Podcasts about labour mp

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Best podcasts about labour mp

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Latest podcast episodes about labour mp

Last Word
Jeff Beck, Alice Mahon, Tom Karen OBE, Gina Lollobrigida

Last Word

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 28:04


Matthew Bannister on Jeff Beck (pictured), who was acclaimed as one of the most influential and innovative rock guitarists of all time. Alice Mahon, the left wing Labour MP who often rebelled against her own party. Tom Karen OBE, the designer who came up with the Raleigh Chopper Bike, the Bond Bug, the Reliant Robin and the Popemobile. Gina Lollobrigida, the first post war Italian actress to gain an international reputation as a sex symbol. She was known for her rivalry with Sophia Loren. Producer: Neil George Interviewed guest: Martin Power Interviewed guest: Jeremy Corbyn Interviewed guest: Julia Langdon Interviewed guest: Eugenie Karen Interviewed guest: Josephine Bahns Interviewed guest: Angie Errigo Archive clips used: BrianMay.Com, Thoughts on sad loss of Jeff Beck 12/01/2023; UK Parliament, Margaret Thatcher's last Prime Minister's Questions 27/11/1990; Raleigh, Noel Edmonds' Raleigh bike advert 1978; Discovery Real Time, Wheeler Dealers S07E06 Bond Bug 12/10/2010; krc/ YouTube, sound effect Landspeeder - Star Wars 18/01/2017; BBC Sound Archive, The Pope in Liverpool 30/05/1982; BBC Sound Archive, The Morning Show - African Service 07/01/1970; Excelsa Film/ Omnium International du Film/ Ponti-De Laurentiis Cinematografica, Women of Rome - clip (1954); Hecht-Lancaster Productions/ Joanna Productions/ Susan Productions, Trapeze - trailer (1956); 7 Pictures/ Raoul Walsh Enterprises, Come September - trailer (1961); BBC One, Parkinson 28/09/1974; Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer/ Canterbury Production, Never So Few - trailer (1959).

RNZ: Checkpoint
Ardern resigns: What does it mean for Waitangi, Ratana?

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 3:37


Labour MPs get their election skates on early, determined to choose Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern's replacement on Sunday. The Prime Minister's announcement came as a shock to her caucus yesterday. Her last official day is just two weeks away on February 7. So who will replace her as our next leader? What impact will it have on Labour's election hopes? And what does it mean for this year's Ratana and Waitangi celebrations? Political reporter, Katie Scotcher begins our coverage in Napier.

RNZ: Checkpoint
Swing seat Maungakiekie reacts to Jacinda Ardern's resignation

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 3:18


Some people in one of the country's most marginal seats believe Labour has essentially handed National the 2023 election following the shock resignation of the Prime Minister. Maungakiekie, taking in suburbs in Auckland like Penrose, Royal Oak and Mt Wellington has been one of our more closely fought electorates. In 2017, it elected a National MP. In 2020, a Labour MP. Jonty Dine gauged the mood of the electorate.

RNZ: Checkpoint
Sunday looms for Labour MPs to elect new Prime Minister

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 7:45


Sunday is decision day for Labour MPs choosing a new Prime Minister. Under a rule introduced in 2021, if the party is in power at the time its leader vacates the job, the caucus can elect a new one as long as they have a two thirds majority. Otherwise the decision goes to the wider party membership and unions. Former Labour MP and Chief party whip and former chair of the Labour women's caucus Sue Moroney talks to Lisa Owen.

RNZ: Morning Report
What's next for Labour?

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 3:37


Labour MPs' phones will be running hot today as they consider who best to lead them into the looming election.  MPs will meet again on Sunday and hold a vote for a new party leader and prime minister.  Our political reporter, Katie Scotcher, is in Napier. 

The Brendan O'Neill Show
213: Kate Hoey: The coming betrayal of Brexit

The Brendan O'Neill Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 49:47


Kate Hoey, life peer and former Labour MP, talks to Brendan O'Neill about the problem with the Northern Ireland Protocol, the myth of ‘Bregret' and why Keir Starmer can't be trusted. Read spiked here: https://www.spiked-online.com/ Read Kate's articles for spiked: https://www.spiked-online.com/author/kate-hoey/   Become a spiked supporter: https://www.spiked-online.com/supporters/  Sign up to spiked's newsletters: https://www.spiked-online.com/newsletters/ Check out spiked's shop: https://www.spiked-online.com/shop/  Sponsored by Wondrium: https://www.wondrium.com/brendan/ 

Iain Dale - The Whole Show
Labour revive row over private schools, Cross Question & what pressures still exist around ADHD?

Iain Dale - The Whole Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 147:07


MPs vote down Labour plan to abolish private schools' charitable status, Cross Question & what kind of pressures still exist around ADHD? Joining Iain Dale on Cross Question this evening are Conservative MP and former Chief Whip Wendy Morton, new General Secretary of the TUC Paul Nowak, Labour MP and former Shadow Home Secretary Diane Abbott and Editor of the Spectator Fraser Nelson.

Cross Question with Iain Dale
Wendy Morton, Paul Nowak, Diane Abbott & Fraser Nelson

Cross Question with Iain Dale

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 49:24


Joining Iain Dale on Cross Question this evening are Conservative MP and former Chief Whip Wendy Morton, new General Secretary of the TUC Paul Nowak, Labour MP and former Shadow Home Secretary Diane Abbott and Editor of the Spectator Fraser Nelson.

Westminster Abbey
Institute Symposium: Harnessing technology

Westminster Abbey

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 61:48


A discussion regarding the potential use of technology to heal divisions in public life. Featuring  Rory Cellan-Jones, former BBC technology correspondent; Chi Onwurah, Labour MP for Newcastle and Dr Michael Burdett, philosophical theologian and Assistant Professor, Nottingham University. 

Sky News Daily
Westminster Accounts: Who's behind the money?

Sky News Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 30:10


For decades, if you wanted to find out how much a wealthy donor, a big company, or a union has pumped into our political system, you'd need to study dozens of entries in several editions of the register of members' interests. All of this information was clouded in opaque language and difficult for most voters to access. Now, Sky News and our partners at Tortoise Media have been working to change that, so we can all follow the flow of money through our political system. On the Sky News Daily, host Niall Paterson heads back into Westminster with deputy political editor Sam Coates and political producer Tom Larkin to take a closer look at exactly who is donating to our political parties, and individual MPs. Donors include an investment firm, MPM Connect, which gave £345,200 to three Labour MPs and the northern internet company, IX Wireless, who donated £138,800 to ‘Red wall' Tories. You can take a look at the database yourself by clicking here.Politics Producer: Tom Larkin Podcast Producer: Rosie Gillott Sound Designer: Tom Burchell Digital Promotions Producer: David Chipakupaku Editor: Philly Beaumont

The Black Spy Podcast
Is The UK Too Military Centric?

The Black Spy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 57:23


Is The UK Too Military Centric? The Black Spy Podcast Season 7, Episode 0008 This week's episode looks into Britain's and other nations' military expenditures and asks if too much is spent on military forces whilst seeking to answer why this is the case. Carlton explores the subject in-depth, at the request of you the listeners who have asked about military expenditure and asked why is it required? Consequently the Black Spy looks at this issue step by step analyzing several countries expenditure and suggesting reasons for this. Have you wondered why in Britain, the USA and Russia etc, politicians find it difficult to speak openly about suggesting to cut military expenditure? Or why on the UK's Conservative benches MPs seem to always be asking for more military expenditure. Moreover, why, under the present Labour Party of Sir Keir Starmer, are Labour MPs aping this position. As always we hope that listeners will learn something from today's podcast, however more importantly Carlton hopes listeners will simply enjoy the experience! By the way, please don't forget to subscribe to The Black Spy Podcast to never miss an episode. To contact the Black Spy or donate to The Black Spy Podcast utilise the following: To donate - Patreon.com/TheBlackSpyPodcast Email: carltonking2003@gmail.com Facebook: The Black Spy Podcast Facebook: Carlton King Author Twitter@Carlton_King Instagram@carltonkingauthor To read Carlton's Autobiography: “Black Ops – The incredible true story of a British secret agent” Click the link below: https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/BO1MTV2GDF/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_awdb_WNZ5MT89T9C14CB53651 Carlton is available for speaking events. For this purpose use the contact details above

White Swan
Tom Greatrex: A political culture geared to crisis and why nuclear is the answer

White Swan

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 47:34


In episode 15 of White Swan: The Crisis Podcast, we welcome a person kept very busy during a global energy crisis: Tom Greatrex, CEO of the Nuclear Industry Association, which represents 250 companies across the nuclear supply chain in the UK. Tom is also a former Labour MP (2010 and 2015), and a highly respected Shadow Energy Minister. He is the vice chair of the Football Supporters Association and represents supporters on the FA Council.As an advocate of nuclear power, he deconstructs the fear associated with nuclear power and demystifies major nuclear disasters, including Fukushima and Chernobyl. On the recent concerns around energy security, Tom says: “The best time to build a nuclear power station has always been about 15 years ago. The next best time is now.”Talking about his time as an MP, Tom reflects on the current political culture and how it – along with a missing sense of purpose –prevents politicians from making good long-term decisions. With politics geared to 24-hour news and social media, creating an environment of short-termism, Tom advises leaders to think for the future.Listen to White Swan with Tom for an insightful and fascinating conversation about nuclear, politics, and football – and the crisis management lessons behind them. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Political Party
Show 298 - Dan Hodges

The Political Party

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 68:36


One of Britain's most prominent political commentators shares his experience of writing in the online era - with all its pros and cons. Dan has led a fascinating life. Son of Glenda Jackson, the Oscar winning former Labour MP, he worked for her and then embarked on a varied career which includes working for the Mail on Sunday. Fascinated by politics but not obsessed with it, he has a unique perspective on Westminster. This is the perfect start to 2023, Follow Dan on Twitter: @DPJHodges Buy Dan's book One Minute to Ten: https://www.amazon.co.uk/One-Minute-Ten-Miliband-Ambition/dp/0718183312 Buy tickets to The Political Party, live at The Duchess Theatre here: https://nimaxtheatres.com/shows/the-political-party-with-matt-forde/Forthcoming guests include:23 Jan: Emily Maitlis and Jon Sopel20 Feb: Keir Starmer6 March: Eddie Izzard Plus more to be announced! Follow @mattforde on Twitter for the latest news Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Spectator Radio
Do women still face barriers in the workplace?

Spectator Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 28:19


Since the pandemic, the nature of working has changed, and in some cases, revealed the weaknesses in the experience of work for women. With some companies eager to get back to business as usual, women are now demanding more from work, and they are leaving jobs in unprecedented numbers to get it. Women could benefit from the flexibility that comes with a hybrid office policy. At the same time, it could present challenges for those with caring responsibilities or disabilities who may wish to stay home when other employees would happily go into the office. How can businesses create a working environment that supports women in work? And with that, offer opportunities for women to expand their career potential. To discuss this Katy Balls is joined by Caroline Nokes, MP for Romsey and Southampton who also chairs the Women and Equalities Committee; Fiona Cannon, who is the Group Sustainable Business Director for Lloyds Banking Group; and Tulip Siddiq, Labour MP for Hampstead and Kilburn who is the Shadow Economic Secretary to the Treasury and Shadow Minister for Cities. This podcast is kindly sponsored by Lloyds Banking Group. 

Women With Balls
Do women still face barriers in the workplace?

Women With Balls

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 28:19


Since the pandemic, the nature of working has changed, and in some cases, revealed the weaknesses in the experience of work for women. With some companies eager to get back to business as usual, women are now demanding more from work, and they are leaving jobs in unprecedented numbers to get it. Women could benefit from the flexibility that comes with a hybrid office policy. At the same time, it could present challenges for those with caring responsibilities or disabilities who may wish to stay home when other employees would happily go into the office. How can businesses create a working environment that supports women in work? And with that, offer opportunities for women to expand their career potential. To discuss this Katy Balls is joined by Caroline Nokes, MP for Romsey and Southampton who also chairs the Women and Equalities Committee; Fiona Cannon, who is the Group Sustainable Business Director for Lloyds Banking Group; and Tulip Siddiq, Labour MP for Hampstead and Kilburn who is the Shadow Economic Secretary to the Treasury and Shadow Minister for Cities. This podcast is kindly sponsored by Lloyds Banking Group. 

RNZ: Morning Report
Hastings MP, Mayor express concern over new remand facility

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2022 4:19


The local Labour MP and mayor in Hastings have expressed strong concerns to the Government over the location of a new kind of remand facility proposed by iwi and police. Its supporters say it will be transformational for Māori, while local authorities believe it will destroy prime land for desperately needed houses. Hawke's Bay reporter Tom Kitchin spoke to Charlotte Cook.  

Profile
Wes Streeting

Profile

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2022 14:39


As nurses strike and the Health Service faces winter pressures, Mark Coles looks at the life and career of Shadow Health Secretary and Labour MP for Ilford North, Wes Streeting. Friend and colleagues reveal how childhood poverty and a cancer diagnosis have shaped the views and aspirations of the man tipped to be a future leader of the Labour party. Presenter: Mark Coles Producers: Ben Cooper and Diane Richardson Editor: Simon Watts Production Co-ordinators: Maria Ogundele and Helena Warwick-Cross Sound Engineer: Rod Farquhar

The Week in Westminster

The Political Editor of the Financial Times, George Parker, looks back on events in a frozen week in Westminster. He brings together Conservaive MP Simon Clarke, the former Levelling Up Secretary, and Jack Straw, the former Labour Cabinet minister and adviser to the Callaghan government, to discuss the mounting number of strikes and whether there are any parallels with the 'Winter of Discontent' in 1978-9. In a rare interview, Lord Macpherson, Permanent Secretary to the Treasury from 2005 to 2016, reflects on the tumultous economic events of the last few months and whether so-called Treasury orthodoxy has returned. Also in the programme, the Labour MP for Canterbury, Rosie Duffield, and Jack Brereton, Conservative MP for Stoke-on-Trent South, discuss migrant Channel crossings and the pressures on the asylum system. Finally, Rachel Reeves, the Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer, reveals why she writes over 3,000 Christmas cards each year. Editor: Peter Snowdon

Spectator Radio
Coping with financial worries

Spectator Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 29:15


Many are already feeling the pinch of the cost-of-living crisis. Choices between ‘heating and eating' have become routine for some households, as bills and food costs rise. With money at the forefront of everyone's minds, feelings of stress, shame, and embarrassment are causing a decline in mental health. Research has shown that the cost-of-living crisis is having a significant impact on people's mental health, disproportionately affecting women and those from low-income households. Combatting mental health can come from peer support, professional help and public policy, but is the issue ever taken seriously enough? What can be done to address the shame and guilt linked to money worries?   For this episode, Katy Balls is joined by Maria Caulfield, who is the Minister for Mental Health where her department also oversees Women's Health. Catherine Rutter, the Director for Customer Inclusion at Lloyds Banking Group. And Kim Leadbeater, Labour MP for Batley and Spen, who received an MBE for her services to social cohesion and combatting loneliness.   This podcast is kindly sponsored by Lloyds Banking Group.

Women With Balls
Coping with financial worries

Women With Balls

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 28:52


Many are already feeling the pinch of the cost-of-living crisis. Choices between ‘heating and eating' have become routine for some households, as bills and food costs rise. With money at the forefront of everyone's minds, feelings of stress, shame, and embarrassment are causing a decline in mental health. Research has shown that the cost-of-living crisis is having a significant impact on people's mental health, disproportionately affecting women and those from low-income households. Combatting mental health can come from peer support, professional help and public policy, but is the issue ever taken seriously enough? What can be done to address the shame and guilt linked to money worries?   For this episode, Katy Balls is joined by Maria Caulfield, who is the Minister for Mental Health where her department also oversees Women's Health. Catherine Rutter, the Director for Customer Inclusion at Lloyds Banking Group. And Kim Leadbeater, Labour MP for Batley and Spen, who received an MBE for her services to social cohesion and combatting loneliness.    This podcast is kindly sponsored by Lloyds Banking Group.

RNZ: Checkpoint
Hot mic catches Ardern calling Seymour an 'arrogant prick'

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 3:48


The Prime Minister's been caught calling ACT leader David Seymour an "arrogant prick" in the House this afternoon. Jacinda Ardern quickly apologised - and David Seymour accepted, wishing her a merry Christmas. The unfortunate muttering came hours after the government announced the departure of three ministers, who will hang up their hats at next year's election, as well as three backbench Labour MPs. The Prime Minister announced the exodus this morning - ahead of her planned Cabinet reshuffle early next year. Here's our deputy political editor Craig McCulloch.

RNZ: Morning Report
Mic catches Ardern calling Seymour 'arrogant prick'

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 2:47


The Prime Minister's been caught calling ACT leader David Seymour an "arrogant prick" in the House. Jacinda Ardern quickly apologised - and David Seymour accepted.. wishing her a merry Christmas. The unfortunate muttering came hours after the government announced the departure of three ministers, who will hang up their hats at next year's election, as well as three backbench Labour MPs.  Here's deputy political editor Craig McCulloch.   

Cross Question with Iain Dale
Craig Whittaker, Luciana Berger, James Heale & Zack Polanski

Cross Question with Iain Dale

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 48:49


Ben Kentish sits in and is joined on Cross Question by Conservative MP Craig Whittaker, former Labour MP and Chief Executive of iNHouse Communications Luciana Berger, the Spectator's James Heale and Deputy Leader of the Green Party Zack Polanski.

The Country
The Country 30/11/22: Jacinda Ardern talks to Jamie Mackay

The Country

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 4:50


We caught up with the Prime Minister on her way to Fieldays this morning to talk about the Government's announcement about recognising on-farm sequestration in the emissions pricing plan, which Labour MPS are at Mystery Creek - and where's David Parker?See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Andrew Dickens Afternoons
Andrew Dickens: We've been used as a rubbish bin and the Aussies know it

Andrew Dickens Afternoons

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 4:09


We are now just moments away from the nationwide vigils and protests against retail crime planned to take place outside dairies and Labour MPs offices. This comes after the murder of 34 year old Janak Patel outside the Rose Cottage Dairy in Sandringham last Wednesday. In the half week of debate after this crime we have seemingly talked about every aspect of crime without touching the major factor behind the Rose Cottage crime. People assumed it was part of the ram raid fad that has taken hold this spring, that it was theft of cigarettes and vapes that have gained a new transactional value due to their high price due to the taxes imposed upon them. That the offenders were youth who have no fear of consequence from the NZ Police or Justice System. That this crime was spurned on by a government that is portrayed as soft on crime. As we have found out in the fullness of time, the alleged offender was 34. His accomplice 42. These were not kids.  It was not a ram raid.  They were after the cash register not the ciggies. There has been a consequence as the alleged offenders have been caught and charged. We found out that Rose Cottage has a long history of violent crime that pre dates this government, including being hit 2 months in a row in 2016 and one of those incidents was an armed robbery. And most tellingly we have discovered the alleged offender was deported from Australia. The grounds for his deportation from Australia cannot be reported for legal reasons but he joins a long list of deportees returned to New Zealand that have gone on to cause havoc. The 501 strategy of deporting New Zealanders on bad character assessments has been happening since 2016. In that time 3000 odd holders of New Zealand passports have been sent back to this country. They have boosted gang numbers and brought a new level of organisation and violence with them. They have committed 8000 offences with more than a third of those offences have been violent. We have been used as a rubbish bin and the Aussies know it which is why Peter Dutton famously called the policy taking the trash out. A new government is now in place and more sympathetic to New Zealand.  Does this mean the mass importation of criminals raised in Australia might stop? Well, the Australian Home Affairs Minister, Clare O'Neil, featured on Q&A yesterday. She said that while they were looking at the treatment of New Zealanders in Australia, the 501 deportation policy wasn't going anywhere because it is an important national security policy for their country. So the mass importation of hardened criminals continues.   In my opinion it is the single biggest driver of a perceived rise in crime and yet we are powerless to resist.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

POLITICO's Westminster Insider
A boozy dinner with Labour MP Wes Streeting

POLITICO's Westminster Insider

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 47:28


Host Jack Blanchard sits down with Wes Streeting, the shadow health secretary, to discuss life, politics and the Labour Party over a bottle of red wine at an exclusive Westminster restaurant. Streeting, tipped by many as the next Labour leader, discusses his poverty-stricken childhood, his recent battle with cancer and his vision for the future on the eve of his 40th birthday. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Hunting Ghislaine with John Sweeney
EXCLUSIVE Sweeney Keeps Talking: John McDonnell MP

Hunting Ghislaine with John Sweeney

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 0:58


Find out what John Sweeney really thinks about his interview with John McDonnell, Labour MP and the most left-wing Chancellor we never had. Available exclusively on Global Player. https://www.globalplayer.com/podcasts/42KuWb/ Download it from the App store or go to globalplayer.com If you're already on Global Player, search 'Sweeney Keeps Talking'.

The Week in Westminster

Emily Ashton of Bloomberg review the week in Westminster, including a discussion about the Chancellor's Autumn Statement, Conservative MP Anthony Browne and Labour MP and chair of the Business Select Committee Darren Jones. Conservative MP Miriam Cates and Joeli Brearley, founder of the charity Pregnant Then Screwed, discuss issues around childcare including how support for mothers can be improved. Also in this week's programme, Liberal Democrat MP Christine Jardine explains why she has tabled a Bill to allow Parliament to appoint an independent ethics adviser if the role remains vacant. And Labour Leader of the House of Lords, Angela Smith and Conservative Peer Philip Norton, who is also professor of government at the University of Hull, discuss Lord Norton's Private Members' Bill which aims to strengthen the body that vets nominees for new peerages. They also discuss the size of the House of Lords.

Woman's Hour
Practical advice for anxious mothers. Burns specialist Professor Fiona Wood. Iran protests

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 56:38


The imagery around pregnancy is often of glowing women doing yoga with calm expressions. For many women through it can be a time of anxiety about the birth, the baby, the future. All perfectly natural but it can be hard to ask for or access help. A new book ‘Break Free From Maternal Anxiety' A self-help Guide for Pregnancy, Birth and the First Postnatal Year' offers CBT-based support. One of the authors Dr Catherine Green joins Emma Barnett to share professional and personal experience. We hear from Professor Fiona Wood a world leading burns specialist the reluctant subject of a new book ‘Under Her Skin'. She was the first female plastic surgeon in Western Australia (in 1991) and has been named Australia's Most Trusted Person and National Living Treasure becoming a household name after she led a team that helped saved the lives of people injured in the Bali bombing. Women continue to lead protests in Iran. But many Iranians say speaking out against the regime brings real risks. Now according to State Media a court in Iran has issued the first death sentence to a person arrested for taking part. We get the latest from Faranak Amidi the BBC's Near East Women's Affairs Reporter and Rushanara Ali the Labour MP for Bethnal Green and Bow about what she wants the UK Government to do. A tribute to Sue Baker one of the original members of the Top Gear team who's died. Plus tampon tax campaigner Laura Coryton on new research which suggests at least 80% of the savings, as a result of the tax ending two years ago has been absorbed by retailers. Presenter Emma Barnett Producer Beverley Purcell

Brexitcast
Nursing a Dispute

Brexitcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 34:38


Why are nurses going on strike and what could it mean for the NHS? Pat Cullen, general secretary of the Royal College of Nursing, and Shaun Lintern, health editor at the Sunday Times, discuss what's driving nurses to strike and how patients could be affected. Jeremy Vine updates us on the latest results from the US midterms. And David Miliband, president of the International Rescue Committee and a former Labour MP, talks all things COP27, and debates whether he should join Mastodon. This episode of Newscast was presented by Adam Fleming and made by Tim Walklate with Miranda Slade, Danny Wittenberg and Chris Flynn. The technical producer was Emma Crowe and the assistant editor was Sam Bonham.

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 157: “See Emily Play” by The Pink Floyd

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022


Episode one hundred and fifty-seven of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “See Emily Play", the birth of the UK underground, and the career of Roger Barrett, known as Syd. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a twenty-five-minute bonus episode available, on "First Girl I Loved" by the Incredible String Band. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources No Mixcloud this time, due to the number of Pink Floyd songs. I referred to two biographies of Barrett in this episode -- A Very Irregular Head by Rob Chapman is the one I would recommend, and the one whose narrative I have largely followed. Some of the information has been superseded by newer discoveries, but Chapman is almost unique in people writing about Barrett in that he actually seems to care about the facts and try to get things right rather than make up something more interesting. Crazy Diamond by Mike Watkinson and Pete Anderson is much less reliable, but does have quite a few interview quotes that aren't duplicated by Chapman. Information about Joe Boyd comes from Boyd's book White Bicycles. In this and future episodes on Pink Floyd I'm also relying on Nick Mason's Inside Out: A Personal History of Pink Floyd and Pink Floyd: All the Songs by Jean-Michel Guesdon and Philippe Margotin. The compilation Relics contains many of the most important tracks from Barrett's time with Pink Floyd, while Piper at the Gates of Dawn is his one full album with them. Those who want a fuller history of his time with the group will want to get Piper and also the box set Cambridge St/ation 1965-1967. Barrett only released two solo albums during his career. They're available as a bundle here. Completists will also want the rarities and outtakes collection Opel.  ERRATA: I talk about “Interstellar Overdrive” as if Barrett wrote it solo. The song is credited to all four members, but it was Barrett who came up with the riff I talk about. And annoyingly, given the lengths I went to to deal correctly with Barrett's name, I repeatedly refer to "Dave" Gilmour, when Gilmour prefers David. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript A note before I begin -- this episode deals with drug use and mental illness, so anyone who might be upset by those subjects might want to skip this one. But also, there's a rather unique problem in how I deal with the name of the main artist in the story today. The man everyone knows as Syd Barrett was born Roger Barrett, used that name with his family for his whole life, and in later years very strongly disliked being called "Syd", yet everyone other than his family called him that at all times until he left the music industry, and that's the name that appears on record labels, including his solo albums. I don't believe it's right to refer to people by names they choose not to go by themselves, but the name Barrett went by throughout his brief period in the public eye was different from the one he went by later, and by all accounts he was actually distressed by its use in later years. So what I'm going to do in this episode is refer to him as "Roger Barrett" when a full name is necessary for disambiguation or just "Barrett" otherwise, but I'll leave any quotes from other people referring to "Syd" as they were originally phrased. In future episodes on Pink Floyd, I'll refer to him just as Barrett, but in episodes where I discuss his influence on other artists, I will probably have to use "Syd Barrett" because otherwise people who haven't listened to this episode won't know what on Earth I'm talking about. Anyway, on with the show. “It's gone!” sighed the Rat, sinking back in his seat again. “So beautiful and strange and new. Since it was to end so soon, I almost wish I had never heard it. For it has roused a longing in me that is pain, and nothing seems worth while but just to hear that sound once more and go on listening to it for ever. No! There it is again!” he cried, alert once more. Entranced, he was silent for a long space, spellbound. “Now it passes on and I begin to lose it,” he said presently. “O Mole! the beauty of it! The merry bubble and joy, the thin, clear, happy call of the distant piping! Such music I never dreamed of, and the call in it is stronger even than the music is sweet! Row on, Mole, row! For the music and the call must be for us.” That's a quote from a chapter titled "The Piper at the Gates of Dawn" from the classic children's book The Wind in the Willows -- a book which for most of its length is a fairly straightforward story about anthropomorphic animals having jovial adventures, but which in that one chapter has Rat and Mole suddenly encounter the Great God Pan and have a hallucinatory, transcendental experience caused by his music, one so extreme it's wiped from their minds, as they simply cannot process it. The book, and the chapter, was a favourite of Roger Barrett, a young child born in Cambridge in 1946. Barrett came from an intellectual but not especially bookish family. His father, Dr. Arthur Barrett, was a pathologist -- there's a room in Addenbrooke's Hospital named after him -- but he was also an avid watercolour painter, a world-leading authority on fungi, and a member of the Cambridge Philharmonic Society who was apparently an extraordinarily good singer; while his mother Winifred was a stay-at-home mother who was nonetheless very active in the community, organising a local Girl Guide troupe. They never particularly encouraged their family to read, but young Roger did particularly enjoy the more pastoral end of the children's literature of the time. As well as the Wind in the Willows he also loved Alice in Wonderland, and the Little Grey Men books -- a series of stories about tiny gnomes and their adventures in the countryside. But his two big passions were music and painting. He got his first ukulele at age eleven, and by the time his father died, just before Roger's sixteenth birthday, he had graduated to playing a full-sized guitar. At the time his musical tastes were largely the same as those of any other British teenager -- he liked Chubby Checker, for example -- though he did have a tendency to prefer the quirkier end of things, and some of the first songs he tried to play on the guitar were those of Joe Brown: [Excerpt: Joe Brown, "I'm Henry VIII I Am"] Barrett grew up in Cambridge, and for those who don't know it, Cambridge is an incubator of a very particular kind of eccentricity. The university tends to attract rather unworldly intellectual overachievers to the city -- people who might not be able to survive in many other situations but who can thrive in that one -- and every description of Barrett's father suggests he was such a person -- Barrett's sister Rosemary has said that she believes that most of the family were autistic, though whether this is a belief based on popular media portrayals or a deeper understanding I don't know. But certainly Cambridge is full of eccentric people with remarkable achievements, and such people tend to have children with a certain type of personality, who try simultaneously to live up to and rebel against expectations of greatness that come from having parents who are regarded as great, and to do so with rather less awareness of social norms than the typical rebel has. In the case of Roger Barrett, he, like so many others of his generation, was encouraged to go into the sciences -- as indeed his father had, both in his career as a pathologist and in his avocation as a mycologist. The fifties and sixties were a time, much like today, when what we now refer to as the STEM subjects were regarded as new and exciting and modern. But rather than following in his father's professional footsteps, Roger Barrett instead followed his hobbies. Dr. Barrett was a painter and musician in his spare time, and Roger was to turn to those things to earn his living. For much of his teens, it seemed that art would be the direction he would go in. He was, everyone agrees, a hugely talented painter, and he was particularly noted for his mastery of colours. But he was also becoming more and more interested in R&B music, especially the music of Bo Diddley, who became his new biggest influence: [Excerpt: Bo Diddley, "Who Do You Love?"] He would often spend hours with his friend Dave Gilmour, a much more advanced guitarist, trying to learn blues riffs. By this point Barrett had already received the nickname "Syd". Depending on which story you believe, he either got it when he started attending a jazz club where an elderly jazzer named Sid Barrett played, and the people were amused that their youngest attendee, like one of the oldest, was called Barrett; or, more plausibly, he turned up to a Scout meeting once wearing a flat cap rather than the normal scout beret, and he got nicknamed "Sid" because it made him look working-class and "Sid" was a working-class sort of name. In 1962, by the time he was sixteen, Barrett joined a short-lived group called Geoff Mott and the Mottoes, on rhythm guitar. The group's lead singer, Geoff Mottlow, would go on to join a band called the Boston Crabs who would have a minor hit in 1965 with a version of the Coasters song "Down in Mexico": [Excerpt: The Boston Crabs, "Down in Mexico"] The bass player from the Mottoes, Tony Sainty, and the drummer Clive Welham, would go on to form another band, The Jokers Wild, with Barrett's friend Dave Gilmour. Barrett also briefly joined another band, Those Without, but his time with them was similarly brief. Some sources -- though ones I consider generally less reliable -- say that the Mottoes' bass player wasn't Tony Sainty, but was Roger Waters, the son of one of Barrett's teachers, and that one of the reasons the band split up was that Waters had moved down to London to study architecture. I don't think that's the case, but it's definitely true that Barrett knew Waters, and when he moved to London himself the next year to go to Camberwell Art College, he moved into a house where Waters was already living. Two previous tenants at the same house, Nick Mason and Richard Wright, had formed a loose band with Waters and various other amateur musicians like Keith Noble, Shelagh Noble, and Clive Metcalfe. That band was sometimes known as the Screaming Abdabs, The Megadeaths, or The Tea Set -- the latter as a sly reference to slang terms for cannabis -- but was mostly known at first as Sigma 6, named after a manifesto by the novelist Alexander Trocchi for a kind of spontaneous university. They were also sometimes known as Leonard's Lodgers, after the landlord of the home that Barrett was moving into, Mike Leonard, who would occasionally sit in on organ and would later, as the band became more of a coherent unit, act as a roadie and put on light shows behind them -- Leonard was himself very interested in avant-garde and experimental art, and it was his idea to play around with the group's lighting. By the time Barrett moved in with Waters in 1964, the group had settled on the Tea Set name, and consisted of Waters on bass, Mason on drums, Wright on keyboards, singer Chris Dennis, and guitarist Rado Klose. Of the group, Klose was the only one who was a skilled musician -- he was a very good jazz guitarist, while the other members were barely adequate. By this time Barrett's musical interests were expanding to include folk music -- his girlfriend at the time talked later about him taking her to see Bob Dylan on his first UK tour and thinking "My first reaction was seeing all these people like Syd. It was almost as if every town had sent one Syd Barrett there. It was my first time seeing people like him." But the music he was most into was the blues. And as the Tea Set were turning into a blues band, he joined them. He even had a name for the new band that would make them more bluesy. He'd read the back of a record cover which had named two extremely obscure blues musicians -- musicians he may never even have heard. Pink Anderson: [Excerpt: Pink Anderson, "Boll Weevil"] And Floyd Council: [Excerpt: Floyd Council, "Runaway Man Blues"] Barrett suggested that they put together the names of the two bluesmen, and presumably because "Anderson Council" didn't have quite the right ring, they went for The Pink Floyd -- though for a while yet they would sometimes still perform as The Tea Set, and they were sometimes also called The Pink Floyd Sound. Dennis left soon after Barrett joined, and the new five-piece Pink Floyd Sound started trying to get more gigs. They auditioned for Ready Steady Go! and were turned down, but did get some decent support slots, including for a band called the Tridents: [Excerpt: The Tridents, "Tiger in Your Tank"] The members of the group were particularly impressed by the Tridents' guitarist and the way he altered his sound using feedback -- Barrett even sent a letter to his girlfriend with a drawing of the guitarist, one Jeff Beck, raving about how good he was. At this point, the group were mostly performing cover versions, but they did have a handful of originals, and it was these they recorded in their first demo sessions in late 1964 and early 1965. They included "Walk With Me Sydney", a song written by Roger Waters as a parody of "Work With Me Annie" and "Dance With Me Henry" -- and, given the lyrics, possibly also Hank Ballard's follow-up "Henry's Got Flat Feet (Can't Dance No More) and featuring Rick Wright's then-wife Juliette Gale as Etta James to Barrett's Richard Berry: [Excerpt: The Tea Set, "Walk With Me Sydney"] And four songs by Barrett, including one called "Double-O Bo" which was a Bo Diddley rip-off, and "Butterfly", the most interesting of these early recordings: [Excerpt: The Tea Set, "Butterfly"] At this point, Barrett was very unsure of his own vocal abilities, and wrote a letter to his girlfriend saying "Emo says why don't I give up 'cos it sounds horrible, and I would but I can't get Fred to join because he's got a group (p'raps you knew!) so I still have to sing." "Fred" was a nickname for his old friend Dave Gilmour, who was playing in his own band, Joker's Wild, at this point. Summer 1965 saw two important events in the life of the group. The first was that Barrett took LSD for the first time. The rest of the group weren't interested in trying it, and would indeed generally be one of the more sober bands in the rock business, despite the reputation their music got. The other members would for the most part try acid once or twice, around late 1966, but generally steer clear of it. Barrett, by contrast, took it on a very regular basis, and it would influence all the work he did from that point on. The other event was that Rado Klose left the group. Klose was the only really proficient musician in the group, but he had very different tastes to the other members, preferring to play jazz to R&B and pop, and he was also falling behind in his university studies, and decided to put that ahead of remaining in the band. This meant that the group members had to radically rethink the way they were making music. They couldn't rely on instrumental proficiency, so they had to rely on ideas. One of the things they started to do was use echo. They got primitive echo devices and put both Barrett's guitar and Wright's keyboard through them, allowing them to create new sounds that hadn't been heard on stage before. But they were still mostly doing the same Slim Harpo and Bo Diddley numbers everyone else was doing, and weren't able to be particularly interesting while playing them. But for a while they carried on doing the normal gigs, like a birthday party they played in late 1965, where on the same bill was a young American folk singer named Paul Simon, and Joker's Wild, the band Dave Gilmour was in, who backed Simon on a version of "Johnny B. Goode". A couple of weeks after that party, Joker's Wild went into the studio to record their only privately-pressed five-song record, of them performing recent hits: [Excerpt: Joker's Wild, "Walk Like a Man"] But The Pink Floyd Sound weren't as musically tight as Joker's Wild, and they couldn't make a living as a cover band even if they wanted to. They had to do something different. Inspiration then came from a very unexpected source. I mentioned earlier that one of the names the group had been performing under had been inspired by a manifesto for a spontaneous university by the writer Alexander Trocchi. Trocchi's ideas had actually been put into practice by an organisation calling itself the London Free School, based in Notting Hill. The London Free School was an interesting mixture of people from what was then known as the New Left, but who were already rapidly aging, the people who had been the cornerstone of radical campaigning in the late fifties and early sixties, who had run the Aldermaston marches against nuclear weapons and so on, and a new breed of countercultural people who in a year or two would be defined as hippies but at the time were not so easy to pigeonhole. These people were mostly politically radical but very privileged people -- one of the founder members of the London Free School was Peter Jenner, who was the son of a vicar and the grandson of a Labour MP -- and they were trying to put their radical ideas into practice. The London Free School was meant to be a collective of people who would help each other and themselves, and who would educate each other. You'd go to the collective wanting to learn how to do something, whether that's how to improve the housing in your area or navigate some particularly difficult piece of bureaucracy, or how to play a musical instrument, and someone who had that skill would teach you how to do it, while you hopefully taught them something else of value. The London Free School, like all such utopian schemes, ended up falling apart, but it had a wider cultural impact than most such schemes. Britain's first underground newspaper, the International Times, was put together by people involved in the Free School, and the annual Notting Hill Carnival, which is now one of the biggest outdoor events in Britain every year with a million attendees, came from the merger of outdoor events organised by the Free School with older community events. A group of musicians called AMM was associated with many of the people involved in the Free School. AMM performed totally improvised music, with no structure and no normal sense of melody and harmony: [Excerpt: AMM, "What Is There In Uselesness To Cause You Distress?"] Keith Rowe, the guitarist in AMM, wanted to find his own technique uninfluenced by American jazz guitarists, and thought of that in terms that appealed very strongly to the painterly Barrett, saying "For the Americans to develop an American school of painting, they somehow had to ditch or lose European easel painting techniques. They had to make a break with the past. What did that possibly mean if you were a jazz guitar player? For me, symbolically, it was Pollock laying the canvas on the floor, which immediately abandons European easel technique. I could see that by laying the canvas down, it became inappropriate to apply easel techniques. I thought if I did that with a guitar, I would just lose all those techniques, because they would be physically impossible to do." Rowe's technique-free technique inspired Barrett to make similar noises with his guitar, and to think less in terms of melody and harmony than pure sound. AMM's first record came out in 1966. Four of the Free School people decided to put together their own record label, DNA, and they got an agreement with Elektra Records to distribute its first release -- Joe Boyd, the head of Elektra in the UK, was another London Free School member, and someone who had plenty of experience with disruptive art already, having been on the sound engineering team at the Newport Folk Festival when Dylan went electric. AMM went into the studio and recorded AMMMusic: [Excerpt: AMM, "What Is There In Uselesness To Cause You Distress?"] After that came out, though, Peter Jenner, one of the people who'd started the label, came to a realisation. He said later "We'd made this one record with AMM. Great record, very seminal, seriously avant-garde, but I'd started adding up and I'd worked out that the deal we had, we got two percent of retail, out of which we, the label, had to pay for recording costs and pay ourselves. I came to the conclusion that we were going to have to sell a hell of a lot of records just to pay the recording costs, let alone pay ourselves any money and build a label, so I realised we had to have a pop band because pop bands sold a lot of records. It was as simple as that and I was as naive as that." Jenner abandoned DNA records for the moment, and he and his friend Andrew King decided they were going to become pop managers. and they found The Pink Floyd Sound playing at an event at the Marquee, one of a series of events that were variously known as Spontaneous Underground and The Trip. Other participants in those events included Soft Machine; Mose Allison; Donovan, performing improvised songs backed by sitar players; Graham Bond; a performer who played Bach pieces while backed by African drummers; and The Poison Bellows, a poetry duo consisting of Spike Hawkins and Johnny Byrne, who may of all of these performers be the one who other than Pink Floyd themselves has had the most cultural impact in the UK -- after writing the exploitation novel Groupie and co-writing a film adaptation of Spike Milligan's war memoirs, Byrne became a TV screenwriter, writing many episodes of Space: 1999 and Doctor Who before creating the long-running TV series Heartbeat. Jenner and King decided they wanted to sign The Pink Floyd Sound and make records with them, and the group agreed -- but only after their summer holidays. They were all still students, and so they dispersed during the summer. Waters and Wright went on holiday to Greece, where they tried acid for the first of only a small number of occasions and were unimpressed, while Mason went on a trip round America by Greyhound bus. Barrett, meanwhile, stayed behind, and started writing more songs, encouraged by Jenner, who insisted that the band needed to stop relying on blues covers and come up with their own material, and who saw Barrett as the focus of the group. Jenner later described them as "Four not terribly competent musicians who managed between them to create something that was extraordinary. Syd was the main creative drive behind the band - he was the singer and lead guitarist. Roger couldn't tune his bass because he was tone deaf, it had to be tuned by Rick. Rick could write a bit of a tune and Roger could knock out a couple of words if necessary. 'Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun' was the first song Roger ever wrote, and he only did it because Syd encouraged everyone to write. Syd was very hesitant about his writing, but when he produced these great songs everyone else thought 'Well, it must be easy'" Of course, we know this isn't quite true -- Waters had written "Walk with me Sydney" -- but it is definitely the case that everyone involved thought of Barrett as the main creative force in the group, and that he was the one that Jenner was encouraging to write new material. After the summer holidays, the group reconvened, and one of their first actions was to play a benefit for the London Free School. Jenner said later "Andrew King and myself were both vicars' sons, and we knew that when you want to raise money for the parish you have to have a social. So in a very old-fashioned way we said 'let's put on a social'. Like in the Just William books, like a whist drive. We thought 'You can't have a whist drive. That's not cool. Let's have a band. That would be cool.' And the only band we knew was the band I was starting to get involved with." After a couple of these events went well, Joe Boyd suggested that they make those events a regular club night, and the UFO Club was born. Jenner and King started working on the light shows for the group, and then bringing in other people, and the light show became an integral part of the group's mystique -- rather than standing in a spotlight as other groups would, they worked in shadows, with distorted kaleidoscopic lights playing on them, distancing themselves from the audience. The highlight of their sets was a long piece called "Interstellar Overdrive", and this became one of the group's first professional recordings, when they went into the studio with Joe Boyd to record it for the soundtrack of a film titled Tonite Let's All Make Love in London. There are conflicting stories about the inspiration for the main riff for "Interstellar Overdrive". One apparent source is the riff from Love's version of the Bacharach and David song "My Little Red Book". Depending on who you ask, either Barrett was obsessed with Love's first album and copied the riff, or Peter Jenner tried to hum him the riff and Barrett copied what Jenner was humming: [Excerpt: Love, "My Little Red Book"] More prosaically, Roger Waters has always claimed that the main inspiration was from "Old Ned", Ron Grainer's theme tune for the sitcom Steptoe and Son (which for American listeners was remade over there as Sanford and Son): [Excerpt: Ron Grainer, "Old Ned"] Of course it's entirely possible, and even likely, that Barrett was inspired by both, and if so that would neatly sum up the whole range of Pink Floyd's influences at this point. "My Little Red Book" was a cover by an American garage-psych/folk-rock band of a hit by Manfred Mann, a group who were best known for pop singles but were also serious blues and jazz musicians, while Steptoe and Son was a whimsical but dark and very English sitcom about a way of life that was slowly disappearing. And you can definitely hear both influences in the main riff of the track they recorded with Boyd: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "Interstellar Overdrive"] "Interstellar Overdrive" was one of two types of song that The Pink Floyd were performing at this time -- a long, extended, instrumental psychedelic excuse for freaky sounds, inspired by things like the second disc of Freak Out! by the Mothers of Invention. When they went into the studio again with Boyd later in January 1967, to record what they hoped would be their first single, they recorded two of the other kind of songs -- whimsical story songs inspired equally by the incidents of everyday life and by children's literature. What became the B-side, "Candy and a Currant Bun", was based around the riff from "Smokestack Lightnin'" by Howlin' Wolf: [Excerpt: Howlin' Wolf, "Smokestack Lightnin'"] That song had become a favourite on the British blues scene, and was thus the inspiration for many songs of the type that get called "quintessentially English". Ray Davies, who was in many ways the major songwriter at this time who was closest to Barrett stylistically, would a year later use the riff for the Kinks song "Last of the Steam-Powered Trains", but in this case Barrett had originally written a song titled "Let's Roll Another One", about sexual longing and cannabis. The lyrics were hastily rewritten in the studio to remove the controversial drug references-- and supposedly this caused some conflict between Barrett and Waters, with Waters pushing for the change, while Barrett argued against it, though like many of the stories from this period this sounds like the kind of thing that gets said by people wanting to push particular images of both men. Either way, the lyric was changed to be about sweet treats rather than drugs, though the lascivious elements remained in. And some people even argue that there was another lyric change -- where Barrett sings "walk with me", there's a slight "f" sound in his vocal. As someone who does a lot of microphone work myself, it sounds to me like just one of those things that happens while recording, but a lot of people are very insistent that Barrett is deliberately singing a different word altogether: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "Candy and a Currant Bun"] The A-side, meanwhile, was inspired by real life. Both Barrett and Waters had mothers who used  to take in female lodgers, and both had regularly had their lodgers' underwear stolen from washing lines. While they didn't know anything else about the thief, he became in Barrett's imagination a man who liked to dress up in the clothing after he stole it: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "Arnold Layne"] After recording the two tracks with Joe Boyd, the natural assumption was that the record would be put out on Elektra, the label which Boyd worked for in the UK, but Jac Holzman, the head of Elektra records, wasn't interested, and so a bidding war began for the single, as by this point the group were the hottest thing in London. For a while it looked like they were going to sign to Track Records, the label owned by the Who's management, but in the end EMI won out. Right as they signed, the News of the World was doing a whole series of articles about pop stars and their drug use, and the last of the articles talked about The Pink Floyd and their association with LSD, even though they hadn't released a record yet. EMI had to put out a press release saying that the group were not psychedelic, insisting"The Pink Floyd are not trying to create hallucinatory effects in their audience." It was only after getting signed that the group became full-time professionals. Waters had by this point graduated from university and was working as a trainee architect, and quit his job to become a pop star. Wright dropped out of university, but Mason and Barrett took sabbaticals. Barrett in particular seems to have seen this very much as a temporary thing, talking about how he was making so much money it would be foolish not to take the opportunity while it lasted, but how he was going to resume his studies in a year. "Arnold Layne" made the top twenty, and it would have gone higher had the pirate radio station Radio London, at the time the single most popular radio station when it came to pop music, not banned the track because of its sexual content. However, it would be the only single Joe Boyd would work on with the group. EMI insisted on only using in-house producers, and so while Joe Boyd would go on to a great career as a producer, and we'll see him again, he was replaced with Norman Smith. Smith had been the chief engineer on the Beatles records up to Rubber Soul, after which he'd been promoted to being a producer in his own right, and Geoff Emerick had taken over. He also had aspirations to pop stardom himself, and a few years later would have a transatlantic hit with "Oh Babe, What Would You Say?" under the name Hurricane Smith: [Excerpt: Hurricane Smith, "Oh Babe, What Would You Say?"] Smith's production of the group would prove controversial among some of the group's longtime fans, who thought that he did too much to curtail their more experimental side, as he would try to get the group to record songs that were more structured and more commercial, and would cut down their improvisations into a more manageable form. Others, notably Peter Jenner, thought that Smith was the perfect producer for the group. They started work on their first album, which was mostly recorded in studio three of Abbey Road, while the Beatles were just finishing off work on Sgt Pepper in studio two. The album was titled The Piper at the Gates of Dawn, after the chapter from The Wind in the Willows, and other than a few extended instrumental showcases, most of the album was made up of short, whimsical, songs by Barrett that were strongly infused with imagery from late-Victorian and Edwardian children's books. This is one of the big differences between the British and American psychedelic scenes. Both the British and American undergrounds were made up of the same type of people -- a mixture of older radical activists, often Communists, who had come up in Britain in the Ban the Bomb campaigns and in America in the Civil Rights movement; and younger people, usually middle-class students with radical politics from a privileged background, who were into experimenting with drugs and alternative lifestyles. But the  social situations were different. In America, the younger members of the underground were angry and scared, as their principal interest was in stopping the war in Vietnam in which so many of them were being killed. And the music of the older generation of the underground, the Civil Rights activists, was shot through with influence from the blues, gospel, and American folk music, with a strong Black influence. So that's what the American psychedelic groups played, for the most part, very bluesy, very angry, music, By contrast, the British younger generation of hippies were not being drafted to go to war, and mostly had little to complain about, other than a feeling of being stifled by their parents' generation's expectations. And while most of them were influenced by the blues, that wasn't the music that had been popular among the older underground people, who had either been listening to experimental European art music or had been influenced by Ewan MacColl and his associates into listening instead to traditional old English ballads, things like the story of Tam Lin or Thomas the Rhymer, where someone is spirited away to the land of the fairies: [Excerpt: Ewan MacColl, "Thomas the Rhymer"] As a result, most British musicians, when exposed to the culture of the underground over here, created music that looked back to an idealised childhood of their grandparents' generation, songs that were nostalgic for a past just before the one they could remember (as opposed to their own childhoods, which had taken place in war or the immediate aftermath of it, dominated by poverty, rationing, and bomb sites (though of course Barrett's childhood in Cambridge had been far closer to this mythic idyll than those of his contemporaries from Liverpool, Birmingham, Newcastle, or London). So almost every British musician who was making music that might be called psychedelic was writing songs that were influenced both by experimental art music and by pre-War popular song, and which conjured up images from older children's books. Most notably of course at this point the Beatles were recording songs like "Strawberry Fields Forever" and "Penny Lane" about places from their childhood, and taking lyrical inspiration from Victorian circus posters and the works of Lewis Carroll, but Barrett was similarly inspired. One of the books he loved most as a child was "The Little Grey Men" by BB, a penname for Denys Watkins-Pitchford. The book told the story of three gnomes,  Baldmoney, Sneezewort, and Dodder, and their adventures on a boat when the fourth member of their little group, Cloudberry, who's a bit of a rebellious loner and more adventurous than the other three, goes exploring on his own and they have to go off and find him. Barrett's song "The Gnome" doesn't use any precise details from the book, but its combination of whimsy about a gnome named Grimble-gromble and a reverence for nature is very much in the mould of BB's work: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "The Gnome"] Another huge influence on Barrett was Hillaire Belloc. Belloc is someone who is not read much any more, as sadly he is mostly known for the intense antisemitism in some of his writing, which stains it just as so much of early twentieth-century literature is stained, but he was one of the most influential writers of the early part of the twentieth century. Like his friend GK Chesterton he was simultaneously an author of Catholic apologia and a political campaigner -- he was a Liberal MP for a few years, and a strong advocate of an economic system known as Distributism, and had a peculiar mixture of very progressive and extremely reactionary ideas which resonated with a lot of the atmosphere in the British underground of the time, even though he would likely have profoundly disapproved of them. But Belloc wrote in a variety of styles, including poems for children, which are the works of his that have aged the best, and were a huge influence on later children's writers like Roald Dahl with their gleeful comic cruelty. Barrett's "Matilda Mother" had lyrics that were, other than the chorus where Barrett begs his mother to read him more of the story, taken verbatim from three poems from Belloc's Cautionary Tales for Children -- "Jim, Who Ran away from his Nurse, and was Eaten by a Lion", "Henry King (Who chewed bits of String, and was cut off in Dreadful Agonies)", and "Matilda (Who Told Lies and Was Burned to Death)" -- the titles of those give some idea of the kind of thing Belloc would write: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "Matilda Mother (early version)"] Sadly for Barrett, Belloc's estate refused to allow permission for his poems to be used, and so he had to rework the lyrics, writing new fairy-tale lyrics for the finished version. Other sources of inspiration for lyrics came from books like the I Ching, which Barrett used for "Chapter 24", having bought a copy from the Indica Bookshop, the same place that John Lennon had bought The Psychedelic Experience, and there's been some suggestion that he was deliberately trying to copy Lennon in taking lyrical ideas from a book of ancient mystic wisdom. During the recording of Piper at the Gates of Dawn, the group continued playing live. As they'd now had a hit single, most of their performances were at Top Rank Ballrooms and other such venues around the country, on bills with other top chart groups, playing to audiences who seemed unimpressed or actively hostile. They also, though made two important appearances. The more well-known of these was at the 14-Hour Technicolor Dream, a benefit for International Times magazine with people including Yoko Ono, their future collaborator Ron Geesin, John's Children, Soft Machine, and The Move also performing. The 14-Hour Technicolor Dream is now largely regarded as *the* pivotal moment in the development of the UK counterculture, though even at the time some participants noted that there seemed to be a rift developing between the performers, who were often fairly straightforward beer-drinking ambitious young men who had latched on to kaftans and talk about enlightenment as the latest gimmick they could use to get ahead in the industry, and the audience who seemed to be true believers. Their other major performance was at an event called "Games for May -- Space Age Relaxation for the Climax of Spring", where they were able to do a full long set in a concert space with a quadrophonic sound system, rather than performing in the utterly sub-par environments most pop bands had to at this point. They came up with a new song written for the event, which became their second single, "See Emily Play". [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "See Emily Play"] Emily was apparently always a favourite name of Barrett's, and he even talked with one girlfriend about the possibility of naming their first child Emily, but the Emily of the song seems to have had a specific inspiration. One of the youngest attendees at the London Free School was an actual schoolgirl, Emily Young, who would go along to their events with her schoolfriend Anjelica Huston (who later became a well-known film star). Young is now a world-renowned artist, regarded as arguably Britain's greatest living stone sculptor, but at the time she was very like the other people at the London Free School -- she was from a very privileged background, her father was Wayland Young, 2nd Baron Kennet, a Labour Peer and minister who later joined the SDP. But being younger than the rest of the attendees, and still a little naive, she was still trying to find her own personality, and would take on attributes and attitudes of other people without fully understanding them,  hence the song's opening lines, "Emily tries, but misunderstands/She's often inclined to borrow somebody's dream til tomorrow". The song gets a little darker towards the end though, and the image in the last verse, where she puts on a gown and floats down a river forever *could* be a gentle, pastoral, image of someone going on a boat ride, but it also could be a reference to two rather darker sources. Barrett was known to pick up imagery both from classic literature and from Arthurian legend, and so the lines inevitably conjure up both the idea of Ophelia drowning herself and of the Lady of Shallot in Tennyson's Arthurian poem, who is trapped in a tower but finds a boat, and floats down the river to Camelot but dies before the boat reaches the castle: [Excerpt: The Pink Floyd, "See Emily Play"] The song also evokes very specific memories of Barrett's childhood -- according to Roger Waters, the woods mentioned in the lyrics are meant to be woods in which they had played as children, on the road out of Cambridge towards the Gog and Magog Hills. The song was apparently seven minutes long in its earliest versions, and required a great deal of editing to get down to single length, but it was worth it, as the track made the top ten. And that was where the problems started. There are two different stories told about what happened to Roger Barrett over the next forty years, and both stories are told by people with particular agendas, who want particular versions of him to become the accepted truth. Both stories are, in the extreme versions that have been popularised, utterly incompatible with each other, but both are fairly compatible with the scanty evidence we have. Possibly the truth lies somewhere between them. In one version of the story, around this time Barrett had a total mental breakdown, brought on or exacerbated by his overuse of LSD and Mandrax (a prescription drug consisting of a mixture of the antihistamine diphenhydramine and the sedative methaqualone, which was marketed in the US under the brand-name Quaalude), and that from late summer 1967 on he was unable to lead a normal life, and spent the rest of his life as a burned-out shell. The other version of the story is that Barrett was a little fragile, and did have periods of mental illness, but for the most part was able to function fairly well. In this version of the story, he was neurodivergent, and found celebrity distressing, but more than that he found the whole process of working within commercial restrictions upsetting -- having to appear on TV pop shows and go on package tours was just not something he found himself able to do, but he was responsible for a whole apparatus of people who relied on him and his group for their living. In this telling, he was surrounded by parasites who looked on him as their combination meal-ticket-cum-guru, and was simply not suited for the role and wanted to sabotage it so he could have a private life instead. Either way, *something* seems to have changed in Barrett in a profound way in the early summer of 1967. Joe Boyd talks about meeting him after not having seen him for a few weeks, and all the light being gone from his eyes. The group appeared on Top of the Pops, Britain's top pop TV show, three times to promote "See Emily Play", but by the third time Barrett didn't even pretend to mime along with the single. Towards the end of July, they were meant to record a session for the BBC's Saturday Club radio show, but Barrett walked out of the studio before completing the first song. It's notable that Barrett's non-cooperation or inability to function was very much dependent on circumstance. He was not able to perform for Saturday Club, a mainstream pop show aimed at a mass audience, but gave perfectly good performances on several sessions for John Peel's radio show The Perfumed Garden, a show firmly aimed at Pink Floyd's own underground niche. On the thirty-first of July, three days after the Saturday Club walkout, all the group's performances for the next month were cancelled, due to "nervous exhaustion". But on the eighth of August, they went back into the studio, to record "Scream Thy Last Scream", a song Barrett wrote and which Nick Mason sang: [Excerpt: Pink Floyd, "Scream Thy Last Scream"] That was scheduled as the group's next single, but the record company vetoed it, and it wouldn't see an official release for forty-nine years. Instead they recorded another single, "Apples and Oranges": [Excerpt: Pink Floyd, "Apples and Oranges"] That was the last thing the group released while Barrett was a member. In November 1967 they went on a tour of the US, making appearances on American Bandstand and the Pat Boone Show, as well as playing several gigs. According to legend, Barrett was almost catatonic on the Pat Boone show, though no footage of that appears to be available anywhere -- and the same things were said about their performance on Bandstand, and when that turned up, it turned out Barrett seemed no more uncomfortable miming to their new single than any of the rest of the band, and was no less polite when Dick Clark asked them questions about hamburgers. But on shows on the US tour, Barrett would do things like detune his guitar so it just made clanging sounds, or just play a single note throughout the show. These are, again, things that could be taken in two different ways, and I have no way to judge which is the more correct. On one level, they could be a sign of a chaotic, disordered, mind, someone dealing with severe mental health difficulties. On the other, they're the kind of thing that Barrett was applauded and praised for in the confines of the kind of avant-garde underground audience that would pay to hear AMM or Yoko Ono, the kind of people they'd been performing for less than a year earlier, but which were absolutely not appropriate for a pop group trying to promote their latest hit single. It could be that Barrett was severely unwell, or it could just be that he wanted to be an experimental artist and his bandmates wanted to be pop stars -- and one thing absolutely everyone agrees is that the rest of the group were more ambitious than Barrett was. Whichever was the case, though, something had to give. They cut the US tour short, but immediately started another British package tour, with the Jimi Hendrix Experience, the Move, Amen Corner and the Nice. After that tour they started work on their next album, A Saucerful of Secrets. Where Barrett was the lead singer and principal songwriter on Piper at the Gates of Dawn, he only sings and writes one song on A Saucerful of Secrets, which is otherwise written by Waters and Wright, and only appears at all on two more of the tracks -- by the time it was released he was out of the group. The last song he tried to get the group to record was called "Have You Got it Yet?" and it was only after spending some time rehearsing it that the rest of the band realised that the song was a practical joke on them -- every time they played it, he would change the song around so they would mess up, and pretend they just hadn't learned the song yet. They brought in Barrett's old friend Dave Gilmour, initially to be a fifth member on stage to give the band some stability in their performances, but after five shows with the five-man lineup they decided just not to bother picking Barrett up, but didn't mention he was out of the group, to avoid awkwardness. At the time, Barrett and Rick Wright were flatmates, and Wright would actually lie to Barrett and say he was just going out to buy a packet of cigarettes, and then go and play gigs without him. After a couple of months of this, it was officially announced that Barrett was leaving the group. Jenner and King went with him, convinced that he was the real talent in the group and would have a solo career, and the group carried on with new management. We'll be looking at them more in future episodes. Barrett made a start at recording a solo album in mid-1968, but didn't get very far. Jenner produced those sessions, and later said "It seemed a good idea to go into the studio because I knew he had the songs. And he would sometimes play bits and pieces and you would think 'Oh that's great.' It was a 'he's got a bit of a cold today and it might get better' approach. It wasn't a cold -- and you knew it wasn't a cold -- but I kept thinking if he did the right things he'd come back to join us. He'd gone out and maybe he'd come back. That was always the analogy in my head. I wanted to make it feel friendly for him, and that where we were was a comfortable place and that he could come back and find himself again. I obviously didn't succeed." A handful of tracks from those sessions have since been released, including a version of “Golden Hair”, a setting by Barrett of a poem by James Joyce that he would later revisit: [Excerpt: Syd Barrett, “Golden Hair (first version)”] Eleven months later, he went back into the studio again, this time with producer Malcolm Jones, to record an album that later became The Madcap Laughs, his first solo album. The recording process for the album has been the source of some controversy, as initially Jones was producing the whole album, and they were working in a way that Barrett never worked before. Where previously he had cut backing tracks first and only later overdubbed his vocals, this time he started by recording acoustic guitar and vocals, and then overdubbed on top of that. But after several sessions, Jones was pulled off the album, and Gilmour and Waters were asked to produce the rest of the sessions. This may seem a bit of a callous decision, since Gilmour was the person who had replaced Barrett in his group, but apparently the two of them had remained friends, and indeed Gilmour thought that Barrett had only got better as a songwriter since leaving the band. Where Malcolm Jones had been trying, by his account, to put out something that sounded like a serious, professional, record, Gilmour and Waters seemed to regard what they were doing more as producing a piece of audio verite documentary, including false starts and studio chatter. Jones believed that this put Barrett in a bad light, saying the outtakes "show Syd, at best as out of tune, which he rarely was, and at worst as out of control (which, again, he never was)." Gilmour and Waters, on the other hand, thought that material was necessary to provide some context for why the album wasn't as slick and professional as some might have hoped. The eventual record was a hodge-podge of different styles from different sessions, with bits from the Jenner sessions, the Jones sessions, and the Waters and Gilmour sessions all mixed together, with some tracks just Barrett badly double-tracking himself with an acoustic guitar, while other tracks feature full backing by Soft Machine. However, despite Jones' accusations that the album was more-or-less sabotaged by Gilmour and Waters, the fact remains that the best tracks on the album are the ones Barrett's former bandmates produced, and there are some magnificent moments on there. But it's a disturbing album to listen to, in the same way other albums by people with clear talent but clear mental illness are, like Skip Spence's Oar, Roky Erickson's later work, or the Beach Boys Love You. In each case, the pleasure one gets is a real pleasure from real aesthetic appreciation of the work, but entangled with an awareness that the work would not exist in that form were the creator not suffering. The pleasure doesn't come from the suffering -- these are real artists creating real art, not the kind of outsider art that is really just a modern-day freak-show -- but it's still inextricable from it: [Excerpt: Syd Barrett, "Dark Globe"] The Madcap Laughs did well enough that Barrett got to record a follow-up, titled simply Barrett. This one was recorded over a period of only a handful of months, with Gilmour and Rick Wright producing, and a band consisting of Gilmour, Wright, and drummer Jerry Shirley. The album is generally considered both more consistent and less interesting than The Madcap Laughs, with less really interesting material, though there are some enjoyable moments on it: [Excerpt: Syd Barrett, "Effervescing Elephant"] But the album is a little aimless, and people who knew him at the time seem agreed that that was a reflection of his life. He had nothing he *needed* to be doing -- no  tour dates, no deadlines, no pressure at all, and he had a bit of money from record royalties -- so he just did nothing at all. The one solo gig he ever played, with the band who backed him on Barrett, lasted four songs, and he walked off half-way through the fourth. He moved back to Cambridge for a while in the early seventies, and he tried putting together a new band with Twink, the drummer of the Pink Fairies and Pretty Things, Fred Frith, and Jack Monck, but Frith left after one gig. The other three performed a handful of shows either as "Stars" or as "Barrett, Adler, and Monck", just in the Cambridge area, but soon Barrett got bored again. He moved back to London, and in 1974 he made one final attempt to make a record, going into the studio with Peter Jenner, where he recorded a handful of tracks that were never released. But given that the titles of those tracks were things like "Boogie #1", "Boogie #2", "Slow Boogie", "Fast Boogie", "Chooka-Chooka Chug Chug" and "John Lee Hooker", I suspect we're not missing out on a lost masterpiece. Around this time there was a general resurgence in interest in Barrett, prompted by David Bowie having recorded a version of "See Emily Play" on his covers album Pin-Ups, which came out in late 1973: [Excerpt: David Bowie, "See Emily Play"] At the same time, the journalist Nick Kent wrote a long profile of Barrett, The Cracked Ballad of Syd Barrett, which like Kent's piece on Brian Wilson a year later, managed to be a remarkable piece of writing with a sense of sympathy for its subject and understanding of his music, but also a less-than-accurate piece of journalism which led to a lot of myths and disinformation being propagated. Barrett briefly visited his old bandmates in the studio in 1975 while they were recording the album Wish You Were Here -- some say even during the recording of the song "Shine On, You Crazy Diamond", which was written specifically about Barrett, though Nick Mason claims otherwise -- and they didn't recognise him at first, because by this point he had a shaved head and had put on a great deal of weight. He seemed rather sad, and that was the last time any of them saw him, apart from Roger Waters, who saw him in Harrod's a few years later. That time, as soon as Barrett recognised Waters, he dropped his bag and ran out of the shop. For the next thirty-one years, Barrett made no public appearances. The last time he ever voluntarily spoke to a journalist, other than telling them to go away, was in 1982, just after he'd moved back to Cambridge, when someone doorstopped him and he answered a few questions and posed for a photo before saying "OK! That's enough, this is distressing for me, thank you." He had the reputation for the rest of his life of being a shut-in, a recluse, an acid casualty. His family, on the other hand, have always claimed that while he was never particularly mentally or physically healthy, he wasn't a shut-in, and would go to the pub, meet up with his mother a couple of times a week to go shopping, and chat to the women behind the counter at Sainsbury's and at the pharmacy. He was also apparently very good with children who lived in the neighbourhood. Whatever the truth of his final decades, though, however mentally well or unwell he actually was, one thing is very clear, which is that he was an extremely private man, who did not want attention, and who was greatly distressed by the constant stream of people coming and looking through his letterbox, trying to take photos of him, trying to interview him, and so on. Everyone on his street knew that when people came asking which was Syd Barrett's house, they were meant to say that no-one of that name lived there -- and they were telling the truth. By the time he moved back, he had stopped answering to "Syd" altogether, and according to his sister "He came to hate the name latterly, and what it meant." He did, in 2001, go round to his sister's house to watch a documentary about himself on the TV -- he didn't own a TV himself -- but he didn't enjoy it and his only comment was that the music was too noisy. By this point he never listened to rock music, just to jazz and classical music, usually on the radio. He was financially secure -- Dave Gilmour made sure that when compilations came out they always included some music from Barrett's period in the group so he would receive royalties, even though Gilmour had no contact with him after 1975 -- and he spent most of his time painting -- he would take photos of the paintings when they were completed, and then burn the originals. There are many stories about those last few decades, but given how much he valued his privacy, it wouldn't be right to share them. This is a history of rock music, and 1975 was the last time Roger Keith Barrett ever had anything to do with rock music voluntarily. He died of cancer in 2006, and at his funeral there was a reading from The Little Grey Men, which was also quoted in the Order of Service -- "The wonder of the world, the beauty and the power, the shapes of things, their colours lights and shades; these I saw. Look ye also while life lasts.” There was no rock music played at Barrett's funeral -- instead there were a selection of pieces by Handel, Haydn, and Bach, ending with Bach's Allemande from the Partita No. IV in D major, one of his favourite pieces: [Excerpt: Glenn Gould, "Allemande from the Partita No. IV in D major"]  As they stared blankly in dumb misery deepening as they slowly realised all they had seen and all they had lost, a capricious little breeze, dancing up from the surface of the water, tossed the aspens, shook the dewy roses and blew lightly and caressingly in their faces; and with its soft touch came instant oblivion. For this is the last best gift that the kindly demi-god is careful to bestow on those to whom he has revealed himself in their helping: the gift of forgetfulness. Lest the awful remembrance should remain and grow, and overshadow mirth and pleasure, and the great haunting memory should spoil all the after-lives of little animals helped out of difficulties, in order that they should be happy and lighthearted as before. Mole rubbed his eyes and stared at Rat, who was looking about him in a puzzled sort of way. “I beg your pardon; what did you say, Rat?” he asked. “I think I was only remarking,” said Rat slowly, “that this was the right sort of place, and that here, if anywhere, we should find him. And look! Why, there he is, the little fellow!” And with a cry of delight he ran towards the slumbering Portly. But Mole stood still a moment, held in thought. As one wakened suddenly from a beautiful dream, who struggles to recall it, and can re-capture nothing but a dim sense of the beauty of it, the beauty! Till that, too, fades away in its turn, and the dreamer bitterly accepts the hard, cold waking and all its penalties; so Mole, after struggling with his memory for a brief space, shook his head sadly and followed the Rat.

america tv love american death history black world children english uk space news americans british games young war walk spring secrets european wild heart inspiration stars dna songs african trip hospitals bbc wind sun vietnam wolf joker britain catholic beatles mothers lion tiger greece liverpool stem nurses cambridge birmingham wright iv kent david bowie eleven butterflies waters depending bomb bob dylan victorian newcastle civil rights john lennon invention bach lsd pink floyd apples communists rat boyd chapman bb boogie pops handel controls string heartbeat alice in wonderland kinks adler byrne ban mole greyhound emo sanford climax roald dahl tilt paul simon sigma yoko ono emi eaten camelot gnome james joyce syd pollock jenner abbey road gog rock music cautionary tales brian wilson elektra lewis carroll relics roger waters haydn notting hill jeff beck arthurian groupies marquee sainsbury willows etta james freak out i ching opel dick clark gilmour howlin edwardian coasters walk like gk chesterton john lee hooker bo diddley wish you were here labour mp tennyson sgt pepper richard wright penny lane twink pinups pat boone anjelica huston syd barrett new left john peel allemande manfred mann nick mason free school amm jimi hendrix experience klose sdp johnny b goode pretty things shine on rubber soul girl guides liberal mps american bandstand chubby checker oar notting hill carnival ray davies psychedelic experiences harrod newport folk festival bandstand elektra records frith bacharach roky erickson steptoe tam lin strawberry fields forever spike milligan soft machine andrew king joker's wild mose allison who do you love saucerful shallots joe boyd geoff emerick rhymer rick wright lodgers radio london distributism entranced ewan maccoll crazy diamond fred frith quaalude incredible string band belloc pete anderson partita no rob chapman track records slim harpo ron grainer addenbrooke what would you say mike leonard emily young cloudberry interstellar overdrive dave gilmour grimble nick kent norman smith ufo club skip spence chris dennis pink fairies first girl i loved jac holzman arnold layne malcolm jones dodder smokestack lightnin tilt araiza
RNZ: Morning Report
National candidate on his chances in by-election

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 3:27


National's Hamilton West candidate says winning next month's the by-election won't be easy. Tama Potaka hopes to take the seat made vacant when the independent and former Labour MP, Gaurav Sharma resigned from parliament.   Mr Potaka is the chief executive of Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki. Before that he worked for the New Zealand Super Fund and spent seven years as General Manager at Tainui Group Holdings in Hamilton. Tama Potaka declined to be interviewed on the programme this morning - we wanted him to appear alongside the Labour candidate Georgie Dansey. But he spoke to reporter Andrew McRae yesterday.

Milk the Cow Podcast
Laura Pidcock (Ex-Labour/People's Assembly)Milk the Cow Podcast

Milk the Cow Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 55:44


In this episode, Mike chats with Laura Pidcock ex Labour MP, NEC member and current Chair of The People's Assembly. They discuss:

The Game Football Podcast
What Could Derail Arsenal's Title Hopes?

The Game Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 60:25


Hugh Woozencroft is joined by Gregor Robertson, Tom Clarke and Alyson Rudd, with Tom Roddy.Brighton gave Graham Potter a hostile welcome on his return with Chelsea. Was his in-game management affected by the boos? (00:00)Leeds got the better of Liverpool as Jurgen Klopp's side continued to struggle. How do they turn the corner? (19:31)Unlike Liverpool, Arsenal didn't fall foul of Nottingham Forest. In fact, they embarrassed them - but what could derail the Gunners' charge towards an unexpected title fight? (31:32)Alyson tells us all about her enlightening conversation with Fulham's Bobby Decordova-Reid and his Labour MP sister, Marsha (40:11)Hugh has a big statement to make about Manchester City's Kevin De Bruyne - but will everyone else agree? (45:06)Marcus Rashford continues to impress - but can he break into the England World Cup squad? (51:39)Get more of The Times and The Sunday Times for less than £1 a day. Start your free trial: thetimes.co.uk/thegame Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

DryCleanerCast a podcast about Espionage, Terrorism & GeoPolitics
S7 Ep8: Hope Not Hate and the Walk-In with Nick Lowles

DryCleanerCast a podcast about Espionage, Terrorism & GeoPolitics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 65:47


In this episode, we are joined by Nick Lowles from Hope Not Hate.   Hope Not Hate is the real organisation behind ITV's The Walk-In. Nick joins us to discuss the work of Hope Not Hate, and he gives us an overview of the far-right in Britain today.  We also discuss a Far Right plot by the terrorist group National Action to murder Labour MP, Rosie Cooper. That plot was foiled by a National Action member who objected to violence and became an informant for Hope Not Hate. The plot to murder Rosie Cooper has now been turned into an excellent ITV television drama called “The Walk-In.” Find out more about Hope Not Hate here: https://hopenothate.org.uk/ You can connect with Nick on Twitter: https://twitter.com/lowles_nick Watch "The Walk-In" on ITV player here: https://www.itv.com/hub/the-walk-in/2a7556a0005 Music on this podcast is provided by Andrew R. Bird (Andy Bird) You can check out his work here: https://soundcloud.com/andrewbirduk For more information about the podcast, check out our website: https://secretsandspiespodcast.com/  Secrets and Spies is part of the Spy Podcast Network. Check out our other excellent spy-related podcasts here: https://www.spypodcasts.com/  You can support Secrets and Spies in a few ways:    * Subscribe to our Youtube page: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDVB23lrHr3KFeXq4VU36dg * Become a “Friend of the podcast”  on Patreon for £3 www.patreon.com/SecretsAndSpies * You can buy merchandise from our shop: https://www.redbubble.com/shop/ap/60934996?asc=u Connect with us on social media  TWITTER twitter.com/SecretsAndSpies  FACEBOOK www.facebook.com/secretsandspies    Check out our short spy film “THE DRY CLEANER” which is now available to buy on Apple TV & Amazon Prime.  Watch the trailer here: https://youtu.be/j_KFTJenrz4

RNZ: Morning Report
Labour MP makes history with swearing-in

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 2:29


Women will hold the majority of seats in Parliament for the first time ever when Labour MP Soraya Peke-Mason is sworn in today. Peke-Mason's move to Parliament was announced in June, after news that Kris Faafoi would leave politics and Trevor Mallard would move on to a diplomatic posting. Because Gaurav Sharma announced his resignation last week, it means there's currently a 50-50 split between men and women in the House, with Peke-Mason set to tip the balance. She spoke to Corin Dann.

Today with Claire Byrne
Liz Truss latest

Today with Claire Byrne

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 11:39


Andrew Pierce, Daily Mail Columnist & Presenter at LBC; Pat McFadden, Labour MP and Shadow Chief Secretary to the Treasury.

Amanpour
What next for the UK?

Amanpour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 55:03


Resigning after just 45 days in office, Liz Truss has cemented herself as the United Kingdom's shortest-serving prime minister. She presided over a period of chaos: her economic plan tanked the pound and sent markets into freefall, raised interest rates and threw ordinary people into panic about their mortgages and the cost of living. Her slew of tax cuts for the wealthy has been ditched now by her new chancellor Jeremy Hunt. Now, the Conservative Party will hold yet another leadership election, aiming to have another prime minister in place by next Friday. But the calls for a general election are growing louder. Can – and should – the Conservative Party really govern Britain right now? Former Conservative MP and minister Sir Alan Duncan joins the program, followed by Labour MP and Shadow Foreign Secretary David Lammy.  Also on today's show: Robert Draper, author of Weapons of Mass Delusion; wildly popular Iranian singer Googoosh.To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

The Mike Hosking Breakfast
Gaurav Sharma: Former Labour MP says he will announce new centrist party name and policies in due course

The Mike Hosking Breakfast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 2:44


Gaurav Sharma believes there is plenty of support for his new political party. The former Labour MP has announced he is quitting Parliament, sparking a by-election in his Hamilton West seat, in which he'll be standing. Sharma told Mike Hosking he'll be announcing the formation of a new centrist party and its name and policies in due course. He's talking to people who want a party that isn't too right or too left. Sharma will need 500 members to register that party. LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

RNZ: Checkpoint
Ex-Labour MP Sharma quite Parliament, forces by-election

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 3:50


Independent MP Gaurav Sharma has resigned from Parliament, forcing a by-election in Hamilton West. The former Labour MP says he intends to stand in the by-election as an independent candidate. Labour Leader Jacinda Ardern is describing the move as "unnecessary and wasteful". RNZ political reporter, Katie Scotcher, has the details.  

Iain Dale All Talk
170. Peter Kyle

Iain Dale All Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 87:46


Iain Dale talks to the Labour MP for Hove & Portslade, Peter Kyle, about his childhood, dyslexia, being gay, his work ethic, and what it's like to share an office with Wes Streeting.

INSIDE BRIEFING with Institute for Government
"The nightmarish state of British politics"

INSIDE BRIEFING with Institute for Government

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 48:48 Very Popular


Academic, author and former Talking Politics host David Runciman joins the IfG podcast team to take stock of the state of British politics. As wearing Conservative politicians make their way back from Birmingham, and with Labour MP's having left Liverpool, just how health are Westminster's largest parties right now? Is growth the new dividing line in Westminster and beyond - and is there really an anti-growth coalition? And what on earth is going to happen next in the never-ending, unpredictable rollercoaster ride of British politics? Hannah White presents With Alex Thomas and Gemma Tetlow Produced by Candice McKenzie

This Cultural Life
Glenda Jackson

This Cultural Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 43:29


Actor and former MP Glenda Jackson reveals the influences and experiences that inspired her work on stage and screen. One of the greatest actors of her generation, Glenda won Academy Awards for Women in Love and A Touch Of Class, and was Oscar nominated for Sunday Bloody Sunday. She has also won Tony, Emmy and Golden Globes awards for her theatre and television work. In 1992 she gave up acting to become a Labour MP, winning her seat five times. But in 2016 she returned to the stage, playing King Lear in London and New York, and to television for a BAFTA winning performance as an elderly women with dementia in Elizabeth Is Missing. Glenda Jackson recalls her working class upbringing in Birkenhead, and how she won a scholarship to the drama school RADA with help from the manager of the Boots chemists' where she worked at the time. She chooses the director Peter Brook as a major influence on her work, having starred in his radical 1964 stage production of the play Marat/Sade, and the version he subsequently adapted for cinema. She remembers also working closely with the director Ken Russell on several films, including the Oscar-winning Women in Love, adapted from the DH Lawrence novel. Glenda's comic appearances on the Morecambe and Wise Show in the early 1970s are recalled as career highlights. Glenda Jackson also chooses Margaret Thatcher as huge influence on her life and career, as it was the policies of the former Prime Minister which prompted her to give up acting for 23 years while she served as a Labour MP. Producer: Edwina Pitman

A Point of View
Notions of Blackness

A Point of View

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 9:42


Bernardine Evaristo reflects on notions of blackness in the aftermath of comments made this week by the Labour MP, Rupa Huq, who described the Chancellor, Kwasi Kwarteng, as 'superficially' black. 'If one of the most egregious features of racism' Bernardine writes, 'is to reduce people to stereotypes, to homogenise and generalise the qualities of people according to their racialised identities, then what does it say about us when we describe a person as not really being black or Asian because they do not behave according to our values, cultural codes or political interests?' Producer: Adele Armstrong Sound: Peter Bosher Production coordinator: Iona Hammond Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith

Dan Snow's History Hit
What Could Labour Learn From Harold Wilson?

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 23:43 Very Popular


In the week of the Labour Party when polls indicate that the party is likely to form the next government, it seems an opportune moment to examine what lessons they might be able to draw from their own history. But why Harold Wilson?Harold Wilson won four general elections. More than Clement Atlee or Tony Blair. Wilson was a wily, strategic political operator who made some radical changes to the UK including the decriminalisation of homosexuality, legalising abortion, abolishment of the death penalty and confirming the UK's membership of the European Economic Community. He led the country through a number of crises that would be very familiar to us today including industrial action an energy crisis and the pound sterling being under threat. He was also, allegedly, the Queen's favourite Prime Minister.To discuss Wilson's life and leadership Dan is joined by Nick Thomas-Symonds. Nick is a Labour MP and Shadow Secretary of State for International Trade. He is also a writer, barrister and politician and has recently published a biography of Harold Wilson.This episode was produced by Mariana Des Forges, the audio editor was Dougal Patmore.If you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe to History Hit today!To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store.Complete the survey and you'll be entered into a prize draw to win 5 Historical Non-Fiction Books- including a signed copy of Dan Snow's 'On This Day in History'. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Iain Dale’s Book Club
Chapter 192 : Nick Thomas-Symonds

Iain Dale’s Book Club

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 50:26


Iain Dale talks to Labour MP and political biographer Nick Thomas-Symonds about his new biography of Harold Wilson, HAROLD WILSON: THE WINNER.

The Political Party
Show 287 - Tom Blenkinsop

The Political Party

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 60:53


Patriotic. Principled. Hilarious. Tom Blenkinsop is all three of those things and so much more. This is full of brilliant stories of trade union fist fights, his father's involvement in D Day and searing political sense. Tom was the Labour MP for his hometown from 2010 to 2017. He stood down at the 2017 election in protest against Jeremy Corbyn's leadership. That was just one of many principled decisions Tom has taken in his life. He's a member of the Army Reserve and explains his support for monarchy and what it means to members of the armed forces. This is an absolute corker. Follow Tom on Twitter: @TomBlenkinsop See Matt's completely rewritten stand-up show Clowns To The Left Of Me, Jokers to the Right on the following dates: Tues 18 Oct - Leicester Square TheatreFri 21 Oct - Bloomsbury TheatreFru 28 Oct - Bloomsbury Theatre Buy tickets here: https://www.mattforde.com/2022tour Buy tickets to The Political Party, live at The Duchess Theatre here: https://nimaxtheatres.com/shows/the-political-party-with-matt-forde/ Email the show: politicalpartypodcast@gmail.com Follow Matt on Twitter: @mattforde Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Hardy Report
Labour MP Wayne David on Britain's standing in the world

The Hardy Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 33:22


Labour MP Wayne David on Britain's standing in the world You can find out more about him on Twitter @WayneDavid_MP. The Hardy Report is a political news and current affairs podcast, bringing you interviews with a range of activists, campaigners and politicians from across the political spectrum in the United States and the United Kingdom. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thehardyreport/support

Woman's Hour
Why do Conservatives elect female leaders?

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 57:26


As the Conservative Party looks set to elect its third female leader and prime minister, it has left observers and women in other political parties wondering about the secret of their success. The Labour Party have yet to elect a female leader despite having introduced all women shortlists for the 1997 election which returned a record 101 female Labour MPs to the House of Commons, one of whom was Fiona Mactaggart the MP for Slough. She joins Emma Barnett alongside former cabinet minister and MP for Chipping Barnet Theresa Villiers. This year, there have been increasing reports of refugees attempting to travel into Europe by sea, with some travelling by dinghy across the Mediterranean and across the channel into the UK. Last week, the Ocean Viking search & rescue ship rescued 466 women, children and men in 10 rescue operations within 60 hours in the Mediterranean, including two heavily pregnant women and a 3-week-old baby. Emma is joined by Rebecca, a British midwife and medical lead on board the Ocean Viking. Leonardo DiCaprio has been called out for only publicly dating women under the age of 25. It comes as the 47-year-old actor broke things off with his girlfriend Camila Morrone who was 22 years his junior. We discuss why women are responding to the news online with so much humour and mockery with the digital culture commentator Hannah Van-de-peer. Emma also speaks to the relationship psychologist Emma Kenny. Helen Fields is a criminal barrister turned bestselling author. Her latest novel The Last Girl to Die follows private investigator Sadie Levesque as she investigates murder on the Isle of Mull, far off the coast of Scotland. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lucinda Montefiore

Pod Save the World
Boris Johnson Brexits

Pod Save the World

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 61:34 Very Popular


Ben and Tommy record a bonus episode on British Prime Minister Boris Johnson's resignation with special guest and friend of the pod David Lammy, Labour MP and shadow Foreign Secretary of State.