Podcasts about Jacobin

political club during the French Revolution

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Latest podcast episodes about Jacobin

Give Them An Argument
Season 5 Episode 4: Why Socialists Need to Talk About Justice (ft. Lillian Cicerchia)

Give Them An Argument

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2023 72:00


Ben was on a plane back to the West Coast when this aired, but Andy and Cale held down the fort, recapping the big NYC live show and then playing an interview Ben recorded with socialist philosopher and GTAA fan-favorite Lillian Cicerchia about her Jacobin article "socialists Need to Talk About Justice."You can read the article here:https://jacobin.com/2022/12/capitalism-socialism-liberalism-justice-philosophy-marxFollow Lillian on Twitter: @classreductressFollow Ben on Twitter: @BenBurgisFollow GTAA on Twitter: @Gtaa_ShowRead the new philosophy Substack:benburgis.substack.comBecome a GTAA Patron and receive numerous benefits ranging from patron-exclusive postgames every Monday night to our undying love and gratitude for helping us keep this thing going:patreon.com/benburgisVisit benburgis.com

Jacobin Radio
Long Reads: Kristin Surak on Japan's Lost Generation

Jacobin Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 70:54


During the 1980s, Japan seemed like it might overtake the US to become the world's largest economy. But since a property bubble burst in the early 90s, Japan has become a by-word for economic stagnation. That hasn't prevented the ruling Liberal Democratic Party from maintaining its status as the most successful political party in the rich capitalist world.Kristin Surak joins Long Reads to discuss modern Japan. Kristin teaches sociology at the London School of Economics and is the author of Making Tea, Making Japan: Cultural Nationalism in Practice.Find her work for Jacobin, including the essay "Japan's Shinzō Abe Was an Uninspiring Leader Who Prospered by Default," here: https://jacobin.com/author/kristin-surakCheck out Pluto audiobooks at: tiny.one/jacobinAnd join the Left Book Club by using code WINFREE at leftbookclub.comLong Reads is a Jacobin podcast looking in-depth at political topics and thinkers, both contemporary and historical, with the magazine's longform writers. Hosted by features editor Daniel Finn. Produced by Conor Gillies, music by Knxwledge. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

What's Left To Do?
Bhaskar: The Journey Toward Jacobin (Part 1)

What's Left To Do?

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 50:26


Join us on Patreon for Part 2: www.patreon.com/whatslefttodo If Patreon isn't your thing, please join us in supporting this work with a contribution over at: www.whatslefttodo.com/support There's a high probability that you like and read Jacobin Magazine; And if you don't, you will. Well, Bhaskar Sunkara is the guy who started Jacobin. Everyone's favorite Trinidadian Socialist (second to Kwame Ture, of course :-)

QAnon Anonymous
Premium Episode 197: Bolsonarismo, Conspiracy Theories & the Jan 8th Riots feat Ben Fogel (Sample)

QAnon Anonymous

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 10:36


On January 8th, in the city of Brazilia, supporters of Brazil's ex-President Jair Bolsonaro stormed multiple government buildings. The Bolsonarista movement, as it's known, had grown convinced that their idol's 2022 presidential election loss was fraudulent. We explore what happened that day, the movement that spawned it, and the Brazilian new right — ascendant, extremely online, and with their own reactionary conspiracy theories. We also have a segment on how the American right is reacting to the events. Our guest is Ben Fogel, a contributing editor for Jacobin who is currently working on a phd in Brazilian anti corruption politics at NYU. Subscribe for $5 a month to get an extra episode of QAA every week + access to ongoing series like 'Manclan' and 'Trickle Down': http://www.patreon.com/QAnonAnonymous Ben Fogel: https://twitter.com/BenjaminFogel Music by Pontus Berghe, Christiane Needs FX, CE. Editing by Corey Klotz. New Merch / Join the Discord Community / Find the Lost Episodes / Etc: http://qanonanonymous.com

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael
Behind the Scenes of the Class Warfare, Body-Horor Cult Classic SOCIETY (+ BRIDE OF RE-ANIMATOR, SILENT NIGHT, DEADLY NIGHT 4, & GIRL NEXT) w/ Screenwriter Zeph E. Daniel

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 127:33


On this edition of Parallax Views, the 1989 horror film Society has become a cult classic for it's wild mix of body horror, dark humor, satire of high society, and class warfare politics. Joining us to discuss that movie, as well as his work on other horror movies past and present, is the film's co-write Zeph E. Daniel. In the second hour, Zeph and I discuss his return to screenwriting with the 2021 horror/thriller GIRL NEXT, a story of a young woman's fight to survive after being kidnapped by human traffickers that gets very strange when demonic entities, body-altering drugs, quantum physics, and a sinister MKULTRA-style government experiment are thrown into the plot's mix. Among the topics covered in our conversation: - How Zeph became involved in screenwriting and early sci-fi writing - Working with producer/director Brian Yuzna, known for his body-horror films including the Re-Animator franchise and Society - How Society's initial story involved a Satanic cult rather than strange, alien-like shapeshifting beings posing as rich humans in Beverly Hills - Satirizing the shallowness of the wealthy and Beverly Hills culture - Silent Night, Deadly Night 4: Initiation and it's witchcraft plot involving the demon Lilith - The length of the filming shoot for the Yuzna-made movies Zeph worked on - Zeph's thoughts on Bride of Re-Animator - The class warfare element of Society, Zeph's interview with the left-wing publication Jacobin, and the exploitation of the poor by the rich in Society's story - Actress Devin DeVasquez's "Clarissa" character in Society - The differences between Zeph's original story for Society and the movie itself - Special effects artist Screaming Mad George and the infamous "The Shunting" ritual scene in Society - Girl Next and the story of how Zeph formed Crazed House Ltd. with director Larry Wade Carell - Zeph's belief in spiritual warfare - Zeph's thoughts and feelings on his work being rejected by the Christian community despite his being a born again Christian; the story of how his evangelical Christian novel Lamb was rejected by the Christian community; the fear of creativity that exists within some Christian circles - The next Crazed House Ltd. movie and the big name horror star legend that'll have a voice role in the film - Experiences at Texas Frightmare Weekend - Problems with wanting to express one's authentic creative self and still getting funding to make a movie - Sex in cinema; the sexual scenes in Girl Next - An explanation of the body-altering drug that's central to Girl Next's plot; how quantum physics and simulation theory play into Girl Next and it's upcoming sequels - Zeph's "Special Thank You" credit in the serial killer movie Ed Gein starring Steve Railsback (The Stuntman; Helter Skelter) - How Zeph works with people who do not share his beliefs about religion or his personal story - The cult classic status of Society today and the different types of people that have come to love the film - Society as a movie that was soft banned in the U.S. but very popular in Europe - Zeph's speculations on what happened to Society's protagonist Bill Whitley (played by Billy Warlock) after the events of the story - The trials and tribulations of making Girl Next - Zeph's early experiences on the radical left - Power elites and oppression of working people - The infamous "The rich have always sucked off low-class shit like you" line in Society that crystalizes it's class conflict themes - And much, much more!

Grey History: The French Revolution
1.48 The Trial of the King Part III

Grey History: The French Revolution

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 65:15


With problems besetting the young republic, the Convention had to end the contentious trial of Louis XVI. How would the trial proceed? Who would determine the King's guilt and punishment? When would the judgment take effect? These are just some of the many questions the deputies grappled with as they dealt with the King's conviction and sentencing.This episode explores the Convention's votes on the King's guilt, the proposed appeal to the people, and the punishment for Louis XVI. It also introduces the important revolutionary Bertrand Barère.Support the show & get exclusive access to all the amazing bonus content:https://www.patreon.com/greyhistoryBonus ContentSpanish efforts to influence the trial King Louis XVIhttps://www.patreon.com/posts/bonus-content-1-76236711Questions & Answers Link for Audio Messages and Traditional Text Questions:https://www.videoask.com/ffwinj4nsUse the same link above to submit feedback on the King's Trial for the upcoming Talk Back Radio segment! Send your questions, praise, and scorn here:https://greyhistory.com/contact/Sign Up for the Newsletter:https://mailchi.mp/0e846e8d26f5/grey-history-newsletterFollow on Social Media:https://www.facebook.com/greyhistorypodcastshttps://www.instagram.com/greyhistorypodcasts/https://twitter.com/greyhistorypod

Jacobin Radio
Long Reads: Pepijn Brandon on Revolution in the Netherlands (Part 2)

Jacobin Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 37:29


The Dutch Revolt of the sixteenth century defeated the Spanish monarchy, the great European superpower of its day. It may not be as well remembered as the English Civil War or the French Revolution. But it was a watershed moment in the development of modern Europe. Pepijn Brandon joins Long Reads to discuss this revolt. He's an historian at VU University in Amsterdam and the author of War, Capital, and the Dutch State. This is the second part of a two-part interview.Long Reads is a Jacobin podcast looking in-depth at political topics and thinkers, both contemporary and historical, with the magazine's longform writers. Hosted by features editor Daniel Finn. Produced by Conor Gillies, music by Knxwledge.Join the Left Book Club at a discount by using the code WINFREE at leftbookclub.comGet an audiobook from Pluto Press at this link: tiny.one/jacobin Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Left Reckoning
100 - What's Next For The Left & Dumb Coup In Brazil? w/ Bhaskar Sunkara & Brian Mier

Left Reckoning

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 106:20


THANKS EVERYONE FOR ALL THE SUPPORT TO GET US TO EP 100, SUPPORT THE SHOW SO WE CAN KEEP GROWING AT PATREON.COM/LEFTRECKONING Bhaskar Sunkara (@SunRaySunRay) founder of Jacobin and President of The Nation joins us to talk about the current moment the left is in the US after two influential but unsuccessful Bernie Sanders campaigns. Then Brian Mier (@BrianMierTeleSur) of TeleSur and Brasilwire joins us to talk about Lula's inauguration and the attempt by Bolsonaro supporters to attack Brazillian democracy. COME SEE US LIVE IN NYC ON JAN 2023 - https://www.ticketweb.com/event/this-is-revolution-left-reckoning-cutting-room-tickets/12706315?pl=cegpresents&REFID=clientsitewp&edpPlParam=%3Fpl%3Dcegpresents MERCH STORE IS LIVE - https://leftreckoning.com/store

American Prestige
Special - The January 8, 2023 Riot in Brasília w/ Benjamin Fogel

American Prestige

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 2:54


This is a free preview of a paid episode. To hear more, visit www.americanprestigepod.comDanny and Derek welcome back Benjamin Fogel, contributing editor to Jacobin, to discuss the events of Sunday, January 8, 2023 in Brazil's capital Brasília as crowds of people attacked all three branches of government.Recorded Monday, January 9, 2023

Serious Danger
Patreon Unlocked: Not So Super (ft. Robert Lechte @djrobstep)

Serious Danger

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 83:28


We've unlocked one of our favourite Patreon bonus episodes, as Tom gets into superannuation with Robert Lechte ( @djrobstep ), who has written on the topic for Jacobin and likely at some point in your Twitter feed. Is super theft? Does it enshrine generational inequality? And how would you fix it? Is Paul Keating a smart financial genius or a stupid neo-lib dummy? Full video version of this episode available on https://www.youtube.com/c/SeriousDangerAU  New Patreon bonus ep! Emerald and Tom's first ever live show together, recorded live at Greens National Conference in Brisbane! They begin with a reading of Andrew Bolt's sane and measured attack on a sacred cow that has had it far too easy for far too long - Finding Nemo. Then Michael Berkman, Greens MP for Maiwar in Brisbane and EMERALD'S BOSS, joins to talk about his recent ethics referral and the scary future of protest in Australia. https://www.patreon.com/SeriousDangerAU  Follow Rob on twitter @djrobstep  https://workersagainstsuper.org/   Read Rob's piece: https://jacobin.com/2020/05/australia-superannuation-system-inequality-labor  https://djrobstep.com/  Produced by Michael Griffin Follow us on Twitter, Instagram, TikTok and Patreon @SeriousDangerAU seriousdangerpod.comSupport the show: http://patreon.com/seriousdangerauSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Working People
Live Show: Organize, Fight, Win (w/ Michelle Valentin Nieves & Harry Marino)

Working People

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 72:32


Earlier this month Working People hit a new milestone: We recorded our first live episode in front of an audience! Organized by the Action Builder / Action Network team and hosted by Busboys & Poets in Washington, DC, we got to speak with Michelle Valentin Nieves of the Amazon Labor Union and Harry Marino of the Major League Baseball Players Association about the incredible worker organizing victories for Amazon workers and minor league baseball players, and about lessons we have learned from an intense year of grassroots struggle that we will be carrying into 2023.  Michelle Valentin Nieves is the Executive Secretary and a founding member of the Amazon Labor Union. Harry Marino is an assistant general counsel at the Major League Baseball Players Association. He is formerly the Executive Director of Advocates for Minor Leaguers, the nonprofit organization that joined with the MLBPA to unionize Minor League players. Harry pitched in the Minor League systems of the Baltimore Orioles and Arizona Diamondbacks.  Since launching in 2012, Action Network tools have helped the Women's March mobilize huge rallies across the globe, helped the DNC raise millions for candidates and organizations, and more. The Action Builder toolset, launched in 2019, helps dozens of unions and progressive organizations empower leaders and build strong organizing campaigns. Additional links/info below... Michelle's Twitter page Harry's Twitter page Amazon Labor Union website, Facebook page, and Twitter page Major League Baseball Players Association website, Facebook page, and Twitter page Action Network website, Facebook page, and Twitter page Action Builder website  Advocates for Minor Leaguers website Working People, "Amazon Labor Union" Eric Blanc, Jacobin, "The Workers Behind Amazon's Historic First Union Explain How They Did It (An Interview with Christian Smalls, Angelika Maldonado, & Michelle Valentin Nieves)" Evan Drellich, The Athletic, "‘Hit the Go Button': The Six Years that Made Baseball's Minor League Union" Tipping Pitches, "The Gang Forms a Union (feat. Trevor Hildenberger)" Permanent links below... Working People Patreon page Leave us a voicemail and we might play it on the show! Labor Radio / Podcast Network website, Facebook page, and Twitter page In These Times website, Facebook page, and Twitter page The Real News Network website, YouTube channel, podcast feeds, Facebook page, and Twitter page Featured Music (all songs sourced from the Free Music Archive: freemusicarchive.org) Jules Taylor, "Working People Theme Song

Demystifying Science
Climate or Corruption? - Spencer Roberts, The Intercept

Demystifying Science

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 104:04


What happens when corrupt incentive structures and incorrect ecological assumptions crash into each other? A billion crabs vanish, and everyone blames it on the nebulous effects of a changing climate. Everyone, that is, except for Spencer Roberts - freelance journalist with bylines at the Intercept, Jacobin, Nautlius, and The New Republic. Roberts started looking into the hyperbolic headlines and discovered a predictable mess of corrupt incentive structures, questionable ecological practices, and a bottomless appetite for exploiting ever-deeper, colder waters. We talk greenwashing, corrupt incentives, government as corporation, nuclear power, and what to do about everything that's wrong. #climatechange #corruption #demystifysci Check our short-films channel, @DemystifySci: https://www.youtube.com/c/DemystifyingScience AND our material science investigations of atomics, @MaterialAtomics THE MATERIAL WORLD https://www.youtube.com/@MaterialAtomics Join our mailing list https://bit.ly/3v3kz2S PODCAST INFO: Anastasia completed her PhD studying bioelectricity at Columbia University. When not talking to brilliant people or making movies, she spends her time painting, reading, and guiding backcountry excursions. Michael Shilo also did his PhD at Columbia studying the elastic properties of molecular water. When he's not in the film studio, he's exploring sound in music. They are both freelance professors at various universities. - Blog: http://DemystifySci.com/blog - RSS: https://anchor.fm/s/2be66934/podcast/rss - Donate: https://bit.ly/3wkPqaD - Swag: https://bit.ly/2PXdC2y SOCIAL: - Discord: https://discord.gg/MJzKT8CQub - Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/DemystifySci - Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/DemystifySci/ - Twitter: https://twitter.com/DemystifySci MUSIC: -Shilo Delay: https://g.co/kgs/oty671

Haymarket Books Live
Freedom Dreams Episode 2 with Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor & Robin D.G. Kelley

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 87:34


Join Robin D.G. Kelley for the Freedom Dreams discussion series. The second discussion features Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor. Freedom Dreams is a classic in the study of the Black radical tradition that has just been released in a new 20th anniversary edition. In this live event series, Robin D. G. Kelley will explore the connections between radical imagination and movements for social transformation with pathbreaking artists and scholars. Speakers: Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor is an award-winning scholar and public intellectual. Taylor is author of Race for Profit: How Banks and the Real Estate Industry Undermined Black Homeownership, published in 2019 by University of North Carolina Press. Race for Profit was a semi-finalist for the 2019 National Book Award and a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in History in 2020. She was named a Guggenheim Foundation Fellow and MacArthur Foundation Fellow in 2021. Her earlier book From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation won the Lannan Cultural Freedom Award for an Especially Notable Book in 2016. She is also editor of How We Get Free: Black Feminism and the Combahee River Collective, which won the Lambda Literary Award for LGBQT nonfiction in 2018. Taylor's scholarship examines racism and public policy, inequality, Black politics, radical politics and social movements in the United States, both in historical and contemporary contexts. Taylor is working on two projects, one that look at the dynamics of race, class and politics in the first generation after the Black social movements of the 1960s and a book that examines the Black radical tradition mediated through the life and politics of Angela Y. Davis. Taylor is a contributing writer at The New Yorker. Her writing has appeared in the Los Angeles Times, Boston Review, Paris Review, Guardian, The Nation and Jacobin, among others. She is a former Contributing Opinion Writer for The New York Times. Taylor has been named one of the hundred most influential African Americans in the United States by The Root. Essence Magazine named her among the top one hundred “change makers” in the county. She has been appointed as a Distinguished Lecturer for the Organization of American Historians by the Organization of American Historians. For eight years, Taylor was a professor in the Department of African American Studies at Princeton University. She is the Leon Forrest Professor of African American Studies at Northwestern University. Robin D.G. Kelley is Professor and Gary B. Nash Endowed Chair in U.S. History at UCLA. He is the author of Hammer and Hoe, Race Rebels, Freedom Dreams: The Black Radical Imagination, and Thelonious Monk: The Life and Times of an American Original, among other titles. His writing has been featured in the Journal of American History, American Historical Review, Black Music Research Journal, African Studies Review, New York Times, The Crisis, The Nation, and Voice Literary Supplement. Join the upcoming events in the Freedom Dreams Series: https://www.eventbrite.com/cc/freedom-dreams-with-robin-dg-kelley-1288129 Watch the live event recording: youtu.be/BBoQI9HU1rk Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: @haymarketbooks

New Books in World Affairs
Eren Duzgun, "Capitalism, Jacobinism and International Relations: Revisiting Turkish Modernity" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 99:30


Western interpretations of the Ottoman age of reform and the Turkish Republic often evaluate these histories against an idealized, essentialized narrative of the European history, in which a triumphant bourgeois class instigated transitions to political liberalism and capitalism. Consequently, their explanations of persistent authoritarian tendencies and statist economic development policies focus on what features of European modernity are missing or insufficiently present in Turkey.  In Capitalism, Jacobinism and International Relations: Revisiting Turkish Modernity (Cambridge UP, 2022), Eren Duzgun, argues that this approach to comparative historical analysis not only fails to grasp Ottoman and Turkish history on its own terms, but it also gets European history wrong by overlooking the variety of trajectories of political and economic development that characterized European history from the age of revolutions onwards. Duzgun argues that the concept of Jacobinism holds the key to understanding both Ottoman and Turkish modernization and transitions to modernity in continental Europe that did not correspond to the narrative of ‘bourgeois revolutions' that undergirds both liberal and Marxist theories of modernization. We will discuss the origins of the Jacobin route to modernity, how the Jacobin model relates to common understandings of capitalist political economies, and why a book about Turkish and Ottoman history needed a chapter on French history. Eren Duzgun is assistant professor of international relations at the University of Nottingham's China Campus in Ningbo, China. Geoffrey Gordon is a PhD candidate in comparative politics at the University of Virginia. Follow him on Twitter: @geofflgordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

New Books Network
Eren Duzgun, "Capitalism, Jacobinism and International Relations: Revisiting Turkish Modernity" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 99:30


Western interpretations of the Ottoman age of reform and the Turkish Republic often evaluate these histories against an idealized, essentialized narrative of the European history, in which a triumphant bourgeois class instigated transitions to political liberalism and capitalism. Consequently, their explanations of persistent authoritarian tendencies and statist economic development policies focus on what features of European modernity are missing or insufficiently present in Turkey.  In Capitalism, Jacobinism and International Relations: Revisiting Turkish Modernity (Cambridge UP, 2022), Eren Duzgun, argues that this approach to comparative historical analysis not only fails to grasp Ottoman and Turkish history on its own terms, but it also gets European history wrong by overlooking the variety of trajectories of political and economic development that characterized European history from the age of revolutions onwards. Duzgun argues that the concept of Jacobinism holds the key to understanding both Ottoman and Turkish modernization and transitions to modernity in continental Europe that did not correspond to the narrative of ‘bourgeois revolutions' that undergirds both liberal and Marxist theories of modernization. We will discuss the origins of the Jacobin route to modernity, how the Jacobin model relates to common understandings of capitalist political economies, and why a book about Turkish and Ottoman history needed a chapter on French history. Eren Duzgun is assistant professor of international relations at the University of Nottingham's China Campus in Ningbo, China. Geoffrey Gordon is a PhD candidate in comparative politics at the University of Virginia. Follow him on Twitter: @geofflgordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Islamic Studies
Eren Duzgun, "Capitalism, Jacobinism and International Relations: Revisiting Turkish Modernity" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in Islamic Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 99:30


Western interpretations of the Ottoman age of reform and the Turkish Republic often evaluate these histories against an idealized, essentialized narrative of the European history, in which a triumphant bourgeois class instigated transitions to political liberalism and capitalism. Consequently, their explanations of persistent authoritarian tendencies and statist economic development policies focus on what features of European modernity are missing or insufficiently present in Turkey.  In Capitalism, Jacobinism and International Relations: Revisiting Turkish Modernity (Cambridge UP, 2022), Eren Duzgun, argues that this approach to comparative historical analysis not only fails to grasp Ottoman and Turkish history on its own terms, but it also gets European history wrong by overlooking the variety of trajectories of political and economic development that characterized European history from the age of revolutions onwards. Duzgun argues that the concept of Jacobinism holds the key to understanding both Ottoman and Turkish modernization and transitions to modernity in continental Europe that did not correspond to the narrative of ‘bourgeois revolutions' that undergirds both liberal and Marxist theories of modernization. We will discuss the origins of the Jacobin route to modernity, how the Jacobin model relates to common understandings of capitalist political economies, and why a book about Turkish and Ottoman history needed a chapter on French history. Eren Duzgun is assistant professor of international relations at the University of Nottingham's China Campus in Ningbo, China. Geoffrey Gordon is a PhD candidate in comparative politics at the University of Virginia. Follow him on Twitter: @geofflgordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/islamic-studies

New Books in History
Eren Duzgun, "Capitalism, Jacobinism and International Relations: Revisiting Turkish Modernity" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 99:30


Western interpretations of the Ottoman age of reform and the Turkish Republic often evaluate these histories against an idealized, essentialized narrative of the European history, in which a triumphant bourgeois class instigated transitions to political liberalism and capitalism. Consequently, their explanations of persistent authoritarian tendencies and statist economic development policies focus on what features of European modernity are missing or insufficiently present in Turkey.  In Capitalism, Jacobinism and International Relations: Revisiting Turkish Modernity (Cambridge UP, 2022), Eren Duzgun, argues that this approach to comparative historical analysis not only fails to grasp Ottoman and Turkish history on its own terms, but it also gets European history wrong by overlooking the variety of trajectories of political and economic development that characterized European history from the age of revolutions onwards. Duzgun argues that the concept of Jacobinism holds the key to understanding both Ottoman and Turkish modernization and transitions to modernity in continental Europe that did not correspond to the narrative of ‘bourgeois revolutions' that undergirds both liberal and Marxist theories of modernization. We will discuss the origins of the Jacobin route to modernity, how the Jacobin model relates to common understandings of capitalist political economies, and why a book about Turkish and Ottoman history needed a chapter on French history. Eren Duzgun is assistant professor of international relations at the University of Nottingham's China Campus in Ningbo, China. Geoffrey Gordon is a PhD candidate in comparative politics at the University of Virginia. Follow him on Twitter: @geofflgordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies
Eren Duzgun, "Capitalism, Jacobinism and International Relations: Revisiting Turkish Modernity" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 99:30


Western interpretations of the Ottoman age of reform and the Turkish Republic often evaluate these histories against an idealized, essentialized narrative of the European history, in which a triumphant bourgeois class instigated transitions to political liberalism and capitalism. Consequently, their explanations of persistent authoritarian tendencies and statist economic development policies focus on what features of European modernity are missing or insufficiently present in Turkey.  In Capitalism, Jacobinism and International Relations: Revisiting Turkish Modernity (Cambridge UP, 2022), Eren Duzgun, argues that this approach to comparative historical analysis not only fails to grasp Ottoman and Turkish history on its own terms, but it also gets European history wrong by overlooking the variety of trajectories of political and economic development that characterized European history from the age of revolutions onwards. Duzgun argues that the concept of Jacobinism holds the key to understanding both Ottoman and Turkish modernization and transitions to modernity in continental Europe that did not correspond to the narrative of ‘bourgeois revolutions' that undergirds both liberal and Marxist theories of modernization. We will discuss the origins of the Jacobin route to modernity, how the Jacobin model relates to common understandings of capitalist political economies, and why a book about Turkish and Ottoman history needed a chapter on French history. Eren Duzgun is assistant professor of international relations at the University of Nottingham's China Campus in Ningbo, China. Geoffrey Gordon is a PhD candidate in comparative politics at the University of Virginia. Follow him on Twitter: @geofflgordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/middle-eastern-studies

New Books in European Studies
Eren Duzgun, "Capitalism, Jacobinism and International Relations: Revisiting Turkish Modernity" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in European Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 99:30


Western interpretations of the Ottoman age of reform and the Turkish Republic often evaluate these histories against an idealized, essentialized narrative of the European history, in which a triumphant bourgeois class instigated transitions to political liberalism and capitalism. Consequently, their explanations of persistent authoritarian tendencies and statist economic development policies focus on what features of European modernity are missing or insufficiently present in Turkey.  In Capitalism, Jacobinism and International Relations: Revisiting Turkish Modernity (Cambridge UP, 2022), Eren Duzgun, argues that this approach to comparative historical analysis not only fails to grasp Ottoman and Turkish history on its own terms, but it also gets European history wrong by overlooking the variety of trajectories of political and economic development that characterized European history from the age of revolutions onwards. Duzgun argues that the concept of Jacobinism holds the key to understanding both Ottoman and Turkish modernization and transitions to modernity in continental Europe that did not correspond to the narrative of ‘bourgeois revolutions' that undergirds both liberal and Marxist theories of modernization. We will discuss the origins of the Jacobin route to modernity, how the Jacobin model relates to common understandings of capitalist political economies, and why a book about Turkish and Ottoman history needed a chapter on French history. Eren Duzgun is assistant professor of international relations at the University of Nottingham's China Campus in Ningbo, China. Geoffrey Gordon is a PhD candidate in comparative politics at the University of Virginia. Follow him on Twitter: @geofflgordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/european-studies

New Books in Intellectual History
Eren Duzgun, "Capitalism, Jacobinism and International Relations: Revisiting Turkish Modernity" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 99:30


Western interpretations of the Ottoman age of reform and the Turkish Republic often evaluate these histories against an idealized, essentialized narrative of the European history, in which a triumphant bourgeois class instigated transitions to political liberalism and capitalism. Consequently, their explanations of persistent authoritarian tendencies and statist economic development policies focus on what features of European modernity are missing or insufficiently present in Turkey.  In Capitalism, Jacobinism and International Relations: Revisiting Turkish Modernity (Cambridge UP, 2022), Eren Duzgun, argues that this approach to comparative historical analysis not only fails to grasp Ottoman and Turkish history on its own terms, but it also gets European history wrong by overlooking the variety of trajectories of political and economic development that characterized European history from the age of revolutions onwards. Duzgun argues that the concept of Jacobinism holds the key to understanding both Ottoman and Turkish modernization and transitions to modernity in continental Europe that did not correspond to the narrative of ‘bourgeois revolutions' that undergirds both liberal and Marxist theories of modernization. We will discuss the origins of the Jacobin route to modernity, how the Jacobin model relates to common understandings of capitalist political economies, and why a book about Turkish and Ottoman history needed a chapter on French history. Eren Duzgun is assistant professor of international relations at the University of Nottingham's China Campus in Ningbo, China. Geoffrey Gordon is a PhD candidate in comparative politics at the University of Virginia. Follow him on Twitter: @geofflgordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

Exchanges: A Cambridge UP Podcast
Eren Duzgun, "Capitalism, Jacobinism and International Relations: Revisiting Turkish Modernity" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

Exchanges: A Cambridge UP Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 99:30


Western interpretations of the Ottoman age of reform and the Turkish Republic often evaluate these histories against an idealized, essentialized narrative of the European history, in which a triumphant bourgeois class instigated transitions to political liberalism and capitalism. Consequently, their explanations of persistent authoritarian tendencies and statist economic development policies focus on what features of European modernity are missing or insufficiently present in Turkey.  In Capitalism, Jacobinism and International Relations: Revisiting Turkish Modernity (Cambridge UP, 2022), Eren Duzgun, argues that this approach to comparative historical analysis not only fails to grasp Ottoman and Turkish history on its own terms, but it also gets European history wrong by overlooking the variety of trajectories of political and economic development that characterized European history from the age of revolutions onwards. Duzgun argues that the concept of Jacobinism holds the key to understanding both Ottoman and Turkish modernization and transitions to modernity in continental Europe that did not correspond to the narrative of ‘bourgeois revolutions' that undergirds both liberal and Marxist theories of modernization. We will discuss the origins of the Jacobin route to modernity, how the Jacobin model relates to common understandings of capitalist political economies, and why a book about Turkish and Ottoman history needed a chapter on French history. Eren Duzgun is assistant professor of international relations at the University of Nottingham's China Campus in Ningbo, China. Geoffrey Gordon is a PhD candidate in comparative politics at the University of Virginia. Follow him on Twitter: @geofflgordon.

New Books in French Studies
Eren Duzgun, "Capitalism, Jacobinism and International Relations: Revisiting Turkish Modernity" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in French Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 99:30


Western interpretations of the Ottoman age of reform and the Turkish Republic often evaluate these histories against an idealized, essentialized narrative of the European history, in which a triumphant bourgeois class instigated transitions to political liberalism and capitalism. Consequently, their explanations of persistent authoritarian tendencies and statist economic development policies focus on what features of European modernity are missing or insufficiently present in Turkey.  In Capitalism, Jacobinism and International Relations: Revisiting Turkish Modernity (Cambridge UP, 2022), Eren Duzgun, argues that this approach to comparative historical analysis not only fails to grasp Ottoman and Turkish history on its own terms, but it also gets European history wrong by overlooking the variety of trajectories of political and economic development that characterized European history from the age of revolutions onwards. Duzgun argues that the concept of Jacobinism holds the key to understanding both Ottoman and Turkish modernization and transitions to modernity in continental Europe that did not correspond to the narrative of ‘bourgeois revolutions' that undergirds both liberal and Marxist theories of modernization. We will discuss the origins of the Jacobin route to modernity, how the Jacobin model relates to common understandings of capitalist political economies, and why a book about Turkish and Ottoman history needed a chapter on French history. Eren Duzgun is assistant professor of international relations at the University of Nottingham's China Campus in Ningbo, China. Geoffrey Gordon is a PhD candidate in comparative politics at the University of Virginia. Follow him on Twitter: @geofflgordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/french-studies

The Todd Herman Show
The Trifecta: Progressivism, narcissism and racism: why they match up so well - A Best of Show I enjoyed exploring Ep_540_Hour 1

The Todd Herman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 50:52


THE THESIS: The Global Left is harnessing victim driven movements into one evil, insatiable force animated by covetous revenge. When there are enough victims coalesced to form a political power base, sociopaths often appear as the face of the movement. Victim driven movements always end in violence. A single, God-led movement is the only solution to forestall the violence on a mass scale. THE SCRIPTURE & SCRIPTURAL RESOURCES: The New Testament makes clear how we are to treat the least of these and that is as we would treat the Lord Jesus Himself Matthew 25:4040 “The King will reply, ‘Truly I tell you, whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers and sisters of mine, you did for me.”It also rejected a victim-lead movement of revenge against the Romans, something many Jewish people craved. In the eyes of the Lord, we are all hurt by the same affliction, sin. Why Was the Messiah Expected to Free Israel from Rome? When Jesus arrived, God's purpose was not to save his nation so they could disobey him again and fall into slavery once more. He wanted them to be saved for all time from their biggest enemy — sin.God is of order, not chaos. The enemy thrives upon chaos, victim lead movements thrive on chaos. Read Genesis 1: Genesis 1We are to teach our children God's laws and to teach others about them. Proverbs 22:6“Train up a child in the way he should go; even when he is old he will not depart from it.”While Jesus will absolutely return as a warrior King, it will not be for revenge, for for righteousness. In Christ, we are victors not victims--even when we suffer for Him. THE NEWS & COMMENT:On Victim Movements: [AUDIO] - “Woke activists say they simply care more. But a pioneering psychologist, Sam Vaknin, who studies narcissism says, "The potential for aggression in victimhood movements is much larger than in the general population... Anything that is grievance-based leads to violence and death."The Mockingbird Media has found a way to make Twitter employees--some of the highest paid people--into a victim group.BREAKING: Elon Musk FIRES top Twitter execs as he takes charge; Musk entered the San Francisco headquarters ahead of the $44 billion deal closing, and was faced with skeptical employees worried for their jobs and the company culture. MSNBC pretends not voting for John Fetterman means you think disabled people should be banned for working for the US Government. Disabled Americans have the right to be represented, and most importantly, to work — and that includes working for the U.S. government.Taking another stance, this Blue Check pretends Senators need do nothing but vote yes or no. You are victimizing John Fetterman if you do not vote for him. David J. Sirota is an American journalist, columnist at The Guardian, editor for Jacobin, author, television writer, and screenwriter. He is also a political commentator and radio host based in Denver. He is a nationally syndicated newspaper columnist, political spokesperson, and blogger.John Fetterman's “wife”, who apparently enjoys promoting the fact that she has sex with both men and women, turns swimming into a victimhood activity [AUDIO] - Gisele Fetterman: "Historically, swimming in America is very racist."Before Dylan Mulvaney (who just got to interview Biden the Figurehjead), chose the sacred victim role under the magic (and meaningless) word “transgender”, he was merchandising the victimhood of being a same sex attracted man-child who sang pedophile trolling songs while nearly naked (and seemingly became sexually aroused by that). [AUDIO] - Before he started pretending to be a pubescent girl @JoeBiden's emotional consultant on chemically and surgically mutilating children, Daylan Mulvaney did thisShe rejects victimhood, so Marya Flores, an Hispanic woman now serving in Congress has been denied membership in the Congressional Hispanic Victimhood Caucus.Mayra Flores Prevented From Joining the Congressional Hispanic CaucusEnter the sociopathsA woman who would let you buy bolts at Home Depot, but not at small hardware stores, who literally banned people from buying gardening seeds at that same Home Depot openly, brazenly lies about how long her school closure diktats lasted, [AUDIO] - Michigan Gov. Whitmer Lies About Closing Schools for Only Three Months Over COVIDCanceled the school year in March 2020. Then she closed schools again in November and December in 2020 and January 2021.The Dictator of New York has trouble understanding why people want repeat murderers in prison.[AUDIO] - Kathy Hochul doesn't understand why jailing murderers is importantIn the utterly fallen City of Seattle, Amazon has about 24x as many cops as entire neighborhoods in Seattle.Amazon to switch security vendors, resulting in 1,200 Seattle-area layoffs. . . and the sacred victim drug addicts--whom Seattle stores rather than restores--are dying in record numbers[AUDIO] - Audit shows alarming increase in meth use in Seattle; reward system proposed to keep users clean. . . and sociopaths in government continue to allow the cartels to set-up drug cooking RVs. Thank the Lord the feds were able to bust a few of them. [AUDIO] - IF THERE WAS EVER ANY DOUBT: Multiple people associated with Mexican cartels facing federal charges today after massive drug and firearms bust in Ballard, Bothell, and West Seattle. Authorities confirm RV's were being used to traffick illegal drugs. Yup, RV's.

New Books in Diplomatic History
Eren Duzgun, "Capitalism, Jacobinism and International Relations: Revisiting Turkish Modernity" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in Diplomatic History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 99:30


Western interpretations of the Ottoman age of reform and the Turkish Republic often evaluate these histories against an idealized, essentialized narrative of the European history, in which a triumphant bourgeois class instigated transitions to political liberalism and capitalism. Consequently, their explanations of persistent authoritarian tendencies and statist economic development policies focus on what features of European modernity are missing or insufficiently present in Turkey.  In Capitalism, Jacobinism and International Relations: Revisiting Turkish Modernity (Cambridge UP, 2022), Eren Duzgun, argues that this approach to comparative historical analysis not only fails to grasp Ottoman and Turkish history on its own terms, but it also gets European history wrong by overlooking the variety of trajectories of political and economic development that characterized European history from the age of revolutions onwards. Duzgun argues that the concept of Jacobinism holds the key to understanding both Ottoman and Turkish modernization and transitions to modernity in continental Europe that did not correspond to the narrative of ‘bourgeois revolutions' that undergirds both liberal and Marxist theories of modernization. We will discuss the origins of the Jacobin route to modernity, how the Jacobin model relates to common understandings of capitalist political economies, and why a book about Turkish and Ottoman history needed a chapter on French history. Eren Duzgun is assistant professor of international relations at the University of Nottingham's China Campus in Ningbo, China. Geoffrey Gordon is a PhD candidate in comparative politics at the University of Virginia. Follow him on Twitter: @geofflgordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Lex Fridman Podcast
#349 – Bhaskar Sunkara: The Case for Socialism

Lex Fridman Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 232:04 Very Popular


Bhaskar Sunkara is a democratic socialist, political writer, founding editor of Jacobin, president of The Nation, and author of The Socialist Manifesto. Please support this podcast by checking out our sponsors: – House of Macadamias: https://houseofmacadamias.com/lex and use code LEX to get 20% of your first order – Linode: https://linode.com/lex to get $100 free credit – Onnit: https://lexfridman.com/onnit to get up to 10% off – InsideTracker: https://insidetracker.com/lex to get 20% off – ExpressVPN: https://expressvpn.com/lexpod to get 3 months free EPISODE LINKS: Bhaskar's Twitter: https://twitter.com/sunraysunray Jacobin: https://jacobin.com Jacobin's Twitter: https://twitter.com/jacobin The Nation: https://thenation.com The Socialist Manifesto (book): https://amzn.to/3hKpt2p PODCAST INFO: Podcast

Jacobin Radio
Long Reads: Pepijn Brandon on Revolution in the Netherlands (Part 1)

Jacobin Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 46:11


The Dutch Revolt of the sixteenth century defeated the Spanish monarchy, the great European superpower of its day. It may not be as well remembered as the English Civil War or the French Revolution. But it was a watershed moment in the development of modern Europe.Pepijn Brandon joins Long Reads to discuss the Dutch Revolt. He's an historian at VU University in Amsterdam and the author of War, Capital, and the Dutch State. This is the first part of a two-part interview.Long Reads is a Jacobin podcast looking in-depth at political topics and thinkers, both contemporary and historical, with the magazine's longform writers. Hosted by features editor Daniel Finn. Produced by Conor Gillies, music by Knxwledge.Get an audiobook from Pluto Press before the end of December and you'll be entered to win a set of their entire collection: tiny.one/jacobinAnd join the Left Book Club at a discount by using the code WINFREE at leftbookclub.com Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Takeaway
Prestige Won't Pay The Bills

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 20:03


Last Thursday, more than 1,100 New York Times journalists and other staff members walked off the job in a historic 24 hour strike, punctuating nearly two years of contract negotiations over better compensation, pensions and healthcare benefits. Despite the image of prestige that working at a legacy news outlet conjures, workers describe being unable to make ends meet on the pay the Times provides.  The situation is similar for part-time faculty at The New School, a private university with a public image bolstered by its history of fostering radical inquiry. These 2,600 adjuncts teach nearly 90% of the school's classes, but many say they work multiple jobs due to low pay. The portion who were teaching this semester recently ended the longest adjunct strike in U.S. history — three weeks. These labor disputes are an expression of the inherent tension for mission-driven creative and intellectual workers: holding management accountable while continuing to be accountable to the public they serve. We're joined by Alex Press, labor reporter and staff writer at Jacobin Magazine, and Natasha Lennard, columnist at The Intercept and part-time faculty member at The New School.

The Takeaway
Prestige Won't Pay The Bills

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 20:03


Last Thursday, more than 1,100 New York Times journalists and other staff members walked off the job in a historic 24 hour strike, punctuating nearly two years of contract negotiations over better compensation, pensions and healthcare benefits. Despite the image of prestige that working at a legacy news outlet conjures, workers describe being unable to make ends meet on the pay the Times provides.  The situation is similar for part-time faculty at The New School, a private university with a public image bolstered by its history of fostering radical inquiry. These 2,600 adjuncts teach nearly 90% of the school's classes, but many say they work multiple jobs due to low pay. The portion who were teaching this semester recently ended the longest adjunct strike in U.S. history — three weeks. These labor disputes are an expression of the inherent tension for mission-driven creative and intellectual workers: holding management accountable while continuing to be accountable to the public they serve. We're joined by Alex Press, labor reporter and staff writer at Jacobin Magazine, and Natasha Lennard, columnist at The Intercept and part-time faculty member at The New School.

New Books in World Affairs
Daniel Immerwahr, "The Galactic Vietnam: Technology, Modernization, and Empire in George Lucas's Star Wars" (2022)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 65:33


In this episode I got to chat about two of my favorite things: the history of imperialism and Star Wars with Daniel Immerwahr, Professor of History at Northwestern University. Our conversation focused on his recent article “The Galactic Vietnam: Technology, Modernization, and Empire in George Lucas's Star Wars,” in Ideology in U.S. Foreign Relations: New Histories, edited by David Milne and Christopher Nichols (Columbia University Press, 2022). In the piece her uses the film and the figure of George Lucas to explore various aspects of the United States in the Cold War. Were Ewoks the Viet Cong? Was the Death Star a B-52? Was Alderaan Hanoi? Listen and find out. Daniel Immerwahr earned his Ph.D. at UC Berkeley in 2011 after undergraduate studies at both Columbia and Cambridge. His previous work includes Thinking Small: The United States and the Lure of Community Development (Harvard, 2015) and the award winning and best-selling How to Hide an Empire: A Short History of the Greater United States (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2019), which has been translated into German, Dutch, Italian, Korean, and Chinese so far. Dr. Immerwahr's writings have appeared in the New York Times, The Guardian, the Washington Post, The New Republic, The Nation, Dissent, Jacobin, Slate, and elsewhere. Michael G. Vann is a professor of world history at California State University, Sacramento. A specialist in imperialism and the Cold War in Southeast Asia, he is the author of The Great Hanoi Rat Hunt: Empires, Disease, and Modernity in French Colonial Vietnam (Oxford University Press, 2018). When he's not reading or talking about new books with smart people, Mike can be found surfing in Santa Cruz, California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

New Books in Military History
Daniel Immerwahr, "The Galactic Vietnam: Technology, Modernization, and Empire in George Lucas's Star Wars" (2022)

New Books in Military History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 65:33


In this episode I got to chat about two of my favorite things: the history of imperialism and Star Wars with Daniel Immerwahr, Professor of History at Northwestern University. Our conversation focused on his recent article “The Galactic Vietnam: Technology, Modernization, and Empire in George Lucas's Star Wars,” in Ideology in U.S. Foreign Relations: New Histories, edited by David Milne and Christopher Nichols (Columbia University Press, 2022). In the piece her uses the film and the figure of George Lucas to explore various aspects of the United States in the Cold War. Were Ewoks the Viet Cong? Was the Death Star a B-52? Was Alderaan Hanoi? Listen and find out. Daniel Immerwahr earned his Ph.D. at UC Berkeley in 2011 after undergraduate studies at both Columbia and Cambridge. His previous work includes Thinking Small: The United States and the Lure of Community Development (Harvard, 2015) and the award winning and best-selling How to Hide an Empire: A Short History of the Greater United States (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2019), which has been translated into German, Dutch, Italian, Korean, and Chinese so far. Dr. Immerwahr's writings have appeared in the New York Times, The Guardian, the Washington Post, The New Republic, The Nation, Dissent, Jacobin, Slate, and elsewhere. Michael G. Vann is a professor of world history at California State University, Sacramento. A specialist in imperialism and the Cold War in Southeast Asia, he is the author of The Great Hanoi Rat Hunt: Empires, Disease, and Modernity in French Colonial Vietnam (Oxford University Press, 2018). When he's not reading or talking about new books with smart people, Mike can be found surfing in Santa Cruz, California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/military-history

New Books in History
Daniel Immerwahr, "The Galactic Vietnam: Technology, Modernization, and Empire in George Lucas's Star Wars" (2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 65:33


In this episode I got to chat about two of my favorite things: the history of imperialism and Star Wars with Daniel Immerwahr, Professor of History at Northwestern University. Our conversation focused on his recent article “The Galactic Vietnam: Technology, Modernization, and Empire in George Lucas's Star Wars,” in Ideology in U.S. Foreign Relations: New Histories, edited by David Milne and Christopher Nichols (Columbia University Press, 2022). In the piece her uses the film and the figure of George Lucas to explore various aspects of the United States in the Cold War. Were Ewoks the Viet Cong? Was the Death Star a B-52? Was Alderaan Hanoi? Listen and find out. Daniel Immerwahr earned his Ph.D. at UC Berkeley in 2011 after undergraduate studies at both Columbia and Cambridge. His previous work includes Thinking Small: The United States and the Lure of Community Development (Harvard, 2015) and the award winning and best-selling How to Hide an Empire: A Short History of the Greater United States (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2019), which has been translated into German, Dutch, Italian, Korean, and Chinese so far. Dr. Immerwahr's writings have appeared in the New York Times, The Guardian, the Washington Post, The New Republic, The Nation, Dissent, Jacobin, Slate, and elsewhere. Michael G. Vann is a professor of world history at California State University, Sacramento. A specialist in imperialism and the Cold War in Southeast Asia, he is the author of The Great Hanoi Rat Hunt: Empires, Disease, and Modernity in French Colonial Vietnam (Oxford University Press, 2018). When he's not reading or talking about new books with smart people, Mike can be found surfing in Santa Cruz, California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
Daniel Immerwahr, "The Galactic Vietnam: Technology, Modernization, and Empire in George Lucas's Star Wars" (2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 65:33


In this episode I got to chat about two of my favorite things: the history of imperialism and Star Wars with Daniel Immerwahr, Professor of History at Northwestern University. Our conversation focused on his recent article “The Galactic Vietnam: Technology, Modernization, and Empire in George Lucas's Star Wars,” in Ideology in U.S. Foreign Relations: New Histories, edited by David Milne and Christopher Nichols (Columbia University Press, 2022). In the piece her uses the film and the figure of George Lucas to explore various aspects of the United States in the Cold War. Were Ewoks the Viet Cong? Was the Death Star a B-52? Was Alderaan Hanoi? Listen and find out. Daniel Immerwahr earned his Ph.D. at UC Berkeley in 2011 after undergraduate studies at both Columbia and Cambridge. His previous work includes Thinking Small: The United States and the Lure of Community Development (Harvard, 2015) and the award winning and best-selling How to Hide an Empire: A Short History of the Greater United States (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2019), which has been translated into German, Dutch, Italian, Korean, and Chinese so far. Dr. Immerwahr's writings have appeared in the New York Times, The Guardian, the Washington Post, The New Republic, The Nation, Dissent, Jacobin, Slate, and elsewhere. Michael G. Vann is a professor of world history at California State University, Sacramento. A specialist in imperialism and the Cold War in Southeast Asia, he is the author of The Great Hanoi Rat Hunt: Empires, Disease, and Modernity in French Colonial Vietnam (Oxford University Press, 2018). When he's not reading or talking about new books with smart people, Mike can be found surfing in Santa Cruz, California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Dance
Daniel Immerwahr, "The Galactic Vietnam: Technology, Modernization, and Empire in George Lucas's Star Wars" (2022)

New Books in Dance

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 65:33


In this episode I got to chat about two of my favorite things: the history of imperialism and Star Wars with Daniel Immerwahr, Professor of History at Northwestern University. Our conversation focused on his recent article “The Galactic Vietnam: Technology, Modernization, and Empire in George Lucas's Star Wars,” in Ideology in U.S. Foreign Relations: New Histories, edited by David Milne and Christopher Nichols (Columbia University Press, 2022). In the piece her uses the film and the figure of George Lucas to explore various aspects of the United States in the Cold War. Were Ewoks the Viet Cong? Was the Death Star a B-52? Was Alderaan Hanoi? Listen and find out. Daniel Immerwahr earned his Ph.D. at UC Berkeley in 2011 after undergraduate studies at both Columbia and Cambridge. His previous work includes Thinking Small: The United States and the Lure of Community Development (Harvard, 2015) and the award winning and best-selling How to Hide an Empire: A Short History of the Greater United States (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2019), which has been translated into German, Dutch, Italian, Korean, and Chinese so far. Dr. Immerwahr's writings have appeared in the New York Times, The Guardian, the Washington Post, The New Republic, The Nation, Dissent, Jacobin, Slate, and elsewhere. Michael G. Vann is a professor of world history at California State University, Sacramento. A specialist in imperialism and the Cold War in Southeast Asia, he is the author of The Great Hanoi Rat Hunt: Empires, Disease, and Modernity in French Colonial Vietnam (Oxford University Press, 2018). When he's not reading or talking about new books with smart people, Mike can be found surfing in Santa Cruz, California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/performing-arts

New Books in Film
Daniel Immerwahr, "The Galactic Vietnam: Technology, Modernization, and Empire in George Lucas's Star Wars" (2022)

New Books in Film

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 65:33


In this episode I got to chat about two of my favorite things: the history of imperialism and Star Wars with Daniel Immerwahr, Professor of History at Northwestern University. Our conversation focused on his recent article “The Galactic Vietnam: Technology, Modernization, and Empire in George Lucas's Star Wars,” in Ideology in U.S. Foreign Relations: New Histories, edited by David Milne and Christopher Nichols (Columbia University Press, 2022). In the piece her uses the film and the figure of George Lucas to explore various aspects of the United States in the Cold War. Were Ewoks the Viet Cong? Was the Death Star a B-52? Was Alderaan Hanoi? Listen and find out. Daniel Immerwahr earned his Ph.D. at UC Berkeley in 2011 after undergraduate studies at both Columbia and Cambridge. His previous work includes Thinking Small: The United States and the Lure of Community Development (Harvard, 2015) and the award winning and best-selling How to Hide an Empire: A Short History of the Greater United States (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2019), which has been translated into German, Dutch, Italian, Korean, and Chinese so far. Dr. Immerwahr's writings have appeared in the New York Times, The Guardian, the Washington Post, The New Republic, The Nation, Dissent, Jacobin, Slate, and elsewhere. Michael G. Vann is a professor of world history at California State University, Sacramento. A specialist in imperialism and the Cold War in Southeast Asia, he is the author of The Great Hanoi Rat Hunt: Empires, Disease, and Modernity in French Colonial Vietnam (Oxford University Press, 2018). When he's not reading or talking about new books with smart people, Mike can be found surfing in Santa Cruz, California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/film

Varn Vlog
M.C. Toussaint on Green Socialism and Left Media

Varn Vlog

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 145:39


Please support our Patreon.  For early and ad-free episodes, members-only content, and more.M.C. Toussaint is a producer for This Is Revolution and has worked with Jacobin and Majority Report.  We talk about her journey into socialism through environmentalism and ecology.  Crew:Host: C. Derick VarnAudio Producer: Paul Channel Strip  ( @aufhebenkultur )Branding Design: Djene Bajalan and C. Derick VarnIntro and Outro Music by Bitter Lake.Intro Videos Design: Jason Myles, Dejene Balajan Support the show

Jacobin Radio
Long Reads: Michela Wrong on Eritrea's Endless War

Jacobin Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 81:06


Eritrea's long struggle for independence finally ended in victory three decades ago. It seemed like a fresh beginning for one of Africa's smallest countries. But the Eritrean leader Isaias Afwerki soon established a highly repressive political system that caused many young people to flee. Since 2020, Afwerki's army has been a key protagonist in one of the world's most destructive wars.Michela Wrong, journalist and the author of several books about African politics including I Didn't Do It For You, joins the podcast to discuss a history of modern Eritrea.Long Reads is a Jacobin podcast looking in-depth at political topics and thinkers, both contemporary and historical, with the magazine's longform writers. Hosted by features editor Daniel Finn. Produced by Conor Gillies, music by Knxwledge. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

All Things Co-op's podcast
Cooperative Socialism with Ben Burgis

All Things Co-op's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 51:23


In this episode of All Things Co-op, Cinar, Larry, and Kevin talk to philosopher, podcaster, and Jacobin contributor Ben Burgis about his views on cooperatives and their relationship to socialism. Burgis and the ATC guys discuss the value of co-ops under a capitalist economy and in a socialist future, the need for political victories to advance socialist ideals, the role of debating those who don't share your views, and possible paths forward towards a new cooperative society.  

The Argument
The One Thing Democrats Can Control — and How They Should Do It

The Argument

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 32:57


Are the Democrats, finally, in array? They've just had the best midterms by a sitting president's party in about 20 years, and passed significant legislation in 2022. And now House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is stepping down after nearly two decades as leader, without the specter of intraparty battles. So what comes next for Dems, and what should the party's future strategy be?Today on “The Argument,” Jane is joined by two writers with close eyes on the Democratic Party. Bhaskar Sunkara is the founding editor of Jacobin and the president of The Nation magazine. Michelle Cottle is a member of the editorial board of The New York Times. They assess the place progressivism has in the Democratic Party, what the incoming generational shift in leadership will bring and how Democrats must win.(A full transcript of the episode will be available midday on the Times website.)

Current Affairs
A Merciless Intellectual Brawl Between a YIMBY and a "Left NIMBY"

Current Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 71:36


For some time, Nathan has been critical of the "YIMBY" (Yes In My Backyard) movement, which takes stances on housing policy that are sometimes classified as "market fundamentalist" or "trickle-down." Nathan's article "The Only Thing Worse Than a NIMBY is a YIMBY" is scathing, and Current Affairs has published a public service announcement discouraging people from letting their friends become YIMBYs. For their part, online YIMBYs generally do not care for Nathan, and he has been branded a leader of the "Left NIMBYs." But does this fight make sense? Darrell Owens of the group CA YIMBY argued recently in Jacobin that those who think YIMBYs advocate "Reaganomics" in housing policy are mistaken, and that the movement has been misunderstood by its critics. Owens said:"The overall YIMBY movement understands that we need more market-rate and public housing, more subsidies for housing, zoning reform, and stronger tenant protections, especially around eviction. And while there are some moderates and neoliberals that don't support rent control, they're in the minority. For example, the majority of local YIMBY groups across California endorsed the repeal of the ban on statewide rent control in 2020."Darrell and Nathan have clashed on social media before, and Nathan was listed as a major "Left NIMBY" on Darrell's Discourse Lounge Substack, so today Darrell and Nathan meet for the first time to hash out their differences and figure out whether Nathan is a NIMBY and whether YIMBYism has been treated unfairly by its critics. The title of this episode is intentionally misleading clickbait, because the conversation is polite and respectful and Nathan and Darrell both have positive things to say about each other's work and significant points of common ground. But they discuss such questions as:What is a YIMBY? What is a NIMBY? Are the NIMBY-YIMBY labels even useful? Isn't everyone a little bit of both?Is historic preservation just a NIMBY thing?How much of the YIMBY movement is "market fundamentalist"? Is it funded by dark money?Can we at least all agree that cars are terrible and trees are great?Do leftists tend to oppose building new housing? Are they "vacancy truthers"?Is AOC a YIMBY? Is Reason magazine YIMBY?If architects made new buildings less ugly would this whole debate become a lot less contentious?What does a comprehensive left housing agenda look like?Does Darrell regret making fun of Nathan's clothes?

This Is Hell!
The Meat Merchants Feeding Climate Catastrophe / Spencer Roberts and Jan Dutkiewicz

This Is Hell!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 82:00


Chuck Mertz speaks with science writer Spencer Roberts and political economist Jan Dutkiewicz about Big Meat's lobbying against policy making to reduce meat production and coverup how much animal agriculture feeds climate change. This week in Rotten History and new responses to the Question from Hell! Spencer Roberts is a science writer, ecologist, musician, and engineer from Colorado. His writing focuses on corporate greenwashing and science corruption. It is featured in places like Jacobin, Wired, and Current Affairs. @Unpop_Science Jan Dutkiewicz is a Visiting Fellow at Harvard Law School. He holds a Ph.D. in Political Science and comes to Harvard after Postdoctoral Fellowships at Johns Hopkins University and with the Swiss National Science Foundation. He is a political economist whose research focuses on large-scale conventional meat production and the emergent world of alternative protein. His work examines how business interests, ethical and environmental debates, and consumer behavior both shape and are shaped by the law, policy, and politics, and how this all influences what Americans eat. @jan_dutkiewicz

Probably Cancelled Podcast
The Myth of Normal: Trauma, Illness, and Healing in a Toxic Culture w/ Daniel Maté, pt. 2

Probably Cancelled Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 66:45


I'm joined by my friend Daniel Maté (@DanielBMate), who co-wrote and recently published a new book with his father Gabor Maté titled, “The Myth of Normal: Trauma, Illness, and Healing in a Toxic Culture”. In this part 2 we talk about how to heal from our inevitable childhood wounds and potentially reconnect with our families. www.walkwithdaniel.com www.danielmate.com https://www.youtube.com/c/LyricsToGoShow Myth of Normal: https://www.amazon.com/Myth-Normal-Illness-Healing-Culture/dp/0593083881/ Jacobin interview: https://jacobin.com/2022/10/gabor-mate-capitalist-society-physically-mentally-unwell-trauma Hello Again: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GIcppb9mbSc Follow the Probably Cancelled Podcast on twitter: @CancellledPod and IG: @probably.cancelled.podSubscribe to be notified of new episodes!Our fundraiser may be found here

Count the Dings (Official)
Woke Bros: Gilded Joe #TBT

Count the Dings (Official)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 65:28


Wos and Nando are off this week but in honor of #TBT the fellas wanted to run back the time were joined by special guest Matt Karp, a contributing editor at Jacobin and associate professor at Princeton. The trio dives into Matt's recent article about the potential new gilded ages ahead and how that ties into the recent news of Joe Biden passing a new stimulus and his swing towards the working class. WATCH THIS EPISODE ON YOUTUBE: Youtube.com/countthedings1 Produced by John Jervay - https://twitter.com/johnjervay Sign up for The Athletic: TheAthletic.com/dings Support us on www.patreon.com/countthedings Find us: www.countthedings.com Social: @countthedings @bommpodcast Facebook: www.facebook.com/countthedings Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices