Podcasts about Labour Party

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Best podcasts about Labour Party

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Latest podcast episodes about Labour Party

RNZ: Checkpoint
Helen Clark joins candidate Georgie Dansey in Hamilton West

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 2:48


The Labour Party drew on its star power in Hamilton West today as former Prime Minister Helen Clark joined its candidate on the by-election campaign trail. Georgie Dansey is up against National's Tama Potaka in the race for the western side of the Waikato River - traditionally a bellweather seat. It's shaping up to be National's seat to lose but Helen Clark says her political experience tells her nothing can be taken for granted. Our political reporter Anneke Smith has more.

Listen, Organize, Act! Organizing & Democratic Politics
S2.E7: Bernard Crick on Politics & its Enemies

Listen, Organize, Act! Organizing & Democratic Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 75:03


This episode discusses the work of British philosopher Bernard Crick, with a particular focus on is his seminal essay “In Defence of Politics.” In clear prose and with sharp insight, Crick sets out a definition of politics and an account of why and how politics is essential not simply to survive but to thrive. Community organizers, alongside many others, have turned to Crick's essay again and again to explain the meaning, purpose, and character of democratic politics.I discuss Crick's political philosophy and the essay with Maurice Glasman, a political theorist, Labor peer, and a founding figure of the Blue Labor movement. The concerns of Blue Labour very much echo and resonate with those Crick outlines in his essay. As well as knowing Crick personally, Maurice shares an involvement in Labour Party politics with Crick. Prior to this involvement, Maurice was, for many years, involved in community organizing as part of London Citizens and Citizens UK.Resources for Going DeeperBernard Crick, In Defence of Politics, 5th edn (Continuum, 2005)Bernard Crick, "Civic Republicanism and Citizenship: the Challenge for Today," in Bernard Crick and Andrew Lockyer, Active Citizenship: What Could it Achieve and How?  (Edinburgh University Press, 2010)Maurice Glasman, 'Preface to In Defence of Politics' (2013)All available to download from: https://ormondcenter.com/listen-organize-act-podcast  For more information & relevant updates follow me on Twitter: @WestLondonMan For readings to download relevant to or discussed in an episode visit: https://ormondcenter.com/listen-organize-act-podcast

RNZ: Morning Report
Early voting begins in Hamilton West by-election

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 2:59


Early voting begins today in the Hamilton West by-election. It follows the removal of the former Hamilton West MP Gaurav Sharma from the Labour Party a few months ago. Electoral Commission chief electoral officer Karl Le Quesne spoke to Corin Dann. 

POLITICO's Westminster Insider
A boozy dinner with Labour MP Wes Streeting

POLITICO's Westminster Insider

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 47:28


Host Jack Blanchard sits down with Wes Streeting, the shadow health secretary, to discuss life, politics and the Labour Party over a bottle of red wine at an exclusive Westminster restaurant. Streeting, tipped by many as the next Labour leader, discusses his poverty-stricken childhood, his recent battle with cancer and his vision for the future on the eve of his 40th birthday. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

RNZ: Focus on Politics
Recession prediction leaves Labour with a labour problem

RNZ: Focus on Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 16:01


Dire economic predictions and high interest rates from the Reserve Bank this week have increased the pressure on Labour, and given National a chance to pitch itself as the solution.  The opposition party also ditched its politically problematic plan to cut the top tax rate, after weeks of laying the groundwork. In today's Focus on Politics podcast, RNZ Political Editor Jane Patterson revisits the interest rate shock that spells trouble for an under-pressure Labour Party.

Pluto Press: Radicals in Conversation
RIC in-haus: Is Socialism Possible in Britain?

Pluto Press: Radicals in Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 51:26


Radicals in Conversation in-haus is a new podcast series collaboration between Pluto Press and Bookhaus, an independent bookshop in Bristol. RIC in-haus is recorded on location at Bookhaus. The bookshop's ‘in-haus' events programme features authors of some of the most exciting radical nonfiction being published today. In episode 5, Andrew Murray speaks about his new book, Is Socialism Possible in Britain?: Reflections on the Corbyn Years (Verso, 2022). The book analyses Jeremy Corbyn's tenure as Labour leader and the prospects for parliamentary socialism in a post-Corbyn Britain. A veteran of the Stop the War Coalition, Andrew Murray was seconded to Corbyn's office from the Unite trade union, and he offers here an insider's view of the most radical period in Labour's recent history.  Andrew is in conversation with Darran McLaughlin from Bookhaus. They discuss the difference between the 2017 and 2019 elections, the Labour Party's Brexit woes, and the threat Corbyn posed to the political and economic establishment. In assessing what went right and what went wrong, Andrew also offers his thoughts on what might be done differently next time, if socialism is ever to be possible in Britain. — Buy the book: bookhausbristol.com/shop

RNZ: Morning Report
Winston Peters rules out working with the Labour Party again

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 3:10


We may be still a year out from the next general election, but the MMP rule-in-rule-out game has already begun. New Zealand First leader Winston Peters has launched a broadside at his former coalition partner Labour, leaving the door open for National - but Christopher Luxon is being coy. Here's political reporter Giles Dexter.  

Diary of a Kidney Warrior Podcast
Episode 73: Khalid Mahmood MP's Kidney Warrior Story

Diary of a Kidney Warrior Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 31:27


Labour Party politician serving as the MP for Birmingham Perry Barr, Khalid Mahmood, joins Dee Moore to share his inspirational Kidney Warrior story.   Khalid Mahmood MP shares about: Being diagnosed with Chronic Kidney Disease. Going onto dialysis Receiving a kidney transplant Khalid Mahmood MP shares practical advice and more!   For updates and more, follow Dee Moore on:   Instagram: www.instagram.com/diaryofakidneywarrior  Facebook: www.facebook.com/diaryofakidneywarrior  Twitter: www.twitter.com/diaryofakidneyw  Tik Tok: @diaryofakidneywarrior  Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UChGUfib7lu9eKENlLJ6lafw Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dee-moore-diaryofakidneywarrior     Follow Khalid Mahmood MP Twitter: https://twitter.com/khalid4PB Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/khalidmahmoodmp/ Website: https://www.khalidmahmoodmp.com/   If you were affected by any of the issues raised in this episode     Contact Kidney Care UK    Website: www.kidneycarekuk.org Email: info@kidneycareuk.org Tel: 01420 541 424 Facebook: www.facebook.com/kidneycareuk.org Instagram: @kidneycareuk YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCeqQTdAsEzXphqjHVtcTD-A     To sign up to receive the Kidney Matters Quarterly Magazine Email: info@kidneycareuk.org   Follow NHS Blood & Transplant: Website: www.organdonation.nhs.uk Twitter: NHS Blood & Transplant: @NHSBT               NHS Organ Donation: @NHSOrganDonor Facebook: www.facebook.com/nhsorgandonor Instagram: NHS Organ Donation: @nhsorgandonor YouTube: www.youtube.com/user/nhsorgandonation/channels  

4th Republic
November 21st 2022- Two Anambra men take their rivalry to the national stage

4th Republic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 6:12


Anambra Governor, Charles Soludo reprises his historic rivalry with Labour Party presidential candidate, Peter Obi with a written takedown. The PDP's G5 continue to needle their party's candidate, Atiku Abubakar while flirting with his rivals. Get the breakdown of all this and more. Subscribe to Stomach Infrastructure here Music by lvymusic from Pixabay

Past Imperfect
Keir Starmer

Past Imperfect

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 53:24


Sir Keir Starmer is a politician, who grew up in Surrey and worked as a barrister before becoming an MP. He specialised in human rights law and rose through the ranks to become Director of Public Prosecutions before being awarded a knighthood 2014. His progress into the establishment was completed when he was elected to parliament the following year and in 2020 he became leader of the Labour Party. Now if the polls are to believed Keir Starmer may be prime minister after the next general election. But his childhood was far from easy. Keir talks candidly to Rachel and Alice about growing up in a small pebble dashed house with six humans and four dogs, where money was tight and the phone was cut off. He shares bittersweet memories of early years overshadowed by his mother's degenerative, disabling illness and frequent critical stays in hospital high dependency units. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Novara Media
Downstream: Labour are as Bad as the Tories on Immigration w/ Maya Goodfellow

Novara Media

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 85:25


We're told by the Conservatives and their acolytes in the media that the Labour Party is — and always has been — soft on immigration. Little could be further from the truth. Ash Sarkar meets Dr Maya Goodfellow to talk about New Labour's inhumane immigration policies, the problem with the term ‘economic migrant' and how […]

TyskySour
TyskySour: UK-France Deal

TyskySour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 39:21


Suella Braverman’s headline-grabbing migrant deal is a re-heated version of policies that have already failed. Michael Walker and Ash Sarkar discuss the farcical nature of migration politics in Britain. Plus: Keir Starmer plots to block Jeremy Corbyn from the Labour Party. __________________________________________ Support Novara Media for as little as £1 a month: https://novaramedia.com/support

Novara Media
TyskySour: UK-France Deal

Novara Media

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 39:21


Suella Braverman’s headline-grabbing migrant deal is a re-heated version of policies that have already failed. Michael Walker and Ash Sarkar discuss the farcical nature of migration politics in Britain. Plus: Keir Starmer plots to block Jeremy Corbyn from the Labour Party. __________________________________________ Support Novara Media for as little as £1 a month: https://novaramedia.com/support

RNZ: Checkpoint
Labour plays down latest poll at end of weekend conference

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 3:19


The Labour Party is playing down its sharp drop in support in the latest political poll, saying the result should be taken with a "grain of salt". The Newshub Reid Research poll has Labour sitting around 32 percent, trailling National which is registering just over 40 percent. It's the worst result for Labour since Jacinda Ardern took over as leader in 2017, and would allow National and ACT to govern alone. And it came just hours after the governing party wrapped up an annual conference, making the case for re-election next year. RNZ political editor Jane Patterson has the details.

Talking Infrastructure
Going Green, Going Local: The Power of Local Leadership in Net Zero and Levelling Up

Talking Infrastructure

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 49:03


Our latest episode was recorded live at an AECOM-sponsored panel at the 2022 Labour Party Conference. Convened by leading thinktank Policy Exchange, the expert panel share how local leaders across the UK are building momentum to decarbonise cities and encourage green economic growth through effective public/private partnerships.The line-up comprises Jamie Driscoll, Mayor of the North of Tyne Combined Authority; Paul Ormerod, economist, and Chair of the Atom Valley project; Helena Rivers, Net Zero Lead, Buildings + Places Europe at AECOM; and Ruth Kelly, Senior Fellow at Policy Exchange.

RNZ: Morning Report
Jacinda Ardern on plummeting popularity in latest poll

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 7:37


It's troubling times for the governing Labour Party, with their popularity plummeting in the latest Newshub Reid Research poll. Labour dropped 5.9 points to 32.3% support, well below National on 40.7%. Factor in the minor parties and on these numbers, National and Act would combine for more than 50% of the vote, while Labour and the Greens would have less than 42%. Prime Minister and Labour Party leader, Jacinda Ardern, spoke to Māni Dunlop.

RNZ: Morning Report
Analysis on latest poll results

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 5:39


The Labour Party's popularity has plummeted in the latest Newshub Reid Research poll, with its worst result since Jacinda Ardern became leader in 2017. It's dropped about six points to 32% - National is up slightly, tipping over 40%. Factor in the minor parties and on these numbers, National and Act would combine for more than 50% of the vote, while Labour and the Greens would have less than 42%. Our political editor, Jane Patterson, spoke to Corin Dann.

RNZ: Morning Report
Labour's Hamilton West candidate on her chances in by-election

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 5:01


Georgie Dansey, the Labour Party candidate for Hamilton West doesn't believe the coming by-election will be a referendum on the government's performance as much as a contest won or lost on local issues. "Every electorate is different," she says. Ms Dansey is the chief executive of the Independent Schools Education Association and a small business owner. She spoke to Corin Dann.

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Political commentators Lamia Imam & Brigitte Morten

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 20:50


Lamia and Brigitte join Kathryn to talk about Labour's annual conference this weekend, and the extension to the childcare subsidy. The changes kick in from next April - will it ease the squeeze on households...and the polls? The inflation bogeyman remains, while Labour is gunning for National's taxcut package. Meanwhile National's candidate selection is facing scrutiny. Brigitte Morten is a director with public and commercial law firm Franks & Ogilvie and a former senior ministerial advisor for the previous National-led government. Lamia Imam worked for two years for the Labour Party in the Leader of the Opposition's office under Phil Goff, David Shearer and David Cunliffe. She also worked for the Ministry of Justice, before gaining a Masters in Public Affairs from the University of Texas at Austin. She currently works for a large technology company in Wellington.

The Popular Show

Legend of the old New Left and anti-war movement Tariq Ali joins The Popular Show to discuss Lula's election victory in Brazil, lessons from Afghanistan for Putin and Biden in Ukraine, the anti-Iraq War protest movement, the abject failure of the Western Left to take an autonomous line on the invasion, and why he won't be voting for Keir Starmer's Labour Party. To listen to this episode, become a Patreon supporter and help us build the project: https://www.patreon.com/posts/tps122-extreme-74097719 More ways to help us continue: https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/ https://www.buymeacoffee.com/thepopularshow https://cash.app/£ThePopularShow

Gone By Lunchtime
Labour girds its loins

Gone By Lunchtime

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 37:12


As the Labour Party gathers in Auckland for its annual conference, Annabelle Lee-Mather, Ben Thomas and Toby Manhire assess the impact of the just-passed fair pay agreement legislation, the likely fate of three waters, and the great National repeal agenda, as well as whether National's own tax cut plans will survive to the election. With a byelection in Hamilton West less than a month away, what do the lineups tell us, and who has most to lose? Plus: All the juiciest gossip about precisely when, where and why Jacinda Ardern maybe definitely will resign. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

RNZ: Morning Report
Prime Minister on plans to change alcohol laws

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 7:46


The government plans to make it easier for communities to restrict the sale of alcohol in their area. A new amendment will remove the ability for liquor companies and supermarkets to appeal local alcohol policies. But there's no announcement yet on restricting alcohol marketing and sponsorship. Prime Minister and Labour Party leader Jacinda Ardern spoke to Corin Dann.

The Alexei Sayle Podcast
30: The Perfect Weapon (with Richard Sanders)

The Alexei Sayle Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 71:09 Transcription Available


Many of you watched Al Jazeera's three part series The Labour Files in horror as the inner schemings and corruption of The Labour Party were revealed. Many of you were equally horrified to see that it was getting very little to no coverage in the mainstream media!  Well, in today's podcast we have executive producer of those films and director/writer of the second part - on antisemitism - joining Alexei for a deep dive on how corruption on this scale gets to exist, survive and grow, and what to expect in the future. Stick around until the end of the podcast for a special update on certain aspects of the interview! Send your fan art, thoughts and questions to alexeisaylepodcast@gmail.com Please consider leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts or Spotify (5 stars please!) Become a Patron here to support the show and get access to live episodes of The Alexei Sayle Podcast - patreon.com/AlexeiSaylePodcast. Subscribe to Alexei's YouTube channel here and join him for his Bike Rides. The Alexei Sayle Podcast is produced and edited by Talal Karkouti Music by Tarboosh Records Photograph from the Andy Hollingworth Archive 

RNZ: Morning Report
Phil Goff appointed as NZ High Commissioner to UK

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 5:39


Former Auckland mayor and one-time Labour Party leader Phil Goff has secured top diplomatic appointment overseas. Goff has been appointed as New Zealand's next High Commissioner to the United Kingdom, a role he will take up in January next year. Goff held the foreign affairs, trade and defence portfolios during his 32 years with the Labour Party. He spoke to Corin Dann.  

Pod Save the World
The newest new British PM, with David Lammy

Pod Save the World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 81:43 Very Popular


Tommy and Ben cover the wild week in British politics, the push for diplomacy in Ukraine from progressive Democrats, why former Chinese President Hu Jintao was dragged off stage at China's party conference meeting, the US-Saudi relationship, former Israeli PM Bibi Netanyahu's right-wing comeback bid, Brazil's upcoming election and more. Then Ben is joined by British Labour MP David Lammy to talk about new British PM Rishi Sunak and the future of the Labour Party.

Accidental Gods
Compass: Charting a Progressive Route through the Political Maelstrom with Neal Lawson

Accidental Gods

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 51:53


Neal Lawson was brought up in an activist household and joined the Labour party at sixteen.  After university, he worked for the Transport and General Workers' Union and then was a speech writer for Gordon Brown during the New Labour years.  He has been helping to lead the political campaign group, Compass, since its formation in 2003. He is more focused than ever on how to make big transformative change happen. He works on strategy, relationships, funding and fronting Compass. He writes for The Guardian,[9] the New Statesman[10] and OpenDemocracy[11] about equality, democracy and the future of the left, and appears on TV and radio as a political commentator. He was the author of All Consuming (Penguin, 2009), which analysed the social cost of consumerism. Lawson's writing has been heavily influenced by the late Polish Marxist sociologist Zygmunt Bauman who described him as  “one of the most insightful and inventive minds on the British political stage”.Compass itself is a home for those who want to build and be a part of a Good Society; one where equality, sustainability and democracy are not mere aspirations, but a living reality. We are founded on the belief that no single issue, organisation or political party can make a Good Society a reality by themselves so we have to work together to make it happen. Compass is a place where people come together to create the visions, alliances and actions to be the change we wish to see in the world.In this episode, we explore the recent history of politics in the UK and then open more deeply into the routes by which our manifestly broken political system could be transformed into something that will - in Neal's words - transform the brief flaring fireworks of hope into floodlights that can transform our nation, and the world.  Compass https://www.compassonline.org.uk/campaigns/winasone/Compass 45 Degrees paper https://www.compassonline.org.uk/publications/45o-change-transforming-society-from-below-and-above/What is Quadratic Voting? https://towardsdatascience.com/what-is-quadratic-voting-4f81805d5a06It's Bloody Complicated podcast https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/its-bloody-complicated-a-compass-podcast/id1502390267Book: Four Thousand Weeks https://uk.bookshop.org/books/four-thousand-weeks-the-smash-hit-sunday-times-bestseller-that-will-change-your-life-9781784704001/9781784704001

The Irish Tech News Podcast
The new EU Common Charger Law with Maltese MEP Alex Agius Saliba

The Irish Tech News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 18:16


Earlier this month the EU passed a new law on common chargers that comes into effect by the end of 2024, requiring all mobile phones, tablets and cameras sold in the EU to be equipped with a USB Type-C charging port. From spring 2026, the obligation will extend to laptops. The new law, is part of a broader EU effort to reduce e-waste and to empower consumers to make more sustainable choices. Under the new rules, consumers will no longer need a different charger every time they purchase a new device, as they will be able to use one single charger for a whole range of small and medium-sized portable electronic devices. Regardless of their manufacturer, all new mobile phones, tablets, digital cameras, headphones and headsets, handheld videogame consoles and portable speakers, e-readers, keyboards, mice, portable navigation systems, earbuds and laptops that are rechargeable via a wired cable, operating with a power delivery of up to 100 Watts, will have to be equipped with a USB Type-C port. Alex Agius Saliba, the Maltese EU lawmaker who steered the common charger bill through the EU assembly talks to Ronan about this new law and why it was badly needed. More about Alex Agius Saliba: Alex is a Maltese politician who was elected as a Member of the European Parliament in 2019 on behalf of the Labour Party. Alex has been serving on the Committee on the Internal Market and Consumer Protection, the Committee on Petitions as Coordinator and the Committee on Employment and Social Affairs.

Amanpour
Can new UK PM Rishi Sunak right the ship?

Amanpour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 55:03


After a tumultuous several weeks, Britain has a new prime minister and possibly some stability. The former chancellor Rishi Sunak takes over after the implosion of Liz Truss, who in turn took over after Boris Johnson had to resign. Sunak will be the first person of color in the post, and at 42, the youngest in two centuries. To discuss the challenges ahead, Christiane speaks with editor of The Spectator magazine Fraser Nelson, and Ayesha Hazarika, a former Labour Party adviser.  Also on today's show: Clea Newman Soderlund, daughter of Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward, talks about her father's posthumous memoir Paul Newman: The Extraordinary Life of an Ordinary Man; MacArthur Fellowship winner Reuben J. Miller; Edward Enninful, Editor-in-Chief at British Vogue.To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

Jacobin Radio
Behind the News: Saudi Oil w/ Annelle Sheline

Jacobin Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 53:01


Annelle Sheline of the Quincy Institute explains why Saudi Arabia cut its oil production dramatically. James Meadway, former adviser to Jeremy Corbyn's Labour Party and now director of the Progressive Economy Forum, analyzes why Britain is in economic and political crisis.Behind the News, hosted by Doug Henwood, covers the worlds of economics and politics and their complex interactions, from the local to the global. Find the archive here: https://www.leftbusinessobserver.com/Radio.html Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Power Hungry Podcast
Benny Peiser: Director of Net Zero Watch

The Power Hungry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 39:12


Benny Peiser is the director of Net Zero Watch, a London-based public charity that focuses on the “implications of expensive and poorly considered climate change policies.” In his second appearance on the podcast, (his first was on March 8, 2022) Peiser talks about Liz Truss's resignation last week, why both Tory and Labour Party politicians are to blame for Britain's energy crisis, why Britain must immediately begin drilling and fracking for natural gas, how soaring energy costs could lead to a financial crisis, and why three decades after Margaret Thatcher resigned, Britain is going “back to energy socialism.” (Recorded October 22, 2022).

The Real Story
What caused the turmoil in British politics?

The Real Story

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 49:11 Very Popular


After the resignation of Liz Truss the UK will soon have its third prime minister this year. Britain has long been considered a politically stable nation. So has something changed? The governing Conservative Party is divided on many issues, including the country's future direction post-Brexit. The opposition Labour Party has also struggled to accommodate different views on economic and social policy. Meanwhile the two-party system is being challenged by shifting demographics, a rural-urban divide and strengthening support for Scottish nationalists. So what lies at the heart of the turmoil in the British political system and where does it go from here? Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of expert guests. Professor Tim Bale - Professor of Politics at Queen Mary University of London and author of the upcoming book The Conservative Party After Brexit: Turmoil and Transformation. Polly Toynbee - Guardian columnist and co-author of The Lost Decade: 2010–2020, and What Lies Ahead for Britain. Sir John Curtice - Professor of Politics at the University of Strathclyde and a leading expert on public opinion. Also featuring: David Blunkett (Lord Blunkett) - Former UK Home Secretary in Tony Blair's Labour government. Producers: Paul Schuster and Ellen Otzen.

RSA Events
Building a politics of the common good

RSA Events

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 62:50


Rejecting both New Labour's embrace of free markets and the statism of Corbynism, Blue Labour thinking sought to reconnect Labour with its working-class base, and to bring assets, power and dignity back to local communities. As workers' rights and futures - and the future of the places they live - take centre-stage in politics once more, Blue Labour's founder, political scientist Maurice Glasman, is joined by Shadow Levelling-Up Secretary Lisa Nandy MP to explore what left-conservatism has to offer the Labour Party, and the country, in the post-Brexit, post-Covid era.#RSAcommongoodBecome an RSA Events sponsor: https://utm.guru/udI9xDonate to The RSA: https://utm.guru/udNNBFollow RSA Events on Instagram: https://instagram.com/rsa_events/Follow the RSA on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RSAEventsLike RSA Events on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rsaeventsofficialListen to RSA Events podcasts: https://bit.ly/35EyQYU 

RNZ: Checkpoint
Sharma saga: Hamilton West by-election set for Dec 10

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 1:42


The Hamilton West by election will be held on Saturday 10 December. The by election has been triggered by the resignation of Independent MP Gaurav Sharma, who was kicked out of the Labour Party caucus, and today has been expelled from the party. Labour leader and Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern says she wishes it wasn't happening. [embed] https://players.brightcove.net/6093072280001/default_default/index.html?videoId=6314037293112

The Toby Gribben Show
Lord Neil Kinnock

The Toby Gribben Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 30:26


Neil Kinnock, Baron Kinnock PC is a British former politician. As a member of the Labour Party, he served as a Member of Parliament from 1970 until 1995, first for Bedwellty and then for Islwyn. He was the Leader of the Labour Party and Leader of the Opposition from 1983 until 1992, and Vice-President of the European Commission from 1999 to 2004. Kinnock was considered as being on the soft left of the Labour Party.Born and raised in South Wales, Kinnock was first elected to the House of Commons in the 1970 general election. He became the Labour Party's shadow education minister after the Conservatives won power in the 1979 general election. After the party under Michael Foot suffered a landslide defeat to Margaret Thatcher in the 1983 election, Kinnock was elected Leader of the Labour Party and Leader of the Opposition. During his tenure as leader, Kinnock proceeded to fight the party's left wing, especially its Militant tendency, and he opposed NUM leader Arthur Scargill's methods in the 1984–85 miners' strike. He led the party during most of the Thatcher administration, which included its third successive election defeat when Thatcher won the 1987 general election. Although Thatcher had won another landslide, Labour regained sufficient seats for Kinnock to remain Leader of the Opposition following the election.Kinnock led the Labour Party to a surprise fourth consecutive defeat at the 1992 general election, despite the party being ahead of John Major's Conservative government in most opinion polls, which had predicted either a narrow Labour victory or a hung parliament. Shortly afterwards, he resigned as Leader of the Labour Party, being succeeded in the ensuing leadership election by John Smith. He left the House of Commons in 1995 to become a European Commissioner. He went on to become the Vice-President of the European Commission under Romano Prodi from 1999–2004, before being elevated to the House of Lords as Baron Kinnock in 2005. Until the summer of 2009, he was also Chairman of the British Council and President of Cardiff University. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

RNZ: Checkpoint
Ex-Labour MP Sharma quite Parliament, forces by-election

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 3:50


Independent MP Gaurav Sharma has resigned from Parliament, forcing a by-election in Hamilton West. The former Labour MP says he intends to stand in the by-election as an independent candidate. Labour Leader Jacinda Ardern is describing the move as "unnecessary and wasteful". RNZ political reporter, Katie Scotcher, has the details.  

The Bunker
New era? The political vibe shift is here

The Bunker

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 26:16


It feels like something is changing in the country – but is a real shift occurring? A vibe shift, if you will... Poll fiend and senior data journalist at the New Statesman Ben Walker talks to Ros Taylor about whether the political mood of the UK has fundamentally changed, with Brexit, culture wars, climate change and COVID.  “If the Labour Party used Take Back Control, it would do well as a slogan.” “Younger Brits are more inclined towards personal, not national, identities. But it's the same thing – belonging.”  “Anxiety over the environment is just as high in the Red Wall as in the inner city, but the way you go around solving it is different.”  “A lot of voters feel strained by the old rules. COVID showed things can change.”  www.patreon.com/bunkercast  Written and presented by Ros Taylor. Lead Producer: Jacob Jarvis. Producers: Jacob Archbold and Jelena Sofronijevic. Assistant producer: Kasia Tomasiewicz. Audio production by Alex Rees. Music: Kenny Dickinson. Group editor: Andrew Harrison. THE BUNKER is a Podmasters Production.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

4th Republic
October 17th 2022: The Unifier fosters Disunity

4th Republic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 5:49


Last week, the presidential candidate of the People's Democratic Party (PDP) Atiku Abubakar came under fire for a speech in which he appeared to argue that the north does not need an Igbo or Yoruba president, but rather "someone from the north." After some delay, the Labour Party and its Presidential candidate Peter Obi and Vice President Yusuf Datti-Ahmed have inaugurated their presidential campaign council, which is led by Mohammed Zarewa as Chairman and Doyin Okupe as Director-General. After returning to the country, the APC's Bola Tinubu has made his presence felt through a series of speeches and gaffes. In the debut episode of our weekly briefing, we recap the last week in the Nigerian political sphere. Subscribe to Stomach Infrastructure here

RNZ: Morning Report
Ardern responds to Winston Peters' attacks on Labour government

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 7:20


Jacinda Ardern's former deputy Prime Minister, Winston Peters, has unleashed a withering attack on the Labour Government in his closing address at the New Zealand First annual conference. Peters said the Labour Party was pursuing "woke, virtue signalling madness", and a "separatist agenda". He went on to say the government was scattering the "seeds of apartheid" through New Zealand's laws and institutions. This after Peters' played Queen-maker in 2017, signing a coalition agreement with the Labour Party and forming a Government. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern spoke to Corin Dann.

Unauthorized Disclosure
Asa Winstanley On "Labour Files" And What Unprecedented Leak Revealed

Unauthorized Disclosure

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 59:59


Asa Winstanley, associate editor for Electronic Intifada and co-host of the website's podcast, appeared on "Unauthorized Disclosure" to discuss The Labour Files, a bombshell documentary series from Al Jazeera English based on an unprecedented leak of files from within the UK's Labour Party. Rania Khalek and Kevin Gosztola pay particular attention to the second part of the series that delves into the manner in which Labour Party officials manufactured an "antisemitism crisis" and weaponized the issue to purge the party of left-leaning members, including Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn and Jewish members who oppose Israeli apartheid against Palestinians. The documentary series that outlines clear corruption has been virtually ignored by the British establishment media. The Labour Party is hoping the series just fades away. By highlighting a few clips and highlighting some of the damning revelations in the Labour Files, we are doing what little we can do to challenge the media blackout. For more from Asa, subscribe to his newsletter.

Planet Normal
Caught in the doom loop

Planet Normal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 47:33


Another week, another dose of economic woe to digest on the rocket. Honorary Planet Normal citizen Nick Timothy is back to give his take on what the Labour Party have dubbed ‘the crisis made in Downing Street'.Nick thinks the Government rushed into their budget, and that the Truss camp have been slow to switch gears from campaigning to governing. Liam thinks the Chancellor and PM might be stuck in a 'doom loop,' in part thanks to the political tactlessness of their mini-Budget.Also strapping into the rocket of right thinking is former Chancellor Lord Norman Lamont, who warns economic growth cannot be achieved without stability and urges the Government to 'reset' to show it is serious about fiscal discipline. Lord Lamont also calls for changes to the Tory leadership rules, and says ousting Truss now would be ‘farcical'.And one listener shares their review of co-pilot Halligan's grooming tips…We'd like to ask you a few questions about the ads in this podcast. Please click here to take a quick survey.Read more from Liam: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/authors/liam-halligan/ |Read more from Nick: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/authors/n/nf-nj/nick-timothy/ |Book tickets for for Planet Normal live event: https://extra.telegraph.co.uk/events/live-planet-normal-event-oct/Listen to Chopper's Politics: https://www.playpodca.st/chopper |Need help subscribing or reviewing? Learn more about podcasts here: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/radio/podcasts/podcast-can-find-best-ones-listen/ |Email: planetnormal@telegraph.co.uk |For 30 days' free access to The Telegraph: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/normal | See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

New Books in Political Science
Gregory Conti, "Parliament the Mirror of the Nation: Representation, Deliberation, and Democracy in Victorian Britain" (Cambridge UP, 2019)

New Books in Political Science

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 61:38


Given that we live in an era roiled by concerns about how democratic supposedly democratic countries actually are and when skepticism abounds about how truly representative our electoral systems are, a scholarly study of debates on many of these issues among leading theorists of democracy in Victorian Britain is just the ticket. That is what is on offer in Gregory Conti's book Parliament the Mirror of the Nation: Representation, Deliberation, and Democracy in Victorian Britain (Cambridge UP, 2019). Conti employs the tools of the fields of political theory and political and intellectual history to render vivid and touching the fierce debates among such well-known figures as John Stuart Mill and Walter Bagehot, as well as “in-between” figures such as Thomas Hare (1806–1891). Fierce in terms of the sometimes cruel lampooning of their respective opponents and touching in that many of the proponents of these proposed reforms (e.g., proportional representation and the single transferable vote) were convinced that their nostrums would usher in a golden age for Britain's parliament and, thereby, the nation. Note, though, that for many of the figures in this book it was the proper workings of Parliament and its capacity for reasoned deliberation that they cared about, not so much democratic processes per se in terms of how representatives got elected to it. Indeed, much of what was advocated was designed to keep certain groups out of Parliament and government generally. For many of the thinkers discussed in this book, Parliament in its member makeup should mirror the composition of the nation at large. This was particularly true of adherents of the variety-of-suffrages theory who pined for the hodgepodge of electoral constituencies (especially those in the countryside that were controlled by aristocrats and which were derisively referred to as “rotten boroughs” or “pocket boroughs”) that prevailed before passage of the Reform Act of 1832. Bagehot was of this school. Others, like Mill and Hare, were enamored of the rather complex system of proportional representation, believing that it would militate against what they saw as the evil of too much power devolving to political parties, which they feared would be dominated by intellectually inferior plebians. The word “swamped” was often used. Finally, there were straight-up democrats such as the future leader of the Labour Party and future prime minister, Ramsay MacDonald, who opposed proportional representation as fundamentally elitist and a hindrance to robust debate and effective government. Conti's book is a fascinating exploration of a relatively neglected period in the history of discourse on what democracies need to thrive, who should be allowed to vote, how voting should be done and whether votes mattered so much as seats in Parliament. There were even arguments that if some people did not get to vote but their interests were represented, that was good enough. Let's hear from Professor Conti himself about this lively period of democracy talk. Hope J. Leman is a grants researcher. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science

New Books in History
Gregory Conti, "Parliament the Mirror of the Nation: Representation, Deliberation, and Democracy in Victorian Britain" (Cambridge UP, 2019)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 61:38


Given that we live in an era roiled by concerns about how democratic supposedly democratic countries actually are and when skepticism abounds about how truly representative our electoral systems are, a scholarly study of debates on many of these issues among leading theorists of democracy in Victorian Britain is just the ticket. That is what is on offer in Gregory Conti's book Parliament the Mirror of the Nation: Representation, Deliberation, and Democracy in Victorian Britain (Cambridge UP, 2019). Conti employs the tools of the fields of political theory and political and intellectual history to render vivid and touching the fierce debates among such well-known figures as John Stuart Mill and Walter Bagehot, as well as “in-between” figures such as Thomas Hare (1806–1891). Fierce in terms of the sometimes cruel lampooning of their respective opponents and touching in that many of the proponents of these proposed reforms (e.g., proportional representation and the single transferable vote) were convinced that their nostrums would usher in a golden age for Britain's parliament and, thereby, the nation. Note, though, that for many of the figures in this book it was the proper workings of Parliament and its capacity for reasoned deliberation that they cared about, not so much democratic processes per se in terms of how representatives got elected to it. Indeed, much of what was advocated was designed to keep certain groups out of Parliament and government generally. For many of the thinkers discussed in this book, Parliament in its member makeup should mirror the composition of the nation at large. This was particularly true of adherents of the variety-of-suffrages theory who pined for the hodgepodge of electoral constituencies (especially those in the countryside that were controlled by aristocrats and which were derisively referred to as “rotten boroughs” or “pocket boroughs”) that prevailed before passage of the Reform Act of 1832. Bagehot was of this school. Others, like Mill and Hare, were enamored of the rather complex system of proportional representation, believing that it would militate against what they saw as the evil of too much power devolving to political parties, which they feared would be dominated by intellectually inferior plebians. The word “swamped” was often used. Finally, there were straight-up democrats such as the future leader of the Labour Party and future prime minister, Ramsay MacDonald, who opposed proportional representation as fundamentally elitist and a hindrance to robust debate and effective government. Conti's book is a fascinating exploration of a relatively neglected period in the history of discourse on what democracies need to thrive, who should be allowed to vote, how voting should be done and whether votes mattered so much as seats in Parliament. There were even arguments that if some people did not get to vote but their interests were represented, that was good enough. Let's hear from Professor Conti himself about this lively period of democracy talk. Hope J. Leman is a grants researcher. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
Gregory Conti, "Parliament the Mirror of the Nation: Representation, Deliberation, and Democracy in Victorian Britain" (Cambridge UP, 2019)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 61:38


Given that we live in an era roiled by concerns about how democratic supposedly democratic countries actually are and when skepticism abounds about how truly representative our electoral systems are, a scholarly study of debates on many of these issues among leading theorists of democracy in Victorian Britain is just the ticket. That is what is on offer in Gregory Conti's book Parliament the Mirror of the Nation: Representation, Deliberation, and Democracy in Victorian Britain (Cambridge UP, 2019). Conti employs the tools of the fields of political theory and political and intellectual history to render vivid and touching the fierce debates among such well-known figures as John Stuart Mill and Walter Bagehot, as well as “in-between” figures such as Thomas Hare (1806–1891). Fierce in terms of the sometimes cruel lampooning of their respective opponents and touching in that many of the proponents of these proposed reforms (e.g., proportional representation and the single transferable vote) were convinced that their nostrums would usher in a golden age for Britain's parliament and, thereby, the nation. Note, though, that for many of the figures in this book it was the proper workings of Parliament and its capacity for reasoned deliberation that they cared about, not so much democratic processes per se in terms of how representatives got elected to it. Indeed, much of what was advocated was designed to keep certain groups out of Parliament and government generally. For many of the thinkers discussed in this book, Parliament in its member makeup should mirror the composition of the nation at large. This was particularly true of adherents of the variety-of-suffrages theory who pined for the hodgepodge of electoral constituencies (especially those in the countryside that were controlled by aristocrats and which were derisively referred to as “rotten boroughs” or “pocket boroughs”) that prevailed before passage of the Reform Act of 1832. Bagehot was of this school. Others, like Mill and Hare, were enamored of the rather complex system of proportional representation, believing that it would militate against what they saw as the evil of too much power devolving to political parties, which they feared would be dominated by intellectually inferior plebians. The word “swamped” was often used. Finally, there were straight-up democrats such as the future leader of the Labour Party and future prime minister, Ramsay MacDonald, who opposed proportional representation as fundamentally elitist and a hindrance to robust debate and effective government. Conti's book is a fascinating exploration of a relatively neglected period in the history of discourse on what democracies need to thrive, who should be allowed to vote, how voting should be done and whether votes mattered so much as seats in Parliament. There were even arguments that if some people did not get to vote but their interests were represented, that was good enough. Let's hear from Professor Conti himself about this lively period of democracy talk. Hope J. Leman is a grants researcher. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Blood Origins
Episode 283 - Responding To A Radio Interview On South Australia Bowhunting

Blood Origins

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 36:29


This is not your traditional podcast. Recently, we were sent an interview by Dr. Susan Close, the new Deputy Premier and Minister of Climate, Environment and Water (among other titles) of Australia's newly elected government controlled by the ‘Labour Party'. In the interview, Dr. Close asserts her campaign promise to ‘end bowhunting in South Australia', and Robbie responds. See more from Blood Origins: https://bit.ly/BloodOrigins_Subscribe Music: Migration by Ian Post (Winter Solstice), licensed through artlist.io Podcast is brought to you by: Bushnell: https://www.bushnell.com  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Political Party
Show 289 - *Mick Lynch Live*

The Political Party

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 95:42


One of the most prominent public figures of the year demonstrates why he has captured the imagination of the country. Mick Lynch has connected with people in a way that few union bosses ever will, with his dry sense of humour and direct style. He gives a fascinating insight into RMT negotiations with various transport companies, and tells us what happened off camera during some of his most notorious TV exchanges. He also reveals what his most conservative opinion is and why he'd never have a combover. It's gripping from the first minute and Mick even manages to make a discussion about the benefits of non-affiliation to the Labour Party sound entertaining. Open a can of beer, make yourself some sandwiches and enjoy the funniest conversation about trade unions you'll ever hear. See Matt's completely rewritten stand-up show Clowns To The Left Of Me, Jokers to the Right on the following dates: Tues 18 Oct - Leicester Square TheatreFri 21 Oct - Bloomsbury TheatreFri 28 Oct - Bloomsbury Theatre Tickets: https://www.mattforde.com/2022tour Buy tickets to The Political Party, live at The Duchess Theatre here: https://nimaxtheatres.com/shows/the-political-party-with-matt-forde/Forthcoming guests include:17 Oct: Grant Shapps7 Nov: David Dimbleby14 Nov: Matt Hancock5 Dec: Rachel Reeves Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Pro Politics with Zac McCrary
What the Hell is Going on in UK Politics? (with British Pollster Keiran Pedley)

Pro Politics with Zac McCrary

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 54:55


Keiran Pedley is a veteran pollster, the Director of Politics for Ipsos/UK, and a regular presence in UK media offering analysis on the latest political data and developments. In this conversation, we set the table as to how the UK system is both similar and different than the US, cover the last few Brexit-fueled chaotic years in British politics, the current state of the Labour opposition, and turn to the rise of new Prime Minister Liz Truss and her tumultous first few weeks in office and implications for UK politics moving forward. Whether you're a novice or expert about British politics, you'll enjoy this conversation with Keiran.IN THIS EPISODE...Keiran gives a primer on the UK political system...Keiran talks political realignment across the UK over the past few years...The importance of the "red wall" in British politics...Keiran talks about the greater gender and racial diversity in the Conservative leadership than in the Labour Party...Keiran on the role Brexit has played on roiling UK politics for years...Keiran talks recent polling on views toward Brexit...Keiran on the downfalls of three consecutive Conservative Prime Ministers David Cameron, Theresa May, and Boris Johnson...Keiran talks the struggles among the Labour opposition over the same period...Keiran's analysis of current Labour leader Keir Starmer...Keiran on the ascent of new Conservative Prime Minsister Liz Truss...Keiran talks the recent economic upheaval in the UK financial system that has led to a rough start for Truss...Keiran's very early thoughts on the next British General Election...Keiran on the state of polling in UK politics...AND anti-Semitism, austerity, the BBC, bang-on polling, the Bank of England, Tony Blair, Britain Elects, Gordon Brown, by-elections, Winston Churchill, the central office, clarifying moments, Susan Collins, Jeremy Corbyn, devolution, the EU, economic competence, electoral quirks, Euro-skeptics, eye-watering figures, Nigel Farage, Fox News, freedom of movement, green benches, honeymoon periods, the House of Lords, Israel, Kwasi Karteng, Lib Dems, Liverpool, long-running sagas, Manchester, manifestos, Ed Miliband, New Jersey wives, Barack Obama, political disasters, Reaganomics, the SNP,  Bernie Sanders, short-lisitng, Matt Singh, stitch ups, Rishi Sunak, taking on Brussels, Jon Tester, Margaret Thatcher, trade unions, Donald Trump, UKIP, vociferous campaigning & more!

The Anfield Wrap
'Hillsborough Law Now' Meeting In Liverpool: Free Special

The Anfield Wrap

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 87:52


Coverage of the Hillsborough Law Now meeting from Nova Scotia in Liverpool City Centre, featuring some of The Labour Party's leading figures. Neil Atkinson was there on behalf of The Anfield Wrap...

Dan Snow's History Hit
What Could Labour Learn From Harold Wilson?

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 23:43 Very Popular


In the week of the Labour Party when polls indicate that the party is likely to form the next government, it seems an opportune moment to examine what lessons they might be able to draw from their own history. But why Harold Wilson?Harold Wilson won four general elections. More than Clement Atlee or Tony Blair. Wilson was a wily, strategic political operator who made some radical changes to the UK including the decriminalisation of homosexuality, legalising abortion, abolishment of the death penalty and confirming the UK's membership of the European Economic Community. He led the country through a number of crises that would be very familiar to us today including industrial action an energy crisis and the pound sterling being under threat. He was also, allegedly, the Queen's favourite Prime Minister.To discuss Wilson's life and leadership Dan is joined by Nick Thomas-Symonds. Nick is a Labour MP and Shadow Secretary of State for International Trade. He is also a writer, barrister and politician and has recently published a biography of Harold Wilson.This episode was produced by Mariana Des Forges, the audio editor was Dougal Patmore.If you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe to History Hit today!To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store.Complete the survey and you'll be entered into a prize draw to win 5 Historical Non-Fiction Books- including a signed copy of Dan Snow's 'On This Day in History'. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.