives. At the same time there was a 24 percent reduction in false positives. I gotta tell you, if I were getting a prostate biopsy, I'd really like those improved odds. And it's a great example of the kinds of AI-driven medical technologies that I write about in The Future You, which is now available from Amazon in Kindle ebook format.So I asked Paige's CEO, Leo Grady, to come on the show to explain how the test works, how Paige trained its software to be more accurate than a human pathologist, how the company got the FDA to give its first ever approval for an AI-based pathology product, and what it could all mean for the future of cancer diagnosis and treatment.Here's our conversation.Harry Glorikian: Leo, welcome to the show.Leo Grady: Hi, Harry. Glad to be here.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. You know, I've been watching the company for some time now, and the big story here seems to be that we're really entering the area of digital pathology, also known as sort of computational pathology, and it's funny because I've been talking about digital pathology since I think I started my career back when I was 25, which seems like a long time ago at this point. But for a lot of laboratory tests that we use, like it's usually done by eye, and now we can get a lot from sort of AI being assistive in this way. So keeping in mind that some of the listeners are professionals, but we have a bunch of sort of non-experts, could you start off explaining the term maybe computational pathology and summarize where the state of the art is, which I assume you guys are right at the cutting edge of it?Leo Grady: Yeah, so I think it actually might help just to jump back a level and talk about what is pathology and how is it done today? So today, so pathology is the branch of medicine where a doctor is taking tissue out of a patient through a biopsy, through surgery and making glass slides out of that tissue, looking at it under a microscope in order to make a diagnosis. And today, all of that process of taking the tissue out, cutting it, staining it, mounting it on slides. Then gets looked at under a microscope by a pathologist to make a diagnosis, and that diagnosis the pathologist makes is the definitive diagnosis that then drives all of the rest of the downstream management and care of that patient. When pathologists are looking through a microscope, sometimes they see something that they're not quite sure what it is. And so they may want to do another test. They may want to do another stain. They may want to cut more out of the tissue, make a second slide. Sometimes they want to ask a colleague for their opinion, or if they really feel like they need an expert opinion, they may want to send that case out for a consultation, in which case the glass slides or are put in a, you know, FedEx and basically shipped out to another lab somewhere. All of those different scenarios can be improved with digital pathology and particularly computational pathology and the sort of technology that we build at Paige. So in a digital world, what happens instead is that the slides don't go to the pathologist as glass. They go into a digital slide scanner, and those slide scanners produce a very high resolution picture of these slides.Leo Grady: So these are quarter-micron resolution images that get produced of each slide. And then the pathologist has a work list on their monitor. They look through those those cases, they open them up and then that digital workflow, they can see the sides digitally. When they have those slides digitally, if they want to send them out to a second opinion or or show them to a colleague, it's much easier to then send those cases electronically than it is to actually ship the glass from one location to another. Once those slides are digital it, it opens up a whole other set of possibilities for how information can come to the pathologist. So if they want additional information about something they see in those slides, rather than doing another stain, doing another cut, sending for a second opinion, what we can do and what we do at Paige is we we identify all the tissue patterns in that piece of tissue, match those against a large database where we have known diagnoses and say, OK, this case, this pattern here has a high match toward to something that's in this database. And by providing that information to the pathologists on request that pathologists can then leverage that information, integrate it and use it in their diagnostic process. And this is the product that the FDA just approved. It's the first ever AI based product in pathology that is specifically aimed at prostate cancer and providing this additional information in the context of a prostate needle biopsy.Harry Glorikian: Well, congratulations on that. That's, you know, that's amazing. And I'm. You know, the fact that the FDA is being more aggressive than I remember them being in the past is also a great thing to see. But, you know, we've been talking and quote digitizing things in pathology for for quite some time, let's say, separate from the AI based analytics part of it moving in that direction. What was the kind of technology advance or prerequisite that you guys came up with when you started Paige that that took this to that next level.Leo Grady: Well, as you're pointing out, Harry, most slides are not digitized today, single digits of slides in a clinical setting get digitized. And the reason for that has been you need to buy scanners, you need to change your workflow, you need to digitize these slides. They're enormously large from a file size and data complexity. So then you have to store them somehow and you make all of that investment and then you get to look at the same slide on a monitor that you look at under a microscope. And so pathologists for years have said, why? Why would we make this investment? Why would we go through all of that expense? And that trouble and that change and learn a new instrument when we don't really get a lot of value out of doing so? And furthermore, there was even a question for a long time, do you get the same information on a digital side that you get on glass through a microscope? Yep. There have been a number of things that have been changing that over time. So one is the maturity of the high capacity digital side scanners. There are now a number of hardware vendors that produce these. Storage costs have come down. And one thing that we offer at Paige is is cloud storage, which is really low cost because we're able to effectively pool costs with the cloud providers from multiple different labs and hospitals, so we can really drive those prices down as far as possible.Leo Grady: So that lowers that barrier. And then back in 2017, the first digital side scanner got approved, which demonstrated there was equivalency in the diagnosis between looking at the slide on a monitor and looking at it under a microscope. And that is something that that we also replicated with our digital side viewer, demonstrated that equivalency between digital and glass. But all of those barriers were barriers just to going digital in the first place. And now, really, for the first time, because of the maturity of the scanners, because of the FDA clearance of just the viewer, because of lower cost storage, many of those barriers have come down. Now what has not happened is still a major clinical benefit for going digital in the first place. Yes, you can share slides easier. Yes, you can retrieve slides easier. Yes, you can do education easier. It's still a lot of cost and a lot of changed your workflow, so I really think that that the introduction of the kinds of technologies that that the FDA approved, which we built with Paige Prostate, that actually adds additional information into the diagnostic workflow that can help pathologists use that information help them. You get to a better diagnosis, reduce false positives, reduce false negatives, which is what we showed in the study that for the first time is is going above and beyond just going digital and some of these conveniences of a digital workflow to providing true clinical benefit.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, whenever I look at this from an investment perspective, like if you take apart something and break it into its first principles, you know, levels, you have to have certain milestones hit. Otherwise, it's not going to come together, right? And I've, you know, looking at digital pathology, it's the same thing. You have to have certain pieces in place for the next evolution to be possible, because it's got to be built on top of these foundational pieces. But, you know, once you get there, the exponential nature of of how things change, once it's digitized and once you're utilizing it and prove that it works is sort of where you see the, you know, large leaps of benefit for the pathologist as well as, you know, ultimately we're doing this for better patient care. But you know, your product was I think the FDA called it the first ever FDA approval for an AI product in pathology, which is a big deal, at least as far as I'm concerned, because I've been doing it for a long time. But because it was first, it must have been a one hell of a learning process for you and the FDA to figure out how to evaluate a test like this. Can you sort of explain maybe a little bit about the process? You know, how did you win approval? What novel questions did you have to answer?Leo Grady: It was a long process. You know, as you point out, this is this is the first ever technology approved in this space. And I think you saw from the FDA's own press release their enthusiasm for what this technology can bring to patient benefits. Fortunately, we applied for breakthrough designation back in early 2019, received that breakthrough designation in February of 2019. And as a result, one of the benefits of breakthrough designation is the FDA commits to working closely with the company to try to iterate on the study protocol, iterate on the the validation that's going to be required in order to bring the the technology to market. And so because of that breakthrough designation, we had the opportunity to work with the the FDA in a much tighter iterative loop. And I think that they are they were concerned, I mean, primarily about the impact of a misdiagnosis and pathology, right? Which is really understandable, right? Their view is that, yes, maybe in radiology, you see something and maybe aren't totally sure. But then there's always pathology as a safety net, you know, in case you ever really need to resolve a ground truth. You can always take the tissue out and look at it under a microscope. But when you're dealing with a product for pathology, that's the end of the road. I mean, that is where the diagnostic buck stops. And so anything there that that was perhaps going to misinform a pathologist, mislead them, you know, ultimately lead to a negative conclusion for the patients could have more severe consequences.Speaker2: The flip side, of course, though, is that if you get it right, the benefits are much greater because you can really positively impact the care of those patients. So I think they they, you know, appropriately, we're concerned with the exacting rigor of the study to really ensure that that this technology was providing benefit and also because it was the first I think they wanted to be able to set a standard for future technologies that would have to live up to the same bar. So there were a lot of meetings, you know, a lot of trips down to Silver Spring. But I have to say that that the FDA, you know, I think in technology, there are a lot of companies that are are quick to, you know, malign regulators and rules. I frankly both at Paige and my previous experience at HeartFlow, at Siemens, I think the FDA brings a very consistent and important standard of clinical trial design of of, you know, technology proving that is safe and effective. And I found them to be great partners to work with in order to really identify what that protocol looks like to be able to produce the validation and then to, you know, ask some tough questions. But that's their job. And I think, you know, at the end of the day, the products that get produced that go through that process really have met the standard of of not only clinical validation, but even things like security and quality management and other really important factors of a clinical product.Harry Glorikian: Oh no, I'm in total agreement. I mean, whenever I'm talking to a company and they're like, Well, I don't know when I'm going to go to the agency, I'm like, go to the agency, like, don't wait till the end. Like there, actually, you need to look at them as a partner, not as an adversary.Leo Grady: Yeah. And a pre-submission meeting is is easy to do. It's an opportunity to make a proposal to the FDA and to understand how they think about it and whether that's that's going to be a strategy that's going to be effective and workable for them. So I always think that that pre subs are the place to start before you do too much work because you generally know whether you're on the right path or not.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I agree. And it's funny because you said, like, you know, they're concerned about the product, but it's interesting. Like from all the College of American Pathology studies where you send slides to different people, you don't always get the exact same answer, depending on who's looking at it. So I can see how a product can bring some level of standardization to the process that that helps make the call so uniform, even across institutions when you send the slides. So I think that's moving the whole field in a really positive direction.Leo Grady: Well, only if that uniform call is correct, right? Or better? Great. I mean, if you bring everybody down to the lowest common denominator that that standardization, but it's not moving the field forward. So. Correct. One of the curses of of bringing that level of standardization is that you have to really meet the highest bar of the highest pathologists and not not just the average. That said, you know, we're fortunate to come from Memorial Sloan-Kettering and to have the opportunity to work with some of the the leading pathologists in the world to really build in that level of rigor and excellence into the technology.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. So that brings me to like, you know. The algorithms are built on a fairly large training set would be my assumption and of pre labeled sort of images, where do you guys source that from? Is it you have like a thousand people in the background sort of making sure that everything is labeled correctly before it's fed to the to the algorithm itself?Leo Grady: Well, what you're describing is very common where you have pathologists or in radiology radiologists or other experts really marking up images and saying this is the important part to pay attention to. This part is cancer. That part's benign. Our technology actually works differently. Our founder, Thomas Fuchs, and his team at Memorial Sloan-Kettering actually really made a breakthrough not only in the the quality of some of the the AI systems that were building, but also in the technology itself. And what what they did, this was all published in Nature Medicine a couple of years ago, is basically find a way to just show the computer a slide and the final diagnosis without having a pathologist, you know, mark up the slide, but just show them the final diagnosis. And when you show the computer enough examples of the slide and the final diagnosis, the computer starts to learn to say, OK, this pattern is common to all grade threes. This pattern is common to all grade fours. Or whatever it is. And the computer learns to identify those patterns without anybody going through and marking those up. Well, this technology is important for a few reasons.Leo Grady: One, it means we can train systems at enormous scale. We can not just do thousands of cases, but tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands of cases. Second, it means that we can really build out a portfolio of technologies quickly that are very robust and not have to spend years annotating slides. And third, it allows us to start looking for patterns that no pathologists would necessarily know how to mark up. You know, can we identify which tumors are going to respond to certain drugs or certain therapies? You know, no pathologists are going to be able to say, OK, it's this part of the the tumor that you need to look at because they don't really know. But with this technology where we we know these tumors responded, these tumors didn't it actually helps us try to ferret out those patterns. So that that's one of the real key benefits that differentiates Paige from from other companies in this space is just the difference in the technology itself.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. I mean, it's funny because I must admit, like when we talk about stuff like this, I get super excited because I can see where things can go. It's. It's always difficult to explain it where somebody else can envision what you've been thinking about because you've been thinking about it so long, but it's super exciting. So let's jump to like the most important benefits, like if you had to rank the benefits of the technology, I mean, I've I read on your website that in the clinical study you guys submitted to the FDA, pathologist used using the Paige Prostate were seven percent more likely to correctly diagnose the cancer. Is that the major innovation? Would that by itself be enough to justify an investment in the technology? I mean, I'm trying to. You know, if you were to say God, this is the most important thing and then go down the list, what would they be?Leo Grady: Yeah, that's right. So so the study that we did was like this. We had 16 pathologists. They diagnosed about six hundred prostate needle core biopsy patients and they they did their diagnosis. They recorded it and then they did it a second time using Paige so they could see the benefit of all this pattern matching that that Paige had done for them. And what we did is we compared the diagnosis. They got the first time and the second time with the ground truth, consensus diagnosis that we had from Memorial. And what we found is that when the pathologists were using Paige, they had a 70 percent reduction in false negatives. They had a 24 percent reduction in false positives, and their interest in obtaining additional information went down because they had more confidence in the diagnosis that they were able to provide. And what was interesting about that group of 16 pathologists is it it included pathologists that were experienced, that were less experienced, some that were specialists in prostate cancer, some that were not so specialized in prostate cancer. And among that entire group of pathologists, they all got better. They all benefited from using this technology. And what's more, is that the gap between the less experienced, less specialized pathologists and more experienced, more specialized pathologists actually decreased as they all used the technology. So it allowed them to, like we were talking about before, actually come up to the level of of the better pathologists and even the better pathologists could leverage the information to get even better.Harry Glorikian: So as a male who you know who's going to age at some point and potentially have to deal with, hopefully not, a prostate issue, we want them to make an accurate diagnosis because you don't want the inaccurate diagnosis, especially in in that sort of an issue. But what about the speed? I mean, you've you talk about that, you know, it helps streamline the process and reduce reduce turnaround time for for patients. What does that do to workload and and how quickly you're able to turn that around compared to, say, a traditional method.Leo Grady: Our study was really focused on clinical benefit and patient benefit. We were not aiming to measure speed and the way in which the study was designed and the device is intended to be used is that the pathologist would look at the case, decide what they they think the result is, and then pull up the Paige results and see if it changes their thinking or calls their attention to something that they may have missed. So the focus of the the product was really on the the benefit to the the clinical diagnosis and the clinical benefit to patients by providing more information to the doctors. And the result of that information was, you know, clearly demonstrated benefit. Now if they can get to that result by looking at the Paige results and they don't need another cut, they don't need another stain, they don't need another consultation, then that's going to get the results back to the urologists faster, back to the patient faster and will ultimately enable them to start acting on that diagnosis more quickly. But the intention of the study, the intended use of the device is not around making pathologists faster. It's really around providing them this additional information so that they can use that in the course of their diagnosis and get the better results from patients.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's pause the conversation for a minute to talk about one small but important thing you can do, to help keep the podcast going. And that's to make it easier for other listeners discover the show by leaving a rating and a review on Apple Podcasts.All you have to do is open the Apple Podcasts app on your smartphone, search for The Harry Glorikian Show, and scroll down to the Ratings & Reviews section. Tap the stars to rate the show, and then tap the link that says Write a Review to leave your comments. It'll only take a minute, but you'll be doing us a huge favor.And one more thing. If you like the interviews we do here on the show I know you'll like my new book, The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer.It's a friendly and accessible tour of all the ways today's information technologies are helping us diagnose diseases faster, treat them more precisely, and create personalized diet and exercise programs to prevent them in the first place.The book is now available in Kindle format. Just go to Amazon and search for The Future You by Harry Glorikian.And now, back to the show.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: So I asked this out of naivete because I didn't I didn't go looking for it. But have you guys done a health economic analysis of the system?Leo Grady: We have one. It certainly it's, as you know, it's really key to be able to look at that we have a model that we've built. We're still refining it with additional data. There was a study that was announced in the U.K. a couple of weeks ago where the NHS is actually funding a prospective multicenter trial that includes Oxford, Warwick, Coventry, Bristol to be able to evaluate the the health, economics and clinical benefits of using this technology in clinical practice prospectively. So that's something that we engaged with NICE [the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence] on in order to try to get the design correct that will help feed in real world data into the model. But we have a model that we've been using internally and are continuing to build and refine.Harry Glorikian: So. Again, incredible that you guys got FDA approval, I think the company was founded in 2017, if I'm correct. Can you talk about, you know, the founders and yow you guys, you know, built this so quickly, I mean time scale wise, it's a pretty compressed time scale, relatively speaking.Leo Grady: Well, yeah, it isn't, it isn't, ...so the company started in 2017, our first employee was actually middle of 2018 and we had our first venture round and in early 2018. However, the work that went into the company that spun out of Memorial Sloan-Kettering started earlier. So there is a group of really visionary individuals at MSK that back, I want to say, 2014, 2015, actually had started this push toward digital pathology, computational pathology, really seeing where the puck was going and building this technology. They formed something called the Warren Alpert Center, and the Warren Alpert Center provided some initial funding to really get this going and to hire some of the founders and to really move this technology in the right direction. And it was really because that technology started to show such promise that MSK made the decision that that was at a point where it could be better, you know, more impactful to actually go outside of MSK into a company where where we could industrialize the technology and really bring it to hospitals and labs around the world. So the technology started earlier, 2014, 2015. Paige was really launched in, I would say, 2018, although technically it was incorporated earlier and and then from that point I personally joined in 2019. And so I'm not I'm not a founder, but when I joined in 2019, you know, we we really spun up a significant team and and brought to bear some of my own experience and industrializing AI technology and bringing it out to clinical benefit.Harry Glorikian: Well, you know, most founders don't take the company all the way. It's a rare breed that's able to get it that far. So you know this a great story, but let's step back here and talk about like now you have to like, get people to accept this technology right, which is the human factor which I always find much more confounding than the the the the computational factor. So you've got to get, you know, somebody inside a hospital or pathology lab. Do you run into resistance or pushback from the technology, I mean, are they skeptical about the algorithm? How do you get a human to sort of buy off on this? I remember when we were presenting this, oh God, again, 25 years ago, they hated it. I mean, just hated it. And as time has gone by, you've seen that that digitization is slowly taking effect and where you know, it's assistive as opposed to something, I remember when we first launched this, it was, "This is going to be better than" or "take your job," which is a great way to make an enemy on the other side. And I see that the two actually being better than one or the other per se on on its own. So how are you guys approaching this? And do you have any anecdotal stories that you might be able to share?Leo Grady: Yeah, and so I think there are two elements are one is, you know. Are people resistant by the nature of the technology because they feel threatened by it, and then the other is how does market adoption start with this sort of technology to just the first point? You know, I tend to be very careful about the term AI. I feel like it know it often introduces this concept of, you know, people think of a robot doctor that's going to run in and start doing things. And it's just it's not. I mean, AI is a technology that's been in development for four decades. I did my PhD in AI, in computer vision, 20 years ago, and it's just a technology, right? It's like a transistor. It can be used to build many different things. At its core, it's just complex pattern matching, which is what we how we leverage that technology. In the case of Paige Prostate was to help provide that information. I think, you know, the better frame to think about this technology is as a diagnostic. This is just like a diagnostic test. You validate it with a standalone sensitivity and specificity. The information gets provided the doctor. You have to do a clinical trial that samples the space effectively of the patient population and the intended use.Leo Grady: And you have to make sure the doctors understand the information and know how to use it effectively. It's before my time, but I heard that when immunohistochemistry was first really introduced in pathology, that there is a discussion that this was going to take all the pathologists' jobs. And who needs a pathologist if you can just stain with IHG and get get a diagnostic result out of it? Well, you know, 20 years, IHT is an essential component of of pathology, and it's a key element of of the diagnostic workflow for pathologists. So, far from replacing any pathologists, it's empowered them. It's made there the benefit that they can provide to the clinicians, even more valuable and even more important. And I think we're going to see a similar trajectory with this computational technology. Now your first question about market adoption, how people adopting this, I would say that, you know, last week I went to the College of American Pathology meeting, which was in person in Chicago. It's my first in-person meeting since COVID, so a year and a half ago. And I noticed--and this was this was right after the announcement by the FDA of of the approval for Paige Prostate--I noticed there was a market shift in the conversations I was having with pathologists.Leo Grady: It was a shift away from "Does this technology work? Is it ready for prime time? What does it really do?" Toward, "Ok, how do we operationalize this? How do we bring it in house, how do we integrate this into a workflow and how do we how do we pay for it?" You know, those are the conversations that we were having in Chicago at CAP. Not does this work? Is it ready for prime time? So I do think that there is a market understanding that the technology is real, that it works, that it can provide benefit. Now it's just a question of how do we operationalize and how do we get it paid for? Because today there's no additional reimbursement for it. But you know, again, with market adoption, you're got your Moore adoption curve for anything. You get them and you get your innovators and early adopters, your early majority, late majority and your laggards. And you know where I think we're at a stage where we've got innovators and early adopters that are excited to jump in and start leveraging this technology. And I think, you know, we're going to get to your early majority and the late majority over time. It's always going to be a process.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, no. I mean, you know, reflecting on your IHC [immunohistochemistry], that's where I started my career. Like, I think I taught like two hundred and fifty IHC courses over the first, say, three or four years that I was in the in the business. Three or four years. And you know, I agree with you. There's no way that any one of these technologies takes the place of [a pathologist]. They're additive, right? It's just a tool that helps. Make the circle much more complete than it would be in any one component, all by itself.Leo Grady: Could you ever hear when you were teaching these classes? Did anyone ever say that like, are we even going to need pathologists anymore?Harry Glorikian: No, it was when the is is when imaging systems came out that said the imaging system would then replace the pathologists. The IHC was was really the cusp of precision medicine, where I remember when I first started because we were working with ER and PR and, you know, when I first learned, you know about like, you know, the find and grind method, I would always be like, OK, it's x number of femtomoles. Like, What does that really telling you, right? Compared to this stain over here where I can see, you know, the anatomy, I can see where the cells are. I can see. I mean, there's so much more information that's coming from this that lets me make a better call. I will tell you selling it was not that hard to a lot of people, they they could see the benefit and you could you could really sort of get them to adopt it because they saw it as a tool.Leo Grady: Was that post-reimbursement?Harry Glorikian: Uh, even pre-reimbursement.Leo Grady: Really interesting. Yeah, there's there's a lot we can learn from you then.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, it was. It was. It was an interesting ride back then. I mean, I remember my first day at work. My boss comes to me and says. By the way, you're going to give a talk in Arizona in two weeks, and I was like, What do you mean I'm going to go? Who am I going to give a talk to you? He goes, Oh, you got to give a talk on the technology and how to use it. And I said, who's in the audience? And he said histo techs, and there'll be some pathologists. And I was like, Are you kidding me? And he goes, You got two weeks to get ready. Oh my God, I was cramming like crazy. I was in the lab. I was doing all the different types of assays that we had available. And you know, it was you went out there and I learned very quickly like, the show must go on, like you got to get out there and you got to do your thing. But it was it was a great time in my career to be on that on that bleeding edge of what was happening. So quickly, like, why did you guys start with prostate cancer, though like? It's not the most common cancer, although it's high on the list, so. Or maybe it's the second most type of cancer, but why did you guys start with that and where do you guys see it going from there, I guess, is next.Leo Grady: Well, the the decision of how to rank the different opportunities for, you know, ultimately we believe this technology can benefit really the entire diagnostic process, no matter what the question is in pathology. However, we did have to prioritize right and elements of of where to start, right. The elements of prioritization had a few factors. So one factor was how how prevalent is the disease? I mean, as you know, prostate cancer is one of the big four. Second, is there are a lot of benefit that we can provide today with prostate cancer. You know, man of a certain age goes in, gets a PSA test. It's high, they go and they get 12 cores, 14 cores, 20 cores out of their prostate and that produces. You know, it can be 30 slides, it can be 50 slides, I mean, it really depends, and this can take the pathologist a long time to look through. Most of those cores are negative. In fact, most of those patients are negative, but the consequence of missing something is really significant. And so we felt that this was a situation where there was a big need. There's a lot of there's a lot of screening that goes on with prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is prevalent and the consequence of missing something is really significant. So that's where we felt like we could provide maximum benefit, both in terms of the patient, in terms of the doctor, and also that it was a significant need across the space.Leo Grady: We also had the data and the technology that we could go after that one well. But that said, you know, we announced that we have a breast cancer product that is got a CE mark in an enabling clinical use in Europe. We're doing a number of investigational studies with that product in the US right now and and working toward bringing that one to market. You know, after our our recent funding round, we spun up a number of teams and a number of of verticals that were we're going after in other cancer types and ultimately even beyond cancer. So there's more to come. We wanted we really take seriously the quality, the regulatory confirmation as well as the deployment channel. I mean, we built the whole workflow to be able to leverage this technology throughout the workflow in a way that is meaningful to the pathologist. So the development is is maybe a little bit more heavy and validation than some other companies where you have a PhD student that says, Oh, you know, I won some challenge and I went to go bring this to market building real clinical products, validating them, deploying them, supporting them is a real endeavor. But prostate was just the first, breast is second, and we have a whole pipeline coming out. So stay tuned.Harry Glorikian: So before we end here, I want to just tilt the lens a little bit towards the consumer and say, like, you know. Why would consumers show interest or at least be aware that these things are coming? Because I always feel like they're almost the last to know, or they just don't know at all. But, you know, in the future, you know, with technologies like this, do you see it identifying tumors sooner, faster, more accurately? Or, you know, will it will it help increase survival or help us find better drugs? I mean that that's I think, what people are really... If you went down one level from us of the people that are affected by this. Those are the sorts of things they'd want to know.Leo Grady: Well, I think, you know, a useful analogy is what happened with the da Vinci robot. You know, when it was necessary for a patient to get prostate cancer surgery, they often chose centers that had the da Vinci robot. Why? Because they believed that they were able to get better care at those centers. And it's not because the surgeons at the other centers were no good. It's because the the da Vinci added elements of precision and standardization and accuracy that could be demonstrated that would enable the the patient to feel more confident they're getting the best treatment at those centers. So as I think about Paige Prostate and and ultimately the other technologies that we're bringing to market behind that, I would imagine that from the standpoint of the patient, they would want the diagnosis done at a lab where they had access to all of the available information, all the latest technology that could inform the pathologists to get the right answer, right? So would you want to go to a lab where the pathologists had no access to IHC? Would you want to send it to a lab where the pathologist had no ability to do a consultation? Do you want to send your your sample to a lab where the pathologist doesn't have access to Paige? I think in the future the answer is going to be no.Leo Grady: And I think that we're going to see ultimately, insurance companies and Medicare recognize that those labs are able to provide better care to patients and are going to encourage them and incentivize them to adopt these technologies. So, you know, ultimately from a patient standpoint, they they want to choose centers where they're going to get the best care, they're going to get the best diagnosis. I think one of the exciting elements of digital technology is that not everybody is able to go to Memorial Sloan-Kettering, not everyone's able to go to MD Anderson or Mayo Clinic. I think the opportunity with digital technology is to really increase the accessibility and increase the availability of these diagnostic tools that can really empower and enable pathologists in many parts of America, as well as beyond to really get to better results for their patients. And ultimately, you know, every patient cares about getting those those results accurately for themselves and for their loved ones.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, I'm always explaining, you know, to different people like once you digitize it, there's so many opportunities that may open up to make things better, faster, easier, more accurate and even start to shift the business model itself of what can be done and where it can be done. So it's it's a super exciting space, and thanks for taking the time. It was great to talk to you. I mean, I don't get to talk to people in pathology all the time anymore. I'm sort of all over the place, but it's it's near and dear to my heart, that's for sure.Leo Grady: Well, thank you so much, Harry. We're so excited by these recent developments with the first ever FDA approved technology in this space and, you know, really excited to help roll this out to labs and hospitals around the country and around the world to really benefit those doctors and patients.Harry Glorikian: Excellent. Well, I look forward to hearing about the next FDA approval.Leo Grady: Working on it. Look forward to telling you.Harry Glorikian: Thanks.Leo Grady: All right. Thanks so much, Harry.Harry Glorikian: That's it for this week's episode. You can find past episodes of The Harry Glorikian Show and MoneyBall Medicine at my website, glorikian.com, under the tab Podcasts.Don't forget to go to Apple Podcasts to leave a rating and review for the show.You can find me on Twitter at hglorikian. And we always love it when listeners post about the show there, or on other social media. Thanks for listening, stay healthy, and be sure to tune in two weeks from now for our next interview.

The Sport Psych Show
#165 Dr Gillian Cook - How Effective Leaders Create Optimal Conditions for Others to Thrive

The Sport Psych Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 66:42


I speak to Dr Gillian Cook in this week's episode. Gillian is a Lecturer in Sport and Performance Psychology at Liverpool John Moores University. She is a British Psychological Society (BPS) Chartered Sport and Exercise Psychologist, and a Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) registered Practitioner Psychologist. She is the club sport psychologist at Dundee United Football Club, and has worked with teams and organisations including British Swimming, British Athletics, Birmingham City Football Club's Academy, Scottish Hockey, Loughborough Sport, Nike, the NHS, and BBC. Gillian teaches and supervises across the undergraduate, postgraduate, professional doctorate and PhD degree programmes. She is the Module Leader for Developmental Psychology and Individual Differences, as well as Developmental and Social Psychology. Her research interests include high performance leadership, and the psychology of performance excellence. Specifically, her research examines how effective leaders create the conditions for others to thrive and deliver optimal outcomes in high pressure environments.

The Allusionist
Allusionist 145. Parents

The Allusionist

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 44:19


When you're trans and pregnant, some of the vocabulary of pregnancy, birth and parenting might not fit you. In face, some of it might not even work for people of ANY gender. Trans parents Freddy McConnell and CJ talk about gender-additive language, inclusive for women and other genders, and about how in English law, the word 'mother' becomes semantically very complicated indeed. Find out more about the topics covered in this episode at theallusionist.org/parents. Sign up to be a patron at patreon.com/allusionist and as well as supporting the show, you get behind the scenes glimpses and bonus etymologies, AND a delightful community of Teamlusionists! The music is by Martin Austwick. Hear Martin's own songs at palebirdmusic.com or search for Pale Bird on Bandcamp and Spotify, and he's @martinaustwick on Twitter and Instagram.  The Allusionist's online home is theallusionist.org. Stay in touch at twitter.com/allusionistshow, facebook.com/allusionistshow and instagram.com/allusionistshow. Our ad partner is Multitude. To sponsor an episode of the show, contact them at multitude.productions/ads. This episode is sponsored by: • Bombas, makers of the most comfortable socks in the history of feet - and super-smooth undies and T-shirts too. Get 20 percent off your first purchase at bombas.com/allusionist. • Acorn TV, the streaming service featuring hundreds of dramas, mysteries and comedies from around the world. Try Acorn TV free for 30 days, by going to Acorn.TV and using my promo code allusionist. (Be sure to type that code in lower case.)  Support the show: http://patreon.com/allusionist See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Awakening
#120 Brits to get 2 years in jail for posting false(the truth) info on the pandemic - Mindwars Meets Awakening

Awakening

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 18:29


Another Collaboration this week between Mindwars and Awakening podcast Topics covered.. - Brits to get 2 years in jail for posting false(the truth) info on the pandemic - https://www.zerohedge.com/political/brits-who-post-false-information-about-vaccines-could-be-jailed-two-years - Mums story on daughters injuries from the jab - https://rumble.com/vn0e9i-why-would-anyone-trust-public-health-officials-stephanie-de-garays-daughter.html - NHS staff to all be vexed by April or risk losing their job - https://inews.co.uk/news/health/all-nhs-staff-in-england-will-need-mandatory-covid-and-flu-vaccines-or-risk-losing-their-jobs-1281852?utm_source=upday&utm_medium=referral - Australia bank accounts frozen and houses seized to pay for unpaid covid fines - https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10136275/Unpaid-Covid-fines-taken-bank-accounts-seized-homes-Queensland.html?fbclid=IwAR0pXJHAhHWIi8DcPVRGKRTN5uTHQ--2KBvJzrw72zEERv4oGaW-95fozV0 --- Connect with Roy: All Episodes can be found at www.awakeningpodcast.org To Subscribe or find our videos https://linktr.ee/awakeningpodcast All other Podcasts + Donation https://bio.link/podcaster Video Can be see at https://www.bitchute.com/channel/y2XWI0VCPVqX/ facebook https://www.facebook.com/royawakening Connect with Chris: -- - All episodes of Mindwars can be found at https://anchor.fm/mindwars Mindwars Bitchute channel https://www.bitchute.com/channel/Gt4uHP3cjoCt/ www.mindwars.uk All Episode can be found at www.freedombroadcasters.com Please like, share and subscribe to our channels as it really helps getting the message out their and keeping people awake!

The Guilty Feminist
278. Save our NHS with Jen Brister and guests Dr Bob Gill, Dr Rita Issa and Francesca Martinez

The Guilty Feminist

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 89:07


The Guilty Feminist presented by Deborah Frances-White and Jen BristerEpisode 278: Save our NHS with special guests Dr Bob Gill, Dr Rita Issa and Francesca MartinezRecorded 25 October at Kings Place in London. Released 1 November 2021.The Guilty Feminist theme by Mark Hodge and produced by Nick Sheldon.Vote for us in the National Comedy Awards https://www.thenationalcomedyawards.comOur new podcast You Can Talk to Anyone https://podfollow.com/you-can-talk-to-anyoneMore about Deborah Frances-Whitehttp://deborahfrances-white.comhttps://twitter.com/DeborahFWhttps://www.virago.co.uk/the-guilty-feminist-bookMore about Jen Bristerhttps://twitter.com/jenbristerhttp://www.jenbrister.co.ukMore about Francesca Martinezhttps://twitter.com/chessmartinezhttps://www.francescamartinez.comMore about Your NHS Needs Youhttps://www.yournhsneedsyou.comThe Great NHS heist. https://youtu.be/jboPXkusX04https://twitter.com/drbobgillhttps://twitter.com/drritaissaFor more information about this and other episodes…visit https://www.guiltyfeminist.comtweet us https://www.twitter.com/guiltfempodlike our Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/guiltyfeministcheck out our Instagram https://www.instagram.com/theguiltyfeministor join our mailing list http://www.eepurl.com/bRfSPTCome to a live recordingKings Place. Thursday 4 November. 7:30pm. https://www.kingsplace.co.uk/whats-on/comedy/the-guilty-feminist-04-11/Soho Theatre. Tuesday 9 November. 9:30pm. https://sohotheatre.com/shows/the-guilty-feminist/Big Speeches booking now: https://guiltyfeminist.com/big-speechesThank you to our amazing Patreon supporters.To support the podcast yourself, go to https://www.patreon.com/guiltyfeminist See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.