Podcasts about delivering

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  • 4,821EPISODES
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  • Nov 24, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about delivering

Show all podcasts related to delivering

Latest podcast episodes about delivering

Tanning In A Corn Field
Delivering Mosquitos To Everyone!!

Tanning In A Corn Field

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 14:22


We talk about how to make money! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jonah-taylor8/support

Delivering Marketing Joy Webshow
Delivering Marketing Joy Episode 366 with Colton Briner

Delivering Marketing Joy Webshow

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 10:57


Today on Delivering Marketing Joy I talk with Colton Briner about why he likes "marketing with some stank on it!" How fun is that? Listen in!

The Ops Authority
124: 5 Ways to Show Gratitude in Your Business

The Ops Authority

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 24:08


Do you regularly let the people in your world know how much you appreciate their support of your business?                                                                                                                     Today we are talking about gratitude. This time of year, small business owners shift their focus to start preparing for the upcoming holidays. Often, we are trying to find the equilibrium for all of the family obligations that are ahead. The time we are spending in our business are usually spent in 2 areas:  Delivering on our services Wrapping up the end of the year and/or vision casting for the new year While all of that is good, it is definitely a season of blessings. Gratitude should be a part of your leadership all year long, but if it's not, this is the best season to start! For full show notes, visit theopsauthority.com/podcast/124.

The Perfect RIA
Reading Time with Jarvis - Delivering Massive Value, Freeloaders by Matthew Jarvis

The Perfect RIA

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 10:50


Learn why all clients are not necessarily good clients. https://bit.ly/3Ft0qXF 

All Souls Sunday Sermons
Delivering the Goods (4) (Titus 2)

All Souls Sunday Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 24:38


Better Call Daddy
179. Stepping Up, Speaking Up, And Delivering! OBGYN Kellie Lease Stecher, MD

Better Call Daddy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 59:42


Tragedy is not okay.  Suicide is not okay!  And you never know what is going to trigger someone!  OBGYN Kellie Lease Stecher has made it her purpose and passion to speak up and serve the medical community.  She's igniting others too! If you aren't advocating for Womens rights what are you doing?  Kellie is an action mom, author, and a women's health leader! Better Call Daddy: The Safe Space For Controversy! Kellie Stecher is an OBGYN, Chief Medical Officer of Linked Inclusion™, and Co-Founder and President of Patient Care Heroes, Founding Board Member for the Minnesota Branch of the League of Minority Voters, as well as the Governor of the 7th district of the American Medical Women's Association. She has won the Minneapolis/St. Paul Magazine's Top Doctors' Rising Star award for the last three years. Her work has made her an invaluable contributor to both local and national publications, news, and podcasts. Dr. Stecher's focus is on advocacy and policy change, centering around safety and equity. She is the author of the book, Delivering, which was released in late 2021. The book is meant to empower women, mothers, working women, women in healthcare, and to inspire change. As the Chief Medical Officer at Linked Inclusion™, she leads a team of wellness experts in providing professional DEI + Wellness resources for social change management addressing the physical and mental health services needed for solving the trauma that accompanies exclusion.   Kellie's book Delivering https://www.amazon.com/dp/1914560159/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_glt_fabc_GNTN8FCEW1PJM7806TDJ   Me and my daddy would love to hear from you ratethispodcast.com/bettercalldaddy   Subscribe and leave a five star rating podchaser.com/bettercalldaddy   Connect with Reena linkedin.com/in/reenafriedmanwatts

Delivering Marketing Joy Webshow
Delivering Marketing Joy Episode 365 with Nichole Stella

Delivering Marketing Joy Webshow

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 10:05


Delivering Marketing Joy Episode 365 with Nichole Stella by Kirby Hasseman

Restaurants Reinvented
Delivering the Digital Restaurant - Meredith Sandland & Carl Orsbourn of Learn Delivery

Restaurants Reinvented

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 42:01


Hear what these two digital restaurant savants and best-selling authors, Meredith Sandland & Carl Orsbourn, have to say about the future of the restaurant industry and what possible challenges restaurant operators may face during the digital age. Our guests had the idea to write their book, Delivering the Digital Restaurant, as they ''want the industry to survive this big omnichannel shift. And to do that, they need some tools and a group discussion to talk about how to navigate this"!Moments to Listen For:• The 2 Sides of Algorithmic Growth for Restaurants  - Not only has the digital age introduced new avenues for exponential growth for restaurants such as with ghost kitchens and online ordering, but it will also allow operators to use data and algorithms to optimize their advertising & operations to help grow their brand. • Bringing the Restaurant to the People - The digital restaurant will allow brands to transcend their brick-and-mortar locations, and bring the restaurant right to their guests' doorstep. Convenience is key. • Cater to Your Workers - The new generation of workers, the Millenials and Gen-We (a.k.a Gen-Z), is a different beast. They are truly digital natives and have different priorities than previous generations such as being motivated by purpose-driven work. Reaching and appealing to them will be a challenge for many operators. • Be Nimble & Aim to Innovate - The digital age brings a lot of unknowns to the restaurant industry. To be successful, operators must be willing to innovate, experience, and recognize that they're going to fail at times. Being flexible and having an agile tech stack will help you be ready for any change that is still to come.Resources:• Get your copy of Delivering the Digital Restaurant! • 5 Things You Need to Know About Gen We.• Is Your Digital Foundation Built on Sand or Stone? • 10 Best Practices for Launching a Virtual Brand & Ghost KitchenConnect with Meredith & Carl on LinkedIn!

Navigating the Customer Experience
150: Insights on Delivering An “Elite” Experience to Clients with Nathan Foy

Navigating the Customer Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 23:48


Nathan Foy is founder and CEO of Fortis, nine-time Inc. Magazine honoree as one of America's fastest-growing companies. Fortis provides over 25,000 private, secure trips in 114 countries per year to clientele worth more than half a trillion dollars. These clients routinely ranked Fortis on Gallup surveys as the best in the industry. With offices in Greenville, South Carolina, and Hong Kong, Fortis offers ground transportation to more private jet owners than any other service in the world.   Nathan's first book, What Rich Clients Want: (But Won't Tell You), translates the Fortis experience into a replicable, scalable business model any service provider can recreate. Nathan lives in Greenville with his wife, Pam and their four children.   Questions   Could you share with our guests a little bit about your journey, how it is that you got to where you are today? Could you tell us a little bit about that book? Is there a particular strategy or approach that you take to serve rich clients versus clients who are not rich, you want to share with us how it is this book can be applied to everybody in business? Can you share with us maybe what are maybe two or three things that you've seen emerge as needs that customers are looking to be even more fulfilled since the pandemic? What are some of the approaches that organizations need to take maybe leaders, in order to ensure that your team members are practicing these behaviors or competencies, especially if it doesn't come naturally? Let's start maybe with the first two, professionalism and problem solving. How can you build strengths or strengthen the competencies of your team to ensure that they're demonstrating these behaviors with the customers? How do you stay motivated every day? Could you also share with our audience what's the one online resource, tool, website or app that you absolutely can't live without in your business? Could you also share with our audience, maybe one or two books that have had the biggest impact on you, it could be a read a very long time ago, or even one that you've read recently, but it really has impacted you. Could you share with us what's going on in your life right now that you're really excited about? It could be something that you're working on to develop yourself or your people? Where can listeners find you online? Do you have a quote or saying that during times of adversity or challenge, you'll tend to revert to this quote; it kind of helps to get you back on track or get you refocused if for any reason you get derailed?   Highlights   Nathan's Journey   Nathan shared that it was not intentional in its original conception. So, Fortis as a company began as a prepaid taxi cab card for college students. That was his original idea, was to create a card that students could use for transportation, this was in 2000 and this was the era when prepaid phone cards or prepaid meal cards were all the rage.   And so, he raised money from friends and family, he went up and down the East Coast, he built a network of taxicab companies. And their launch was for the Fall moving season of 2001, almost exactly 20 years ago. And it was going pretty well and then, unfortunately, 911 happened and everything changed. They ran out of money, people weren't visiting their kids for college anymore. And so, they started to adapt.   They sold their cab cards to companies. And then shortly after that, they found their first private jet company and they said they wanted chauffeured cars. And then they adapted into that really in the beginning of 2002. And that's really been their niche ever since.   Your Book, What Rich Clients Want - Strategy or Approach That You Take to Serve Rich Clients Versus Clients Who Are Not Rich   Me: So, in your bio, I read that you have this amazing book called What Rich Clients Want: (But Won't Tell You). So, could you tell us a little bit about that book? Is there a particular strategy or approach that you take to serve rich clients versus clients who are not rich, you want to share with us how it is this book can be applied to everybody in business?   Nathan shared that it's really the result of 20 years of doing this and understanding that the most discerning clients that spend the most never actually tell you what they want, it's on you as a customer service person to discern that. And he thinks while this is a book that could be used to serve rich clients, he thinks the lessons here could apply to anybody in the service business.   So, what the book does is, it outlines basically that there's five steps that one has to proceed two, and two has to precede three. And if those are all there, then you can have a system of service that really leads clients into more than they expected they could get. And he thinks when you have that, then you can really create loyalty that lasts.   Me: Alright, you want to share with us what those steps are?   Nathan shared that the first step is “Professionalism.” And so, just kind of owning the introduction, owning the beginning of a relationship, the first impression is super important. And they give a lot of practical tips to that.   And then the second step is “Problem Solving.” So, actually taking a problem that they have, seizing it and acting as if it was your own and solving it so that they can see that you have competence in what you're doing.   The third step is “Concierge.” So, that's actually not just solving the problem, but anticipating even unspoken needs, so that you can see around a corner and make something happen proactively.   The fourth step is “Security.” So, having a layer of security that complements all of those things, but not at the expense of all of those things is very, very important. And these days, it's more about information, reputation, security, those kinds of things than it is physical security in most instances.   And then the fifth level, the highest level is really “Elite.” And that's when you start to begin to push out the boundaries on what's even possible. You'll know you're at this level when the client starts to refer to your company as a verb, they have clients that call them and say, “Can you just “Fortis” this, whatever that is that you do, can you just do that to this?” And that's a really good sign, they don't know the secret sauce, but they just want you to apply it to what's in front of them.   Me: I like that. I like the fact that you gave that analogy just now that they coined it as a verb. It's almost like Google, like before the age of the internet; Google wasn't even a word, let alone a verb. And now, when people want to find anything out there, like just Google it. I mean, it's just so amazing that 10 - 15 years ago, that word, it just didn't exist, it's just not something people would say.   Needs of Customers That Have Emerge That Customers Are Looking to be Even More Fulfilled Since the Pandemic   Me: Now customer service has been really impacted, customer experiences across different industries, across the entire world, all seven continents have definitely been impacted by the pandemic, can you share with us maybe what are maybe two or three things that you've seen emerge as needs that customers are looking to be even more fulfilled since the pandemic?   Nathan stated that the original environment of it, he thinks really led to us creating not just the standard things, masks and things like that, sanitization of surfaces. But we really tried to say, “Okay, what is kind of a level above that that might be unspoken, but that our clients might desire?”   And the thing that they arrived at was, particularly in the pre-vaccine environment, having a chauffeur contacted two or three days after the trip, for a principal, just to make sure that in the intervening time the chauffeur hadn't experienced any symptoms.   And so, the clients, there are many clients that said, I love that you do that, everybody's got testing, and everything, we've got temperature checks, and all those things. But the one thing is that the person could be asymptomatic and a day or two later get symptoms. And that's kind of next level.   And they had a lot of clients that really, really complimented them on doing that. Practically, another thing that they've implemented as partitions are just a much bigger thing in vehicles now than they used to be. And so, they wanted not only to provide that, but they had to kind of stand up, how do we do this so it doesn't look like you just ran to Home Depot and put it together and make that standard across the 1000 cities that they serve. So that was a fun challenge as well.   Professionalism and Problem Solving, How Can You Build Strengths or Strengthen the Competencies of Your Team to Ensure That They're Demonstrating These Behaviours with the Customers   Me: Now, Nathan, one of the things that your book mentions as it relates to professionalism, you had mentioned the five tiers that are required for you to really deliver that supreme or extraordinary level of service. What are some of the, I would say approaches that organizations need to take maybe leaders, in order to ensure that your team members are practicing these behaviors or competencies, especially if it doesn't come naturally? Let's start maybe with the first two, professionalism and problem solving. How can you build strengths or strengthen the competencies of your team to ensure that they're demonstrating these behaviors with the customers?   Nathan shared that it's a great question. So, he would say before we get into the behaviours, it first begins with mindset. And the mindset has to be that you are honing your craft and not doing a job. And what he means by that is that if you want to make customer service into a career, then you have to make it uniquely yours and be a student of it so that the service Yanique offers is completely one of a kind over time, and only you can be you. But you also have to do that in concert with an overall brand that you're continuing to hone and refine to.   So, they have chauffer partners and they have conferences twice a year, they host them and go over kind of just aligning and making their services better. And that's one of the first things he does is just say, “Are you doing a job? Or are you doing a craft?”   Because, quite frankly, if someone's just doing the job, and this is just here to pay my school bills or this is just something I'm doing in between gigs, they don't really spend a lot of time with them. They don't really seek them out because they're not really going to want to ascend to elite status. So, he thinks that's a pretty important thing, just to begin with.   So, really practically professionalism, there's a lot of basics of how someone presents themselves with posture, appearance, confidence, handshake, eye contact, not just being early to do the job, but actually being early and ready to do the job early. Those are things that he would just say, they don't presume that people know and scold them if they don't know; they kind of assume that they don't know those things, and start training them on it. And that involves extensive use of checklists. And again, they're looking for people that are not offended by checklists, it's not saying you're incompetent, or you don't know what you're doing, it's just if you have the basics completely nailed down, that gives you the freedom to move up to higher levels and a checklists, especially the first level is essentially great for that.   If a client, especially a rich client doesn't like you, they're not going to tell you why they don't like you, they're just going to text their assistant and say, “I don't want to use this person again.” And you'll never know why. And so, the idea that you're going to be assessed on professionalism or clients going to give you input on how to be more professional, they don't have the time, they don't have the desire and it's really got to be on you to own that initial bit so that you can kind of get permission to move up to higher steps.   On problem solving, a real quick and easy way to begin with that is to just look for the most common problems that your clients encounter, and build systems for that so that you can be really ready when they have that. A quick example of that, they have a five star chauffeur for them in Miami.   And over the years, he's noticed people enter the airport, they want to go to a drugstore and then there's a core list of things that they're getting at CVS or Walgreens. And he's created what he calls his magic toolbox, but it's basically in his consoles. So, now when somebody lands and they say, “I just need to go to CVS.” He says, “Well, if you don't mind me asking, what is it that you need because I may just have it here.” And then they asked for one or two items, he has it. And he's immediately established competence with them that goes to a deeper level of trust. And now the whole world of what's open to the client, and what this person's capable of doing has really opened up.   Me: That's brilliant. I love that. That's like giving them what they need before they even know they need it.   How Nathan Stay Motivated Every Day   Me: So, could you share with our audience, how do you stay motivated every day? I can imagine that dealing in a business that is catering to clients who are rich, because of course, rich people clearly, yes, they have choices. But I'm sure their choice of business is a little bit different than a person who is probably on a budget. And so, with that in mind, maybe their demands are higher, their standards are higher and it can be frustrating sometimes I can imagine, especially when you're dealing with somebody who the average person would deem as difficult. So, in managing this business and running it for the many years that you've been in it, how is it that you stay motivated every day and you don't get discouraged by comments or just things that customers may see that makes you even wonder, I don't know if it crosses your mind. But do you ever get to the point where you say, “Why? Why am I doing this? Why am I serving all these spoiled, rich people?”   Nathan shared that a mentor of his once told him that if you're hard on yourself, the world is easy. And if you're easy on yourself, the world is hard. So, he would say it begins with the mindset of he's his own biggest critic. And then they as Fortis are their own biggest critics. And they really lean into those challenges that clients give to them. And then every week they have a company meeting, and they gossip good news about each other, they do recognitions and they're saying not just good things that each of them has done, but really, they're kind of taking the time to go through each thing that's been done that they want to congratulate, and tie it to one of their five core values. And then that just helps to recenter them and “Oh yeah, we do value that. And that's an example of that. And I can learn from that. And if I did something like that, then I'm going to be recognized for that too.”   The second bit, he would just say is that he's a firm believer in making your goals for the year, they actually break them up into six month periods, and making them known because every week or two weeks as a leadership team, they're going over their goals for the semester, it's a great way to just recenter you on, it's not about how he feels, or about this one service issue that they had. Overall, there are these big things that they're gunning for and they're doing that as a team.   App, Website or Tool that Nathan Absolutely Can't Live Without in His Business   When asked about an online resource that he cannot live without in his business, Nathan stated that it's a good question. He would say for them LinkedIn has been extraordinarily valuable to connect with their partner chauffeurs and to their clients. And so, particularly when there was just recently the COVID outbreak, that was a terrific way to communicate up to date information and then vice versa for them to get up to date information. And one thing they learned through that, which, he kind of already knew, but they found that it was even more true than he thought was their global network of service providers are some of the most important people in each location. So, people were like maybe thinking about travelling to Paris, and a phone call to a chauffeur security person in Paris would tell them way more than you could just get on the internet. So, staying connected through LinkedIn was really helpful for that.   Books That Have Had the Greatest Impact on Nathan   When asked about books that have had the biggest impact, Nathan shared that the summer after 10th, grade, he had knee surgery and he loved to play sports, he played a lot of basketball during the summers. And he had surgery right after school was out. And everybody told him, “Oh, it's going to be three to four weeks, and you'll be back on your feet.” And it more or less put him out for eight weeks or most of the summer. And so, he's laid up in bed, this is pre internet and he's getting tired of watching TV and just being lazy and thinking about all the things he's missing out. And so, he got a book that's called Made in USA and it was by Sam Walton, the founder of Walmart. And he just devoured that book. And he thinks that was the book that kind of sparked in him an interest in being an entrepreneur and actually understanding what that could look like and what that can be. And because he had a lot of time to think, set his mind racing that summer when he had nothing to do.   What Nathan is Really Excited About Now!   Nathan shared that he's really excited about the book in the sense that he's not pretending that any of the foundational things that he has in What Rich Clients Want are novel. In fact, he gave a huge amount of credit to Horst Schulze, who is essentially the founder of a lot of these concepts for Ritz Carlton he would say, especially level one and level two things. They lean a lot on the Ritz Carlton experience to learn from that. But then he thinks the neat thing is, is that over 20 years, having learned and distilled these things, and now being able to talk with them, with audiences like yours, he just find that really rewarding, really gratifying.   And in fact, tomorrow night, at their headquarters, they're having their book launch party and he's got old team members driving in from other locations to come in and celebrate. So, it's fun to share the information and also celebrate the hard work that kind of went into making the book happen.   Where Can We Find Nathan Online   Website – www.fortis.co Website – www.nathanfoy.com LinkedIn – Nathan W. Foy Twitter - @nfoyal   Quote or Saying that During Times of Adversity Nathan Uses   When asked about a quote or saying that he tends to revert to, Nathan shared that there's a famous quote from Teddy Roosevelt that he will try to quote, but it says basically, “The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who even if he fails, he fails while daring greatly, so that his place is not among those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat.”   Me: Lovely, I love it. And how does that quote help you?   Nathan shared that it tells him it's not about only winning; it's just being in the arena and if you're in the arena, you're going to get bloodied; you're going to have discouragements, you're going to have disappointments, but you are daring greatly. And that's something that he thinks is worth doing in our professional lives and in our lives in general.   Please connect with us on Twitter @navigatingcx and also join our Private Facebook Community – Navigating the Customer Experience and listen to our FB Lives weekly with a new guest   Grab the Freebie on Our Website – TOP 10 Online Business Resources for Small Business Owners   Links   What Rich Clients Want: (But Won't Tell You) by Nathan Foy Sam Walton: Made in USA: My Story by Sam Walton   The ABC's of a Fantastic Customer Experience   Do you want to pivot your online customer experience and build loyalty - get a copy of “The ABC's of a Fantastic Customer Experience.”   The ABC's of a Fantastic Customer Experience provides 26 easy to follow steps and techniques that helps your business to achieve success and build brand loyalty. This Guide to Limitless, Happy and Loyal Customers will help you to strengthen your service delivery, enhance your knowledge and appreciation of the customer experience and provide tips and practical strategies that you can start implementing immediately! This book will develop your customer service skills and sharpen your attention to detail when serving others. Master your customer experience and develop those knock your socks off techniques that will lead to lifetime customers. Your customers will only want to work with your business and it will be your brand differentiator. It will lead to recruiters to seek you out by providing practical examples on how to deliver a winning customer service experience!

Life After Corporate
75. The Art of The Big Talk - Stepping Into the Red Circle

Life After Corporate

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 27:19


  Welcome back to another episode of Life After Corporate! In today's episode, we will be chatting with Tricia Brouk, who is an international award-winning director, producer, author and founder of The Big Talk Academy.  Tricia helps high-performing professionals transform into industry thought leaders through the power of authentic storytelling. Her methodology centers around transforming her client's authentic stories into an industry-leading voice and commanding media presence to gain wider recognition to become the go-to experts in their fields. With her experience as a seasoned and award-winning director, producer, and mentor to countless speakers, Tricia has put more than 50 speakers onto TEDx stages in less than four years. She has spoken at Forbes, Pride Global, The New York Public Library, Barnes and Noble, Ellevate, The Jumbo African Support Hub and The National Organization for Rare Disorders.  Be sure to tune in until the end of the episode because Tricia and I will be talking about having ideas that are worth spreading, sharing these ideas as a service to the community, and delivering a “wow” experience to your audience so they can learn and be entertained at the same time. Let's dive in!    [00:01 - 09:01] Opening Segment I welcome our guest: Tricia Brouk  Trish shares about her journey Wanted to be on stage at an early age Realized the limited impact of being a professional ballet dancer Eventually became a speaker and producer To leave a legacy by inspiring others [09:02 - 24:18] Ideas Worth Spreading  Having inspiring ideas worth spreading The difference between TED talks from other presentations TED Talk as an act of service to the community  Being mindful of whose stage you decide to apply to be on Do your due diligence Delivering a “wow” experience to the audience Starts with pre-production  Include theatricality  Think of impacting the audience Learning and being entertained at the same time   [24:19- 36:12] Closing Segment  Connect with Tricia through the links below  Follow us on social media and leave a review Final words   Resource Mentioned:    TED Talks: The Official TED Guide to Public Speaking    Tweetable Quotes: “[TED Talks] are really meant to serve the audience so that they adopt your idea as their own, think differently, and potentially take action upon leaving the theater. - Tricia Brouk “When you understand your powerful message and your story, and your idea worth spreading is meant to serve communities, and is meant to be heard by that one person so that you can change and even save their life, all of the fear of applying will go away. Because you're doing this out of service.” - Tricia Brouk   You can find Tricia on the following links:  www.triciabrouk.com The Influential Voice Book Podcast www.TheBigTalkAcademy.com   Checkout this chapter from Tricia's book entitled, The Influential Voice here!    SUBSCRIBE & LEAVE A FIVE-STAR REVIEW and share this podcast to other growing entrepreneurs!  Get weekly tips on how to create more money and meaning doing work you love and be one of the many growing entrepreneurs in our community. CLICK HERE to join our private Facebook Group!  Connect with me on Instagram, LinkedIn, or checkout our website at www.lifeaftercorporatepodcast.com

Leaders in Lending
Delivering a Better Digital Experience to Earn Trust & Loyalty

Leaders in Lending

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 21:49


Building trust and loyalty in the digital age is an ongoing challenge many businesses face. The question always comes down to: What investments should you be making to enable a digital experience that will leave your customers wanting more? Jeff Keltner, Senior Vice President of Development at Upstart and the host of the show, shares his thoughts on what your financial institution needs to succeed in the modern world. Jeff discusses: - Three things a financial institution needs to offer their customers to earn loyalty - Improving beyonddigital experiences that don't meet expectations - Three tips for enabling the digital experience - The evolving value of the high-touch, person-to-person experience Mentioned during the podcast: - Episode 27 w/ Vince Passione from LendKey - Episode 22 w/ Mark Pregmon from USAA - Episode 7 w/ Jim Deitch from Teraverde Management Advisors - Episode 3 w/ Robert Pirelli from TCF Bank - Episode 2 w/ Cathy Myers from First Financial Bank To hear more from Leaders in Lending, check us out on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or on our website. Listening on a desktop & can't see the links? Just search for Leaders in Lending on your favorite podcast player.

The Founder Hour
Jim McCann | How 1-800-Flowers Has Been Delivering Smiles for 45 Years

The Founder Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 66:58


Jim McCann is the founder and chairman of 1-800-Flowers, one of the first companies to pioneer and popularize the use of both toll-free telephone numbers and Web sites in the early days of the Internet to sell goods and services directly to consumers.What started as a flower shop on the Upper East Side of Manhattan in 1976 has since grown into a publicly-traded company worth over $2 billion with thousands of employees.SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTER & STAY UPDATED > http://bit.ly/tfh-newsletterFOLLOW TFH ON INSTAGRAM > http://www.instagram.com/thefounderhourFOLLOW TFH ON TWITTER > http://www.twitter.com/thefounderhourINTERESTED IN BECOMING A SPONSOR? EMAIL US > partnerships@thefounderhour.com

Lykken on Lending
11-15-21 To earn repeat and referral business…...keep delivering value!!

Lykken on Lending

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 64:00


In our Hot Topic this week we have Peter Paglia on the program to discuss how HomeBinder is helping lenders become more valuable to their referral partners.  Want to know more aboutPeter Paglia? To read more about this episode click here!!

Business RadioX ® Network
BRX Pro Tip: Consistently Delivering Value

Business RadioX ® Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021


BRX Pro Tip: Consistently Delivering Value Stone Payton: [00:00:00] Welcome back to BRX Pro Tips. Stone Payton and Lee Kantor here with you. Lee, it’s so important that we strive to consistently deliver value. But even more so when our product service suite is subscription-driven kind of a recurring revenue model, isn’t it? Lee Kantor: […]

Framework with Jamie Hopkins
Nzinga Shaw: Delivering Business Results Through Diversity and Inclusion

Framework with Jamie Hopkins

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 38:33


This week, James Hopkins and Ana Trujillo Limon talk with Nzinga Shaw, Vice President for Human Resources at Edelman, about the duties of diversity and inclusion leaders in firms, and how to prepare yourself for success. You can find show notes and other information at CarsonGroup.com/Framework.

Ride the Lightning: Tesla Motors Unofficial Podcast
Episode 328: Tesla Semi Is Delivering...This Year??

Ride the Lightning: Tesla Motors Unofficial Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 75:26


A big-name Tesla Semi buyer says his company expects delivery of Tesla's 18-wheeler soon. Does he know something we don't? Plus: Tesla is leading by example at its factories with regard to renewable energy, two popularly requested new software features get added to the fleet, and more! If you enjoy the podcast and would like to support my efforts, please check out my Patreon at https://www.patreon.com/teslapodcast and consider a pledge. I'd be grateful. Every little bit helps! And don't forget to leave a message on the Ride the Lightning hotline anytime with a question, comment, or discussion topic for next week's show! The toll-free number to call or Skype is 1-888-989-8752. Also, give Wholesome Bakery's delicious plant-based treats a try, like my favorite, the cookie sandwiches. I promise you that you won't regret it! Find them at https://www.wholesomebakery.com  P.S. Get 15% off your first order of awesome aftermarket Tesla accessories at AbstractOcean.com by using the code RTLpodcast at checkout. And if you're ordering a Jeda Wireless Charging Pad or USB hub for Model 3/Y (coupon code RTL), please use my referral link: https://getjeda.com/ref/8/ Grab the SnapPlate for any of the four Teslas at https://everyamp.com/RTL/. Finally, pick up a 128gb or 256gb Sentry Mode/Dashcam kit at http://www.puretesla.com/rtl 

All Souls Sunday Sermons
Delivering the goods (3) (Titus 1:10–16)

All Souls Sunday Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 29:09


Single-handed sailing podcast
Single-Handed Ep# 147

Single-handed sailing podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 66:29


Delivering a Tayana 48 from Maryland to the BVI's

Mailin’ It! - The Official USPS Podcast
An interview with Postmaster General Louis DeJoy

Mailin’ It! - The Official USPS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 32:52


On this episode of Mailin' It, we're sitting down with the 75th Postmaster General, Louis DeJoy. Join us as we learn about his career as an entrepreneur, his transition into his role at the Postal Service, and what he loves most about his role as PMG.We'll also be talking to Louis about the Delivering for America plan, including the 10-year transformation that USPS is undergoing and where the organization is headed in the future.Read more about the Postal Service's 10-year plan here: https://about.usps.com/what/strategic-plans/delivering-for-america/ 

MarTech Podcast // Marketing + Technology = Business Growth
Delivering Relevant Product Recommendations -- Josh Francia // Blueshift

MarTech Podcast // Marketing + Technology = Business Growth

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 14:01


Chief Growth Officer at Blueshift, Josh Francia continues the conversation about the value of CDPs. Your interaction with your customers should be personal. That's how you're going to make the most impact and build meaningful relationships. Today, Josh explores merchandising and delivering relevant product recommendations using Smart Hub CDPs. Show NotesConnect With: Josh Francia: Website // LinkedInThe Voices of Search Podcast: Email // LinkedIn // TwitterBenjamin Shapiro: Website // LinkedIn // TwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Orange Tree
Episode 5: Delivering Darkness | Austin Bomber

The Orange Tree

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 38:46


At a FedEx distribution center near San Antonio, a package explodes. Law enforcement officials quickly realize that another package that likely has a bomb in it has also been shipped via FedEx, and they race to find it. An FBI agent works to match receipts for equipment bought in the Austin area that could be used to make a bomb with a database of vehicles. She finds a match and officials believe they have identified the bomber. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/darkness-podcast/support

Slick Talk: The Hospitality Podcast
"Hey Alexa, What's The Wifi Password?" with Matthew Loney

Slick Talk: The Hospitality Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 65:54


Matthew Loney currently serves as the President and Chief Executive Officer of Xplorie, the leading guest experience platform for U.S. leisure markets. Delivering best-in-life moments for millions of guests annually, Xplorie has nearly quadrupled in size over the past five years under Mr. Loney's leadership. Prior to joining Xplorie, Mr. Loney served as an attorney and held executive positions at two national restaurant chains. This episode is sponsored by Hostfully! https://bit.ly/3ofzG5X (Hostfully) is an industry leading software company that provides property managers and hoteliers with a property management platform and amazing digital custom guidebooks that will make your guests' experience with you 10X better! Use https://bit.ly/3ofzG5X (SLICKTALK20) to get $100 off of their property management platform and two months free of their premium digital guidebooks! This episode is sponsored by our friends at NoiseAware! NoiseAware is the only 100% privacy safe noise monitoring solution so get with NoiseAware so you don't waste any time while you grow your professional and amazing business! Use https://bit.ly/3uBlEhf (SLICKTALK20) to get 20% off your noise devices with https://bit.ly/3uBlEhf (NoiseAware)! This episode is also sponsored by Jetstream! Jetstream is a full-service hospitality solution with a powerful team behind it! To learn more about Jetstream, just clickhttps://jetstreamtech.io/ ( this link)!     In this episode, we explore:  03:33 - Background of the guest 07:37 - Vacation Rentals 11:16 - Restaurant Concepts 13:46 - Tours and Activity Industries 18:25 - Directions and Decisions to take 22:13 - Challenges experienced from the start 26:51 - Figuring out the hurdles 32:13 - Biggest Hurdle that turned into success 37:37 - Voice Operated Technology - Alexa 43:13 - Managing Content 48:45 - Recognizing the common issues 50:26 - Importance of Podcasting for the business 55:50 - How podcast help other people 01:00:17 - Connect with the guest Connecting with the Guest: Website: http://www.xplorie.com (www.Xplorie.com) LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/matthewloney/ (https://www.linkedin.com/in/matthewloney/) Slick Talk Website & Socials: https://bit.ly/3uCsm6H (https://bit.ly/3uCsm6H)

Delivering Marketing Joy Webshow
Delivering Marketing Joy Episode 364 with Dale Denham

Delivering Marketing Joy Webshow

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 11:30


Delivering Marketing Joy Episode 364 with Dale Denham by Kirby Hasseman

Business Breakdowns
HelloFresh: Delivering on Process Power - [Business Breakdowns, EP. 34]

Business Breakdowns

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 63:53


Today, we're breaking down HelloFresh. HelloFresh delivers weekly meal kits to people's homes. With eight million active customers, the Berlin-based business is the most popular company of its kind in the world.   To break down HelloFresh, I'm joined by its CEO and co-founder, Dominik Richter. We discuss the challenges of scaling an operationally intensive business, why HelloFresh is more like CPG companies than grocery stores, and what he's learned about brand building.   Meal-kits are a notoriously difficult business model to get right and this is a great example of process power; a competitive advantage you don't come across often. Please enjoy this great breakdown of HelloFresh.   For the full show notes, transcript, and links to the best content to learn more, check out the episode page here.   -----   This episode is brought to you by Tegus. We created Business Breakdowns to uncover the lessons and frameworks behind every business, and that's what makes Tegus our perfect launch partner. Much of the foundational prep for these episodes starts with research on the Tegus platform.   With Tegus, you can learn everything you'd want to know about a company in an on-demand digital platform. Investors share their expert calls, allowing others to instantly access more than 20,000 calls on Coinbase, Hinge Health, Farfetch, or almost any company of interest. All you have to do is log in. If you're ready to go deeper on any company and you appreciate the value of primary research, head to tegus.co/breakdowns for a free trial.   -----   This episode is brought to you by MIT Investment Management Company (MITIMCo), the endowment office of MIT. MITIMCo seeks to find people who are focused on achieving exceptional long-term investment returns, partner with these firms early, and stick around for the very long term. Visit mitimco.org and their new emerging managers page to learn more.   -----   Business Breakdowns is a property of Colossus, LLC. For more episodes of Business Breakdowns, visit joincolossus.com/episodes.   Stay up to date on all our podcasts by signing up to Colossus Weekly, our quick dive every Sunday highlighting the top business and investing concepts from our podcasts and the best of what we read that week. Sign up here.   Follow us on Twitter: @JoinColossus | @patrick_oshag | @jspujji | @zbfuss   Show Notes [00:04:07] - [First question] - What HelloFresh does for its customers [00:05:53] - How many meals are delivered a year and the scale of the business today [00:07:08] - The full customer experience of ordering a meal kit for the week [00:08:03] - What the original service was and the original version of their product [00:10:26] - Overview of the business from a P&L standpoint [00:14:09] - Their centralized and widespread manufacturing plants  [00:16:35] - Attributes of a good recipe that benefits both the customers and the business [00:18:32] - Thoughts on the cost of ingredients and how they impact everything [00:20:43] - How the HelloFresh supply chain differs from traditional ones [00:23:58] - The magnitude of waste and its impact on gross margins [00:27:38] - Identifying customers, acquiring them, and retaining them [00:30:52] - Why other meal kit companies have seemingly done poorly [00:35:53] - Differences in the customer experience of HelloFresh subscribers that allowed them to thrive [00:38:38] - Managing a business that's dependent on process power and balancing which levers to pull and when [00:41:24] - An example of a decision made to improve tiny percentages of performance [00:44:17] - How a world returning to normal might impact their pandemic propelled growth [00:47:22] - Thoughts on potentially expanding to private supply and distribution [00:50:23] - Lessons learned about successful advertising, branding, and marketing [00:52:41] - Key variables in HelloFresh's growth for the coming years [00:57:10] - What drives the decision to acquire and build a portfolio of brands [01:00:01] - The biggest risks that the business might face in the future [01:02:27] - What his favorite meal is from their menu and why

The Perfect RIA
Reading Time with Jarvis - Delivering Massive Value, Firing PITAS by Matthew Jarvis

The Perfect RIA

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 9:51


Hear a snippet from Matthew's book, Delivering Massive Value. https://bit.ly/3jZG2oX 

SuperFeast Podcast
#141 Herbalism; The Peoples Medicine with Erin Lovell Verinder

SuperFeast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 63:55


Today on the podcast, we are graced with the highly cultivated holistic healer; Erin Lovell Verinder for an intimate discussion around her devotion to the plant path, the world of herbalism, and why we are witnessing a timely resurgence of this revered profession of healing. A Herbalist, nutritionist, energetic healer, mentor, and author of two incredible bodies of work, Erin's the kind of woman that leaves you wondering; How does she do it all? Birthed consecutively amidst a pandemic, Erin's books, Plants For The People (Thames & Hudson 2020) and The Plant Clinic (Thames & Hudson 2021), are modern classic guides to the world of plant medicine and herbalism, endowed with elegant visual codes of your favourite coffee table book. This is the second time we've had Erin on the podcast, and we're so thrilled to have her back. Both versed in the love language of plant medicine, this conversation between Tahnee and Erin is a celebration of herbalism, filled with nuance and some progressive insights on not gendering herbs through their application. Erin discusses what she calls her pillars to thrive, supporting the immune system during the pandemic, and the profound effect of having a gentle approach to healing and detoxing. A remembering, a becoming, and unfolding of the world of holistic herbal healing; This episode is one for everyone. Tune in.      "You have to be a savvy business owner as well. I've had different iterations of having a healing space, my own multi-modality wellness space, which sold and successfully ran for many years. Then being a head-practitioner at a busy, busy clinic in Sydney, and then being digital and writing books. I've had all these different iterations, and it's given me a lot of perspectives. But there's a lot of things I wished that I knew when I came out, and if I can help people in that way, I'm really excited to do that because it's a big job".     - Erin Lovell Verinder      Tahnee and Erin discuss: Immunity protocols. Drop dosing for kids. Herbal remedies for kids. The gendering of herbs. Detox and cleansing culture. Viewing fear as a mental virus. Herbs as the people's medicine. The matriarchal lineage of herbalism. The process of healing and becoming. Knowing yours, and your child's constitution type. Healing the gut; An energetic core of our constitution.     Who is Erin Lovell Verinder? Erin is a fully qualified Herbalist, Nutritionist, and Energetic Healer who has worked in the healing realms for twenty-one years. Erin holds a Bachelor of Western Herbal Medicine, an Advanced Diploma of Nutritional Medicine, and a Diploma of Energetic Healing and is a member of the (ATMS) Australian Traditional Medicine Society. Walking the plant path, Erin is a woman in tune with the natural world. On a full-hearted mission to educate, assist, and up-level how we can all heal with the rhythms of nature. Marrying the wisdom and philosophy of naturopathic medicine as the golden compass to treat the whole- not just the symptom is the pure guiding force in Erin's practice. Getting to the roots of ill health is the solid intention and directive of her work. Through her practice, Erin addresses the drivers and encourages the body to gently return to balance, using food as medicine, medicinal plants, lifestyle changes, functional testing, and energetic healing; Delivering a wholesome, high vibrational experience. Erin has written two phenomenal books: Plants For The People (Thames & Hudson 2020. The Plant Clinic (Thames & Hudson 2021).   CLICK HERE TO LISTEN ON APPLE PODCAST    Resources: Erin's Instagram  erinlovellverinder.com The Plant Clinic Book Plants For The People Book Plants For The People SuperFeast podcast   Q: How Can I Support The SuperFeast Podcast? A: Tell all your friends and family and share online! We'd also love it if you could subscribe and review this podcast on iTunes. Or  check us out on Stitcher, CastBox, iHeart RADIO:)! Plus  we're on Spotify!   Check Out The Transcript Here:   Tahnee: (00:00) Hi, everyone. Welcome back to the SuperFeast podcast. We have one of my favourite guests. You're Mr. Guest of the show now, Erin. Erin Lovell Verinder, who is a beautiful Herbalist, she's also an author, and we're here really today to talk about her new book, The Plant Clinic, which has already gotten pre-discussed in my house. It's, again, a stunning book, but also a really practical manual. Even for someone who's like trained in herbalism, I'm using it all the time because it captures all these protocols and concepts and ideas in this really beautiful and succinct way. I want to congratulate you on your new baby. Well done.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (00:39) Thank you so much. That's so sweet.   Tahnee: (00:42) Yeah, and welcome back to the show. It's great to have you.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (00:44) Thank you for having me.   Tahnee: (00:45) Yeah, I'm so happy to have you here. Your first podcast was one of the most popular, so it's really great to have you.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (00:51) Oh, that's so sweet.   Tahnee: (00:52) Yeah, I know. We're like aww. I think people just love... and that's something we've always been really passionate about is like, yeah, it's great to buy products and we love that you can buy SuperFeast from the shelf or whatever. But when you start to make your own herbal medicines, I think there's something, I don't know, that connects you to herbalism in a different way and connects you to the energy of the plants in a different way. I use pre-made stuff and I make my own stuff. I think it just depends on where I'm at in my life. But, yeah, I think having books like yours, especially, modernising herbalism because a lot of the old books can... like they're awesome, but they can be a bit retro [crosstalk 00:01:28]. How's it been going since publication? Have you been getting any positive feedback or?   Erin Lovell Verinder: (01:37) Yeah, it's been lovely. I've done two books now in the pandemic which has been like fairly wild and interesting. That they're being birthed at this time when actually I feel like they've been really needed and the spirit of plant medicine is like singing, I think, at this time within the pandemic and everything that we are moving through as a collective. Yeah, so Plants for the People came out in my March 2020 when the pandemic hit, and then The Plant Clinic just came out August 31st in Australia when we were all basically in lockdown. We were in the eye of it, so there were no stores open. Which was strange and I had to add a real block around that initially like, "Oh, I can't do in-person and people can't go see it at the stores."   Erin Lovell Verinder: (02:22) But I moved through that and it's actually, of course, it's been really well received and people are finding it and ordering it, and yeah, giving me such beautiful feedback. There's nothing more rewarding than that. Honestly, I get so much from those messages and emails about how the book has impacted their life or their little ones life or how they're working with their family in health and herbs and how they learn how to do this from the book, or I came at the right time. Like a lot of people say that I picked the book up and it's just at the most perfect time and that really thrills me. Yeah, it's been beautiful, it's been a beautiful exchange of putting the book out and what's coming back to me, which is beautiful.   Tahnee: (03:02) Yeah, it must be really rewarding, and how much work goes into these things. Yeah, incredible to see it in the flesh.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (03:13) So much work.   Tahnee: (03:13) Yes, so much work.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (03:13) Sorry, I was going to say this book really held us captive for over a year, and Noah, my husband, designed it so it was this real family effort and creation from our little family to you all. It was a major, so much work. So I'm so proud of it to see we did it, we did it, we made it.   Tahnee: (03:33) Yeah, well it's quite encyclopaedic in a way of like it really... I think Plants for the People was this amazing introduction to the world of plants. But then this is almost like working with a herbalist. It's got almost protocols and what a day would look like if you're working on a specific issue? And there's pillars of health that you might get introduced to working with a clinicians, so for me it felt a bit more actually going and seeing a practitioner. Like this book's almost like one in your house.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (04:05) Yes. No, really, that was truly my intention of writing it, for sure, was taking all of my years of clinical practise and knowledge, and as best as I could, distilling it down onto the paper to support and guide people with these daily protocols and how to work with plants as if you were working with the herbalist. Because the truth is like not everybody can access that one on one care and afford to weave that into their support team and whatnot, or access it. I just wanted to create a body of work that was super accessible and had all of those. Oh, so much in there, there's just so much in that book, for sure.   Tahnee: (04:44) Yeah, well, I think and I really appreciated like you have got a lot there for children and around dosing. I think that's stuff we get asked about a lot at SuperFeast. There's a lot of fear around working with herbs and children, and at different stages of pregnancy and postpartum and things. It's quite confusing on the internet. Like I saw you made a note in there around like you're going to read different things and they're going to conflict sometimes. Like I wonder do you have any overarching philosophies around working with kids and how do you approach that? You've got some dosing guidelines in here, but I'm just interested to flick that out a little bit.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (05:22) Yeah, for sure. I wanted to shed light on that because, yeah, you're right, I get asked all the time as well. When I started my practise as a herbalist, I was really specialising in paediatrics. And for years I really worked very closely with kids and their parents because you're always working with parents when you work with kids too. Which sometimes is the harder piece, to be honest. But so dosing was important and shedding light on working with children was important to me. I'd say that one of the biggest pieces around dosing with kids is that often less is more. So really even looking at drop dosing and working with more this energetic concept of dosing herbs, then these big wacky, not wacky, but big therapeutic dosing.   Tahnee: (06:10) Mamado herbs.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (06:10) Yeah, I had a whole section on drop dosing in the book, which I feel like can be really helpful. That more ease, using your intuition to start it just like these small little drops. You might start with five drops in a little bit of water for your little one, or instead of doing like a big meal dropper, it might just be like a few drops and see how your little one responds in that way. Drop dosing's a really good one to consider with kids because I feel like kids are so responsive often to herbs, to the plant world. Yeah, so I always start more with a drop dose approach, but there's a bunch of different rules in herbal medicine that you can calculate doses based on...   Erin Lovell Verinder: (06:52) So there's Clark's rule, but there's also Young's, and excuse me, so I would look at those and I've actually highlighted Clark's in the book because I feel like that's you're looking at... There's ones that look at age and weight and there's all these different methods that you can use. But I feel like Clark's is just really easy.   Tahnee: (07:12) Really simple.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (07:13) Yeah.   Tahnee: (07:14) Yeah, I've noticed that in my treating my daughter, because we've not really had much more than colds and she had a sore ear last night actually at 3:00 in the morning and gave her some immune herbs and put some Colloidal Silver in her ear and gave her a little limp massage and she woke up like, "Oh my ear's fine now, mommy." I'm like it's amazing to me how fast they heal, and I'm like, "If that was me, I'd probably still be in bed going ugh."   Erin Lovell Verinder: (07:42) Totally [crosstalk 00:07:43].   Tahnee: (07:42) She's like, "I'm good, I'm good. I'm ready to go to school and I love just..." Yeah, I hardly gave her, I probably gave her eight drops of this little immune tincture that we have. Which it's a bit stronger than the mushrooms like to give her sometimes things that pack a bit more of a punch if she's properly unwell. But, yeah, I really noticed that you just don't need much and homeopathics are so effective for them and those kinds of things.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (08:05) Yes, absolutely. Responsive, so responsive, and they shift really quickly, really quickly. Like a stupid charged shift with kids. I would say like really go low dose and just read a bit more about it. Like in the section of The Plant Clinic, get familiar with that, and then you do have to use your intuition a little bit knowing your little one like what's their constitution like? What do they respond from? Are they really... I've outlined the constitution piece in the book and there's only a little section on it.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (08:39) But I feel like it's so helpful to think about whether someone has a more robust constitution or a more sensitive constitution. Because it really changes how you approach dosing with plant medicine based on that. I would even implement that ethos into looking at your little one, are they quite robust? Are they sensitive and how would you dose them as well around that?   Tahnee: (09:00) I think that for adults too, it's something we speak about a lot when people come to us with dosing issues. Like they might take a quarter teaspoon and be like, "Are you sure these aren't psychedelic?" I'm like, "No, they're not. But you're obviously very sensitive, so for you, you're not going to need a very large dose at all. You can get away with like probably an eighth of a tea spoon or a pinch or something." That's great, good value, off you go. Then you're going to deal with people that are stronger, more robust, less sensitive to their energy body and they're going to be able to take much higher doses and not be affected by it. Yeah, I find that a lot that people miss that bio individuality piece of like you are going to behave and perform differently to everybody else.   Tahnee: (09:43) It's tricky like we were chatting before we came on with the compliance and regulations that we have to meet as herbalists. When working with a product like ours where we're selling it directly to the public, we have to state dosage and this isn't always aligned to what I believe to be true. I would actually prefer it to be a lot more nuanced, I suppose. But, yeah, just the way it is. Energy's kind of that was your first domain, I suppose, like working in that more subtle realm. How has that come into... has that been coming into clinic more for you lately with all this stuff going on? I imagine you probably need some protection yourself.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (10:29) I [inaudible 00:10:30]. Yeah, that's so interesting. On lots of levels, it's been coming in strongly. For my own practice because what has been presenting... so clients, what people are moving through and what we're moving through collectively, I really do believe it's a whole new paradigm and people are operating on a really different level than they were operating on pre-pandemic. As a practitioner, definitely it has impacted how I show up and what is needed? What's the demand on me to hold that space, and it's like I have to cast a bigger circle to hold it. That's been interesting in my own process and witnessing what that's bringing out in me and how I can show up. Yeah, for sure, that's been a whole thing.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (11:25) But in terms of what people are moving through and whether or not I have to call on those energetic parts, for sure. I'm always, in everything that I do as a practitioner, I'm always doing my best to honour the unseen forces and the subtle anatomy of it all. That means even if I'm working with somebody on their gut, I'm also honouring the emotions of the gut and the energy systems of the gut. I'm not just looking at it in a very black and white physiological anatomy and physiology, or like even the action of the herb or the action of the nutrient of food that we're working with, I'm more thinking about to the energy of it and the energy of what that person's moving through.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (12:13) Yeah, it's always a consideration and it's for sure a big consideration right now. Because what people are moving through is far... Like obviously people present with physical symptoms or imbalances that need support. But I really do believe that things are driven by our emotional bodies and spiritual bodies and our mental bodies too. I do believe that there's always involvement, right? I do believe that those aspects aren't... it's a lot going on right now. There's a lot of deep emotion that's tied into the physical right now. Yeah, I'm for sure working on those realms and levels always.   Tahnee: (12:51) I know you're seeing that in presentation more around adrenal type stuff or is it like... Personally, in myself, I can feel like a tendency to withdraw a lot more in a lot more sensitive just in general to people and energy. I'm also pregnant, so it's hard to know how much of that's pregnancy and how much of that's COVID. But, yeah, I've really noticed that in myself, like I just have a much smaller buffer between myself and the world and I'm having to be quite protective of that. Which was unusual for me because normally I'm quite comfortable with big groups and people, and now I'm like, "Oh, no, there's like 10 people [inaudible 00:13:33]." It's that stuff. I don't even know what you call that, like sensitivity and maybe anxiety and a bit of that.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (13:44) Yeah, I would say that there's... Like really what's coming forward, it's got a lot to do with the nervous system, and for sure, I would say that there's a lot more anxiety and a lot more deep fatigue. But like sensitivity, a lot of sensitivity, sensitivity to stimulation, depression, or low mood, low vitality. And just a lot of fear, there's a lot of fear that's going around, and I think fear can be a bit of a collective thought virus as well? There's like people are dealing with the fear and how that's cycling in their body, and fear of being unwell. There's just a lot of fear. I think that that's what I started talking about and referring to that new paradigm. Like everyone's just operating on a very different level right now.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (14:43) As a clinician, having been in practise now solid for like over 10 years, of course, I've never seen anything like it where everyone's experiencing the same thing in some way, in such a way. Obviously, we're experiencing similar things by being alive on the planet at the same time, but not like this.   Tahnee: (15:01) Acutely.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (15:03) Acutely, so people present with being maybe they want to talk about what they can do to support their immune systems, or their concerns about the vaccination, or which is very hard to navigate as a practitioner, for sure. Because actually this is a space that we are legally meant to step back from. There's just a lot of like what people are curious about and what they're worrying about. But the anxiety and the depression and the adrenal stuff, it's all like nervous system adrenal system, fight or flight survival mode stuff big time.   Tahnee: (15:48) Yeah, we're activating the sympathetic nervous system.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (15:50) Absolutely.   Tahnee: (15:51) Yeah, I can see that like we've got a team of about 30, so I can see different waves of things move through, and yeah, I've noticed those kinds of things in our team. I think I really... like that's one of the things I love about this book and would really recommend to people if you are thinking about immune protocols, you're thinking about anxiety and managing that with herbs. Like you've got calls for those listed out in here like whole chapters devoted to them. I think just having, I know for me, having things that I can lean on that support me, it's like a bomb.   Tahnee: (16:26) It's like you might be aware of that feeling and that sensitivity, but you don't have to lean into it too far because you've got these things to prop you up. It's where I think herbs can really store on all these beautiful, calming, gorgeous herbs that we have of access to reishi. I'm loving all these [inaudible 00:16:44] lately. I can just feel this real need to nourish that inner aspect.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (16:50) Absolutely. Yeah, and personally, it's funny, even oat staw are like I've got a little milky oats tincture on my table here, on my desk. Yep, and I've also been taking reishi myself as well. The two that you mentioned are very much like present in my field, in my body. Because I think the biggest thing is how can people shift from that sympathetic nervous system state to that parasympathetic rest and digest state? And how can I support them to do that? That's a lot of the work I'm doing right now, for sure. A lot of it is about our herbal helpers and how our plant medicines that calm the nervous system, and even can gently sedate the nervous system when you're in a really acute state of anxiety or panic or fear.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (17:42) It's I just feel for everyone. I feel for everyone so much right now. There's just so much of that going around, so that's why I actually... Obviously, I didn't... Well, I was writing, so I was writing the book in the depth of the pandemic. But, yeah, that was a part of why I wrote the emotions, mind spirit section, in The Plant Clinic. Because, as a clinician, even pre-pandemic, I was always treating lots of anxiety and working with people with anxiety, panic, depression. Just that low vitality as well, and all stemming from more of a mental, emotional place. Yeah, so I'm really proud of that section because I just really feel like it's rare to come across a body of work in herbalism that addresses that directly. I feel like often we're not talking so much about the spirit in, at all. Sometimes-   Tahnee: (18:39) I completely agree. It's all physical and often very... Like it's something I really love about your work is obviously you have the background of the energy medicine and then you've also got the more chemical constituents like biomedical background.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (18:54) Yeah, herbals and nutritional medicine.   Tahnee: (18:55) Yeah, and like this nice intersection of... which I think is where medicine really needs to go is like, and what has drawn me to Chinese medicine and Ayurveda and these things in my life is like we need to acknowledge that subtle realm and their unseen forces, as you call them. That's a really potent part of healing and a potent part of why we often have anxiety and things like that. We disconnect from what we really need or what we're really calling for in our deepest selves. Yeah, I think herbs really help with that, and I think even the action of preparing your own medicine and preparing your own tonics and things like there's something very nourishing and soothing in that.   Tahnee: (19:40) I don't know, just like it's a small, simple process that moved you toward maybe where you want to be. I think that was something I really noticed and loved about the book was it was that section, and you should be proud of yourself. It's important and I know it's hard to speak to those things as a practitioner sometimes because people can sound woo woo. It's something we struggle with a lot. Like we want to be woo woo.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (20:06) Totally. Yeah, girl, I'm just so at a point where I'm like, "This is what it is, guys. I'm not even worried if I sound woo woo."   Tahnee: (20:14) Totally.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (20:14) I'm just like, "This is my message. This is what's coming out. Receive it or don't."   Tahnee: (20:19) Well, I love it. You're a little bit more evolved than me. I'm still [crosstalk 00:20:24]-   Erin Lovell Verinder: (20:24) No, no, no.   Tahnee: (20:26) Bit, no. I think it takes some confidence though, and some like, probably, like you've had these 10 years in clinic. You're like it's this little experience of this is what I see and it's proven to me over and over again and I can't avoid it.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (20:40) Well, it's just that thing of like you can't compartmentalise health. It's like we're whole beings. If you're going to, like I said, just example of the gut that I'm circling back to that, if you're going to work on the gut, of course, you have to work on it from a very physical level. What's going on in the gut and how can we heal the gut? What are we eating? What are we feeding? But what are we thinking? What are we, actually, what are we absorbing from self-talk? What's our environment like that impacts our digestive systems? What are the roots of the gut dysbiosis? Is there trauma there? I think working on the gut, it's like the deepest seed of like our actual beginning of our root system. The beginning of us-   Tahnee: (21:23) Yeah, like our, what's the word, evolution in the womb as well-   Erin Lovell Verinder: (21:27) Absolutely, it's the beginning.   Tahnee: (21:28) ... with primal layers.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (21:30) Yeah, and it's like so I often feel like when people are working deeply on healing their guts, and I do a lot of digestive healing with clients, we're going back to the roots and it's so powerful. There's people always go through really big, almost like deep initiation and rebirth canals when they're working on the gut in a way. And I'm like, "Well, it would be like I'm going to get half of the results if I don't honour those other parts of what someone's going through and support them through that too." I know this from doing it for so many years, so yeah, I'm like I'm all in, I'm all in.   Tahnee: (22:04) Well, that's enough.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (22:06) I'm all in.   Tahnee: (22:06) Here I am and I noted that page in your book where you talk about on unfolding and healing isn't pretty, and I think that's something I often try and emphasise for people. It's like it's not just these detox reactions or herb reactions and things that we get. But it's like if you are... I know this personally, like my work around my gut was deeply connected to a lot of stuff from my childhood and it was not fun. It was not fun at all to start actually acknowledging the pain and the stuff that was brought forward from remembering and acknowledging those things. But the outcome being have a great digestive system in these days and it's like, yeah, it's worth it but it's not always nice.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (22:54) Absolutely. Yeah, that's really important in my process working with people, and I think my ethos is healing is not always pretty, it's not always straightforward. It takes time, you're unfolding and allowing that to be a process. It's the process of becoming. I think becoming is a real theme in my work, and when I mentor people too who want to walk the plant path it's like we're a little bit I'm geared towards like this a little, a lot. Geared towards instant culture, like this instant culture, instant gratification culture, and we just want to do the thing and then that's that. That's what we are, and I'm like, "Ah, there's a whole process."   Erin Lovell Verinder: (23:42) For me to show up who I am, I've walked these 20 something years now to get to this place where I can confidently say to you all, "Hey, take it or leave it. Like this is who I am and this is what I've got to say." I'm not saying I'm... I've got work to do still, I'm just saying this is who I am at this point. But-   Tahnee: (24:03) It's still unfolding.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (24:04) It's still unfolding. Like I've become to this point and healing is like that. It's a becoming and it's just an unfolding and it's gentle and it can be gentle, sometimes it's not. But you have to be gentle with yourself in that process.   Tahnee: (24:18) I was going to say, and I noticed a tendency toward gentleness in your work, which I like. There's not these extreme, like your detox protocols and things, they're not these extreme crazy things that we've all... Maybe not everyone's tried, but I've definitely tried some of it [inaudible 00:24:33]. Look, there's space for them in the world and I'm not trying to say they're wrong, but I think, especially in times like this, where people are so sensitive and there's so much collective for like angst and fear and stress. Like gentleness is probably the best medicine we could give ourselves at this point. I hope I'm not speaking for you, but that's-   Erin Lovell Verinder: (24:54) No, I totally agree. Yeah, for sure. Gentle is definitely my approach, and in writing a book that I know that is going to be accessed by all these different people and they're not going to be guided by me personally. As in they can just call me up and ask a question. I really wanted to write a book that I knew would be gentle for people and they could have a really soft pace with it, but also get results. I think that kind of concept, detoxification as well, because, yeah, there's a whole detoxification section in the book. I wanted to dispel a bit of myths around like this whole cleansing culture and detox culture.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (25:38) Yeah, the whole section explains it well around like your body's naturally detoxifying all the time, so how can we just, every minute, so how can we support those systems to just give them a little extra lift? But in a way that just actually flows with what they're already doing. So you might find that, "Oh, my liver is stagnated." Well, your liver is still doing its thing, it just needs a little bit of help. Yeah, that was my approach of like, "We're not going to do anything drastic. We're just going to be really gentle." But it can often be so profound when you are gentle in your approach.   Tahnee: (26:15) Yeah, I definitely like preconception with Ayo was pretty hectic, and this baby, I made a real effort to not be like that and I focused a lot more. I still did a bit of preparatory work that was very gentle, and then I focused a lot more on building and nourishing myself. Which I think I neglected that part a little bit with Ayo was a bit more like gung-ho with the cleansing. Like I didn't get any morning sickness at all this time. I did get a lot of rage, so maybe I did quite of both.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (26:50) [crosstalk 00:26:50] rage.   Tahnee: (26:53) But it was interesting having like just that really different first trimester experience of like with Ayo was like if it wasn't salty and crunchy, it wasn't going in my mouth. Whereas with this baby I was like, "I can eat pretty much everything." Yeah, it was a lot more gentle to navigate that first trimester, and yeah, except if you were Mason Taylor because you were not having a gentle time, but [inaudible 00:27:18] high oestrogen perhaps. Yeah, really I thought that was really interesting just personal anecdote. Yeah, and again, like you speak to hormones a lot in your book and it is a gentle approach.   Tahnee: (27:35) I think especially with women, we are cyclical beings and we are very sensitive and I think a lot of... and I've read a lot of books by male herbalists and that can be very gung-ho. It can come in hard and it can come in a little bit aggressive, and I think it's nice to bring some of that gentleness into that space as well.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (27:58) Yeah, I think, yeah, fully, and I think herbalism has been... I think there's a heavy matriarchal lineage running through herbalism. The OG lineage perhaps.   Tahnee: (28:10) Yeah.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (28:10) The OG lineage, exactly. So I think there's also a really different lens of perspective when you've been trained in that lineage as well. That's definitely been my lineage, and all my teachers were women, which women identified which felt correct learning with this softer... I mean not all soft but-   Tahnee: (28:35) Yes, I've had Susan Weed on the [inaudible 00:28:37]-   Erin Lovell Verinder: (28:37) Not soft, Susan, not all soft. But, yeah, the teachers I really resonated with were just very, very soft. So that really also expanded my path around how important that felt for me to have that gentleness as a teacher and a writer and a clinician as well. I just I really want people to feel held in whatever I do, and there's a softness to that, whatever that is. That matriarchal maternal instinct to want to be soft and to want to hold that space.   Tahnee: (29:16) Yeah, and I think that's really aligned to... One thing I think we both have like as a theme in our belief systems is this idea of herbs is people's medicine. If you think about like traditionally women are going to hold the kitchen, they're going to hold the garden, and they're going to be holding the medicine in a way. I think there's this real sense of something I've always said to Mason, like I want to be 60 and I want to be old and I want people to come and be like, "I've got this," and I always give them something. It's like a potion. I think there's this real beautiful ancestral line of women healers that I think we're seeing this resurgence in like...   Tahnee: (29:57) I just had Asia Suler on the podcast, and she's very feminine in how she works. Yeah, I can feel this, I don't know, this softening in the herbal world. When I started with Mase, it was guys doing tablespoons of mushrooms and it's bio hacky. It was really hectic, and I was like, "Whoa." I wasn't drawn into that, like I was drawn into working with the herbs and the mushrooms, for sure, but not in that way. Yeah, it's been interesting to watch that space change as well. It's a lot more feminine now and a lot more soft.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (30:29) Yeah, for sure. Then on the flip side of that too, I feel like what's fascinating is as we let go of these concepts of gender, and gender is a construct as well, how people, non-binary people, might be practising herbalism. And bringing it into this space that, they're definitely practising herbalism, but bringing it into this space that is like neither that nor that. As we upgrade our language and the love language of herbalism just keeps expanding from different voices who have different perspectives. I think that's also really interesting. And just also thinking about plants, not in their male or female plants. I think that's really limiting in terms of my idea of how I think about plants, and that's changing and growing, and as I grow. But, yeah, I've really been feeling more into that.   Tahnee: (31:36) I'm interested in this, because we come from a modulus tradition where there is a lot of genderizing of everything. I definitely had that bias, and I would obviously love to... I've done some workshops, actually, I did a really amazing workshop with a non-binary teacher in Oregon and she was like... Well, she wasn't a she, but she looked feminine to me, but I think she was a they, and they were speaking a lot about female bodied people and herbal abortions and working in that space around trauma to do with birth and miscarriage. Look, it was one of the best workshops and trainings I've ever done, and they spoke a little bit about the non-...   Tahnee: (32:26) Like this person's clinic really served that community, so they spoke a bit about issues in that community. But I don't see a lot of representation of that in the herbal world, maybe you do more because you might be a bit more exposed to it. But, yeah, I'd be interested in your experience. Like how are you now relating to plants through that energetic realm if you are not choosing binary terms?   Erin Lovell Verinder: (32:50) Yeah, look, it's really interesting because I think that, first of all, I think herbal culture in Australia is really... and we've talked about it. We went into this in the last podcast, which I really loved because I thought it was just a really interesting perspective for you and I to talk about that. Because we both have a lot of experience with American herbalism and that spirit of herbalism in the States. Having you train there and me spending so much time there, and because my husband's American and having such a kinship with America. But Australian herbalism is just so, so different because we have to study in these private colleges or university settings, and essentially, it's a health science degree, or whether you do a health science naturopathy degree or whatnot. And you're learning herbs or you become a herbalist at Western Herbal Medicine.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (33:39) So that in itself already puts herbalism in a really inaccesible place for a lot of people here in Australia. Because unless you've got... My debt from school is from training is insane, let alone what they're paying now and that mine was so long ago. I'm just saying that because it like casts an awareness on not all types of people would have access to doing this kind of training here in Australia. Obviously, you can learn herbs in different ways, but if you were to go out and practise and learn in a structured setting. Whereas in America, and this is what we went into on the last podcast, it's like it's the people's medicine. It's like essential to have that medicine in the system where there is no universal healthcare.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (34:28) Therefore, I think herbalism reaches a lot of different types of people, and not just privileged people. Not just people of privileged who can go and do those kind of degrees. There's a different spirit to it. I think that there's a lot of exciting things happening in the States with non-binary people who identify non-binary, but are herbalist and they're practising in ways that are undoing some of those structures, which I think is really fascinating. I'm still listening. I'll continue to listen and learn, and yeah, I'm curious. But the way that, for me, how it's impacted, I think I just always felt like those systems didn't feel super true and resonate with me.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (35:15) Some of the systems of like these are women's herbs and these are the men's herbs. I know these are ancient traditions, so I'm not saying that they don't have a place and there's not a lot of gold in all of that, of how we can treat female body people or male body people, or let's use those terms just to streamline this conversation. But I do feel that I didn't deeply resonate with that. So there's a section in The Plant Clinic that's Mums & Bubs, and there's a section that's hormone health. I was like, "How do I be more inclusive in those spaces?" But I'm trying to convey what I'm trying to convey. I had to use certain terminology like Mums & Bubs, or like this is first-   Tahnee: (36:01) [crosstalk 00:36:01] people and-   Erin Lovell Verinder: (36:01) ... Birthing people and mensturating people. Yeah, so that was a little tricky, but I wrote a little note in the book on gender terminology and I was like, "Oh, this is going to really shake it up, isn't it?" Maybe this is going to shake it a little bit up, but hey, I think that's what we're all here for as well to open conversations and to get people thinking about a different layer, a different perspective. And how boring if we all just felt like we all knew it all and it was the exact same way forever. The times are changing, and that means herbalism is changing too. I've witnessed it changed dramatically from when I started studying to now. There was really like it was so wacky, if you're a herbalist. It was like, "Oh, good luck. Like get onto the world, let's see what happens?"   Tahnee: (36:55) All in three months.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (36:58) Totally. Yeah, exactly. You might not have a job real soon or your clinic probably will fail because there's not that many people into this. It felt like that when I got out and now it's like it's in a totally different place where I feel like it's having this epic renaissance.   Tahnee: (37:15) I agree, yeah.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (37:16) Yeah, and it's just so rich. But so rich in action, in movement, in growth. I just feel like... Oh, so back to your question about how I'm practising it, it's more about the energy. It's just, honestly, it comes down to the energy and the presentation of what someone's going through and how I would meet them with herbs. It's like a herb like Shatavari, which is a very beautiful I think central herb that is very much linked in with a woman's herb. Because it has such an effect on the menstrual cycle, and it is a beautiful herb for women. But it's a beautiful herb for everyone in many different ways. Even like those really we think of them as really Yang ginseng like Panax ginseng or Korean ginseng.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (38:12) We think more to apply those to men. But, absolutely, I just do not think that is true in terms of how we can apply it to all people just in... If it suits, if the presentation's correct, if the energy's correct, if the dose is correct, it's just about listening. I think it's just about listening. Like I might think, yeah, a herb like Rose is just really feminine. We use that like soft, feminine, the unfolding, the petals of Rose. But I know a lot of people who could do with Rose, and it's just heart medicine. I just challenge that a little bit in The Plant Clinic, but it's just it's my own perspective.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (39:04) But it doesn't mean it has to be true for you, and I do think that aeons of information around herbs that would be supportive for our menstrual cycle, and say, supportive for sperm motility. Of course, I understand that they're applied to like this male identified person or this woman identified person. But, at the same time, I'm just challenging that idea of that actually isn't everybody as well. There's just this nuances, so we just need to open up space for nuance.   Tahnee: (39:36) Yeah, and I think it comes down to the intention of the person ingesting the herbs as to what kind of energy shifts they want to experience in their body? I can imagine if you're a male body person who identifies as female, you might not care about your sperm motility so much. So you might not be interested in working with those herbs. But then, again, I'm very clunky in this space, so anyone listening please feel free to write me an email about it. But I definitely have had like a personal experience of the universe having a binary, like two binary forces that are constantly in motion. It's hard to explain in words, but it's more of a visual or a felt sense that I have.   Tahnee: (40:26) I can understand that there's a spectrum between an extreme of each, whether you want to call it yin and yang or gender and male-Feminine, whatever, the Shiva-Shakti from the yoga traditions. Like I can feel this real truth in that sense of the binary is always in motion between one another, and that creates this experience that we live in. We're going very deep right now.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (40:51) Yes.   Tahnee: (40:53) But for me that-   Erin Lovell Verinder: (40:54) Unexpectedly deep into this area.   Tahnee: (40:57) [crosstalk 00:40:57] on the radar today. We haven't had enough sleep for this conversation, but yeah.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (41:01) Totally, forgive us if we're stumbling through this. But I think it's important to talk about it. It's important.   Tahnee: (41:09) It is, yeah. This has formed my, like cosmology, has formed my worldview. This sense of this dance between these two poles creating this manifest reality. That's literally how I've ended up explaining to myself how all this is here. I can understand that those like masculine and feminine terms aren't necessarily useful, but I think what you're pointing to, and I've had this experience in myself. Like postpartum, Deer Antler is not a herb I relate to normally. Postpartum, I'm like, "Give me that stuff." It's like I can see that I've gone through this big depletion of my yang of given birth. It's like a huge journey, and it's like to pull some of that masculine or yang energy or whatever you want to call it into my being is a really powerful medicine for me at that point.   Tahnee: (42:02) I don't keep doing it for long, it just it's a period of time and then I'm done with that again. I think I can relate to what you're saying there. It's also I think I often, for me, I've really related to ratio's a very feminine energy, but I would always expect men to take it because I think it can connect them to that softer part of themselves, like what you're saying with Rose. Yeah, and I remember you... I might not remember it word for word, but you said something to the effect of this book is for older people. There are some sections that are working toward women's reproductive stuff, and yes, they might not be useful for everybody. But, in general, herbalism is for everybody, like just about tuning into what's right for you in the moment.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (42:51) That's it, that's ultimately what it is. I think I'm just curious as well about out doing, undoing old paradigms. I think there must be something with that [crosstalk 00:43:08]. What's that?   Tahnee: (43:11) Just in like paradigm breaking mode right now.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (43:13) Yeah, make it all [inaudible 00:43:14]. No, I know, I'm just curious about these things that sometimes I think... Look, I know that that's even in writing these books, I felt like that was actually breaking down a bit of a paradigm in herbalism. Because, personally, my experience of, and I think most people would agree with this if you've got a big herb collection of books, you would know that most of your books are written by older people. There's a real sense of like, which is beautiful, of course, the elders in the community and these people that have lived all these years and all this experience to put it down in a book, what a gift. But being a younger person, and I'm nearly 40, I'm not super, super young, but being a younger person, writing a book about herbal... It was like breaking the boundary there a little, and I think I just maybe like doing that. I don't know.   Tahnee: (44:10) I think that's a theme in your work, and I think I also see a lot of courage in that. Like that you were able to so young guide yourself. If you haven't listened to our first podcast, Erin did a lot of really early training in energy work and things before training to be a herbalist. For a young person to have the courage to fuller those paths, I think that takes a lot of, I don't know, self belief or faith or whatever you want to call it. Is that something, you know, did you bump up against that in putting these books together? Was it like there's a self-worth thing here or like an imposter syndrome thing or were like, "No, I'm feeling strong and solid in there."   Erin Lovell Verinder: (44:52) I was really supported, so I think that feeling really cheered and supported was a huge piece of feeling like I've got this as well. Well, I just felt like someone had to do it. I felt a bit like, "Well, someone's got to do this, someone's got to do this."   Tahnee: (45:12) You're an Aries, aren't you?   Erin Lovell Verinder: (45:15) Yeah, [crosstalk 00:45:16].   Tahnee: (45:15) That's why.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (45:18) Yeah, I don't know.   Tahnee: (45:19) Aries runs a lot, "Yeah, of course, I can do it."   Erin Lovell Verinder: (45:21) Yeah, totally.   Tahnee: (45:22) Everybody else is like, Oh my God, it's so scary."   Erin Lovell Verinder: (45:25) Well, and like it's so classic me as well to just like... even when I enrolled in herbal medicine and nutritional medicine, which was like a double degree vibe is what I was doing at the same time. I didn't even read the syllabus, I was just like, "Yeah, I'm going to do this. I've got this." It was like, "I really want to be this. I wonder what's going to happen?" Then I got it and I was like, "This is a science degree."   Tahnee: (45:45) What am I doing?   Erin Lovell Verinder: (45:46) Yeah. What is this biochemistry and pharmacology? I really didn't know. I think, in a way, probably anyone doing their first book feels that way too. Like you're so excited about it, you sign up, you do it, and then you're like, "Oh my goodness, this is so much work. This is so demanding and hard." I think I did that with the first book, I just dove in and was really excited and eager. I was like, "Yeah, someone's going to do this. It's going to be great. I'm just going to tell the stories of the plants again and just introduce people back to that remembering." Then I got there and was like, "Oh, this is just this is hard." But I felt confident, and I was like... I sound like such an Aries right now.   Tahnee: (46:31) [crosstalk 00:46:31] a lot of it.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (46:35) I felt confident that I could pull it off, even though it also brought out other parts of myself. I'm a Liberian rising, and I think that I'm so such an aesthetic person and I really love things to look beautiful and be visually like visual eye candy and pull you in. That was actually really fun for me because both books, I got to strengthen that muscle in me of making things beautiful. I think too that has been missing in the modern herbalism space of bringing books to life that people want to put on their tables and the coffee tables and having the kitchen because it's beautiful.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (47:16) I think that there's just no denying that we're all very aesthetic creatures these days, and particularly, with Instagram and the social media channels where we're all pulled in from the visual of everything. Yeah, I just think it was timely to just bring a book to life that both books that are just visually pretty. But, yeah, for sure, that's definitely my nature just to be very much like just jump in.   Tahnee: (47:44) Yeah, I love it there. I think like you have brought it up, more than brought it up, and it's you're completely right in the visual. I think I've got your books at home, but I think we've also got both of them in the office and people just go straight to them. We have like, I don't know, I want to say thousands of books on herbalism and-   Erin Lovell Verinder: (48:04) You have lots of books [crosstalk 00:48:06]-   Tahnee: (48:08) I've got more even at our house, and people would just go straight for them and it's, to me, I'm like, "Oh, that's like the plants are being sung into people's hearts through the visual storytelling as well as your words." I think that's really powerful because images they connect us in a different way. Just I was looking into the moustache and picture in here and I'm like just that joy and that bright laugh that these sessions bring to a space. I think there's something really magical about that. I think what I really also liked about this one, I'm trying to remember your first book which I haven't read in a little while. But you talk about the pillars to thrive in this and I'm not sure that was in the first one. I don't think it was.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (48:55) No, it wasn't at all.   Tahnee: (48:55) Yeah, could you talk a little bit about that? Obviously, get the book for the in-depth look at it. But I'm just interested in right now we've talked a lot about where everyone's at, sensitivity, we're feeling a bit un-hinged [inaudible 00:49:10]. We've gone deep into the cosmos. We've tried to navigate gender issues in terms of some really practical stuff. Like not that none of that is practical, but-   Erin Lovell Verinder: (49:21) Not really.   Tahnee: (49:23) ... like how would you say to people like, "Yes, we've got herbs," but what are those lifestyle pieces that are non-negotiables for you that need to be honoured to be well in this time?   Erin Lovell Verinder: (49:34) Yeah, I think I feel like that's such a foundation of the book are those pillars. I wrote the book really with all of those elements in mind in every single daily planner.   Tahnee: (49:47) [crosstalk 00:49:47].   Erin Lovell Verinder: (49:47) Yeah, I wrote it around them and that's it. In my clinical practise, I've learnt that, like we talked about before, you can't compartmentalise a person's healing process and you can't pull them apart and say, "Just do this and you'll be great." What I've learned is that we've taken the herbs to really allow them to sink into a deeper state of received healing in the body. We need to do other elements and to take care of the body. We need to make sure that we are hydrated, we're eating good nourishing food that's healing for us, we're resting, we're connecting to nature. We're really mindful of what we're saying to ourselves. So our self-talk and we're moving our bodies. The pillars are just those elements, and the rest, the good food, moving your body, connected to nature, self-talk, body movement. No, I missed one.   Tahnee: (50:41) Yeah, I think you got them all.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (50:41) Drinking water.   Tahnee: (50:41) Diabetic.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (50:41) Diabetic.   Tahnee: (50:41) Connected with nature.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (50:48) Yeah, those pillars are super important. It's very naturopathic thinking about what are the elements that the body needs to, the body being, needs to be supported with to heal. You'll see in every protocol. Like let's say there's a protocol for an acute cold, it will say practise the pillars, and then it says which pillars to practise. You might want to do, obviously, like to do them all, but you really focus on rest and really focusing on hydration and eating good food. Then I suggest some foods that could be really helpful too. The book was really written around those because I really believe that to work with plant medicines, you need to also work with those elements. I felt like it was seriously negligible of me to write a book about healing with plant medicine without mentioning all those elements of how we can heal holistically and truly.   Tahnee: (51:36) It's something that comes up so much for us where someone will call and be like, "Oh, I run 50 kilometres a day and I work 80 hours away. Can I do this essentially at work? Can you give me for my adrenals?" I'm like, "Hmm." I just would like to say that I'm happy to help you and support you, but really that's not a sustainable way to live forever. These hormonal issues you're experiencing in this insomnia and all of these things that are coming up for you like we can't avoid looking at our lifestyles. I think, again, this gentleness, that was something that I've certainly learned and I felt in your... You're not preaching anything, you're not trying to say like there's a right way or a wrong way.   Tahnee: (52:21) It's just like, look, these are pretty basic foundations that we all need to acknowledge are essential to living. And you have to sleep at some point and you have to drink water. Yes, I think they just become... and it's nice to have them laid out in such a simple way, I think. I think it was really I liked that you had like say with the code immunity one, like rest is a priority now instead of maybe moving your body. I think it's important for people to remember that it's okay to not do your physical practise some days if your body needs to rest more than anything else.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (52:54) Absolutely. Yeah, they're just so fundamental to really working with healing your body and your being. It's just the simple reminders to return back to those practises and a gentle guide. That's really what it is, like those pillars to thrive when you read them and get to know them. But I can't tell you how many times in clinic I returned to those, and then constantly I'm just repeating myself around, "Let's drink more water, let's rest more, let's move the body more, let's eat these foods." It's amazing how simple it is, but we need to be reminded. I know, personally, I've got my big water bottle here and I fill it up and I'm going to really work to hit three of those a day and drink three of those a day.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (53:43) If I don't have my water bottle there, I forget. I'm just not an amazing natural water drinker. That really helps for me, and so I have to put my intention and energy towards weaving that in. Because I feel way better when I'm hydrated. It's just, yeah, it's always those elements, those little things in that book where it says, "There's a little tip on how to drink more water." I hope that really helps.   Tahnee: (54:07) That's what we get in clinic. Again, I remember being... I know we've both had adrenal crash in our lives and mine came I must've been about 23 or '4. I was pretty young. And I remember going to see this naturopath and she was like, "Okay, babe, you're going to put a bottle of water on the front seat of your car. You're going to put a bottle of water in your hand like this." Then she's like, "If you're stuck in traffic, you drink a sip of..." I had to be coached through, God it's embarrassing now, but like having enough water. Then she's like, "I know you're going to eat three meals a day and you're going to have some protein in everything."   Tahnee: (54:45) It was just this stuff that now obviously has become integrated and is stuff I'm trying to teach my kid, and constantly stay on top of it. But, yeah, I'm the same, I'm not someone that would go and reach for a glass of water unless I'm dehydrated, basically.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (55:01) Yes, to the point of dehydration.   Tahnee: (55:04) It's like, yeah, it's good. I'm like just have a jar, always there, refill it regularly. I've even had to have apps at points in my life, but it's just like that's how you get through it. Same with [inaudible 00:55:16], I was talking, a lot of moms can probably relate, you get to like 9:00 and your kid's asleep and you're like your house is clean and then you're like, "Ooh, me time." It's like-   Erin Lovell Verinder: (55:26) Yeah, and then you sit up and watch three hours of shows.   Tahnee: (55:29) [crosstalk 00:55:29] I've had to just be really tough and no fucking computers in the bedroom. Like, no, we don't have a TV, so it's like I have to be tight with that stuff or else one slip and I'm doomed. I appreciated having that, it was a good reminder even after all those years and all this money spent.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (55:55) That's the thing, these pillars really they're free. Obviously, we pay for our food, but a lot of them are super accessible and pretty much free. It's like that concept too that "wellness" is this big thing and it has to be expensive, and it's like that's actual bull. It's about coming back to these really foundational, fundamental practises that make our bodies and being seen and thrive and they are so simple. That's really what the pillars to thrive are, and yeah, you very much heavily referred to throughout the whole book to bring you back and keep reminding you how to practise them.   Tahnee: (56:41) Again, like you would have with Erin in face to face [crosstalk 00:56:44]-   Erin Lovell Verinder: (56:44) Exactly. Can you imagine me being like, "You can do it. Drink your water."   Tahnee: (56:49) Take care of yourself.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (56:50) What are you saying to yourself?   Tahnee: (56:53) You could record me a go to bed Tommy lullaby, that'd be good.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (56:59) I like that you like a-   Tahnee: (56:59) Got to sleep.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (57:01) ... little note, like a little alarm that just says, "Honey, switch off."   Tahnee: (57:05) Yeah. I've been good with pregnancy. I'm trying to really honour that I need about two more hours than I used to need at night. But, yeah, I know definitely it's an easy thing. Literally, every week at daycare pick up I chat with some mom and she's like, "Oh my God, I just started watching something I'm sure and I shouldn't have and now I had everybody..." I'm like, "I know, I've been there." I really like you're not taking clients at the moment, and you're in this liminal space. Obviously, you've had birth to book, it's not a minor thing, but I know you're still very busy with your clinic. But, obviously, don't have space for new clients. But you mentioned, is it okay if we talk about the mentoring things that are going to come? Yeah, could we talk through that one?   Erin Lovell Verinder: (57:50) Yeah, so I've got a wait list for clients, just for new clients. At this point, it's closed so we'll see when it will open up again. But, yeah, for the mentoring. So I've been doing mentoring one to one for, gosh, years and years and years, and I've loved it and I've learnt so much mentoring so many people. I really wanted to do that before writing a programme to just get this deep sense of what people are seeking, and they absolutely are themes that have come through to what I share and what people are going through. I'm in the midst of writing the mentoring programmes now in the hopes they'll be released. These things sometimes take time, but early 2022.   Tahnee: (58:36) Okay.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (58:37) Yeah, there'll be two different strains of mentoring and how you can mentor with me. It's really exciting because it's the first programmes I'll have done. Though I've taught many groups over the years, this is my first group digital offering and I think it's going to be really exciting and new ways for me to work with people and reach more people and be able to support more people and spread myself into those different spaces. It's exciting, yes.   Tahnee: (59:05) Yeah. Well, as a clinician, I could see a limited as to how many people you can see. But if you're teaching teachers and people that are working with people, then yeah, you're able to make a bigger impact.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (59:20) Sure, I mean... Oh, go ahead. Sorry.   Tahnee: (59:20) Well, I was just going to say that what are the qualifications? Is it for people who are trying to settle or studying or that what's your-   Erin Lovell Verinder: (59:23) There'll be two different streams, so one is more for people who are studying or graduated, and the other one is more people who are curious to step onto the plant path. Because they have two very different ways to teach and audiences to speak to. I'm really, really passionate about doing my very best as well to shape, or whatever I could do to help support and shape someone into feeling like a really capable and strong presence as a practitioner because it's a big job. I think that we come out of our studies, particularly here in Australia, and it's... I don't know. I was flabbergasted at how I didn't learn so much at school and I felt really unprepared. Then it's like, "Oh my God, I'm working with people. Is this right? How do I do this? And how do I set up these basics elements of my business?"   Erin Lovell Verinder: (01:00:22) You really have to be like a savvy business owner as well. I've had different iterations of having a big healing space like my own multi-modality wellness space for many years and selling that successfully and running it. Then being a head practitioner at a busy, busy clinic in Sydney, and then being digital and writing books. I've had all these different iterations and it's given me a lot of perspective. But there's a lot of things I wished that I knew when I came out, and if I can help people in that way, I'm really excited to do that because it's a big job.   Tahnee: (01:00:56) I guess like that, is that business aspect part of one of the streams? Like your-   Erin Lovell Verinder: (01:01:05) Yeah, we're definitely weaving that in and I'm so lucky to have my husband who's like-   Tahnee: (01:01:12) Mr. Noah.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (01:01:13) Mr. Noah, he's a virgo who is so amazing at... He really can show up with a skill set that I do not have and I am totally okay about not having that skillset. He's amazing at that. I sounded like I was talking myself out before, but I really I'm lacking much of that [crosstalk 01:01:31]. But, yeah, and he has a marketing background, so that's been really helpful to have his input into the course as well and how to run a business and the marketing aspect. It's huge, right? It is a huge element.   Tahnee: (01:01:48) Yeah, I only know it from yoga, but like similarly you do a teacher training and they're like, "Okay, you're a teacher now." And you like, "well, and like how do I go to class? What do I..." That worked for a studio, so I had a silver platter, like I was very fortunate. But a lot of my friends never ended up teaching because that jump from education to actual practise was really difficult.   Erin Lovell Verinder: (01:02:11) Really difficult and overwhelming.   Tahnee: (01:02:15) Yeah, and I was lucky to have worked and then managed other businesses so I had a bit of a business brain. Like I often think, God, if I didn't h

Rock The Podcast
Delivering a Brand Strengthening Interview

Rock The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 23:16


On today's episode of Monetize the Mic, Jess and Margy are talking about how to deliver a brand strengthening podcast interview so you can skyrocket your visibility (because you don't have a brand if nobody knows who you are). There is a difference between building a business and building a brand and you should establish both. And building a brand isn't just about colors and logos, it's about the storytelling behind it. And that storytelling starts on your podcast interviews. Margy gives some great tips and strategies for how to be brave, get out there, and get stronger as you go.

Be Calm on Ahway Island Bedtime Stories
549. Delivering Joy: a kids’ meditation and story

Be Calm on Ahway Island Bedtime Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 19:07


Gabby Flower Delivery Truck bravely drives to a new part of Ahway Island to collect flowers for a very special bouquet!

Accelerating Excellence with Del Gilbert
Accelerating Excellence - Episode 91: 10 Best Practices for Delivering a Dynamic Presentation

Accelerating Excellence with Del Gilbert

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 16:20


Giving a presentation should not be something to dread or to get through. Look at it in a positive and confident way. It's your opportunity to make the world a little better place. With these 10 Best Practices for Delivering a Dynamic Presentation, you will be better able to influence, engage, and inspire others. To download the 10 Best Practices for Delivering a Dynamic Presentation  resource guide, CLICK HERE.

All Souls Sunday Sermons
Delivering the goods (2) (Titus 1:5–9)

All Souls Sunday Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 25:20


Vidjagame Apocalypse
First-Person Kickers – Vidjagame Apocalypse 444

Vidjagame Apocalypse

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021


Delivering a good, solid kick in a game feels great, especially when it sends your enemies flying helplessly into spikes or off cliffs. This week, the regular VGA crew pays tribute to five of the greatest, meatiest kick attacks ever... Read more

Afrobility: Africa Tech & Business
#41: SafeBoda - How the Ugandan motorbike hailing platform is delivering mobility services across Africa

Afrobility: Africa Tech & Business

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 129:08


Overview: Today, we're going to talk about SafeBoda - the Ugandan motorbike hailing platform. We'll explore the SafeBoda story across 7 areas: Motorbike hailing platforms in other emerging markets (GoJek) African mobility context SafeBoda's founding & early history Fundraising and growth Product & monetization strategy Competitive positioning & potential exit options Overall outlook This episode was recorded on Oct 31, 2021. Companies discussed: SafeBoda, GoJek, Gokada, Pathao, Allianz X, CRE Ventures, Uber Boda, Bolt / Taxify Boda, Tugende, Chipper Cash, Musha ventures, Go ventures & Gozem Business concepts discussed: Mobility Tech, Pan-Africa expansion, Transportation + FinTech Superapps Conversation highlights: (05:20) - Motorbike hailing platforms in other emerging markets (GoJek) (05:30) - Africa transportation context (07:40) - Uganda country & transportation context (24:50) - Founder background - Rapa Thomson, Maxime Dieudonne, Alastair Sussock (38:20) - SafeBoda's launch (43:36) - Fundraising (52:50) - Geographic expansion (1:15:00) - Product & monetization strategy (1:25:00) - Competition and options for exit (1:37:00) - Olumide's overall thoughts and outlook (1:48:01) - Bankole's overall thoughts and outlook (1:51:10) - Recommendations and small wins Olumide's recommendations & small wins: Recommendation: Founders podcast (Dave Senra) & Don't Sweat the Small Stuff . . . and It's All Small Stuff (Richard Carlson) Small win: Was in Chicago hanging out with friends for birthday, Hung out with friends in a Miami night out & installed Windows 11 which is sweet and beautiful Other content: Get.Africa #46 article about SafeBoda's Kenya exit (by Chiagoziem Onyekwena), Twitter conversation (by Stone Twine) about SafeBoda's disintermediation Bankole's recommendations & small wins: Recommendation: Azonto Ghost song & movie || How Big Tech Runs Tech Projects and the Curious Absence of Scrum Small win: Chelsea FC can't stop winning. Big win. Other content: So, Where did the Popular Uganda Boda Bodas Come From? Listeners: We'd love to hear from you. Email info@afrobility.com with feedback! Founders & Operators: We'd love to hear about what you're working on, email us at info@afrobility.com Investors: It would be great to link up with you to drive the ecosystem forward. Contact us at info@afrobility.com Join our insider mailing list where we get feedback on new episodes & find all episodes at Afrobility.com

Restaurant Unstoppable with Eric Cacciatore
842: Delivering the Digital Restaurant with Meredith Sandland

Restaurant Unstoppable with Eric Cacciatore

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 110:28


With excitement allow me to introduce to you today's guest, Meredith Sandland. Prior to co-authoring Delivering the Digital Restaurant: Your Roadmap to the Future of Food, Meredith spent two decades in consulting, corporate strategy, and restaurant development. After Building 1,000+ restaurants the Chief Development Officer at Yum! Brands' Taco Bell, Meredith observed that the on-demand economy was starting to affect restaurants. Meredith joined ghost kitchen start-up, Kitchen United as employee #4 to create their business model, raise initial capital, and serve as the public face of the Google Venture-backed disruptor. Check out the book: Delivering The Digital Restaurant: Your Roadmap To The Future Of Food by Meredith Sandland and Carl Osbourn Show notes… Calls to ACTION!!! Join Restaurant Unstoppable Network and connect with my past guest and a community of superfans. Subscribe to the Restaurant Unstoppable YouTube Channel Join the private Unstoppable Facebook Group Join the email list! (Scroll Down to get the Vendor List!) Favorite success quote or mantra: “If your actions inspire others to dream more, do more, and become more, you are a leader.” In today's lecture with Meredith Sandland we will discuss: All of the major points discussed in full detail in the book Delivering the Digital Restaurant Today's sponsor: Diageo Bar Academy equips bartenders, servers, managers, and hospitality professionals with the insights, stories, and tools to be better - raising the bar on industry standards. Diageo Bar Academy reaches a diverse audience, with backgrounds and skill levels of all ranges- providing them with skills, knowledge, and the techniques they need to improve their personal and professional lives. 7shifts is a modern labor management platform, designed by restaurateurs, for restaurateurs. Effectively labor management is more important than ever to ensure profitability and restaurant success. Trusted by over 400,000 restaurant professionals, 7shifts gives you the tools you need to streamline labor operations, communicate with your team, and retain your talent. Best of all 7shifts integrates with the POS and Payroll systems you already use and trust (like Toast!) turning labor into a competitive advantage for your business. Restaurant Unstoppable members get 3 months, absolutely free. MarginEdge is completely free for new customers until September. No setup fees. No integration fees. No commitment. Take your back office paperwork down to 2-3 minutes a day while creating real-time financial views to inform your path ahead. Contact info: You can buy the book right here! Get the book straight from the authors at www.deliveringthedigitalrestaurant.com Check out learn.delivery Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for joining today! Have some feedback you'd like to share? Leave a note in the comment section below! If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the top of the post. Also, please leave an honest review for the Restaurant Unstoppable Podcast on iTunes! Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated! They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them. And finally, don't forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. Huge thanks to Meredith Sandland for joining me for another awesome episode. Until next time!   Restaurant Unstoppable is a free podcast. One of the ways I'm able to make it free is by earning a commission when sharing certain products with you. I've made it a core value to only share tools, resources, and services my guest mentors have recommend, first. If you're finding value in my podcast, please use my links!

The Jeremiah Show
Restaurateur Sherry Villanueva | On Delivering Joy & Connection

The Jeremiah Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 1:10


Restaurateur Sherry Villanueva | On Delivering Joy & Connection www.acmehospitality.com

UNPLUGGED Live Concerts
Lizzo - ”Rumors” with Cardi B, Delivering Hard Truths, and Manifesting Confidence | Apple Music | Interview

UNPLUGGED Live Concerts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 41:18


Lizzo sits down with Zane Lowe to discuss the inspirations behind "Rumors" featuring Cardi B and her highly anticipated upcoming album. Lizzo explains that her shy and awkward childhood metamorphosed into an unbelievable career because of music and confidence. Holding to her belief that “words are spells,” Lizzo has made it her mission to manifest confidence in women by delivering infectious and uplifting songs with hard hitting messages. She opens up about her rise to fame and working with powerful female rappers, mentioning, “Women have been unable to rise to their seat in power until now, this is our time.” Listen to Lizzo on Apple Music: http://apple.co/LizzoYT Music moves fast. To keep up with hungry fans and tireless creators, Apple Music launched New Music Daily, the latest and greatest must-hear songs from pop, hip-hop, Latin and beyond. Hosted by Zane Lowe, watch exclusive interviews with today's most important artists. Team UNPLUGGED.

Delivering Marketing Joy Webshow
Delivering Marketing Joy Episode 363 with Nick Lateur

Delivering Marketing Joy Webshow

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 10:15


Delivering Marketing Joy Episode 363 with Nick Lateur by Kirby Hasseman

Lunge & Lift Podcast
Episode 85 - Khyrs Speed: The Explosive Mother F*cker

Lunge & Lift Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 60:24


This week on the podcast Rob & Ash are joined by Khrys Speed @kdotspeed. Khrys chats with us about his background in sport, all things pro rugby, the ins and outs of weightlifting competitions, coaching and being coached.   We get into ⬇️

Itsdiff Leadership & Career Podcast
Ep 50 Delivering Value Project Management Tips 2021 10 05

Itsdiff Leadership & Career Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 54:24


Value Creation aspects of Project Management

All Souls Sunday Sermons
Delivering the goods (1) (Titus 1:1–4)

All Souls Sunday Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 24:19


Combat Story
Combat Story (Ep 48): Ray McPadden [Part 1] | Ranger | Purple Heart | Valley of Death | We March at Midnight

Combat Story

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 124:48


UPCOMING EVENT on November 11th (Veterans Day): If you'd like to attend a Q&A session on November 11th with Combat Story's Ryan Fugit, please fill out this form (https://tinyurl.com/552ewmu5). Today we hear Part I of the Combat Story of Ray McPadden, a former Army Infantry Officer who survived four deployments that included leading troops in one of the most dangerous valleys of Afghanistan with the 10th Mountain Division and as a Ground Force Commander in the Ranger Battalion. Listeners really appreciate our interviews with Special Operators and it's easy to see why. Many listeners have asked to hear a few more stores from the conventional side of the house. Today's episode focuses entirely on the conventional side of Ray's career and fighting that his Battalion Commander at the time promised would be harder than anything he would go on to do in the Rangers. Ray's experience in the Pech and Korangal Valleys will be eye opening to many who had no idea forces were fighting in this unforgiving terrain and in these isolated conditions. Many have seen Restrepo and the Hornet's Nest and can appreciate just how difficult that fighting was. Ray and his men fought to build the positions and fortifications that would later become the backdrop of those movies and books. We use Ray's own fantastic book - We March at Midnight - as a guide to walk through the first half of his career and will pick up in part two with his time in the Special Ops community. I hope you enjoy this first of two Combat Stories and his fight in what was known as the “Valley of Death” as much as I did. Find Ray Online: Instagram @raymcpadden1 https://www.instagram.com/raymcpadden1/ Book We March at Midnight https://www.amazon.com/We-March-Midnight-War-Memoir-ebook/dp/B08W2NQF4H Find Ryan Online: Follow on Instagram @combatstory https://www.instagram.com/combatstory Follow on Facebook @combatstoryofficial https://fb.me/combatstoryofficial Send us messages at https://m.me/combatstoryofficial Email ryan@combatstory.com Learn more about Ryan www.combatstory.com/aboutus Intro Song: Sport Rock from Audio Jungle Show Notes 0:00 - Intro 1:11 - Guest introduction 2:03 - Interview begins 5:10 - Reenacting Sniper (the movie) as a kid 12:54 - Texas A&M and learning from NCOs for the first time 18:50 - “Actions not words” and leading by example 21:14 - Mood in the Army in 2004-2005 starting out 24:05 - A life in the mountains 25:12 - Donkey and mule training 35:43 - The real side of a military spouse - “They go to war with you” 39:30 - Afghanistan and the Pech Valley 42:00 - First Platoon Sergeant - “The key person” for new LTs 45:22 - Reality of Mountain Warfare 47:22 - Combat Story #1: First big fight 1:21:40 - Combat Story #2: The counterattack 1:27:37 - The Korongal (Korangal aka Korengal) Valley and Restrepo and Operation Red Wings environment (Restrepo Info for those interested https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zvUdruvbdmI) 1:30:01 - Combat Story #3: Initial fight in the Valley 1:44:04 - “War is Freedom” 1:50:13 - Delivering some of the hardest news possible 1:54:29 - Combat Story #4: The Last Firefight - “War is horrible” 2:02:10 - Conventions vs Special Operations 2:03:25 - Listener Comments and Shout Outs

FT Politics
Delivering the autumn Budget

FT Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 33:10


This week we examine the philosophy behind this year's Budget and whether this is a marked change in how the Conservatives look at the economy. Political editor George Parker and chief political commentator Robert Shrimsley discuss.And we look ahead to the COP26 climate summit in Glasgow, where world leaders will, or won't, step up on tackling climate change. Will Boris Johnson's bold ambitions be met? Or will it turn out to be another missed opportunity? Climate reporter Camilla Hodgson and columnist Pilitia Clarke will explain.Audio source: BBCProduced by Howie Shannon. The sound engineers were Breen Turner and Sean McGarrity.-Read the latest on https://www.ft.com/world/uk-Follow @Seb Payne, @George Parker, @Robert Shrimsley-Subscribe to https://www.ft.com/newsletters See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

National Wildlife Federation Outdoors
Delivering on Conservation by Leveraging Technology

National Wildlife Federation Outdoors

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 60:24


In this episode Aaron sits down with Samantha Pedder, VP of Marketing for Terra Technology Group, and Steve Bergmann, Administrator for the Administrative Services Division of Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife. We discuss the modernization of issuing hunting and fishing licenses and outdoor user permits, the efficiencies gained by going paperless, and how agencies are collecting data to optimize user experiences. We talk about how Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife is leading the way and how their use of technology has helped them provide a better experience for hunters and anglers for things like steelhead catch limits, wildfire hunting unit closers, and understanding the needs of specific demographics. Steve and Sam also illuminate how we'll be better able to monitor things like CWD and to implement programs like the Recovering America's Wildlife Act using technology. We also cover the latest efforts on the federal level to better help outdoor users use technology in the field and gain addition access to public lands such as the SOAR Act and the MAPLand Act. Links: Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife: https://myodfw.com/ Terra Technology Group: www.terratg.com S.O.A.R. Act – Simplifying Outdoor Access for Recreation Act - https://www.congress.gov/bill/117th-congress/house-bill/3670/text?r=6&s=1 MAPLand Act - Modernizing Access to our Public Land Act or the MAPLand Act - https://www.congress.gov/bill/117th-congress/senate-bill/904?q=%7B%22search%22%3A%5B%22s904%22%5D%7D&s=1&r=1 Paperless Permit Tag System Example in Arizona -https://www.azgfd.com/commission-proposes-rulemaking-to-establish-a-paperless-permit-tag-system/ Digital License Example in Pennsylvania - https://www.media.pa.gov/pages/game-commission-details.aspx?newsid=502 Show Notes: Who is Samantha Pedder and Steve Bergmann? What have they been doing outside recently? Let's start with Samantha! Broad overview of the business of conservation, technology and delivering licenses.  8:10 - Oregon is doing it well! What changed within the system at the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife? The transition to being paperless.  12:25 - What are people doing around the country? Are most people going paperless with their licenses/tags? This new world of mobile app hunting licenses... 15:00 - For someone who hunts around the country, are they going to have to download multiple apps for each state or are we moving towards a nationwide paperless system. The connection between conservation and utilizing technology in order to conserve wildlife.  21:20 - What are we doing with this data? How are agencies taking input in order to improve the technology and optimize this service? 24:50 - The approach of going paperless is going to make it easier for hunters and anglers to get out and enjoy. What are the basic questions that people have in terms of technology in order to make this process easier? 28:25 - What is the reluctance for hunters and anglers to make the move to go paperless? Talking about embracing various approaches to change. 32:40 - How are agencies analyzing the data and utilizing adaptive management?  36:05 - Message from our partner podcast, Artemis Sportswomen.  36:55- Using some of this new information to address area closures, such as ice storms and wild fires.  38:55 - Unpacking the prevention of a fee increase through the savings of going paper free.  40:33 - What is it that has to happen for more states to embrace technology?  45:20 - How does Recovering America's Wildlife Act come into play? The process of empowering conservation agencies to do their jobs better! 50:03 - What is the SOAR Act?  54:00 - What is the take home message for embracing technology in conservation? At the end of the day, in times of CWD and climate change, embracing new technology is going to be at the betterment of conservation.   

COVID NoiseFilter - Doctors Explain the Latest on COVID-19
Ep. 399 - Hospital Stops Delivering Babies, and Electronic Sleep Tracking

COVID NoiseFilter - Doctors Explain the Latest on COVID-19

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 10:05


Today, in episode 399, our expert Infectious Disease and Community Medicine doctors discuss the latest on COVID-19. We talk about how a hospital has stopped delivering babies due to staff shortages, as well as different methods of tracking your sleep. As always, join us for all the COVID-19 information you need, explained in clear terms by health experts. Website: NoiseFilter - Complex health topics explained simply (noisefiltershow.com) Animations: NoiseFilter - YouTube Instagram: NoiseFilter (@noisefiltershow) • Instagram photos and videos Facebook: NoiseFilter Show | Facebook TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@noisefiltershow --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/noisefilter/message

This Week in Health IT
Delivering on Value Based Care with Andrew Sorenson of Castell Health

This Week in Health IT

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 35:43


October 29, 2021: Andrew Sorenson, Chief Analytics Officer at Castell joins us to talk care traffic control. Specifically, value-based care contracts across clinically integrated networks with a deep dive into data. Not only the EHR data, but information around the social determinants of health and payer data too. Intermountain and Castell are making huge progress in this area. What are some of the challenges that health systems face when they make the jump to value based care contracts? How do you manage cost and quality? What are some of the data sets that you have to bring together to make it work? How do you engage clinicians in the process? What drives the highest quality improvements and how does the patient experience this integrated solution?Key Points:00:00:00 - Intro00:04:20 Re-Imagined Primary Care00:09:30 - One of the key challenges that I hear that health systems are facing is a timing question00:13:05 - The surveillance process is really important00:19:00 - When I put my product hat on I need to be a reducer and not a producerCastell Health

Food School: Smarter Stronger Leaner.
PRACTICE: neuroscience-based light routine to abolish your afternoon slump and midday sleepiness to keep delivering your best work.

Food School: Smarter Stronger Leaner.

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 16:54


TUNE IN TO LEARN:Want to be productive the whole day without slumps in the middle?Here's a neuroscience and circadian biology based behavior tool to help you do just that!And as always, knowledge doesn't work - unless we put it into practice. SUBMIT YOUR QUESTION HERE - https://form.typeform.com/to/tKPDKsegProduced by Angela Shurina,CERTIFIED NUTRITIONIST, COACHI help you use nutrition science in a simple way to reach your health, fitness, performance goals! Skills and Habits VS Diets.IG: @1000yearyoungGET MY FREE 10-DAY EMAIL HEALTH COURSE. THE FOUNDATION SERIES. JOIN TEAM LEAN!

Delivering Marketing Joy Webshow
Delivering Marketing Joy Episode 362 with Jeremy Chacon

Delivering Marketing Joy Webshow

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 17:00


Delivering Marketing Joy Episode 362 with Jeremy Chacon by Kirby Hasseman

A Quest for Well-Being
Delivering Your Greatest Contribution To The World

A Quest for Well-Being

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 47:27


— Didier Sylvain and the Coherence program helps us align our lives to our mission and our gifts; practice liberation from the oppressive structures and stories that we've internalized; and unleash our leadership to drive meaningful impact. He coaches individuals and groups into becoming fuller and more integrated versions of themselves, so they can deliver powerfully on their missions. By applying grounded wisdom and adaptive frameworks to life's challenges and opportunities, he helps leaders transform their organizations, their teams, and themselves. Valeria Teles interviews Didier Sylvain — a Life Alignment Coach, Consultant In Leadership And Personal Development, Speaker, Artist, Composer, PHD In Ethnomusicology, Practitioner Of Sound Healing And Qigong Didier Sylvain is the creator of the 12-week online group coaching program Coherence, which brings together BIPOC leaders and creatives to evolve their leadership and social impact. Didier coaches individuals and groups into becoming fuller versions of themselves by leveraging his training in intentional change theory, appreciative inquiry, adaptive strategy and somatics. He helps leaders transform their organizations, their teams, and themselves to deliver their greatest contribution to the world. His personalized one-on-one coaching, group coaching, online courses, and discovery products have helped clients from Pinterest, Verizon Media, and Honda go on a journey back to themselves. Didier is also an artist, composer, PhD candidate in Ethnomusicology (Columbia University), and certified practitioner of sound healing and qigong. He currently resides in Los Angeles with his family. To learn more about Didier Sylvain and his work, please visit: didiersylvain.com       — This podcast is a quest for well-being, a quest for a meaningful life through the exploration of fundamental truths, enlightening ideas, insights on physical, mental, and spiritual health. The inspiration is Love. The aspiration is to awaken new ways of thinking that can lead us to a new way of being, being well. 

The Gametime Guru
Episode 218: Seeing Sports Through a Different Lens

The Gametime Guru

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 23:24


The show began back in 2017 with the phrase "Delivering a Panoramic View on Sports" and to "Help you See Sports Through A Different Lens"  Now, I'm here to share with you all, how the show has helped ME see sports through a different lens. So many amazing relationships have been built throughout the duration of the show! So many amazing opportunities have come from this. The skillsets I've acquired and the people I've met, have helped me in my business ventures, all of which, have helped me see sports differently!  Today you'll hear me reference the Idaho Underground Sports Network. You'll hear about Scarlet and Great. And you'll hear about the different guests that have been on the show (just go back and listen to their episodes.) Make sure you follow me on Instagram and on Twitter as well.  And hey, if you are like me and you want to start something but don't know how to start. Just message me directly! I'm always available to answer any questions you have! Let me know, because I'm here to help!  _______________________________________________ If you are an entrepreneur who wants to learn more about marketing, funnel building, and overall business, then you MUST check out the One Funnel Away Challenge! Don't miss out on an opportunity to learn from some of the best marketers in the business! Go HERE NOW!! 

Behind The Smoke
Digital Restaurants and the Future of Food | Authors Meredith Sandland and Carl Orsbourn | DH119

Behind The Smoke

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 43:48


Delivering the Digital Restaurant teaches how to build a successful digital restaurant business that will survive and thrive into the future. Authors Meredith Sandland (@meresandland) and Carl Orsbourn (@carlorsbourn) were guests on the Digital Hospitality podcast to discuss what they learned while writing their must-read restaurant business book, Delivering the Digital Restaurant Your Roadmap to the Future of Food. ➤ ORDER THE BOOK: https://www.deliveringthedigitalrestaurant.com Three Takeaways From This Podcast Episode: https://youtu.be/Wgqlw9npU28   1. Monthly Services Make Daily Differences – There was a time when only corporate companies could afford access to digital innovations that optimized orders or operations. That time has passed. Regardless of your size or scale, consider implementing software or systems that might come with a monthly fee but will change your business for the better day after day.   2. Your Competition is Your Community – We are all in this together. By having conversations with the restaurants in your community and discussing trends in your industry, you can create a better food landscape for your city or neighborhood as a whole.   3. There's No Such Thing as Throwaway Content – With all the research that went into writing a book, Carl and Meredith still had 90 percent of their conversations scrapped from the final copy that hit Amazon. So, did they just discard it? Of course not! They will continue to share untold stories through their social platforms as should you.   When Carl Orsbourn and Meredith Sandland began writing their book, Delivering the Digital Restaurant: Your Road Map to the Future of Food, they didn't know how they'd finish it, but they knew why they had to. “Our 'why' is really about helping restaurants navigate this digital change,” beams Meredith Sandland on the Digital Hospitality podcast. “We are incredibly passionate about the magnitude of this change and want to see everyone successfully get through it and thrive because they have figured out how to master it.” As alluded, that change is seeing restaurants of every size, shape and scale embrace evolving technology to better serve their customer base and grow their business. For years, both Meredith Sandland and Carl Orsbourn have worked in different ends of the food industry, expanding brands such as Taco Bell and British Petroleum to a new world with new customers. “I was seeing the enormous level of change of better quality food in the gas station environment,” reflects Carl Orsbourn. “There's so much change happening, so many exciting things that really are only at the front of where I think this industry is going.” Meeting at ghost kitchen company Kitchen United, the co-workers turned co-authors were already on the cutting edge of where the food industry was headed in the 2020s. After years of working for big brands and joining forces at a start-up, both could see that change was imminent. However, no one knew just how much 2020 would expedite this dramatic digital shift. “Everything that's happening is really an existential crisis for the restaurant industry,” Meredith Sandland shares. “We started the book back before the pandemic when we thought this would all take three to five years to play out. Of course, the pandemic accelerated all of that and laid bare the digital divide.”   Digital Restaurants: Because of the rapid change the restaurant industry faced due to the Coronavirus pandemic, restaurants either adapted or closed during the tough and evolving times. Even for those businesses that are still standing, it's essential that they learn through their competition and peers to best adjust their strategy and tools for the good of the communities they serve. “It is critical to figure this out together,” notes Meredith. “When I think in particular of our local independent restaurants, the ones that are the fabric of our community that make ...

On Brand with Donny Deutsch
Willie Geist: Delivering the News with Authenticity

On Brand with Donny Deutsch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 64:37


On today's episode, co-anchor of MSNBC's “Morning Joe” and anchor of “Sunday Today”, the nicest guy on TV, Willie Geist. Together they take through Willie's journey from doing musicals as a kid in New Jersey, meeting his future wife at 11 years old, and getting his start as a freelance producer at MSNBC. Willie shares his secret to a long and happy marriage, the power of not keeping "score", and the importance of having humility. Most importantly, Donny gets to the core of Willie's brand of authenticity and being truly decent. But first, Donny shares his weekly update, naming brands like Lego, Madonna, Justin Bieber, Cracker Jack Pepsi, The Sopranos and many others as either branding up or down, in his segment Brands of the Week.    Thank you to our sponsors! Postie - Postie.com/DONNY for a free Postie demo Miro - Miro.com/DONNY to start your free account  Chime - Chime.com/DONNY to get started Four Sigmatic - Foursigmatic.com/DONNY to get up to 40% off + Free Shipping Follow: @donnyjaydeutsch @williegeist See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.