Podcasts about Nigerians

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Nigerian people

  • 4,710PODCASTS
  • 11,034EPISODES
  • 36mAVG DURATION
  • 4DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jun 24, 2022LATEST
Nigerians

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Best podcasts about Nigerians

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Latest podcast episodes about Nigerians

TrueLife
Let's Unionise the Nigerian Scammers

TrueLife

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 20:24


https://linktr.ee/TrueLifepodcasthttps://twitter.com/ev_rathttps://instagram.com/hushpuppi?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y=https://www.bloomberg.com/features/2021-hushpuppi-gucci-influencer/?cmpid=BBD063021_OUS&utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter&utm_term=210630&utm_campaign=openamericas

The Talk Shop with Bernie and Chimdi
Human trafficking and house music

The Talk Shop with Bernie and Chimdi

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 53:31


Nigerian politician Ike Ekweremmadu and his wife were recently arrested on human trafficking and organ harvesting charges. We dive into the story and give you our thoughts. Drake and Beyonce dropped some oontz oontz music and we had to do a review. This is an episode you don't want to miss.  Listen on Spotify and subscribe to The Talk Shop with Bernie and Chimdi https://open.spotify.com/show/3semoMzSOOchRhEIF8qMhv Listen on Apple Podcasts and subscribe to the The Talk Shop with Bernie and Chimdi https://podcasts.apple.com/ca/podcast/the-talk-shop-with-bernie-and-chimdi/id1502520667 Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/thetalkshoppod?s=21 Follow us on IG: https://instagram.com/thetalkshoppod?igshid=fw24gl4x9stv Subscribe on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFjF_vLpng1UcNMo0kqouAQ

Noire Histoir
Welcome to Lagos [Book Review]

Noire Histoir

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 28:05


A review of “Welcome to Lagos” by Chibundu Onuzo, the story of five people from different parts of Nigerian society who flee the Niger Delta in hopes of better lives in Lagos.   Show notes are available at http://noirehistoir.com/blog/welcome-to-lagos-book-review.

Heavily Flawed Individual
Nigerian Organ Harvesting and The SCOTUS' Concealed Carry New York Decision

Heavily Flawed Individual

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 69:41


social commentary --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/supasly75/support

Rhapsody in Black
Composer Fela Sowande is considered the father of Nigerian art music

Rhapsody in Black

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 5:00


Composer Fela Sowande was introduced to classical and church music from an early age. While he was successful as a musician, he moved to London in 1934 to study civil engineering. Ultimately, his love of music won. Find out more in the latest episode of the 'Rhapsody in Black' podcast.

FriendsLikeUs
Representation in Social Media and Disney Matter

FriendsLikeUs

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 92:33


Godfrey, Loren Lott, and Jenny Saldana visit Friends Like Us and discuss social media, Monique, and black representation in Disney Spaces with host Marina Franklin!   GODFREY is one of the hottest comedians on the circuit. Growing up in Chicago, he constantly got in trouble for misbehaving and being an all-around class clown. Godfrey's Nigerian parents unknowingly encouraged his bad behavior by showing him classic comedy films from an early age. While performing impressions of his college football teammates, Godfrey realized his irreverent style of comedy might be more than just a hobby.. As one of the most dominant forces in the comedy circuit, Godfrey has been seen on stages from New York and Los Angeles to Dubai. Along with his own one-hour special on Comedy Central, Season 2 of Netflix's Tiffany Hadish Presents: They Ready. Godfrey starred recently in HBO Max “That Damn Michaels Che show, the FX pilot "Bronx Warrants," adding to his onscreen credits which include ZOOLANDER, "30 Rock," and a recurring role on "Louie." Godfrey also stars alongside Shaquille O'Neal on the TruTV series, "Upload," which is now going into its second season. SeasAs of Season 16, he is currently one of the recurring cast members of the improv comedy show Wild 'N Out on VH1 and HBO MAX's That Damn Michael Che. Loren Lott is a California girl from San Diego.  At a young age Loren's family knew she would entertain because she would line up stuffed animals, toys and her twin brother, at the bottom of her tree house and give grand performances.  Loren dreamed of entertaining, but her mother, Sharian Lott, told her at age 7 she wouldn't be able to go to Knott's Berry Farm if she were famous so Loren decided to pursue other things, but Sharian did tell Loren that at 13 she could ask her again. To Sharian's surprise when Loren turned 13 the only gift she wanted was a subscription to backstage.com so she could start submitting herself for auditions and Sharian accepted.  After sending hundreds of bold messages to agents Loren finally got one in Hollywood along with a manager a month later. After pursuing her dreams in California for several years, Loren moved to Atlanta where she received a BA in Mass Media Arts with a concentration in radio/tv/film from Clark Atlanta University.  Loren continued acting while in Atlanta appearing live in SHREK THE MUSICAL at the Alliance Theatre and on several Television shows including GREENLEAF, THE GAME, TALES, FATAL ATTRACTION, POWERS, a feature film called TAG, and several independent projects.  While in Atlanta Loren also got cast for season 14 of American idol where she made it to Top 16! After American Idol Loren started her higher theatre career, landing the role of Gladys Night in MOTOWN: THE MUSICAL understudying Diana Ross, in the National tour as well as the Broadway company in New York.  After taking a year off Broadway, Loren returned when she booked the job of a swing in ONCE ON THIS ISLAND.  Loren then appeared live as CeCe Winans in BORN FOR THIS the Musical in Boston making her leading lady debut before returning to ONCE ON THIS ISLAND two months later, to take over the lead role of Timoune for a few months.. Aside from professional acting Loren enjoys making internet content and has managed to create and collaborate several videos that have racked up millions of views across her social media platforms.  Loren considers herself very blessed to be continuously working and gaining support.  She adores her family and is grateful for all of the sacrifices they have made for her dreams.  Loren's ultimate goal is to be a Disney Princess and leave a legacy of inspiring the next generation, as well as to become a Superhero. Loren's dream is to inspire people to live broader than our contained versions of happiness, and Love God and love their neighbor as they love themselves. Jenny Saldana is a writer, actress, and stand-up comedian and a Breast Cancer Rock STAR and all around hotness. She wrote, produced and starred in Happy Cancer Chick, a web series inspired by her own battle with breast cancer. She recently appeared in HBO's High Maintenance. Her video series, The Little Brown Girl Show can be found on Youtube and Facebook Live. Always hosted by Marina Franklin - One Hour Comedy Special: Single Black Female ( Amazon Prime, CW Network), TBS's The Last O.G, Last Week Tonight with John Oliver, Hysterical on FX, The Movie Trainwreck, Louie Season V, The Jim Gaffigan Show, Conan O'Brien, Stephen Colbert, HBO's Crashing, and The Breaks with Michelle Wolf

Menisms
Menisms SE01Ep20 - Trauma

Menisms

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 38:18


We've all had one traumatic experience at one point in our lives. Those experiences have stuck with us for so long and for some maybe even for life. The truth is, trauma hits us in different ways and it's even possible you've had a traumatic experience that's shaping how you react to certain things without you even knowing it. It could be as simple as not being able to jump over a gutter like Olumurwa or an unexplainable fear of sharp objects or fire. What about high school trauma? The bullying and all the drama associated with that stage of life. Or is it the trauma of being a Nigerian or living in Lagos? Our hosts tell it all in this episode and you definitely don't want to miss it. Don't forget to follow us across all our social media platforms @menismspod and @madeauxhq

New Books Network
Moses E. Ochonu, "Emirs in London: Subalteran Travel and Nigeria's Modernity" (Indiana UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 93:08


Emirs in London: Subalteran Travel and Nigeria's Modernity (Indiana UP, 2022) recounts how Northern Nigerian Muslim aristocrats who traveled to Britain between 1920 and Nigerian independence in 1960 relayed that experience to the Northern Nigerian people. Moses E. Ochonu shows how rather than simply serving as puppets and mouthpieces of the British Empire, these aristocrats leveraged their travel to the heart of the empire to reinforce their positions as imperial cultural brokers, and to translate and domesticate imperial modernity in a predominantly Muslim society. Emirs in London explores how, through their experiences visiting the heart of the British Empire, Northern Nigerian aristocrats were enabled to define themselves within the framework of the empire. In doing so, the book reveals a unique colonial sensibility that complements rather than contradicts the traditional perspectives of less privileged Africans toward colonialism. Moses E. Ochonu is Professor of African History at Vanderbilt University. He is author of Africa in Fragments: Essays on Nigeria, Africa, and Global Africanity; Colonialism by Proxy: Hausa Imperial Agents and Middle Belt Consciousness in Nigeria, which was named finalist for the Herskovits Prize; and Colonial Meltdown: Northern Nigeria in the Great Depression. He is editor of Entrepreneurship in Africa: A Historical Approach. Sara Katz is a Postdoctoral Associate in the History Department at Duke University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Killin Missin Hidden
Tales of the Interest - Three Mysterious Mysteries

Killin Missin Hidden

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 75:24


This week we take a break from cults and serial killers and that bad stuff and instead take a dive into three mysteries that most people seem to be unfamiliar with.  We are talking unusual structures, mysterious bioweapons, and even an impossible abduction of five boys.  Tune in for an hours worth of strange tales this week on Killin Missin Hidden!SHOW NOTEShttps://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/the-mystery-of-europes-erdstall-tunnelshttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erdstallhttps://interestingengineering.com/erdstall-tunnels-do-not-reach-from-scotland-to-turkey-contrary-to-rumorhttps://www.nbcnews.com/politics/national-security/havana-syndrome-symptoms-small-group-likely-caused-directed-energy-say-rcna14584https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Havana_syndromehttps://spyscape.com/article/havana-syndrome-7-bizarre-facts-about-the-mysterious-brain-illnesshttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frog_Boyshttps://www.channelnewsasia.com/cnainsider/intrigue-scandal-heartbreak-case-south-korea-missing-frog-boys-774406https://www.mamamia.com.au/frog-boys/https://medium.com/the-crime-scene/the-lost-kids-who-never-came-back-home-the-frog-boys-mystery-53f08e91eabeScams & ConsWhy would anyone give thousands of dollars to a Nigerian prince? Or play a well-known...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify Playful Humans Podcast - People Who Play for a LivingRediscover the power of play for more fun, flow and fulfillment in your life and career!Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify Read It With WhiskeySit back, sip some whiskey, and lean in to some sci-fi and fantasy author interviews!Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify Bigfoot ClassifiedA podcast that explores some of the biggest BIGFOOT cover-ups in history.Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify

New Books in African Studies
Moses E. Ochonu, "Emirs in London: Subalteran Travel and Nigeria's Modernity" (Indiana UP, 2022)

New Books in African Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 93:08


Emirs in London: Subalteran Travel and Nigeria's Modernity (Indiana UP, 2022) recounts how Northern Nigerian Muslim aristocrats who traveled to Britain between 1920 and Nigerian independence in 1960 relayed that experience to the Northern Nigerian people. Moses E. Ochonu shows how rather than simply serving as puppets and mouthpieces of the British Empire, these aristocrats leveraged their travel to the heart of the empire to reinforce their positions as imperial cultural brokers, and to translate and domesticate imperial modernity in a predominantly Muslim society. Emirs in London explores how, through their experiences visiting the heart of the British Empire, Northern Nigerian aristocrats were enabled to define themselves within the framework of the empire. In doing so, the book reveals a unique colonial sensibility that complements rather than contradicts the traditional perspectives of less privileged Africans toward colonialism. Moses E. Ochonu is Professor of African History at Vanderbilt University. He is author of Africa in Fragments: Essays on Nigeria, Africa, and Global Africanity; Colonialism by Proxy: Hausa Imperial Agents and Middle Belt Consciousness in Nigeria, which was named finalist for the Herskovits Prize; and Colonial Meltdown: Northern Nigeria in the Great Depression. He is editor of Entrepreneurship in Africa: A Historical Approach. Sara Katz is a Postdoctoral Associate in the History Department at Duke University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-studies

New Books in History
Moses E. Ochonu, "Emirs in London: Subalteran Travel and Nigeria's Modernity" (Indiana UP, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 93:08


Emirs in London: Subalteran Travel and Nigeria's Modernity (Indiana UP, 2022) recounts how Northern Nigerian Muslim aristocrats who traveled to Britain between 1920 and Nigerian independence in 1960 relayed that experience to the Northern Nigerian people. Moses E. Ochonu shows how rather than simply serving as puppets and mouthpieces of the British Empire, these aristocrats leveraged their travel to the heart of the empire to reinforce their positions as imperial cultural brokers, and to translate and domesticate imperial modernity in a predominantly Muslim society. Emirs in London explores how, through their experiences visiting the heart of the British Empire, Northern Nigerian aristocrats were enabled to define themselves within the framework of the empire. In doing so, the book reveals a unique colonial sensibility that complements rather than contradicts the traditional perspectives of less privileged Africans toward colonialism. Moses E. Ochonu is Professor of African History at Vanderbilt University. He is author of Africa in Fragments: Essays on Nigeria, Africa, and Global Africanity; Colonialism by Proxy: Hausa Imperial Agents and Middle Belt Consciousness in Nigeria, which was named finalist for the Herskovits Prize; and Colonial Meltdown: Northern Nigeria in the Great Depression. He is editor of Entrepreneurship in Africa: A Historical Approach. Sara Katz is a Postdoctoral Associate in the History Department at Duke University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

RHOLagos After Party
#RHOLagos Afterparty interview with Iyabo and Chioma

RHOLagos After Party

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 186:07


#RHOLagos Conversations with Iyabo and Chioma 011   What an episode! We got to have a chat with both Iyabo and Chioma today! Sorry, we had some network issues but we tried to get them to fill in the gap of what we missed in the season finale of the Real Housewives of Lagos!   Let's continue the after-party in the comments. Please no stan culture, just a podcast to promote the show and the women and every Nigerian business featured on the show. Thank you for listening! You can reach OG and Tina via the links

Rants Of A Nigerian Youth
Rant 126: Nigerian policymaking and the Okada Ban

Rants Of A Nigerian Youth

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 25:09


In this episode of Rants of a Nigeria Youth, Dochi Obialo and Harry talk about the policy-making in Nigeria, they also talk about the Okkda and how it is affecting the life of the average Nigerian. This episode is inspiring and interesting. Enjoy! Listen to the full episode and don't forget to subscribe. Please follow us on our social media. https://www.instagram.com/rantsofanigerian/

Mind Bully
Why Self-Determination Makes Dreams Come True

Mind Bully

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 52:59


Today's guest is Trayvon Palmer. He's a professional basketball player, a former teammate, but more importantly, a great friend.Trayvon joins the show to speak on his inspiring journey from JUCO to joining the Detroit Pistons in the NBA. In this episode, Trayvon shares how he deals with adversity, allowing for his self-determination, resilience, and motivation to shine through. @triggatraypTrayvon Palmer ONI Follow instructions (2:30)ON His Jamaican Roots (4:45)ON Being the Quiet Kid (6:30)ON The Pre-Game Jitters are Contagious We're Humans DUH (7:00)ON Why We Struggle with Authenticity (13:45)ON Trayvon Checks Norense (17:07)ON His Transition from Football to Basketball (20:20)ON When you feel like the HARD WORK isn't paying off (24:36)ON Getting Released Twice by the same team (26:15)ON His Journey from Unemployed to the NBA (31:00)ON God's Timing (35:10)ON Trayvon and Friend both check Norense (37:05)ON His NBA CALL UP (39:39)ON Staying true to Himself (46:00)Fan Question (48:19)On Overcoming His Mind Bully (50:05)Send your topic requests and questions to: contact@mindbully.com Follow the show:https://www.instagram.com/mindbullypodcasthttps://twitter.com/mindbullypodFollow the Host:https://www.instagram.com/kingno_https://twitter.com/kingno_Support the show

Submarine and A Roach
Episode 108: "Nigerian False Idol "

Submarine and A Roach

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 73:04


The Boys are back! KOJ, TMT AND MAYOWA TEAM UP TO DISCUSS: LOVE ISLAND MAYOWA'S ENCOUNTER WITH SANWOLU A BIT OF NAIJ POLITICS SOME MUSIC STUFF REAL HOUSEWIVES AND THEIR PERSONAL LIVES

RHOLagos After Party
#RHOLagos Rogbodiyan PRO Max Chioma vs Carolyn 010

RHOLagos After Party

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 151:13


Hello everyone! We talked about the gbasgbo that happened in the season finale of the Real Housewives of Lagos! WOW! Thanks to our girl Colette for joining us  Let's continue the after-party in the comments. Please, no stan culture, just a podcast to promote the show and the women and every Nigerian business featured on the show. Thanks!    Thank you for listening! You can reach OG and Tina via the links

The TheatreArtLife Podcast
Episode 124 – Filmmaking with Ema Edosio

The TheatreArtLife Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 37:28


In this episode we are joined by Ema Edosio, talking all things filmmaking. Ema is an award-winning Nigerian filmmaker, and obtained a Bachelor of Science in computer science from Ogun State University. She then went on to the New York Film Academy and Motion Pictures Institute of Michigan in the United States, where she majored in cinematography and directing. In 2013, Ema returned to Nigeria, where she has worked as a television director with major Nigerian Televisions stations. She talks all about her fascinating work and life in film. https://www.instagram.com/emaedosio/ We want to hear from YOU and provide a forum where you can put in requests for future episodes. What are you interested in listening to? Please fill out the form for future guest suggestions here and if you have suggestions or requests for future themes and topics, let us know here! @theatreartlife Thanks to David Zieher who composed our music.

Central Parish Radio's Podcast
SPECIAL PRAYER FOR FATHERS---PASTOR E.A.ODEYEMI

Central Parish Radio's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 14:28


Special Prayer for Fathers during the 2022 Father's Day Service by Pastor E.A.OdeyemiJoin us every weekday 2pm Nigerian time on Central Parish Radio for Pastor Odeyemi's ministrations.Please subscribe to our podcast to receive notifications of new episodes.Follow Central Parish Radio on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for updates of our programs on www.centralparishradio.org  and information on our podcast or email us on info@centralparishradio.org

The Documentary Podcast
Insecurity in Nigeria

The Documentary Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 23:52


It has a population of 215 million but very few Nigerians have been untouched by incidents of violence and lawlessness which appear to have increased in recent months. Schools, colleges, churches, trains and roads have all been targeted, and people report feeling unsafe wherever they go. We hear the anguish of relatives involved in the recent armed attack on a church in Ondo state in south-west Nigeria, in which 40 people were killed and dozens wounded. A young woman describes the terror of being abducted with her sister and other students.

Ayn Rand Centre UK Podcast
Courage vs Fear | Keeping It Real | James Valliant, Robert & Amy Nasir

Ayn Rand Centre UK Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 60:13


On The House with SpartanNavigating the world of real estate and property management can be overwhelming and...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify Rossifari Podcast - Zoos, Aquariums, and Animal ConservationThe Rossifari Podcast brings my love of zoos, aquariums, and conservation organizations...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify Scams & ConsWhy would anyone give thousands of dollars to a Nigerian prince? Or play a well-known...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify

The Daily Objective
Heraclitus of Ephesus - #524

The Daily Objective

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 54:15


Every TownEvery Town has a dark side and in this podcast we show them all to you. In every...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify Scams & ConsWhy would anyone give thousands of dollars to a Nigerian prince? Or play a well-known...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify Playful Humans Podcast - People Who Play for a LivingRediscover the power of play for more fun, flow and fulfillment in your life and career!Listen on: Apple Podcasts SpotifySupport the show

The Talk Shop with Bernie and Chimdi
Defamation and Politics with Tose Oriakhi

The Talk Shop with Bernie and Chimdi

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 73:48


What does the Heard/Depp case have in common with Nigerian politics. Lies, deception and the court of public opinion. We dive into the strangest domestic abuse case in years and the shady world of the 2023 Nigerian Presidential Elections. Listen on Spotify and subscribe to The Talk Shop with Bernie and Chimdi https://open.spotify.com/show/3semoMzSOOchRhEIF8qMhv Listen on Apple Podcasts and subscribe to the The Talk Shop with Bernie and Chimdi https://podcasts.apple.com/ca/podcast/the-talk-shop-with-bernie-and-chimdi/id1502520667 Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/thetalkshoppod?s=21 Follow us on IG: https://instagram.com/thetalkshoppod?igshid=fw24gl4x9stv Subscribe on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFjF_vLpng1UcNMo0kqouAQ

Diaries of an IJGB
For the love of Nigerian men

Diaries of an IJGB

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 28:43


It's time to show our men some love!! Join my best best friend and me as we share our favourite things about Nigerian men.

The Fifth Floor
Racism for sale

The Fifth Floor

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 41:14


BBC reporter Runako Celina tells us about her long search for the origins of a shocking video circulating on Chinese social media in 2020. It showed a group of African children being instructed to chant racist phrases in Chinese. The answers Runako found are in her BBC Africa Eye documentary Racism for Sale. For the love of mangoes! We unleash the Fifth Floor mic in the BBC Delhi bureau where colleagues from the Indian language services share their love of mangoes, especially their local varieties. Thanks to Siddhanath Ganu of BBC Marathi, Sarika Singh of BBC Hindi, Khushboo Sandhu of BBC Punjabi, Brijal Shah of BBC Gujarati, Venkat Prasad G of BBC Telugu and Saranya Nagarajan of BBC Tamil. New words and a culture shift in Ukraine 'Putler', 'Ruscists' and 'Anglo-Saxons': what words can tell us about the cultural shift in Ukraine since the invasion, and why some are 'changing their shoes mid-air', with Vitaliy Shevchenko from BBC Monitoring. Bangladesh container depot blast The devastating explosion at the Sitakunda container depot near Chittagong killed more than 40 people and injured hundreds. BBC Bangla journalist Shahnewaj Rocky is from Chittagong and spoke with firefighters and some of those who rushed to help the victims. Ventriloquist queen American ventriloquist Angelique-Monet became a queen in Nigeria after falling in love with a Nigerian king and marrying him. She lives in Eti-Oni in southern Nigeria where she and her puppet, Milk the Cow, entertain local children with their skills. BBC Africa's Youth News reporter Damilola Oduolowu caught her show. (Photo: A Chinese greeting from African children. Credit: BBC)

Space: What The F**k, Dude?!
"Whoever Is Richer Usually Gets Whatever They Want"

Space: What The F**k, Dude?!

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 19:08


The Fun Friday Pod this week: Nigerian hackers, Saudis vs. the PGA, comedians aren't in show biz, bubbles, and Lizzo's new song "Grrrls." Pretty sure I still have control of these Insta accounts and NOT THE HACKERS:@blackcatcomedy@thedannypalmershow Support the show

The Dine One Six
Naija Boy Tacos ”Yoruba Demon”

The Dine One Six

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 2:18


Chef Rasheed Amedu of the soon to open Naija Boy Tacos explains his unique South American and Nigerian inspired fried chicken torta

Ideas Untrapped
UNDERSTANDING INNOVATION

Ideas Untrapped

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 38:39


Innovation is the key ingredient to human material prosperity and an essential factor in economic development. But the importance of innovation is often misunderstood because of the common belief that poorer nations need not invent anything new and can always copy existing technologies from the richer nations - hence innovation policies are often missing from the development agenda of most developing countries. My guest today is social scientist and innovation policy expert Dan Breznitz - and he has made many significant contributions to changing the conversation and policy around innovation. We talked about the distinctions between innovation and invention, why the Silicon Valley model of innovation does not fit all contexts, and how innovation policies can be set in the long term.TRANSCRIPTTobi;Where I will start, basically, is innovation as the engine of economic growth is a view that has been pretty much validated through economic history. But when we think of innovation, we still think of new things, invention, which is kinda like a distinction you made in the book. So briefly, just tell me what is the difference between innovation and inventing new things, which most people understand innovation to be.Dan;So there's a big difference between innovation (and that's what we should care about) and invention. We should also care about it but it does not necessarily lead to economic growth, especially not where it happens. So if you and I would go back to my lab or your lab in the university, or just a lab in the back room, and we come up with a new idea for a new product or service. Even if we move it to a level of a prototype or have a patent on it, that's great, that's invention but that's not innovation.Innovation is taking ideas and actualizing them in the real world. So taking the idea that we develop and actually make it into a product (if we talk about economic innovation) or service and sell it to people. It can be novel ideas, but it's across all the arrays of activities from coming up with novel ideas, to improving them, to recombining them with others, to innovation in their production, to even innovation in their assembly and after-sale. And innovation is important and creates welfare, not in the moment of invention but because it's continuous. So let me give you two examples that are very prominent because of Covid.The one which is the most simple, since I know you love new cars, right, Tobi, and you ordered at least three in the last year, right. And you can't get even one of them. And the reason you can get one of them is not because people cannot produce cars, but because there are not enough semiconductors. And the reason there are not enough semiconductors in the world is Silicon Valley, which is called Silicon Valley because it was in semiconductors [but now] no longer knows how to innovate in the production of semiconductors. There are actually only very few companies. two be exact, and they both come from Taiwan, that knows how to create semiconductors, and how to actually innovate in their production.But a much better example is COVID itself. I mean, it's great that we came up with new vaccines. But that was not enough, right, with the molecule. We had to innovate in their production, we had to innovate in material science creating a new glass vial, so we can move them around. We have to innovate in their distribution. But it's now very, very clear that that's not enough. True welfare for humanity and the ability to live with Corona would happen when we innovate to a level, which is now very clear, of producing billions of units of said vaccines and distributing them to every human on earth. Okay. That will probably allow us to put Corona behind us.So it's not the moment of invention. I mean, the moment of invention is great. But innovation is the actualization of ideas all across the [value chain], if you want to call it the supply or the production, network, and stages, in order to constantly come up with better and improved products and services, and its impact, real impact start to happen when either all or most people on earth actually have access to it. And that happens because it's continuous.So you and I talk on Zoom, which is a very old invention, right? Telemedia. However, you and I can talk - you're in Nigeria, I'm in Toronto - and not even think about the cost of this because hundreds of millions... not because somebody invented it, but because after somebody invented it, hundreds of millions of engineering hours, if not days, went into improvement in fiber optics, improvement in software algorithm, improvement in memory, improvement in CPU and speed to the level that now you and I can do zoom as if this is costless. And that's the real impact of innovation.Tobi;There's so much to unpack in that answer. But now today, like you said in the introduction, when people talk about innovation what usually comes to mind is Silicon Valley, and that's the model that you've critiqued quite a lot, rightfully so, in my opinion on many points, but just give me a brief. What are the limitations of the Silicon Valley model of innovation today and why is it an inappropriate example of what innovation should be?Dan;So let's understand what has changed in the world. And what has changed in the world in the last 20 to 30 years is before, when somebody came up with an invention and a novel innovation, it was then produced, it was transformed into industries, in production around that area. So let's think about HP, or Apple computers, as it was known there.It used to be that when they came up with new products, they will produce that product very close to their headquarters. So Apple and HP employed 1000s, if not 10s of 1000s of engineers around Silicon Valley or in places like Colorado, around it. And those people will have great jobs in what you and I will now call advanced manufacturing, and all boats will be right. What we now have is a global system of fragmented production.So let's talk about semiconductors. Okay. In semiconductors, now, we look at Tel Aviv, Silicon Valley, Taipei, Shinshu Park, Taiwan, Seoul, Korea, Shenzhen, in China, all of those places have unbelievably successful semiconductors industries. And if you look at those places, you'll also see that many of the same companies work in all of those places. So you think great, but then if you look at what the companies in those places do, it's completely different.So in Silicon Valley and Tel Aviv, it's the first stage, we think about new ideas to put on silicon. In Taiwan, as you now know because you can get your car, it's the only place where they can take those ideas and actually make them into silicon. And Seoul, in Korea, Samsung and LG control very critical niches. So for every smartphone that you buy, the second-highest profits go to Samsung and LG because of memory and the controller of the screen, the touch screen. And in Shenzhen, it's the only place where we can work with different materials, constantly changing components [that] actually produce a product that works, for example, this iPhone and all the rest and sell it.So all those places are extremely innovative, but they do different activities. And in order to succeed in each one of them, you need therefore different innovational capacities, but also different finance, different institutional system, different education system. And there are real, for two reasons, those options of where you work. One is because once you develop those capabilities and systems, you can excel in one or two of those stages but not in others. And the second is because they also define who is enjoying the fruits of the success, who is being employed, and how we're being compensated for that employment.[What] happened in Silicon Valley and in Tel Aviv is that when move, we move to fragmented production, and we have a new model of venture capital. We moved [away] from actually having an industry which is really about innovation. So if you want to be completely cynical about it, the industry is about creating companies for cheap and selling them for a financial exit within five to seven years for the highest bidders, preferably 1000s of percent, right? It's not really for most of those people about changing the world. And in this system, the only people you employ are the engineers of the top universities (so not the people we should really care about or worry about). They are getting wages that are at the top wages of the US and Silicon Valley, or Tel Aviv, it's the same wages. So they're on their way to becoming a millionaire and they're getting stock options, right, basically lottery tickets to become billionaires.But who are the people that enjoy this system, it's only the GEEK ELITE, their financiers, maybe a few celebrity chefs and that's it. No one else is really employed in that level. And as soon as they finish with their work, all the rest of innovation goes somewhere else to be done. So what happened in both Tel Aviv and Silicon Valley is suddenly from a system that created a lot of good employment and jobs for everybody in that society, you're employing only the top 15 percent who are already basically extremely well off, the rest of it 85% are on a treadmill to nowhere.We all heard about what happened in San Francisco and Silicon Valley. But let's talk about Israel. Israel moved from being the second most equal society in western democracies in the 70s when it started that process, to now moving into a position where one of every five families in Israel is under the poverty line, which means they don't have enough money to buy food at the end of the month. And that's the fruit of a success they enjoy from this tremendous, maybe the most amazing innovation miracle in the second half of the 20th century. 20% of Israelis, including children, don't have enough money to buy food at the end of the month. So I wonder why people, even if they can imitate Silicon Valley, why do we think this is a good model for our community?Tobi;Now, you touched on something that I want to sort of press on, which is the finance of innovation and how it has come to be dominated today by venture capital finance model. Now, we all know how even Silicon Valley itself got started with a lot of public funding, either in Defense Research, which created lots of companies from IBM, Oracle, even Microsoft… how DARPA funded Google initially. So my question then would be why did the public, in this case, governments (whether at the city level or at the federal level) stop funding [research]? How did venture capital come to dominate the finance of innovation, and public financing just kept dwindling and dwindling, is it because we stopped believing in innovation as a source of growth, and policy sort of shifted to things like redistribution and things like that?Dan;So I will say that it really depends. There are some countries, multiple countries that still have a lot of public support for innovation. Canada, for example, is one. However, the problem with some of them is that they don't know how to transport that investment in basic invention into real innovation. And then all that great wealth, intellectual wealth, if you will, and all those inventions are then being taken away, and becomes great innovation somewhere else with what you say private money. So I wouldn't be as harsh on that. What I think has happened is that we have developed together with what people will call the neoliberal worldview. A firm belief with Silicon Valley is the only model. And then a very thin understanding of how Silicon Valley really works. And that's a belief that actually helps a lot of government if they so wish because then they don't have to be responsible and the only thing we need to do is to allow venture capital, whatever that is to come into the play, instead of actually looking cases of success, real success, from China, to Taiwan, to Korea to Finland, to actually all the Nordic countries.Whereas a significant role for public money and very interesting division of labor between public funding, public money and what it's trying to do, and where and how, and I think that's the most important thing, how private money and private investment in innovation are done, regulated, and most importantly institutionalized. And the way to think about it remember those stages we talked about?Tobi;Yes.Dan;Each one of them necessitates a completely different financial system in order to excel in it, right. If your aim is to supposedly create a new Alphabet, Google, or Facebook, you need maybe a system that resembles venture capitalist [...]. I have to say venture capital work only in ICT in biotech so far. So if you are in any other industry, maybe you should look for other ways of financing it. But if you're, for example, in the business of Taiwan where in order to excel as TSMC, you need to build new fabrication facilities, basically, factories at the tune of several billions, if not 10 or above billions a year, Venture Capital, Private Equity and even the New York Stock Exchange and NASDAQ are just not the way you can find this type of behavior.There is no venture capital on earth that would allow you to spend hundreds of millions or billions every year on basically capital equipment. You need to figure out the different financial systems that allow you to do that and judge you. The metrics of your success are different than the metrics of the success that your VCs and NASDAQ uses. From return on assets, to a margin of profitability, all those things need to be changed for you and your financiers to actually be able to make money.Tobi;So not to defend Silicon Valley, I'm not in any position to do that. But I'm just thinking from the perspective of say an African startup founder, for example. And we are talking about the proliferation of this model. So my question is, don't you think this model, the Silicon Valley model, venture financing startup as an approach to innovation spread the way it did because it is permissionless? So for example, I can start a startup right here in my room, in Lagos, Nigeria, whereas the current political economy might not let me be able to build a factory, because then I'll have to go through all kinds of regulatory red tape, I have to know someone at government ministries, I'll have to navigate a whole bunch of things. So an African found out my hear your argument and think, Well, the only way I have this opportunity to rise is because of the Silicon Valley model. So what would you say to them?Dan;So I will say that A, you're right. And, and I'm not against the Silicon Valley model. The two things that you have to take into the equation, and again, as a community leader is A, it's very, very hard to innovate with the Silicon Valley model, which is fine.  But the second, if you are successful, really successful, one of the results will be growing inequality if you really imitate it. So you might as well think about it in advance and figure out ways how to at least limit this inequality, or, you know, the growth much more positive and wide, instead of, you know, like Israel, who understand that they have a problem, but now for at least a decade now have programs after programs trying to diffuse the miracle with mixed success because they're already stuck in that model.So from a point of what you just said, yeah, all power to you. The question is, how can we then widen the, in Lagos, or in Nigeria.... the impact of your startups? One thing is what I call in the book, play [...] is, you say, Yeah, that's a model, that's a financial system and it works. And that's one problem. Once you put venture capital into your firm, Tobi, you will need to supply them with a financial exit, right? That's how they make their money. But what I want as the mayor of Lagos is for your company to grow as big as possible, preferably in Lagos.So we need to then figure out how to do two things. A, how to allow you to grow as big as possible in Lagos for as long as possible before a financial exit. Because then two things happen, A, if you're big enough and successful enough in life your venture capitalist wouldn't want to move, they would like you to be in Lagos. Not only that, then is the biggest you are and the most successful you are the chances are that your financial exit will be an IPO, which means that you will stay as an independent company. And then when we do an IPO, should you go to a NASDAQ IPO or should you go to a local IPO or should you go to an [...] IPO there are several options, right? Each one of them has consequences on your growth. The second if you grow big enough and successful enough, even if the financial exit is somebody is buying you, Tobi, because you by then have already 300, 400 employees in Lagos and you have customers all over Africa, the foreign company that will buy you will probably keep you maybe even grow you to become their main division in Nigeria.So it's not that the only thing that Lagos will get is you, your co-founders and some of your employees becoming millionaires and then the employment disappearing. But not only you as some of your employees grow and become bigger and employ more people. And as we do that, we also need to think about what will be the financial incentives I'll have you if you're big enough, so you can employ people who are not just r&d engineers. So I would call it, you know, playful delay. So the Nigerian startups or any African startups that now happen, grow as big as they can, for as long as they can before they're being bought by someone else.Tobi;So now, if I am the governor of Lagos, the Mayor of Lagos and I'm trying... So my first question before I get that would be, are there geographic? So I'm thinking along the lines of things like new trade theory, economic geography, and specializations. So are there geographic determinants of innovation? Or can innovation be deliberately nurtured and directed in any location? So I had a conversation recently about the supply chain, which you also touched on on semiconductors. And it took the pandemic for me to know that probably two-thirds of the global supply of hand gloves come from Malaysia. But I didn't think, unless you tell me I'm wrong, that Malaysia did set out to become the global supplier of hand gloves. So are some of these innovative niches and economic dominance based on innovation, are they serendipitous or can they be deliberately nurtured in a particular location?Dan;So let's talk reality. Okay.Tobi;Yeah.Dan;And I'm going to use Israel and Taiwan as an example, just because both of them are famous enough that people at least heard about them. So both of them started at the same time, okay. And since I interviewed the people who were responsible, if I tell you that they really knew how the end outcome would look, I'll be lying, and they would be lying as well. But they made particular choices that really define their success. So Israel, even before Silicon Valley became famous and all the rest says, Look, we have no natural resources, we don't have a lot of money, what we have is brains. And we actually have no clue in what industrial sector those brains will transform things into to growth. So we are going to create an innovation policy, which is a horizontal technology policy. Back then just so you understand how limited knowledge was, they called it science-based industries because the term high tech was not yet created. And they said, in order to do that, we will focus all our attention on coming up with new ideas and making them into products. Okay, and we'll derisk will help private [companies] and private companies need to do that. And we will create policy, after policy, after policy to make it happen.And then those companies started to be created. Then very early on like a year after the NASDAQ was established, there was already an Israeli IPO on NASDAQ. So the state co-evolved its policies to slowly but surely worked down this model. So it's not a surprise that Israel ended up basically as an engine of startups. It's not a surprise because it was horizontal. So it was whatever was successful in the market, it followed very closely in the footsteps of the US in new industries, first hardware, and then software. But the Israelis had no clue that this is what was going to happen. They also invested a lot in Agri-tech companies and in geothermal energy and then all the rest. Okay. But their model of how do we know that we are successful is, we will have a lot of new companies with new products that are exportable and we'll build the financial system to allow that to happen. Taiwan was almost the opposite.Taiwan says for both political reasons other is we do not want to have very big corporations like Japan and Korea, which is a model we see to our left. And because we are isolated, we can take that risk. We also don't think that we can be successful completely imitating Silicon Valley. So where we can be successful is in new industries working with the US. It's not just Silicon Valley back then, it's the US as a whole. So we will put bets on this new industry called semiconductors. But unlike Japan or Korea, we will not put bets on a specific niche. But we will create two capabilities that will allow Taiwan to excel in what we want to excel, which is basically the sub-suppliers for American companies, maybe Japanese. Remember, there was nothing else in the world back then. So they spent resources on innovation in the production of semiconductors. So all those companies that we talk about TSMC, UMC, Taiwan Mask Company, all of them came from a public research institution, which created projects that basically took the technology from abroad, brought it to Taiwan, created the company that then allow the ability to, you know, produce semiconductors in Taiwan, that was one.And the second, [is] a huge amount of attention to design. So you want to do something with silicon, you need to do two things. Actually produce the silicon but also design what it is that this chip does. And again, through the same public research institute that was diffused. But the aim was not an industry like Silicon Valley that comes up with new ideas, but the aim was you need much more simple semiconductors, for example, in toys. So we will figure out where there are niches where you already have a need for semiconductors and we'll make those semiconductors more reliable and cheaper. We're not going to invent new ones.And we will be able to do that because we just created those factories so we can do those two things and be these great sub-suppliers for very big multinationals. So without even understanding how the global system is getting fragmented, they opted for one industry and in one part of that industry. When they created TSMC they didn't know that they were going to completely change the global semiconductor industry. But they had a very specific strategy of thinking, what would success look like to Taiwan? So the ability to do over design and supply for big American, European and Japanese companies, the ability to innovate in the production, and the ability to innovate in second-generation innovation and semiconductors and multiple companies that will grow big but most of them are SMEs, and that was the vision. And then as industry changed, right, they co-evolved.In both places, there was nothing, really nothing before the government started. So in Israel, there were 860 Something people with any kind of academic education doing any kind of r&d in the whole business sector. So probably less than in one lecture hall in your university. And in Taiwan, not only that the private industry did not want to do semiconductors but even after a few very successful spinoffs from ITRI, (that public research institute I'm talking about) when they wanted to spin off TSMC (maybe one of the world's most successful companies), private investors in Taiwan refuse to participate, and it ended up in a small Dutch company called Philips [which] became the biggest investors in TSMC. So again, did they know how they were going to change the global industry? No. But did they have a very specific vision of what is success and what would it do to Taiwan and Israel? Yes.Tobi;Excellent. That brings me to my next question, which is kind of broad. Like I mentioned earlier, if I was the governor of Lagos, or the mayor of a city, or even maybe the President, and I want to design innovation policy, I really want to exploit innovation for real inclusive, widespread, broad-based growth that tries to avoid some of these problems that you have mentioned, both in the book and even in our conversation on Israel, Silicon Valley and all that. What should I do? What should I be funding? What complimentary public institutions do I need? And how should innovation policies be designed generally?Dan;So I think you're missing the most important step. The most important step is what, as I just said, Israel and Taiwan have done, maybe even unknowingly. What I will tell you as the governor of Lagos is that, Okay, let's assume you're successful as a first step. 15 years from now, what does Lagos look like? What kind of companies do you have? What kind of people do they employ, what kind of things do they sell to the global system and what kind of things do they buy from the global system? Okay, now that we have this vision, let's do reverse engineering, and figure out how we get into that vision knowing that we, I mean, the world is constantly changing, we might have to, you know, change course, but we have a vision of what success is. And that vision is not the one that too many cases are now [that] when they talk about innovation, they talk, oh, I want to go to VCs and I did a lot of patents. No.What does your society look like? Once you do that, A) we can reverse engineer and figure out exactly what financial system you need, how you develop it, what changes you need for your education system, how you also tie yourself into those global networks so you get the outputs you need, which are not just physical outputs but the constant knowledge and ideas, and how do you move it back? And as you do that, you also need to look at several things: what are your current strengths and limitations? what you can build upon? And what are gaps that you have that [you think] is reasonable for you to assume you can fix? And then we can start to be much more targeted. Not necessarily in industries, but the way I think about it is in capabilities, where do you want to operate in those four stages? And then we can maybe talk about industries, maybe just talk about core activities of what you need in order to excel in that and build all those institutions and programs. But without that vision, you're basically going into a very rough ocean with no map and the no goal. So the only thing that will happen is, at best, you'll be drowned.Tobi;That's powerful and poignant. Final question, Dan. And this is a bit of a tradition on show. What's the one idea, it may be from your work, it may be something you admire, it may be something that is probably even old and the world has forgotten about, what's the one idea that you would like to see spread everywhere, you'd like to see people discuss more, you'd like to see people think about a lot more? What's that idea?Dan;That idea is that: believe in human agency, or believe in the ability of humans to do things and to make things better. Right? So if you think about what makes us human, it's really to innovate is to take ideas and make them part of the world. Right? That's what we do. And for too long, everybody has been taught that there's only one way to success. And I think that that's the main problem of modern economics and modern social science. We look too much at structure, and not enough at the human agency. And we need to believe in the ability of societies, humans working together, figuring out new ways to make our communities better. But in order to do it, they have to understand how the world works and how they work. And doing that I think we now have more options than ever before to make communities both richer and more inclusive. But it has to come from the communities itself. Lagos and a lot of places in Africa need to dream their own dreams and stop dreaming the European or American dreams. The other successful countries that have done that manage at least to tailor the American dream and make it into their, I don't know, flavour [of] dreams - from Japan and Korea to Taiwan, Israel, Finland, all of those places that have moved from being poor to successful after World War Two.Tobi;Terrific. Thank you so much, Dan, for doing this with me. It's been educating, it's been enjoyable. Thank you so much.Dan;You are very, very welcome. I hope that one of those days, maybe after, we will finally innovate our way out of COVID...Tobi;YeahDan;Then I can meet face to face.Tobi;Yeah, I would I would love nothing more. This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.ideasuntrapped.com/subscribe

The Daily Objective
The Fate of Abortion Rights - #523

The Daily Objective

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 44:27


Every TownEvery Town has a dark side and in this podcast we show them all to you. In every...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify Scams & ConsWhy would anyone give thousands of dollars to a Nigerian prince? Or play a well-known...Listen on: Apple Podcasts SpotifySupport the show

Woman's Hour
Women reporting the war in Ukraine, SEND consultation, Red Dress project, former Olympic Athlete, Anyika Onuora

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 57:33


Her newspaper only launched 14 weeks before the outbreak of war in Ukraine, but the Kyiv Independent now has over two million followers on Twitter, and has been described by Time Magazine as: "The world's primary source for reliable English-language journalism on the war." Emma speaks to the Editor of the newspaper, Olga Rudenko about the challenges female journalists are facing in Ukraine. She also discusses how her and her team, which are mostly women, launched their newspaper just weeks after being fired from their previous newspaper that was owned by an oligarch. In a Woman's hour exclusive, two women whose disabled sons died after failing to get their Special Educational Needs supported in the right schools, have written an open Letter to two Secretaries of State warning that the system must change. Ministers are consulting until July 22 on how to make the SEND system better. Our reporter Carolyn Atkinson tells us more, and Emma speaks with Amanda Batten, chair of the Disabled Children's Partnership and Susie who spent £10,000 battling the system to get her disabled child into an appropriate school. Since 2009, the artist Kirstie Macleod has been working on The Red Dress project. This involves pieces of this red silk dress travelling around the world to be embroidered by mostly female artisans, many of whom have been marginalised and live in poverty. After 13 years, 46 countries and 343 embroiderers, the dress is finally finished. And, former Olympic Athlete Aniyka Onuora may have stepped away from the track, but in her new memoir: "My hidden race" she details her personal experience with professional sports, racism and sexism, mental health, and growing up in a Nigerian household in 1990's Liverpool. She joins Emma in the studio.

The New Church
Music Ministration | Bada Godwin | David Nathan | Sunmisola Agbebi | Next Conference'22 | Day 3

The New Church

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 49:42


Welcome to The Gathering, Day 3 of the Next Conference 2022! Thank you for joining us to stay thoroughly equipped by the Word and Spirit in taking territories for God across diverse mountains of influence; Family, Business, Religion, Politics, Education, Media, and Arts. Welcome to the future!!! To know more about The Next Conference, please visit http://www.tnxc.org/ —— About Speaker Bada Godwin: Bada Godwin Adewunmi is a Nigerian singer, songwriter, music director, and minister. He is currently a worship leader serving in The New Church under Kingsword Ministries International. David Nathan: David is a Nigerian- born minister, singer, musician, and songwriter of Christian worship music. As a worship leader, he has led thousands into the presence of God and as a songwriter, he has released a good number of songs including “If no be you”, “For your glory”, amongst others. Sunmisola Agbebi: Sunmisola is a vibrant female gospel singer with a unique sound. The fast-rising Nigerian music sensation, worship leader, and songwriter Sunmisola Agbebi recently released a new song, Koseunti. —— Subscribe to the latest sermons: http://bit.ly/subscribethenewlive We are a Family of Love, led by Pastor Shola Okodugha. To get involved and be in the loop about everything that is happening in our strong church community click here: http://wearethenew.org/ —— Stay Connected Website: The New Church Website TheNew Church Facebook TheNew Church Instagram TheNew Church Twitter #NXC2022 #WeAreTheNew #TheNewChurch #TheNextConference #TheGathering #sholaokodugha

Ag News Daily
June 16, 2022: Nigerian Farmer, Patience Okoku

Ag News Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022


This episode is packed full of facts you need to know; from viral videos explained to financial strain coverage, we are here to inform you on all things ag news. In addition to our reporting, Delaney joins us from Germany with a timely interview featuring Patience Okoku who discusses farming struggles in Nigeria and other African countries.

Love is the Message: Dance, Music and Counterculture
LITM Extra - Decolonising Disco—Counterculture, Postindustrial Creativity, the 1970s Dance Floor and Disco pt.2 [excerpt]

Love is the Message: Dance, Music and Counterculture

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 11:18


This is an excerpt of a full length episode currently only available to patrons. To become a patron and support what we're doing from £3 per month, head to www.patreon.com/LoveMessagePod. In this patrons-only episode Tim concludes reading from his essay Decolonising Disco—Counterculture, Postindustrial Creativity, the 1970s Dance Floor and Disco, published recently in the collection Global Dance Cultures in the 1970s and 1980s: Disco Heterotopias, edited by Flora Pitrolo and Marko Zubak. Picking up where he left off in part 1, Tim introduces us to Sylvere Lotringer, the French critic who straddled both the worlds of academic Post-Structuralism and the Downtown NYC scene, itself a 'heterotopic' formation (after Foucault). We hear about the hybridity and convergence of the city's overlapping scenes in the early '80s, embodied by musicians like Arthur Russell, before the AIDS and Crack crises, Reaganomics and shifts in the art world caused this exciting collectivism to give way to more individualist modes of creation and production. In the final part of the essay, Tim shows how music from Africa, Latin America and Europe was a central component of what he calls 'Discotheque music' (ie records you would hear on the DJ-led dancefloors) which produced the original disco sound. With reference to SalSoul, Saturday Night Fever, Nigerian disco, contemporary reissue labels and more, Tim makes the case for these non-American, largely non-white musics to be included in an expanded edition of the disco archive. Lots of great musical examples are used in this show to illustrate the essay. Tracklist: The B52s - Rock Lobster The Peech Boys - Don't Make Me Wait Public Enemy - Public Enemy Number 1 Fela Kuti - Shakara The Lafayette Afro Rock Band - Djungi Black Blood - A. I. E. (A Mwana) Tony Allen with Africa 70 - Afrodisco Beat Orlando Julius - Disco Hi-Life King Sunny Adé - 365 is My Number / The Message N'draman Blintch - Cosmic Sounds Khalab ft. Tenesha The Wordsmith - Black Noise

Lessons of the Six Figure Woman
The Unfiltered Truth About Marriage Counseling

Lessons of the Six Figure Woman

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 58:41


#053 In the episode Chichi and NG switch it all the way up! Chichi puts on her interview hat and NG takes on the guest role, answering questions all about her experience so far with marriage counseling! She opens up about going to marriage counseling as a Nigerian American woman married to a traditional Nigerian man. The ladies discuss all the ups and down of therapy as a couple and ultimately NG gives her final verdict on whether or not it's worth it thus far. You don't want to miss this one! If you have a question or comment that you want featured on a future episodes OR if you just want to say hello DM us on instagram @lessonsofthesixfigurewoman or email us at LOTSFW@gmail.com.

Salt & Spine
This is Kwame Onwuachi's America (and we're just living in it)

Salt & Spine

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 33:31


Hi there,Apologies for the silence last week! The COVID fairy finally pulled my card, and it knocked me (and my family) down for a number of days. We’re all recovering over here, and I’m excited to share this week’s conversation with you now! I hope you’ll forgive the delay. Read on for more on my recent chat with Kwame Onwuachi—and make sure you’re subscribed to our Substack to access exclusive recipes from Kwame’s My America later this week.–BrianEpisode 132: Kwame OnwuachiIt really does feel like we’re living in Kwame Onwuachi’s America.Industry folks run into him around every turn—he’s fresh off the high-profile hosting gig at Monday’s James Beard Awards, for one—and his voice and influence are becoming undeniably one of the most impactful. After opening five restaurants before turning 30, Kwame has earned accolades from nearly every major media outlet (James Beard Foundation’s Rising Star Chef, Food & Wine Best New Chef, Esquire Chef of the Year, Forbes 30 Under 30, the “most important chef in America” by the San Francisco Chronicle, and so on). Now, Kwame is an executive producer for Food & Wine magazine and is responsible for convening the upcoming 2nd Annual Family Reunion, a multi-day event that celebrates racial and ethnic diversity in hospitality.In Kwame’s first book, 2019’s Notes From A Young Black Chef written with Joshua David Stein, he chronicles his life from growing up in New York City, with extended stints in Louisiana and Nigeria, to the path that led him to his first restaurant, the Shaw Bijou. (And that memoir is now being made into a feature film by A24!)He’s followed it up with a new book—this time a cookbook, titled My America: Recipes from a Young Black Chef, and also co-authored by Stein.Part memoir, part cookbook, My America features recipes from Kwame’s culinary journey—from Suya (Nigerian BBQ) to Egusi Stew, a Nigerian recipe he grew up eating that’s thickened with egusi (melon seed).Recipes This Week:Paid subscribers will get access to two recipes from Kwame’s My America this week: Jamaican Beef Patties and Suya (“the grandfather of American BBQ”):Salt + Spine is supported by listeners like you. To get full access to our exclusive content and featured recipes, and support our work, consider becoming a paid subscriber.We’ve got a great show for you today: Kwame joined us to discuss his culinary career, his books, and of course, to play our signature culinary game. Thanks for joining us to #TalkCookbooks!–Brian, Clea, and the Salt + Spine team Get full access to Salt + Spine at saltandspine.substack.com/subscribe

Unleash Your Inner Creative with Lauren LoGrasso
Break The Trauma Cycle, Reclaim Your Pleasure & Bend Reality w/ TedX Speaker, Yemi Penn

Unleash Your Inner Creative with Lauren LoGrasso

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 60:48


On The Guest: Yemi Penn is a British-born Nigerian author, Engineer, TEDx speaker, and entrepreneur whose mission is to help others overcome and transform their traumas. As a true multi-passionate creative, she has managed to dip her toes into many industries. Most recently she released a short documentary titled “Did I Choose My Trauma?” that follows her experience from childhood abuse to actively healing adulthood. From this conversation you'll learn: Healthy ways to tap into your trauma The reason matriarchal wounds run so deep The wisdom of our bodies (and the pain they hold) How to break cycle of generational trauma Traditional Eastern modalities of healing trauma How to move through transferred trauma How to get specific about what part of you needs healing The role of curiosity in empathy, tolerance, and purpose The concept of bending reality The equation for manifestation Why you might not trust your intuition How to start reclaiming your pleasure How sexuality unlocks creativity The problem with collecting and hoarding accomplishments How to recognize your “alibis” How to find your WHY The journey to a healthy mind And so much more! Check out “Did I Choose My Trauma?” Documentary Buy her book Did You Get The Memo?: Because I F**king Didn't Follow the show @unleashyourinnercreative Follow me @LaurenLoGrasso --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/unleashyourinnercreative/message

234 Essential
Tears for Nigeria

234 Essential

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 114:22


In this week's episode of the podcast, Ugochi and AOT2 discuss the major contenders for the Nigerian presidential elections. They also talk about the last-minute rush for many Nigerians to get their voter cards.For more information on all episode releases and additional information about the hosts, follow 234 Essential on Twitter and Instagram. Subscribe to the 234 Essential newsletter here. You can also send fan mail to: fanmail@234essential.com to let Ugochi and Ayo know your burning thoughts and questions.

The Young God
Peter Obi: A God Among Monsters

The Young God

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 35:52


“Things are bad… And in comes this guy with an incredible track record. He's not saying, ‘I will.' He's saying, ‘it's been done.' Go and verify.” - Obinna Ofor. Nigeria is a mess. Nigerian politics is a mess. But for the first time in forever, a credible candidate has emerged from the mud to give hope to the hopeless. Is it false hope, fool's gold, or fresh optimism? My guest, Obinna For, lends a unique and impassioned perspective on Peter Obi, his campaign and his chances at the presidency. Tickets: The Young God Experience --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/theyounggodpod/message

Central Parish Radio's Podcast
REVELATION SERIES:THE MINISTRY OF ANGELS---PASTOR E.A.ODEYEMI

Central Parish Radio's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 45:45


Teaching on the Book of Revelations:Ministry of Angels by Pastor E.A.OdeyemiJoin us every weekday 2pm Nigerian time on Central Parish Radio for Pastor Odeyemi's ministrations.Please subscribe to our podcast to receive notifications of new episodes.Follow Central Parish Radio on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for updates of our programs on www.centralparishradio.org  and information on our podcast or email us on info@centralparishradio.org

Get To Know You with Tiffeny Farag
Ep 91. How do you know if someone is emotionally invested in you?

Get To Know You with Tiffeny Farag

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 63:29


On this episode of GET TO KNOW YOU, we discuss  another thought-provoking topic; ‘How do you know if someone is emotionally invested in you?'. This week, I'll be sitting down with Harry Uddoh. He is a Nigerian born, Dublin based relationship Coach on a mission to help people cultivate meaning in their relational lives . He helps individuals and couples redefine the relationship they have with themselves. With questions from: What is the nature of your self-perception? i.e. do you think lowly or highly of yourself and if so why? What are your fundamental values and which of them would you trade if you had to? Which of your beliefs are serving you well, and which ones do we need to review and potentially get rid of? He takes a deep fundamentalist approach in a bid to deepen your self-awareness and clarity of mind. To be a functional part of any relationship, you must, first of all, contend with yourself (the good the bad and the ugly) and elucidate what you want, why you want what you want, as well as distinguish between said ‘wants'(nice to have) and ‘needs'(must-haves).He first asks you to redefine the relationship you have with yourself, and this informs how you show-up in your external dealings. His method  highlights that Love and well functioning mechanics(overall compatibility) give rise to a  successful relationship. To know more about this man you can find him at www.harryuddoh.com (https://linktr.ee/Harryuddoh).  Tune in as we discuss receiving and giving emotional investment, lack of emotional investment due to attachment style and explaining what emotional investment you need from your partner. Stay tuned to the end of the episode to find out how you can join the conversation on the Get To Know You Café. Credits Music- Sara OliveiraSupport the show

ESN: Eloquently Saying Nothing
ESN #360 : The One on One Episode

ESN: Eloquently Saying Nothing

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 150:58


This week's topics: • Supportive parents • Nigerian bluntness • Living hyper honestly • How honesty affects relationships • The difference in honesty in male and female relationships • How we've learned parenting from our parents • Children learning traits without their parents' input • If it's alright to leave a relationship just because the spouse doesn't earn enough • How religion encourages broke humbleness • Broke mindset v Wealthy mindset • The different phases of • Ukraine/Russia, China/Taiwan, Nigeria/Biafra • Pushing agendas • AITA for not feasting at your door • AITA for asking my cousin to lose weight to be part of my wedding procession • #StavrosSays : Sign O' The Times Live Concert Movie [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EVolCHbpk34] [https://www.criterionchannel.com/sign-o-the-times] Connect with us at & send your questions & comments to: #ESNpod so we can find your comments www.esnpodcast.com www.facebook.com/ESNpodcasts www.twitter.com/ESNpodcast www.instagram.com/ESNpodcast @esnpodcast on all other social media esnpodcast@gmail.com It's important to subscribe, rate and review us on your apple products. You can do that here... www.bit.ly/esnitunes

The Stock Trading Reality Podcast
The Benefits of Taking Your Time | STR 377

The Stock Trading Reality Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 68:40


Odds are, you are ambitious and love a good challenge. With that being said, if you are a total beginner to the world of trading and investing and are here because you “want to get rich quick and easy”… then RUN! RUN away as fast as you can! If you want to find success in the markets, you'll need to be here because you are passionate about it! When you are passionate, you are going to gain the advantage of ambition… but that's where it all gets a bit tricky. Yes, passion is certainly an advantage; however, it can also work greatly against you in your trading journey. My guest, Sheyi, shares with us exactly how this all plays out. In fact, he was brutally honest about how much of a bad situation be placed himself in as we grew $200 to $7,000 in a single trade (but that's only the start…). What did Sheyi learn from this? How has slowing himself down become a huge benefit? We'll talk about that and much more. Sheyi has Nigerian roots which help to give him a perspective that many of us do not have access to. I think there is immense value in his view of the world and how he goes about his daily life. In other words, there is something for everyone in this discussion and I'm confident you'll enjoy it as much as I did!

Ideas Untrapped
INSECURITY IN NIGERIA

Ideas Untrapped

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 75:09


If you ask any Nigerian today what the number one problem that they think political leadership should tackle - I am fairly certain security will be the overwhelming answer. In the last week alone there have been two deadly attacks in the Ondo state and Kaduna state with scores of people murdered in their homes and places of worship. Go back a week further, and the number of such murderous attacks would have risen to six. What many Nigerians depressing is that the problem is worsening and spreading to all parts of the country without any sign that it might abate anytime soon. Politicians seeking elective positions in next year's elections are making promises to end the crisis, but given how much it has gotten worse under the current administration despite similar promises leaves very little room for optimism. It is in the light of this that I speak to my guests on the podcast today James Barnett and Dr. Muritala Rufai. Our conversation is about what is now known as banditry in the Northwest of Nigeria. We talked about the origins of banditry, the nuances of the many factors at play, corruption, and the failure of local governance. Dr. Murtala Rufai is a professor of history at Usman Danfodiyo University in Sokoto.TRANSCRIPTTobi; So I'll start right at the end, which is not the most recent attack, but the Kaduna train attack was heavy in people's memory, and mentality, and maybe because of the status of some of the people that were involved. And in the weeks after there has been suggestions that the banditry issue is sort of evolving into something rather different. Maybe something akin to Boko Haram or ISWAP tactics. And some have even suggested that there are some evidence that both groups are now working together. So I like to take it from there because in both your paper your article on this, you suggested that this is a problem that has the potential to evolve even more dangerously. So is this part of that evolution? And if so, what can you tell us about the background to that and where it's likely to go next?James; ...In terms of the kind of the relationship between the bandits and Boko Haram, you know, the term that we talk more generally about jihadist because, really, there're kind of at least three different primary factions of what was once Boko Haram in Nigeria, today. There's ISWAP, there's the original Boko Haram, which we use the acronym JAS, which was led by Abubakar Shekau until May of last year when he was killed. And then there's also the Ansaru splinter faction of Boko Haram. So when looking at relationships between bandits and jihadists, I think if anything, our study was maybe a bit more skeptical of some of the claims that, you know, by 2021 (by last year) there was already more speculation. You had more comments from government officials, commentators, journalists saying, you know, the bandits, they are being recruited by Boko Haram, they're working together. I think our study was, in some ways, a bit more skeptical of the degree of, I would say, co-optation.You know, we kind of pushed back to some extent against this idea that the jihadists were coming in and recruiting all the bandits and that they were kind of transforming the conflict. I think our argument was that the conflict in the Northwest for now is very much still one being driven by the bandits rather than by Boko Haram or the jihadists. We do note, as you say, I think there's definitely room for closer potential cooperation. I think that from what we're beginning to see of the Kaduna train attack, the evidence so far, the details I've heard so far, there are kind of concerning issues there. But I think that for now, you know, even recognizing that the Kaduna train attack is a notable attack, a very serious one and obviously, the situation is still ongoing in terms of the the situation with the hostages, negotiations. So I think it's good to kind of avoid commenting too much right now as the situation is rather uncertain. But I think my view is still that one of the impediments that has, kind of, historically prevented the jihadists from getting closer to the bandits is that the bandits, for the most part, they really prized their autonomy. It's very much part of their modus operandi to operate very independently, they will cooperate with, you know, different gangs, will cooperate with each other, but banditry is definitely an activity that in some ways, kind of rewards autonomy. You know, the groups are not as rigidly structured as a jihadist organizations. It's an area where many people today if they want to get rich, they can take up arms and become a bandit. And so I think, because the bandits kind of value their autonomy, and also just given the fact that they've become, frankly, so powerful in recent years, they are not necessarily in such desperate need to kind of be recruited or trained or equipped or supported by jihadist. So I think my view is that there are opportunities from the perspective of Jihadist to work with bandits in certain instances, you know, to cooperate on certain operations. But I think, as we've seen with for example, especially the group Ansaru, which has tried in the past several years to recruit bandits to say, 'you should stop acting like bandits, you should join our group. Your fight is not with Muslim people. It's with the Nigerian government.' They go on this preaching tours and their efforts have really fallen flat. The bandits have not been interested in joining Ansaru. And so there have actually been many clashes. And recently, I think, as recently as a week ago, was the last one. And so, you know, the situation in Northwest is very volatile, many different militants, many different gangs, and sometimes they work together, sometimes they fight together, but I think for the foreseeable future, that the jihadist element to the northwest - this Boko Haram, this Ansaru...it's a problem, it's a challenge and makes things more complicated for sure. But I think that, in my view, the primary challenge in the Northwest is still bandits. It's not Boko Haram.Dr Rufai; I should just continue from where he stopped. You see, the fundamental problem is that the bandits are not in any way a monolithic criminal formation. There are quite a number of bandit gangs and also bandit groups operating separately and individually. Now having the unity of the bandits into a one united organization, for instance, is indeed a very difficult exercise. Because when we talk about a bandit group or a bandit gang, we've seen cases and instances where three, four, five people, for instance, form up a gang. And they have their own independent and absolute autonomy. They could actually do and undo, they may decide to go on attack, they may decide to carry out abduction, they may decide to do whatever they feel like doing. So now, putting all these bandits together into a one single platform - it is indeed a very difficult exercise. And there are also quite a number of them that consider this jihadist group including Boko Haram, Ansaru and ISWAP that he pointed out clearly, as their traditional enemies, and on several locations attempts by these groups to bring to the fore the members of the bandits, for instance, became so much challenging to the extent that some of the bandit groups and also bandit leaders were making it very clear to them that our problem as you were arguing is not with the Nigerian state - that is what we fail to understand. The problem of banditry is basically and fundamentally local. Until probably recently, that the whole conflict is now taking a more national dimension. You go to the rural areas, you interact with the pundits, they will tell you that their problem is local and solution to their problem also remain local.Local in the sense that they more or less have problem with the an sake - with the vigilante - and other local authorities than even with their state governors. So now, my argument has always been: bringing this bandits, about 120 gangs operating separately and loosely, individually, into a one single platform to probably relate with any of the jihadist groups or any of the criminal group like the case of Boko Haram, ISWAP and Ansaru is actually going to be a very difficult exercise. But I am also not disputing the fact that there are very few number of these bandits that subscribe to the view of either Ansaru or Boko Haram. For instance, the general believe and also accusation which is actually not confirm about the train attack is actually something executed and conducted under the leadership of Ali Kachalla. Ali Kachalla has been a very good friend of Dogo Gide, who were all initially bandits under the control of Buharin Daji. Now, there is that possibility of having that continuity in the relationship between Ali Kachalla, who was until probably recently, a bandit, relating with Dogo Gide who is actually his traditional friend while they were under the leadership and control of Buharin Daji. Of course, going by the pattern of the attack. In terms of the train attack, for instance, we've seen actually certain features and characteristics that differ slightly the case of the bandit. And that is why people have the belief that there must be actually connections with [an]other international terrorist group like ISWAP... some said it's ISWAP. some are even talking about Ansaru, and people also talking about the involvement of Boko Haram. But we've also seen historically, as far back as 2016 - 2017, when some Boko Haram elements were sent to the northwest to come and actually recruit and create a certain ideology on the bandits. At the end of the day, some of these members of Boko Haram became bandits. Because of what? Because they feel there is comfort, there is joy, there is freedom, and also there is wealth in banditry compared to Boko Haram.And that has to do with nothing other than the level of independence and autonomy that is within the bandit world.James; I would just jump in really quickly. I think he did a very good job of explaining how the bandits prize their autonomy and that issue with the jihadists. He brought up the character Dogo Gide who I think is worth describing very quickly.He's an interesting figure in terms of understanding, okay, who's a bandit, who's a jihadist, maybe [for] some of the listeners who don't follow these issues as closely. But he's someone that we profiled a bit in our article, our study for the CTC Sentinel, which is a big research report on the bandit-jihadist relations. And he's someone very interesting because he's a bandit, but he has had very close ties with jihadists for several years. There are disagreements, you know, different sources, different people will place his first contact with jihadists at different points. But he's someone that a couple of years ago, he was mostly saying, 'I don't have any ties with Boko Haram.'He is denying any relationship with the jihadist. But now in the past year or so he started to act as if he is a jihadist. But even as we did when we were digging through and doing our analysis, what we found is that he is maybe even now pretending to be more of a jihadist than he really is. Because he will release these videos or he will be communicating with intermediaries, he will be trying to sound like a jihadist, but he doesn't actually even know the proper Arabic phrases. In one instance, he refers to the leader of ISIS to suggest that he is a member of Daesh or ISIS, but he's referring to the dead leader, who's been dead for over a year. And so I think it's one of the challenges of doing this research in the northwest. It's why I think it's good to be very cautious and skeptical and try to kind of scrutinize all the data coming out. Because on the one hand, sometimes like Dogo Gide a couple of years ago, he would have understated his contacts with jihadists. He would have pretended that he doesn't have any at all. Whereas in fact, we do know that he has.He has been in contact with various jihadists for some time. But then he could also maybe overstate his level of influence. Because there are instances in which the bandits find it advantageous to maybe assume the appearance of jihadists because they think it will make them seem more powerful, or because they think that it will give them some sort of advantage in negotiations, for example. That was the case with the Kankara abductions back in December 2020 that was conducted by Awwal Daudawa in Katsina. So it's a very important question, you know, how much are these bandits and jihadists working together? And it's one that I think requires a bit of a skeptical eye. Because sometimes things are not necessarily as they appear on the surface. And sometimes these bandits… they have [a] complicated kind of calculus that will determine how they interact with jihadists, whether they want to give you the jihadists credit for an operation or something like that. So I think that the Dogo Gide example is a very interesting one.Tobi; The sense I'm getting is 'this a bit hard to predict, because the tactics and the motives are constantly changing.' So before I draw you guys into the issue of causality, which is going to be my next question, briefly, given where James stopped, do you think that's part of the reason why the government and security forces have not been able to deal with this issue? Because it's constantly in flux, it's unpredictable? And like he said, there is need for a patient and cautious strategy. Also, and this is a bit speculative, are there people in government to your knowledge who are also aware, and why is that not reflecting in the security approach?Dr. Rufai; Well, you see, what is important about the approach to this particular security threat, in my opinion, is to have a detailed, deeper, and clearer understanding of the issues. And even within the bandit cycle, for instance, we've seen people in the rural areas with AK 47 and AK 49, 24/7, that are not bandits. You can see a major problem now. When you define a bandit on the basis of weapon, for instance, you've completely missed the issue. Why? Because some of these people bearing these weapons are, basically, and fundamentally, using them for self-defense. Without these weapons, for instance, the bandits will within a twinkle of an eye, wipe them out. And that becomes a very serious problem and also challenging to the Nigerian security operatives as well. So, now, the government actually, in my opinion, the security operatives are doing their utmost best, but their best is not enough. It is not enough because there is still a gap. And what is that gap? A knowledge gap of what actually is happening in the field. It is not just about going kinetic. Before you go kinetic, before you take the kinetic approach, for instance, it is far more important to have an underground knowledge of what is obtainable in the rural areas. For instance, the Gide we are talking about, a long time ago, has established a mutual relationship and understanding with the rural communities. And I'm telling you, the rural communities around Dansadau, around Baba Doka, around Birnin Gwari, around Madada, around Dandala will never or have never seen Dogo Gide as a problem or as a threat.That, rather, what he is after is the abduction of school children, abduction of expatriates, and his major problem is with the federal government. And as long as he will keep on fighting the State, the local communities have no problem with him, they may even decide to support him.And at times, getting credible intelligence from the rural areas by the security agencies becomes a very serious problem, because the rurals will rather relate with the bandits than with the Nigerian state. You can see a major problem, a major problem here. And again, because of this level of intermingling between the bandits, where areas that are dominated by the bandits. And also, with Boko Haram elements, where areas dominated by the Boko Haram elements with the rural communities, it becomes a very difficult exercise for the security agencies to execute operations in those areas. And the major dilemma they are facing today, I'm talking about the agencies - the security agencies - is the issue of the collateral damage. If at all you are going to address this issue head-on, then definitely the issue of the collateral damage will be 100%. Why, because, you cannot differentiate who is a bandit and who is not? Who is a member of Boko Haram, and who is not? Who is a passive and active collaborator of these people? And these are some of the issues that actually compounded the issue more. So we cannot say that the security agencies are not doing anything in the field. But, in my opinion, what they are doing is not enough. What is important is not going to kinetic alone, but let us have a clearer and deeper understanding of the issues. And for that to be done, a lot of underground research(es) needs to be conducted, and a lot of sensitization and mobilization, and winning the support and confidence of the rurals or the locals must be done without which I think we are likely going to continue this war to a foreseeable future.Tobi; You want to weigh in James? James; Yeah, I guess I would just add... I think in addition to everything that Dr. Rufai has just said, one other challenge, as Dr Rufai noted in a previous answer to your question that, you know, the issue with banditry in many ways is very local. But it's also become much more of a national issue. And this also, in some ways, complicates the response of the state because the state itself is not monolithic, right.If you look at, you know, who is involved in trying to address this issue of banditry, very often these issues are occurring at a very local level, within a particular district within a particular emirate within a particular local government area. But also, it's become much more of a national issue.The security forces, particularly the military, since the launch of the first major military offensive operation [...] - that was now what? six, seven years ago. The military has also been engaged in the northwest in these anti-banditry operations. And so sometimes, there have been issues of a lack of coordination between all the various stakeholders on the side of, you know, the governments, if you will - broadly defined to include district officials, traditional rulers, local stakeholders like that - where sometimes you'll have one community [that] is actually attempting to negotiate something like a peace deal with some of the local bandits or an amnesty with the local bandits at the same time that the military is conducting a military offensive in the area. And so this kind of erodes trust. Or likewise, there will be times where, you know, a certain area is being really badly affected by the bandits, but the military's focusing on another area because their forces are overstretched. And so I think it's one of the challenges that Nigeria faces so far is looking at, okay, who are the authorities or the stakeholders that are tasked with addressing this issue of banditry? And how can you increase the coordination between the state governments; but also between the state and the federal governments; between the states and the local governments; between the formal authorities and the more informal or traditional authorities which in many regions still have very significant informal influence. So that's also been one of the challenges. And it's reflected to some extent, as he noted in the very fractured nature of the bandits themselves. We were discussing this yesterday with some colleagues of mine here at Unilag after the presentation, one of whom is from the Niger Delta area, and we're comparing and contrasting. He was saying, why can't they do what they did in the Delta? You know, what is the difference between what's happening in the Delta and what's happening in the Northwest? And Dr. Rufai put it very well. He said, you know, in the Delta, the militants can speak with one or two or three voices. But this is a big challenge for the bandits. So, anyone can form a gang these days, there are just so many bandits that there's no one person you can talk to, that represents all the bandits and you can negotiate.Dr. Rufai; And I think, added to the issue of interagency rivalry that he's talking about, it is actually a major challenge. And when you look at the operations against banditry in the northwest today, it has become a military affair. And if all is well, if teams are moving the way they should, this is an issue that's supposed to be addressed by the police. But where are the Nigerian police force today when you're talking about banditry? Nobody talks about the police. And not even the police, for instance, we have the Civil Defense. These are very local problems, local security challenges that actually supposed to be addressed by these people. But as we speak today, it is actually the military that is in charge of addressing some of these issues. And look at it, the role of the military, within the context of provision of internal security, for instance... virtually there are so many operations taking place, virtually in every part of the country. 36 states, including Abuja, for instance, you'll find different military operations. Look at the number of the military within the context of the increasing rate of crime and the violence, insecurity, for instance, the two cannot in any way match. And that becomes a very serious problem. And by extension, the military [personnel] are overstretched and overwhelmed by the level of conflict taking place in the country. And not only that, this problem of banditry just like I said earlier, is basically a local problem. And it is something that actually requires the activities of special forces. Do we really have the special forces within even the military, for instance, to address this issue? Because there's not just an affair of [the military]. Of course, nobody is talking about the State Department and the underground role they are supposed to play in this. So virtually, it is the military operating alone.And this same military [personnel] we're talking about are gradually overwhelmed by the volume, and also the gravity of the problem. They don't even know, in some cases, where to start from. Identifying who is their friend and who is their enemy becomes a problem. The attack on the train, the Abuja-Kaduna train we are talking about, is not in any way aimed at the victims. Rather, to send a danger signal to the Nigerian state. And they've actually succeeded in doing that. And as we speak, identifying where these people are, becomes a huge problem to virtually all the security agencies. Simply because of what? Because of lack of harmony, lack of coordination, and lack of peaceful working relations amongst all the security agencies.Tobi; I don't want to lean too hard on the security angle, at least for now. Because I mean, primarily, you guys are researchers, not policy advisors, at least for the purpose of this conversation. So let's go back for a little bit. Because in your work, you guys stated that the manifestation of this is multi-dimensional. There’s elements of criminality going on, economic opportunism in inter-ethnic clashes, you know, there's also the issue of climate change and damage to the environment and the strain that puts on resources between farmers and herders and many other interests. But what ties these all together? Right? How did this become such a national Flashpoint? Because I recall, maybe, 2016 when these attacks started blasting on the pages of newspapers, we don't even know the word bandit. Right? Bandit made it into the national Zeitgeist much later. It was always herders, Fulani herdsmen, you know. At some point, the presidency was claiming that they're actually foreigners who come to attack locals and carry out criminality and all that. So help me in as many words as you can untangle the causality of this. How did this escalate?James; I think Dr. Rufai can give the ... I mean, it's very multi-dimensional. And he's the historian and has been looking at this for a long time. And you know, in our different reports, we've explained this, yes, there's issues of land use, there's [the] issue of ethnicity, all these different factors that go into it. I think the one that I always stress, and these coming from my background, I worked in Washington, DC for several years, I'm still in contact with people there. Like, when people talk about farmer-herder conflict in Africa, and very often in DC, the first thing is that people have a very reductionist view of it.That's in many ways, kind of, very apolitical in some ways. They think farmers and herders used to get along, and then climate change meant there were fewer and there's fewer land, fewer resources and so now they're fighting each other. And climate change is definitely real, it's definitely a problem. It's absolutely aggravating the situation there. But I think that leaning too hard on the climate change angle, and you see sometimes governments doing this, not just Nigeria, but other governments: they'll say, ah, you know, the problem here is climate change - it's a way to escape responsibility, right? Because you throw up your hands and say, we didn't do this. Tobi; It's not my fault.James; It's not my fault. I think that one of the central issues that is seen in every aspect of how this conflict escalated from people becoming angry, to the weapons flowing into the region, to people not trusting their neighbors, to not trusting the authorities… one of the central issues is corruption.And this is an issue everywhere in Nigeria, right? It's not just in the northwest. But the specific ways it played out in the northwest, I think had a very pivotal role to play. From people not feeling that they could trust the criminal justice system or the authorities to handle disputes or legal matters related to land use, farmer-herder issues. Herdsmen felt that they were really being extorted because they were seen as kind of an easy target by authorities… whether it's the police, village heads, judges in the courts, they were seen as people that can easily be extorted. And then just everything from the fact that I mean, the IGP announced the other day that something like 85,000 AK 47s that belong to the police are unaccounted for. Tobi; Yeah.James; Right. And you wonder how you go out and, you know, we both interview bandits, we've seen nine-year-olds with AK 47s? How is it that that happens? It's not all coming from the Nigerian military or police stockpiles. But you know, there are many reasons that there are so many weapons in West Africa today.But corruption is a huge challenge, both in the inability to prevent weapons from flowing into and around the country. And also the fact that very often weapons that are intended for use by the Nigerian state find their way into the hands of criminals.So I could go on and on that, but I think interviewing people in the Northwest, and you ask them how did this start? Very often they'll talk about corruption.Dr. Rufai; I think he has actually said it all. What is far more important is the issue of corruption, the issue of corruption he's talking about. But again, added to that is, the collapse in our family value system actually added to the crisis. Situations where we have families that could not in any way take care of their children. Within the context of, in some cases, poverty, unemployment, underemployment, all play significant roles in the conflict. And also within the context of the traditional authorities again, it's become a very serious problem. And the point he pointed out on the issue of corruption. Corruption within the traditional rulers contributed and contributed significantly to the escalation of the conflict. But there are a lot of issues lumped together, more especially this issue of injustice.All people contacted and also interacted, interviewed on this issue of rural banditry are pointing to the issue of injustice. Injustice in all sense of the word. Injustice from the traditional authorities, injustice from the security agencies, injustice from virtually every angle of the society, and that plays a very important role, and it serves as a unifying factor that contributed to and that unite virtually most of the bandits together. For instance, you see them also talking about the activities of the vigilante and the an sake. And when you look at the operations of the vigilante and the an sake, it's nothing other than the idea of extrajudicial killings. The level of extrajudicial killings actually taking place in the rural areas is unimaginable even before the issue of rural banditry becomes a problem. And that is why the Fulani people feel they are not actually taken care of, they are absolutely rejected and detected by the Nigerian states and they feel they are on their own. And the best thing to do is to fight for their freedom. And that idea of freedom fighting, forming a union, or a gang for the Fulani liberation movement, for instance, was the bedrock of the banditry.So there are a lot of issues put together. And more so, within the context of the Fulani, they feel the presidency, for instance, Mr. President is a Fulani and they feel if at all they need to be taken care of, there is no regime that's supposed to take good care of them other than this particular regime that the head is someone that is their own - one of them. And that becomes a problem. And you see some of them lamenting and lamenting bitterly about the level of neglect by the State - by both the federal government and also the state government. And when you look at it, [the] absence of state presence plays also a very important role in the rural areas. Infrastructure-wise, for instance, the presence of security in the rural areas is virtually zero. I am talking about villages, I am talking about rural areas. You go to a village with 3000-4000 people, you cannot in any way see a single presence of the State, and that becomes a huge problem. So there is this type of high level of disconnection between the rural world and the urban world. And now, it is the rural world fighting in the urban world. Because of what? Because the rural world was neglected, the rural world was not taken care of, the rural world was absolutely spared from [infrastructure-wise] what we see in the urban centers. And that also constitutes a major problem. Talking about the issue of climate change, talking about the farmer-header issue, in my opinion, are just issues that are of secondary importance to this violent conflict. There has been farmer-herder conflict right from day one, right from the onset. And not only that, traditionally, conflict resolution mechanisms or dispute resolution mechanisms, for instance, were actually at work, and also addressing the farmer-herder clashes. And then the question is, where are they? Taken away by so many things, taken away by the issue of injustice, by the issue of corruption, and lack of respect for traditional authorities.And today, some of these traditional authorities, village heads, district heads, and to some extent, emirs, in Zamfara, in Sokoto, and in other places are under the control of these bandits. Simply because no state presence, no security presence, and the only thing they think they will do is to listen to the bandits.Dance according to the tune of these bandits, and also subscribe to the view of the bandits. Not because they want to do so, but because they were neglected by the federal and the state authorities. And that constitutes a very big problem. Unless we get some of these things right, unless we fix some of these issues, lacuna, and problems associated with the rural areas, I don't think peace will actually elude some of our urban centers and even at the national level.Tobi; It's so important for me to talk about this because in trying to analyze a lot of these issues, some things become a talking point. Right. And even though the government's censorious stance kicks in to quell some of these things, but they do happen. Whether it's on social media, or on internet radios, that's why I'm trying to tease out the issue of causality. Because some people will tell you, without any iota of doubt, that there is a Fulanisation agenda going on and that is the underlying driver of this. Some will say there is a systematic massacre of Christians going on in that region, that has drawn the attention of the Trump administration on religious persecution and so many other issues. So it's very important for the purpose of the audience, and you know, Nigeria is a diverse multi-ethnic society, it's easy for certain talking points to get away and... I mean, it becomes something else. So, now, I get you correctly. Even the issue of causality is not just one thing. But I'm saying it, maybe you guys are not, there's a huge level of state failure going on. Right. Now, my question then is, elections: politicians are campaigning again. As a matter of fact, one thing I learned from this conversation is that nobody is even talking about the issue of restructuring or decentralization of power in the context of this conflict. Right? We are talking about VAT or how to administer Lagos or Port Harcourt or Kaduna. So nobody is even talking about how empowering local governance, local institutions can actually bring peace, you know.But today, if you ask everybody, insecurity is the number one national issue. You know, all politicians are saying that if you elect me, I'm going to solve this... So then my question is, given the level of state failure that I am saying that I can tease out from this conversation, if you have to sketch some kind of starting point or an attempt at addressing the issue, where would you start from?Dr. Rufai; Excuse me, please, I think you've raised very critical issues that require [a] deeper and clearer explanation.Tobi; Please go on.Dr. Rufai; The first issue is the Fulanisation of maybe Nigeria or northern Nigeria, or whatever. I think if at all, there is an ethnic group that is understudied, and that is still less clear in terms of the nature, the operations, and the relationship, I think it's the Fulani.There is a high level of internal division, internal rivalry, and internal conflict among the Fulani. They are not in any way a one united ethnic group as we see, in the case of the Hausa, in the case of the Nupe, and, to some extent, in the case of the Yoruba, and the case of the Igbo.These are people that are so much attached to their traditional and local way of life. Even if you are born and brought up a Fulani, if you don't have respect and value for the Fulani culture, they don't consider you as part of them. And that is why 90%, let me not exaggerate - 60 or 70%, of the victims of rural violence, rural insecurity, rural banditry are Fulani. And 90% of the victims are not just Fulani, are also Muslims. You get the point. And you interact with some of these bandits, you talk about, okay, this person you killed, this person you rustled [their] cattle, this person you intimidate, this village you actually raided, for instance, it is a Fulani dominated village, they will tell you that that particular person, that particular village, that particular community you're talking about, we don't consider them as members of the Fulani. They are not in any way respected within the Fulani circle. They have their own code of conduct that serves as their guiding principles, that serve as their Constitution. Whoever strays away from that code of conduct, for instance, they have no value, no respect for him. And there is also a striking difference between an urban and the rural Fulani. For instance, the town Fulani is different from the village Fulani, the village Fulani is different from the nomadic Fulani, the nomadic Fulani is different from the stationed Fulani. All these nuances are not really clear. Now, if you decide to create a whole northern Nigeria to be under the control of the Fulani, I am sure there will be a lot of crisis and a lot of conflict, internal dynamics and internal differences will not even allow that to happen. Now, in spite of all this, if you have the knowledge and understanding of this, you go by the code of conduct, if you also don't speak the Fulfulde language, they have no respect and no value for you. These are things that people don't understand.Talking about now, a Fulani agenda, trying to create... No. And when it comes to the issue of suppression, exploitation, high level of injustice, I think the level of injustice committed against the Fulani in Nigeria could not be compared with injustice committed against any other ethnic group in Nigeria. These are people that I don't want to use the word docile, but are people that don't voice out. They are people that actually have this idea of not forgiving, and also not forgetting. You commit a crime, you cheat a Fulani man, for instance, today, if he sees you after 10-20 years, he will remember. And he will also wait for a chance and a better opportunity to retaliate. So now, we are simply paying the price of social injustice, exploitation, extortion that we've committed against these people over time, and it has manifested. And that is why when they decided to form up a union in 2011, you find a large number of Fulani people with long historical and deep-rooted grievances populating the gang. Virtually the first generation of the bandits, for instance, have that feeling.And you see if I am given the opportunity today….Tobi; Yeah.Dr. Rufai; To address the problem of rural banditry as the president of this country... I think the easiest way to address the issue is local government autonomy, no more, no less. If you give local government autonomy today, you have no problem with the rural areas. Rural communities will actually hold their local government Chairmen accountable, their are counselors accountable. And when there was local government autonomy in the past, for instance, we've seen the level of infrastructural development taking place in the rural areas. Because every area, every ward, every community has a representative in the local governance. And for instance, you cannot be relating with the local authorities, with the local government chairman without complaining and we've seen the level of projects executed by these local government chairmen in the rural areas. And some of these projects we're talking about are still there in the rural areas. But the major bottleneck is governance will certainly not allow that to happen unless and until they are overpowered, or else they will not allow local government autonomy. They will not because they are the ones controlling the resources. All local government resources go to the state governments. And when you go to the local government areas to the rural areas, you find virtually nothing. So now, if you have this idea of local governance, they are given their autonomy, they get their subvention directly from [the] Federal [Governement], monthly, for instance, you don't even need to hold these local government Chairmen accountable over what is happening in rural areas, the local communities will be the one putting pressure on them to work. And you set in also the idea of high level of competition among the local government chairmen, everyone will be competing. And whenever and wherever there is a rural or a local violence, rural conflict coming up, you hold the local government chairman accountable. So I think, in my opinion, the answer to some of these problems revolves around local government.James; I think, and I would agree with everything you said there, and I think, unfortunately, not to be too pessimistic but that's one reason I don't see this situation dramatically improving anytime soon. Because all of these issues, you know, I'm not an expert in Nigerian governance, but looking at like the security sector, for example, which is a scenario maybe I'm a bit more familiar with. We got a question when we gave our presentation at the University of Lagos yesterday, and one of the questions I got was about state police, people are always fighting about state police. And as I was talking to the person who asked the question after the presentation; I was like, Look, I don't have a strong opinion one way or the other about state police versus Federal Police. All I can say is that there's not going to be some law that just creates state police tomorrow, like, that's not going to happen. Because it all ties into larger questions of the federal structure. You can't just have, you know, a reform of the police into the state police level in a vacuum. Everything is about this larger question of the structure of the federal government, which also gets into this question of oil rents, and you know, how the government funds itself. And so you're not going to be able to pick at these little issues so much and say, Okay, we'll do a bit, we'll restructure the police to the state police, we'll give local government autonomy because all of it ties into this bigger question about the structure of the Nigerian state. And I don't have like a vision for, oh, here's how you should reconstruct Nigeria to improve all these issues. But it's simply an observation that many of these reforms or these kinds of challenges that people have identified that I think are already very much in the public consciousness about, you know, people are demanding local government autonomy, state police, all that stuff...there's a reason that hasn't happened yet. And it's because there are significant structural political impediments to that happening. And so I think that if you know, if the problem really is that, okay, it's the structure of the federal police force, that that's one of the major challenges, then that's not something that's going to be solved overnight.Tobi; One thing that came to my mind now is the issue of power generation. National Assembly just passed a law that would actually require the ratification of two-thirds of the states... good luck with that happening...that then allows state governments to generate their own power. So we've all been locked into this dysfunctional structure. So like you, James, I'm not super optimistic. But one thing I want to push you guys on... your work is gaining a lot of exposure and I'm sure a lot more international exposure is still ahead. Hopefully, there'll be a book. So, now, one thing that regularly comes up is....there was a time the President even wrote an op-ed, on the Financial Times asking for international aid, and security, securing weapons, lifting some of the restrictions, and all that. My point is, how should the international community engage on this banditry issue? Because we just talked about how the security forces sometimes are not the appropriate force level contact for some of these problems. There have been issues of extrajudicial killings even by the security forces, there's the huge issue of excessive force, even in bombings, air raids, you know, collateral damage, and all that. And the same government that controls the security forces then goes to the international community, whether it's the EU, or China, or the United States for aid and assistance in tackling insecurity. But, given the complexity of this issue, how should the international community engage on this [issue]?James; It's really tough. The international community, I think, when we say that what you really mean is like Western governments...Tobi; Absolutely...James; China, depending on what the context is...Tobi; Yeah. There's a Western alliance.James; Yeah, exactly. The Western alliance. I think these conflicts are so complex, deep-rooted in these kinds of systemic issues in Nigeria. And frankly, we just don't have a great track record, you know, speaking as an Oyinbo man, we don't have a great track record of intervening in complex conflict situations like this. I think that one thing that I was very wary of... this is something that we kind of touched on a bit at the end of our study on jihadisation is that, you know, for now, the bandits have a much more parochial local agenda than the jihadists.Dr. Rufai; Yeah.James; This Ansaru, one of the things that was really interesting interviewing with people who had heard Ansaru preach in their villages, in these villages Birnin Gwari, they would say: yeah, Ansaru, they're always complaining about America. They're always saying: your fight is not with Nigeria, your fight is not with this, your fight is with America. They're the great Satan, they're hurting us. And these people they think, 'huh?' you know, that doesn't really resonate with them. They think 'no, no, my complaint is with the local governments and you know, the fact that I don't have roads and school and stuff,' they're not thinking in terms of this big ideological struggle. And I think it's the same for the bandits, you know.I was able to interview several bandits who... they see me, a foreigner, a Christian man, they're just oh, they're very interested. They want to learn, oh, what's the, you know... they're even asking what's Bature land, like, you know, are there different tribes of Bature? Very curious, they did not have these strong preconceived notions about the West and whether or not it's a friend or an enemy. It was very remote to them, you know. And so I think that if you had the kind of Western powers coming in and taking a more visible role in, for example, security assistance or something, then in some ways you'd be giving propaganda to the jihadist right, you know. And I'm not saying anyone's suggesting this now. But since your question was okay, the Nigerian military is not handling the situation sufficiently, what can the international community do? I do not think that the answer is to kind of take on a more forceful role, right? If you had these, like Reaper drones flying over northwestern Nigeria, these bandits, you know, their fight is a local fight. But all of a sudden, they're getting pursued by US military hardware, they go what's happening? And then that's the moment that Ansaru can say, ah, we told you, you see? Your real enemy is America. Dr. Rufai; Yeah. James; You weren't bothering anyone but these Americans, they're ideologically hell-bent on killing Muslims. And so that's why you have to join us. So I think this is a very long way... I'm not giving you a satisfactory answer, I'm just saying what I think we shouldn't do. But I think that it's important to stress that level of caution that whatever approach, the ''international community'' takes, I think it needs to be very careful, very clear to let Nigerians lead on this, to not be taking a too visible role in some ways, especially on the security front. And I think that's a challenge, right? Because as you know, it's a dilemma in some ways, because the Nigerian security forces have not shown the capacity to handle this. But I think that very often, you know, the medicine can be worse than the disease. And so I think that that's kind of my word of caution. But I'll let Dr. Rufai...Tobi; I get you and I'll get to Dr. [Rufai] in a minute, so my question is actually a lot more subtle than that. Of course, everything you say is true. If you have drones flying over the Northwest, this will certainly make it worse but what I'm asking is [that] there is some engagement going on, either it is funding or it is selling military hardware to the Nigerian government, that probably makes this worse? Maybe not directly, from the Western alliance…But, what I'm saying is, how should the engagement change if it's going to, to be a bit more progressive? Even if it is to fund more local researchers to better understand the problem? Right? I mean, to say the obvious, at least for me, in this particular case, it took an Oyinbo man, like you said, to be aware of his work. James; Yeah, it's true. It's one of the challenges.Tobi; Which is not supposed to be so. Right? So I'll go back to that point, how exactly should engagement be, even at [the] diplomatic level? Not just force? How do we better make the incentive and issues clear? Dr, you can weigh in?Dr. Rufai; You see, in my own opinion, rather than going too much international, looking at the Western world... I think, to address this issue properly and adequately, the Nigerien government [Niger Republic] has a better, clearer, and deeper understanding of Northwest's problem, unfortunately, than even the Nigerian state.Because when these conflicts actually started, it was more or less a cross-border issue between Nigeria and Niger. And what the Nigerien Government fantastically did during that period, is to profile all the bandits along the border. Both on the Nigerian side, and also on the Nigerian side. Not just an ordinary profiling, but rather to have the names, the locations, and also the family background of each and every potential bandit. And of course, they succeeded in drawing a map of their locations, and also their relationships. And when that was also going on, for instance, every local head... I mean, either the village head, or a district head, or an emir in Niger, for instance, in that particular part of the world, they have the names of these people. And these people or these bandits, for instance, were declared wanted. And we've seen, of course, going by my interviews, and also fieldwork in some part of Niger, where whenever a bandit comes in, they alert the authorities. And that was how they succeeded in picking [a] larger number of them that are in Niger. On the Nigerian side, when the Northwestern governors, for instance, feel there is need for collaboration with their counterparts in Niger. Of course, they had series of meetings with the governors of Northwest - Kano, Katsina, Sokoto, Zamfara, and the rest. But their unfortunate conclusion is that we are not serious people, these governors are not in any way committed to ending banditry anytime soon. Because there were, of course, some series of joint operations, but at the end of the day, the Nigerien side that were committed, and also ready to end the problem, were rather given out to the bandits.To the extent that they lost some of their officers and men in the course of fighting banditry. And they felt that is basically coming from the neglect of the Nigerian or the Northwestern authorities. And on that basis, they cease to assist, they cease to discuss issues related to insecurity in the Northwest of Nigeria. And not only that, if today, the Nigerien government decides to strengthen its border security, the movement of small arms and light weapons into the northwest, into Nigeria, will certainly reduce and reduce drastically. But since they feel we are not serious people, we are not committed to end[ing] the problem, or the security challenges, for instance, they let it go and they loosely operate along the border. And we've seen cases and instances where people were saying that, okay, there are cases of people moving into the country with arms and ammunition across the border, but Nigerien border officials, for instance, will decide to even close their eyes and feel nothing is happening. And some of these arms and ammunition as long as they aren't going to be used in Niger, they let it move into the northern part [of Nigeria]. So instead of looking for assistance, financial, funding, selling [buying] of military hardware from the Western world, the problem still remains local. I said it's local because you cannot differentiate [between] the people who live in Daura, the President's hometown for instance, and the people who live in Kwangalam, which is in Niger Republic. It is a stone's throw. They are the same father... people from the same father and the same mother, they are people of the same family. And now, there could be other forms of engagement at the local level without necessarily engaging or even involving the state government, not to talk about the federal government. So if you strengthen this old relationship between these border communities, it is enough, for instance, for you to address the issue. And the unfortunate scenario, the unfortunate happening and now is that you see two-three kilometres... for instance, if you take Illela, you can trek from Illela which is in Nigeria in Sokoto State to Kwani, which is just three-four kilometres to Kwani. And you see absolute peace, absolute security, absolute harmony in Kwani, and a high level of insecurity in Illela. And what the larger number of the people in Illela do now is when it is 6 'o' clock, they trek down to the other side of the border...To sleep!To some extent not even sleep in houses, in villages... they sleep in an open space along the border. Wake up in the following morning and move to Nigeria for their daily business and economic activities. So one begins to wonder what is actually happening?Not only in Illela, you go to Kwangalam, you find the same thing. You go to the Medujia, you find the same thing. You go to Jibia, you find the same thing. You ask the question, what is actually happening? And today, some of these border communities have more confidence, trust, pride in the Nigerien security than the Nigerian security. And in an event of [an] attack, they'd rather call the Zandarma, for instance, in Niger to call other security operatives along the border in Niger than to call Nigerian security operatives. So the trust, confidence, is not there at all. So if now we can strengthen international relations within these border areas, look at issues around ECOWAS protocol, for instance, free movement and all that, strengthen that aspect. I think it is something that will go a long way in addressing some of these challenges.Rather than seeking for funds, military hardware, support, from the international communities. And no right-thinking nation in the Western world will engage itself or involve itself in the mess that is happening in Nigeria because it is a local problem.It is a local problem. You get the point. And probably the only thing I think they will do in cases like that is to provide, probably, the necessary advice, the necessary military training, and all that. If not, nobody will just come directly and get themselves into that. And not only that, the major people, people having a very serious threat on this are basically the Chinese. As we speak, there are a large number of Chinese nationalities that were abducted by these bandits. Though some people say bandit and I argue, I said, no, not bandit, rather, Boko Haram, Ansaru, and the rest of them.Because they are people that relate directly with the rural communities. And because of that relationship, they are vulnerable to abduction. And unfortunately, if you interact with some of these Chinese nationalities, the information and the news you will get from them is frightening. It's frightening because we've seen instances and situations where the security guards that are supposed to provide security to these people were the same people collaborating, serving as informants, serving as spy agents to some of these bandits, and also to some of these Boko Haram members.Meaning they facilitate the abduction of these nationalities. And at the end of the day, they will get their own share of the loots. So, there are lots of ugly stories taking place in the country, at times is even better you don't know than you know because you know you won't even say. Because the situation is completely hopeless.James; I think that last point... the penultimate point about strengthening cooperation with Nigeria and Niger. I think that's a great comment, in part because, also, it's not something that the international community, you know, the Western powers needs to do. The mechanisms for that exist, right? Tobi; Yeah.James; You have ECOWAS, you already have all these bilateral forums and stuff between them. So it's just there needs to be the political will on both sides to actually work together on this. This isn't something that you need to turn to Washington or Brussels or London for. These mechanisms for Regional Cooperation already exist, it's just a question of whether there's the political will to use them to actually channel effort towards addressing these issues.Tobi; So I mean, your jobs might be hard, because sometimes the numbers that you deal with, and analyse, are actual human lives. And I know we've been analytical and impersonal so far. These are serious issues with real lives at stake.People are dying, 1000s, every month now, in Nigeria. So on that sombre note, I think we can close the podcast with this last lighthearted question. What's the one idea - it's a bit of a tradition on the show.... what's the one idea that inspires you, that you would like to see spread? That you'd like to see people everywhere believe, adopt, or just be fascinated by? And it could be anything. So what keeps you guys going...what keeps you guys slogging through this?James; Caffeine keeps me going. [laughs]It can be hard to be optimistic sometimes. But I think seeing... I don't know, maybe it's a bit banal, but seeing the energy that many of my Nigerian colleagues have for actually trying to address this issue, I think that helps me avoid fatalism, maybe. I think even Dr. Rufai, you know, we're sharing accommodation here in Unilag, he was up several hours later than I was last night and he was up before me. And so I think sometimes if I get fatalistic or tired, I remember that there are a lot of good people (not just Dr. Rufai that, you know, I got the benefit of working with a number of colleagues in Abuja, Kaduna, people up in Gusau) who genuinely believe that there are solutions to this that they need to be pushing for. For them, the stakes are much higher than they are for me, I have to be honest about that, you know. And so I think that seeing the enthusiasm, the energy, that people bring to this…it acts as a check on my kind of instinct towards pessimism and fatalism. Yeah, I think that's important.Dr. Rufai; I think for me, all I want to see is peace. Harmony. Inter-community relations and inter-community collaboration that actually used to happen in the past. Where we have a free rural world. People operate freely, relate freely, and that love for one another is there.But the unfortunate story is that today, no trust, no freedom, in fact, nothing works actually in the rural areas. And you interact with the rural communities (more), especially in Zamfara, where I know and where I conducted a larger part of my research. Some of these people will tell you [that] they don't need anything from the state government. All they want at the moment is nothing other than peace. A peace that will actually give them an opportunity to continue with their social, economic, and political way of life. They have their own definition of comfort. If it actually rains, cat and dog every year, they consider themselves as the most prosperous people.Because it is from that rain, the grains they produce, [the] different types of crops they harvest, for instance, that they run their daily and yearly life. An ordinary farmer in Zamfara, in Katsina, in some parts of Sokoto is not in any way poor (going by our own definition of poverty, poverty line, and also someone to be poor). Why, because they have their own way, local and the rural way of life... they harvest, they rear their animals, and you see them every year, paying money, millions to go on pilgrimage, Hajj, without intervention from the state, without a penny from anybody. And of course, from the foodstuff, they sustain their life. And they will tell you, if at all there is anything they need from the state, it is the infrastructure and facilities, particularly the roads. Access roads, where they will access the markets, no more, no less. They don't need electricity, for instance, they will tell you that 'take away your education,' they don't bother about that as long as they have operational Islamiyya schools, for instance. They will tell you that 'take away even your justice system,' as long as their traditional village heads are strong, alive, and active to [sic] their responsibilities. They believe in them, and they are capable of providing them with absolute justice. So all this beauty in the rural areas are [sic], today, no more. And what do we see in the rural areas today? A high level, an increasing number of internally displaced persons. People that were millionaires, I mean, millionaires in the actual sense of the war, before banditry, today, are beggars.Today, lives from hand to mouth. They have become so much degraded, wallowing in absolute and abject poverty as a result of these rural conflicts. And what do we see in the rural areas today, we see a large army of internally displaced persons, as I said, child prostitution, and we've seen marriage and the respected women that lost their beloved ones, their husbands, their relatives, their breadwinners, turning into prostitutes, just for them to survive. And the unfortunate story is that nobody cares, nobody reports and nobody tends to know that some of these things are happening. You will understand this better if you go to some of these rural areas.They are poor, not because they are naturally been poor, but because they were denied access to their farmlands by the bandits. And their own definition of life is land. Life begins and ends with land. If they have access to land, I mean farmland, for instance, they have access to a decent living and also to a life that could be compared with any other life in the urban centers. They don't need your water supply. They don't need your electricity. They don't need anything that one could think of within the context of a comfortable life in the urban center. Their rural setting, they are comfortable with it, because you'll see some of them spending five, six years without coming to the state capital. You ask them 'you've never been to Gusau,' for instance, which is your State Capital, he will tell you 'what will I do in Gusau? If at all, you see me in Gusau or any of the urban centers, probably I'm going to the airport, flying out to Mecca.'And look at it, these people will also tell you that the best people you can easily manage, govern and administer with ease are Nigerians and also the rural dwellers. You live a comfortable life, you steal their money, you engage yourself in corruption; they never bother. All they want is peace. If you give them peace, continue with your life. Because their belief is that in the Hereafter you will account for your deed. And that is where the problem lies. So in my opinion, I want to see life going back to normal, the way it used to be in the past - a prosperous and happy, rural areas. Thank you very much.Tobi; Thank you very much, Dr. RUfai. Thank you, James. It's really fantastic talking to both of you. And hopefully, when next we speak about this, things would have improved, hopefully. Thank you both so much. This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.ideasuntrapped.com/subscribe

Mind Bully
How To Stay Motivated During TOUGH Times| Justin Gray

Mind Bully

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 82:01


Todays guest is Justin Gray. He's a professional basketball player, and a former collegiate athlete at Texas Tech University. He is my brother, and my former teammate. One of the brightest people i've ever been around.He joins the pod as “Mr. TEXAS TECH” himself. A Florida boy, who quickly fell in love with the south plains and the 806.In this episode, Justin shares how he is able to find self-confidence, motivation, and inspiration,  in the face of adversity. @justin_gray5Justin Gray ON:ON Growing Up Wanting to Impress his Parents (4:20)ON Going from Public to Private School (16:00)ON Receiving Backlash when Committing to Texas Tech over Harvard (21:00)ON Starting as A Freshman at Texas Tech (29:00)ON Fracturing His Knee (30:25)ON Mental Battle in Fighting to Recovery (36:00)ON Tubby Smith Leaving For Memphis (39:15)ON Making Sacrifices for the team and Chris Beard (45:35)ON Playing through an Injury his Senior Year (51:25)ON His Mindset when Faced with Adversity (58:00)ON Leaving a Legacy at Texas Tech (1:01:50)ON Watching Texas Tech advance to Final 4 after he left (1:02:45)ON “Filthy Humans” (1:11:20)Fan Question (1:15:05)ON Overcoming His Mind Bully (1:17:50)Send your topic requests and questions to: contact@mindbully.com Follow the show:https://www.instagram.com/mindbullypodcasthttps://twitter.com/mindbullypodFollow the Host:https://www.instagram.com/kingno_https://twitter.com/kingno_Support the show

Gun Talk
Nigerian Gun Laws Enabled Attack; Pistol Caliber Carbines; Another Gun Repaired For Free: Gun Talk Radio | 06.12.22 Hour 3

Gun Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 43:41


In this hour: - Journalist David Codrea examines the gun laws that enabled the attack on parishioners in a Catholic church in Nigeria. The same gun laws some want passed in the U.S.. - Another gun maker repairs a gun at no charge.  Should the owner now change it? - Pistol caliber carbines. Tom Gresham's Gun Talk 06.12.22 Hour 3

Solomonster Sounds Off
Sound Off 760 - JOHN CENA RETURNS AND TONI STORM REVEALS WHY SHE LEFT WWE!

Solomonster Sounds Off

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 138:47


Support this week's sponsor by using the link below for the special Solomonster offer!Get 10 PERCENT OFF your first month of BetterHelp online therapy at http://www.betterhelp.com/solomonsterSolomonster is back with a LOADED episode with thoughts on Roman Reigns missing Money in the Bank, and a lot of other shows lately... an interesting twist in Stephanie McMahon's leave of absence from WWE and how the MLW lawsuit may tie in with it... Paige reveals that WWE will NOT be renewing her contract, and the creative idea that she pitched involving Ronda Rousey... spoilers from today's New Japan Dominion show with the Forbidden Door main event now set and which AEW star will be taking part in this year's G1 Climax... thoughts on AEW introducing an All-Atlantic championship... Toni Storm finally reveals the REAL reason why she quit WWE... an update on how long Cody Rhodes is expected to be gone after surgery for his pec tear... John Cena RETURNING to WWE later this month, who his opponent might be for Summerslam and pitching a tag team match for him that ties in with Finn Balor... Edge kicked out of his own Judgment Day faction and the creative plans for the group he was said to have disagreed with... thoughts on WALTER winning the Intercontinental championship and why Sami Zayn should win the Men's MITB match... Apollo Crews returns to NXT and loses his Nigerian accent... and now that Arn Anderson owns the Four Horsemen trademark for wrestling, the reason why AEW should NOT bring back the faction.Get Jon Moxley's book, narrated by Moxley himself, FREE when you use http://www.audibletrial.com/solomonster to sign up for a 30-day Audible trial!***Follow Solomonster on Twitter:http://www.twitter.com/solomonsterSubscribe to the Solomonster Sounds Off on YouTube:https://www.youtube.com/user/TheSolomonster?sub_confirmation=1Become a Solomonster Sounds Off Channel Member:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9jcg7mk93fGNqWPMfl_Aig/join

Black Women Travel Podcast
Chapter 116-Aisha of Moonlight Experiences, The Queer Nomads, + UK Black Pride

Black Women Travel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 55:17


Truly hope you enjoy and are inspired by this week's episode with Aisha. In this chapter Aisha talks about what it has meant to her to be Nigerian and Ghanainan, Christian and Muslim, and a queer Black woman. She talks about being sent from London to Nigeria at a young age, and when she returned,… Continue reading Chapter 116-Aisha of Moonlight Experiences, The Queer Nomads, + UK Black Pride The post Chapter 116-Aisha of Moonlight Experiences, The Queer Nomads, + UK Black Pride appeared first on Black Women Travel Podcast.

PRI's The World
US pledges $300 million in migration support at Americas Summit

PRI's The World

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 47:54


The Summit of the Americas started with discord but ended the week on a high note. The United States unveiled a long list of measures to confront the migration crisis in the Western Hemisphere and pledged $300 million to tackle the problems. And the Polish government is being accused of setting up a "pregnancy register" to document all the pregnancies in the country. The country's Health Ministry said the new database is being set up following a European Union directive, but abortion activists are not convinced. Plus, as the Golden State Warriors and Boston Celtics fight for basketball's biggest bragging rights, Celtics' head coach Ime Udoka, from Nigeria, has attracted lots of Nigerian fans in Boston to cheer them on. The World relies on listener support to power our nonprofit newsroom. If you count on The World to bring you human-centered stories from across the globe, make your gift today to help us reach our goal of raising $25,000 before June 30. Learn more and donate here.

Space: What The F**k, Dude?!
"Some Greasy Little Horror"

Space: What The F**k, Dude?!

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 16:49


The Fun Friday Pod! This week: Teens hitting on Johnny Depp's daughter, "discipline equals freedom," being nice to people who believe in ESP, casinos in NYC, work vs. education, and two trillion galaxies.My Insta is hacked at the moment (thanks, Nigerian hackers!) but you can still follow me at @blackcatcomedy And come to a show! Every Friday 9:00 at Black Cat LES. 172 Rivington NYC. Support the show

Africa Daily
Can Nigerians feel safe after Owo church attack?

Africa Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 17:04


Funerals have begun for some of the forty people killed after armed men burst into a Catholic church in the town of Owo in the South West of Nigeria – shooting anyone who moved, and setting off explosives. The town's medical facility has been overwhelmed with casualties – many of whom had been shot. The authorities say they suspect the extremist group Islamic State West Africa Province carried out the attack. If confirmed, it would be the first attack by the IS-linked militants in southern Nigeria - signifying an expansion of its violence. But questions are being asked about why armed men could so brazenly attack a church in the very middle of a town, and then apparently just melt away like ‘ghosts'. Africa Daily hears the stories of those who lived through the attack – and asks, if such an horrific attack can take place in an area that's previously been relatively safe, is there anywhere in Nigeria that's not impacted by violence and insecurity?

Dr Taylor Marshall Catholic Show
822: Over 50 Christians Killed in Nigerian Catholic Church [Podcast]

Dr Taylor Marshall Catholic Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 12:39


At least 50 Catholics were killed and others injured on Pentecost Sunday when gunmen attacked worshippers at a Catholic church in southwestern Nigeria. Watch this new podcast episode by clicking here: Or listen to the audio mp3 here: If you'd like to order a copy of Taylor's new book Infiltration: The Plot to Destroy the […] The post 822: Over 50 Christians Killed in Nigerian Catholic Church [Podcast] appeared first on Taylor Marshall.