Podcasts about life sciences

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Latest podcast episodes about life sciences

Real Leaders Podcast
Ep. 214 Zero Carbon Leadership In Life Sciences || James Connelly CEO of My GreenLab

Real Leaders Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 56:27


James Connelly is an influential leader in the sustainability and green building movement. Before joining My Green Lab as CEO, James was the VP of Strategic Growth for the International Living Future Institute. He is a frequent keynote speaker on regenerative design, sustainable business, and laboratory sustainability.

Papa Bear Hikes
Spotted Lantern Fly

Papa Bear Hikes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 32:33


Our guest Alejandro Calixto, director of the New York State Integrated Pest Management program at Cornell University, discusses the threat of the Spotted Lantern Fly.“Once these insects reach some of the [state's] grape production areas, there's going to be an impact,” said Alejandro Calixto, director of the New York State Integrated Pest Management program at the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences."Spotted lanternfly spreading in New York state | CALS (cornell.edu)Cornell | New York State IPM Program

What Matters: A Paul Hastings Podcast
Episode 13: Life Sciences Compliance: A Unique Approach

What Matters: A Paul Hastings Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 21:34


The Life Sciences Consulting Group at Paul Hastings is a unique offering from a major law firm. Members of the Group work side by side with the firm's lawyers to provide practical, real world perspectives and operational support in collaboration with the lawyers' strategic risk management advice—a “one-stop shop” solution for clients' compliance needs. In this episode, we talk with Consulting Group Leader BJ D'Avella, along with Laura Skinner and Elaina McEwan, Director and Senior Manager, respectively, in the Consulting Group. They share insights into the Consulting Group's unique value for clients, some client success stories, and their perspectives on the trends and developments life sciences companies should follow in the rest of 2021 and beyond.

BYU-Idaho Radio
COVID-19 Discussion with BYUI Vice President & College Deans

BYU-Idaho Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 32:37


BYU-Idaho Radio sat down with BYU-Idaho Vice President of University Resources as well as the deans of each of the colleges on campus to talk about COVID-19 protocols, adjustments and adaptations. They also talked about the return to the classroom. Those in the discussion include Logan Miller - BYU-Idaho Reporter, Brett Cook - BYU-Idaho University Resources Vice President, John Zenger - Dean of the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences, Kirk Gifford - Dean of the College of Business and Communication, David Peck - Dean of the College of Education & Human Development, Jason Williams - Dean of the College of Language & Letters, - Brian Memmott - Dean of the College of Performing & Visual Arts, Greg Roach - Dean of the College of Physical Sciences & Engineering and Danae Romrell - Dean of Interdisciplinary Studies.

Interviews
Pandemic Ethics: Is Public Health Out of Control?

Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021


Our guest is Euzebiusz (Zeb) Jamrozik, MD, PhD, a practicing internal medicine physician and fellow in ethics and infectious diseases at the Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities at the University of Oxford. He is head of the Monash-WHO Collaborating Centre for bioethics at the Monash Bioethics Centre. His academic work on infectious disease ethics is focused on vaccines, vector-borne disease, and drug resistance. Dr Jamrozik is lead author of the report of a Wellcome Trust funded project on ethical and regulatory issues related to human challenge studies in endemic settings. SHOW NOTES​ Zeb Jamrozik, MD, PhD: Twitter and WebpageJamrozik E and Heriot G. “Imagination and remembrance: What rolw should historical epidemiology play in a world bewitched by mathematical modelling of COVID-19 and other epidemics.” (In History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences free text available)Jamrozik E and Heriot G. “Not in my backyard: COVID-19 vaccine development requires someone to be infected somewhere.” (In The Medical Journal of Australia free text available)Euzebiusz Jamrozik and Michael Seldeling. Human Challenge Studies in Endemic Settings: Ethical and Regulatory Issues (Springer, 2020, free text available)Watch the episode on our YouTube channel

3 Takeaways
Uncontrolled Spread: Why COVID-19 Crushed Us and How We Can Defeat the Next Pandemic: Former FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb (#59)

3 Takeaways

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 24:41


Former FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb gives an inside account of the system wide failure across the U.S. government that left the country blind amidst the global covid pandemic. Throughout the pandemic, he was in regular contact with all the key players in the government and the drug and diagnostic companies. Find out how we can better prepare for the next health crisis – be it a deadlier covid variant, a flu pandemic, or a man-made biological threat. Scott is the author of Uncontrolled Spread: Why COVID-19 Crushed Us and How We Can Defeat the Next Pandemic.

Mises Media
Pandemic Ethics: Is Public Health Out of Control?

Mises Media

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021


Our guest is Euzebiusz (Zeb) Jamrozik, MD, PhD, a practicing internal medicine physician and fellow in ethics and infectious diseases at the Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities at the University of Oxford. He is head of the Monash-WHO Collaborating Centre for bioethics at the Monash Bioethics Centre. His academic work on infectious disease ethics is focused on vaccines, vector-borne disease, and drug resistance. Dr Jamrozik is lead author of the report of a Wellcome Trust funded project on ethical and regulatory issues related to human challenge studies in endemic settings. SHOW NOTES​ Zeb Jamrozik, MD, PhD: Twitter and WebpageJamrozik E and Heriot G. “Imagination and remembrance: What rolw should historical epidemiology play in a world bewitched by mathematical modelling of COVID-19 and other epidemics.” (In History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences free text available)Jamrozik E and Heriot G. “Not in my backyard: COVID-19 vaccine development requires someone to be infected somewhere.” (In The Medical Journal of Australia free text available)Euzebiusz Jamrozik and Michael Seldeling. Human Challenge Studies in Endemic Settings: Ethical and Regulatory Issues (Springer, 2020, free text available)Watch the episode on our YouTube channel

The Accad and Koka Report
Ep. 173 Pandemic Ethics: Is Public Health Out of Control?

The Accad and Koka Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 64:39


Our guest is Euzebiusz (Zeb) Jamrozik, MD, PhD, a practicing internal medicine physician and fellow in ethics and infectious diseases at the Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities at the University of Oxford. He is head of the Monash-WHO Collaborating Centre for bioethics at the Monash Bioethics Centre. His academic work on infectious disease ethics is focused on vaccines, vector-borne disease, and drug resistance. Dr Jamrozik is lead author of the report of a Wellcome Trust funded project on ethical and regulatory issues related to human challenge studies in endemic settings. GUEST: Zeb Jamrozik, MD, PhD: https://twitter.com/id_ethics (Twitter) and https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Euzebiusz-Jamrozik (Webpage) LINKS: Jamrozik E and Heriot G. "Imagination and remembrance: What rolw should historical epidemiology play in a world bewitched by mathematical modelling of COVID-19 and other epidemics." (In History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences https://www.researchgate.net/publication/352203815_Imagination_and_remembrance_what_role_should_historical_epidemiology_play_in_a_world_bewitched_by_mathematical_modelling_of_COVID-19_and_other_epidemics (free text) available) Jamrozik E and Heriot G. "Not in my backyard: COVID-19 vaccine development requires someone to be infected somewhere." (In The Medical Journal of Australia https://www.researchgate.net/publication/349117285_Not_in_my_backyard_COVID-19_vaccine_development_requires_someone_to_be_infected_somewhere (free text )available) Euzebiusz Jamrozik and Michael Seldeling. Human Challenge Studies in Endemic Settings: Ethical and Regulatory Issues (Springer, 2020, https://www.researchgate.net/publication/340224204_Human_Challenge_Studies_in_Endemic_Settings_Ethical_and_Regulatory_Issues (free text) available) WATCH ON YOUTUBE: https://youtu.be/HAmBx6jjGfU (Watch the episode) on our YouTube channel Support this podcast

In Our Time
The Evolution of Crocodiles

In Our Time

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 53:07


Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the remarkable diversity of the animals that dominated life on land in the Triassic, before the rise of the dinosaurs in the Jurassic, and whose descendants are often described wrongly as 'living fossils'. For tens of millions of years, the ancestors of alligators and Nile crocodiles included some as large as a bus, some running on two legs like a T Rex and some that lived like whales. They survived and rebounded from a series of extinction events but, while the range of habitats of the dinosaur descendants such as birds covers much of the globe, those of the crocodiles have contracted, even if the animals themselves continue to evolve today as quickly as they ever have. With Anjali Goswami Research Leader in Life Sciences and Dean of Postgraduate Education at the Natural History Museum Philip Mannion Lecturer in the Department of Earth Sciences at University College London And Steve Brusatte Professor of Palaeontology and Evolution at the University of Edinburgh Producer Simon Tillotson

In Our Time: Science
The Evolution of Crocodiles

In Our Time: Science

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 53:07


Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the remarkable diversity of the animals that dominated life on land in the Triassic, before the rise of the dinosaurs in the Jurassic, and whose descendants are often described wrongly as 'living fossils'. For tens of millions of years, the ancestors of alligators and Nile crocodiles included some as large as a bus, some running on two legs like a T Rex and some that lived like whales. They survived and rebounded from a series of extinction events but, while the range of habitats of the dinosaur descendants such as birds covers much of the globe, those of the crocodiles have contracted, even if the animals themselves continue to evolve today as quickly as they ever have. With Anjali Goswami Research Leader in Life Sciences and Dean of Postgraduate Education at the Natural History Museum Philip Mannion Lecturer in the Department of Earth Sciences at University College London And Steve Brusatte Professor of Palaeontology and Evolution at the University of Edinburgh Producer Simon Tillotson

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 595 (9-20-21): Water and the Human Skeleton

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:40).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 9-15-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of September 20, 2021.  This revised episode from October 2015 is part of a series this fall of episodes on water connections to the human body and human biology. MUSIC – 16 sec – Instrumental That's part of “Halloween,” by John McCutcheon on his 1998 album “Autumnsongs.”  In this first week of autumn, with Halloween merchandise already in stores and on some people's minds, that organ music sets the stage for exploring a vital human organ system that's also one of Halloween's most familiar spectres.  Have a listen for about 15 second to some mystery sounds, and see if you can guess that organ system.  And here's a hint: we couldn't move at all, much less rattle around, without this remarkable framework. SOUNDS  - 13 sec If you guessed the skeleton or skeletal system, you're right!  The rattling you heard was from a plastic Halloween skeleton, accompanied by some creepy laughter from a talking skull decoration.  Since ancient times, human skeletons have been used in art, literature, and culture as symbols of danger, death, and dryness. In fact, the word “skeleton” comes from Latin and Greek words meaning “dried up.”  But there's nothing dead nor dry about a functioning human skeleton.  Our 206 bones contain active cells and tissues that continually take in and release calcium and phosphorus while producing new bone, blood, and fat cells. Bone is about 25 to 30 percent water by weight, with the rest consisting of minerals plus connective protein fibers called collagen.  Water is the main component of cartilage, the relatively flexible tissue in our nose and ears and between bones, including in the disks between the vertebrae in our spine.  In those spinal disks, cartilage fibers enclose a watery core, and this water's resistance to being compressed helps vertebrae move while not being pushed together. Ligaments and tendons join bone and cartilage in the complex, multi-purpose skeletal system.  Aided by water, the skeleton supports the body; protects internal organs; produces cells; and provides levers, pivot points, and cushions to the forces acting on and within the body.  All that, and it's also a classic Halloween image! Thanks to John McCutcheon and Appalseed Productions for permission to use this week's music, and we get the jump on the season of scary skeletons with about 25 more seconds of “Halloween.” MUSIC – 28 sec – Lyrics: “For just one night, I'm allowed to fantasize.  Halloween, here we go.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 287, 10-26-15. “Halloween,” from the 1998 album “Four Seasons: Autumnsongs” on Rounder Records, is copyright by John McCutcheon/Appalsongs and Si Kahn/Joe Hill Music, used with permission of John McCutcheon.  More information about John McCutcheon is available online at http://www.folkmusic.com/.  Thanks to Eric Grace Deedy of Appalseed Productions for her help in acquiring permission to use this music.  More information about Appalseed Productions is available online at https://appalseed-productions-2.square.site/.Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES Structure of human long bones (bones that are longer than they are wide).  Illustration from National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Module, “Skeletal System/Classification of Bones,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/skeletal/.  Skeleton-themed items, including those shown in the two photos above, were part of the Halloween merchandise for sale at a Blacksburg, Va., store on September 15, 2021.EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT THE HUMAN SKELETON The following information is quoted from the National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Module, “Skeletal System/Introduction” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/skeletal/. “Humans are vertebrates, animals having a vertebral column or backbone.  They rely on a sturdy internal frame that is centered on a prominent spine.  The human skeletal system consists of bones, cartilage, ligaments and tendons and accounts for about 20 percent of the body weight. “The living bones in our bodies use oxygen and give off waste products in metabolism.  They contain active tissues that consume nutrients, require a blood supply, and change shape or remodel in response to variations in mechanical stress. “Bones provide a rigid framework, known as the skeleton, that supports and protects the soft organs of the body. “The skeleton supports the body against the pull of gravity.  The large bones of the lower limbs support the trunk when standing. “The skeleton also protects the soft body parts.  The fused bones of the cranium surround the brain to make it less vulnerable to injury.  Vertebrae surround and protect the spinal cord and bones of the rib cage help protect the heart and lungs of the thorax. “Bones work together with muscles as simple mechanical lever systems to produce body movement. “Bones contain more calcium than any other organ.  The intercellular matrix of bone contains large amounts of calcium salts, the most important being calcium phosphate. “When blood calcium levels decrease below normal, calcium is released from the bones so that there will be an adequate supply for metabolic needs.  When blood calcium levels are increased, the excess calcium is stored in the bone matrix.  The dynamic process of releasing and storing calcium goes on almost continuously. “Hematopoiesis, the formation of blood cells, mostly takes place in the red marrow of the bones. “In infants, red marrow is found in the bone cavities.  With age, it is largely replaced by yellow marrow for fat storage.  In adults, red marrow is limited to the spongy bone in the skull, ribs, sternum, clavicles, vertebrae and pelvis.  Red marrow functions in the formation of red blood cells, white blood cells and blood platelets. SOURCES Used for Audio Joseph Hammill and Kathleen M. Knutzen, Biomechanical Basis of Human Movement—Third Edition, Wolters Kluwer/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Baltimore, Md., and Philadelphia, Penn., 2009. Harry N. Herkowitz et al., The Spine—Fourth Edition (Vol. I), W. B. Saunders Company, Philadelphia, Penn., 1999.W. Henry Hollinshead and Cornelius Rosse, Textbook of Anatomy—Fourth Edition, Harper and Row Publishers, Inc., 1985.Evelyn Kelly, The Skeletal System, Greenwood Press, Westport, Conn., 2004. Lakeland Community College, “The Skull and Skeleton in Art: Folk Art to Pop Culture,” https://www.facebook.com/events/1633218576961435/. Merriam-Webster Dictionary, “Skeleton,” online at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/skeleton. National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Module, “Skeletal System,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/skeletal/. Icy Sedgwick, “Skeleton Folklore,” published by Folklore Thursday, October 26, 2017, online at https://folklorethursday.com/halloween/i-can-feel-it-in-my-bones-skeletons-in-folklore/. Walt Disney Animation Studies, “The Skeleton Dance,” 1929, online at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vOGhAV-84iI&t=27s.For More Information about Water and the Human Body Mayo Clinic Health System, “Water: Essential to your body,” online at https://www.mayoclinichealthsystem.org/hometown-health/speaking-of-health/water-essential-to-your-body. U.S. Geological Survey, “The Water in You: Water and the Human Body,” https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/water-you-water-and-human-body?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects.RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Science” subject category. Following are links to other episodes on connections of water to human biology.  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in fall 2021; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes.  Episode 195, 1-6-14 – Water thermodynamics.Episode 393, 11-6-17 – Disease: Influenza.Episode 466, 4-1-19 – Water intake and sports.Episode 517, 3-23-20 and Episode 519, 4-6-20 – Disease: Water connections to COVID-19.Episode 592, 8-30-21 – Overview of water's roles in the body.Episode 593, 9-6-21 – Circulatory system connections to water.Episode 594, 9-13-21 – Neurological system connections to water. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-3 plus 5: MatterK.4 – Water is important in our daily lives and has properties. Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes1.5 – Animals, including humans, have basic life needs that allow them to survive. Grade 66.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment. Life ScienceLS.3 – There are levels of structural organization in living things.LS.7 – Adaptations support an organism's survival in an ecosystem. Physical SciencePS.8 – Work, force, and motion are related. BiologyBIO.2 – Chemical and biochemical processes are essential for life.BIO.3 – Cells have structure and function.Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rdgrade.Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade.Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten.Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade.Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade.Episode 403, 1-15-18 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4ththrough 8th grade.Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school.Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school.Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school.Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school.Episode 531, 6-29-20 – on various ways that animals get water, for 3rd and 4th grade.Episode 539, 8-24-20

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TechNation Radio Podcast
Episode 435: Episode 21-38 7½ Lesson about *Your* Brain

TechNation Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 59:00


Neuroscientist and psychologist Lisa Feldman Barrett. She gives us “7½ Lessons about the Brain” and has some surprises – there is no “reptilian” part of your brain … it's just a myth. Then in biotech – treatments to fight diseases caused by inflammation – Dr. Jim Woody, the CEO of 180 Life Sciences talks about their pipeline of drugs, as well as their lead work in clinical trials now – it's for Dupuytren's Contracture, affecting one out of 25 people in Europe and North America.

Blazing Trails
Back to School: What Parents Need to Know - A Conversation with Dr. Geeta Nayyar, Dr. Carlos del Rio and Aneesh Chopra

Blazing Trails

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 39:20


As kids head back to the classroom this fall and the Delta variant's presence in the US increases, what do you need to know as a parent?Our scientifically-minded panel this week includes Dr. Geeta Nayaar, Executive Medical Director and General Manager of Healthcare and Life Sciences at Salesforce; Dr. Carlos del Rio, the Executive Associate Dean at the Emory School of Medicine; and Aneesh Chopra, CO-Founder and President of CareJourney, who was also the first US Chief Technology Officer under President Obama.They outline some of the steps you can take to keep your kids safe from infection and discuss how companies can take the lead in prioritizing the safety of their employees by providing flexibility and developing trust with them.

BIOS
27. The Promise of TechBio w/ Alaa Halawa & Ayman AlAbdallah @ Mubadala Ventures

BIOS

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 43:43


Alaa Halawa & Ayman AlAbdallah are two integral members of the Mubadala Ventures team & lead the firm's efforts in TechBio. Alaa Halawa is the Co-Head of Mubadala Capital Ventures SF, where he focuses on investing in venture and early growth-stage companies at the intersection of life sciences and technology. Among other themes within life sciences investing, Alaa has concentrated on the following: how technology is enhancing the pharmaceutical industry, from drug discovery through clinical trials; and how technology - and in particular bio-informatics, artificial intelligence and machine learning - is enhancing disease diagnosis. Alaa joined Mubadala in 2009 where he worked on designing and implementing the strategy to develop a technology cluster in Abu Dhabi focusing on semiconductor research through partnerships with Silicon Valley companies and academic institutions. Alaa then moved to the Bay Area to support the transition of Executive Leadership in one of Mubadala's key assets in Silicon Valley, GlobalFoundries, where he worked on a series of strategic, corporate development and transformation initiatives. Alaa holds an MBA from Cornell University and a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering from University of Jordan.Alaa sits on the boards of Recursion, Alloy Therapeutics, Outpace, Xilis, Innovaccer, among others. &Ayman AlAbdallah is a San Francisco-based investor at Mubadala Ventures. In his role, he focuses on early and growth stage investments in technology, healthcare, and life sciences. Prior to Mubadala, Ayman worked in corporate development at Tecan Group (SWX: Tecan) where he co-managed M&A and equity investment efforts in the US and Europe. He began his career as a management consultant at Accenture, where he helped businesses in Canada and the US solve critical strategy and operational challenges. He has also worked with the hedge fund team at OMERS Capital, where he focused on the intersection of machine learning and event-driven investing. In addition to his investing and consulting background, Ayman's journey includes operating experience having been involved with a number of startups, including Sentinelle Medical (acquired by Hologics), Pullsar Technologies (acquired by Tecan), and Airo Health (Y Combinator, Summer 2016 batch). Ayman completed his M.B.A. and mechanical engineering studies at the University of Toronto where he received the Chalmers award and a fellowship for his engineering research thesis investigating novel Lab-on-a-Chip platforms.Ayman sits on the board of Xilis, Unlearn, & Ansa Thank you for listening!BIOS (@BIOS_Community) unites a community of Life Science innovators dedicated to driving patient impact. Alix Ventures (@AlixVentures) is a San Francisco based venture capital firm supporting early stage Life Science startups engineering biology to create radical advances in human health.Music: Danger Storm by Kevin MacLeod (link & license)

To Care is Human
Microsoft's Commitment to Address Health Equity and Disparities

To Care is Human

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 21:55


Microsoft is impacting the world  by empowering people and organizations through software and  the power of data. Antoinette Thomas, US Chief Executive Officer and Industry Executive for US Health and Life Sciences at Microsoft, shares why a focus on equity is so important to their organization and what they are doing to make meaningful contributions during the pandemic and beyond. 

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 594 (9-13-21): Neurons, Ions, and Water

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:18).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImageExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 9-10-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of September 13, 2021.  This revised episode from December 2018 is part of a series this fall of episodes on water connections to the human body and human biology. MUSIC – ~ 15 sec – Lyrics:  “Well you're nothing but a pack of neurons, in a shapely bag of goo.  All your thoughts and dreams, your hopes and schemes, are electrochemical, too.”This week, that music sets the stage for describing some biochemical and electro-chemical aspects of the water-based environment inside of us.  Have a listen for about 45 more seconds. MUSIC – ~47 sec – Lyrics: “Well the first time I ever saw your face, dear, my ions began to diffuse.  Your eyes aglow made the sodium flow through those membrane avenues.  When our fingers unite, more than synapses excite, and those lips I can't refuse.  I know we're more than just a chemical reaction, ‘cause I'm in love with you-oo-oo, I'm in love with you.  Well you're nothing but a pack of neurons, controlling a bag of goo.  All your thoughts and dreams, your hopes and schemes, are electrochemical, too.  You are what you eat, ‘cept for what you excrete, so watch out what you chew.  You're nothing but a pack of neurons, and I'm in love with you-oo-oo, I'm in love with you.  This is the part where the sodium and potassium ions do a little soft-shoe.”You've been listening to part of “Pack of Neurons,” by Bob Gramann of Fredericksburg, Va., on his 2008 album, “Mostly Live.”  According to Mr. Gramann, the title “Pack of Neurons” was inspired by the use of that phrase in The Astonishing Hypothesis, a 1994 book by Francis Crick on human consciousness.   Dr. Crick shared the 1962 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with James Watson and Maurice Wilkins for their discoveries of the structure of the DNA molecule. Mr. Gramann's song is a light-hearted look at the fundamental role of neurons, of nerve cells, in transmitting the electrical impulses that control humans' mental and physical processes.  Those nerve impulses are transmitted along neurons by changes in the concentration of electrically-charged atoms of sodium and potassium. [Note, not in audio: Neurons are the type of nerve cell that transmits impulses.  The nervous system also has other supporting cells.]  Water is vital as the solvent for those charged atoms, known as ions.  And not just in neurons, but in all biological cells, a water-based solution is the medium in which biochemical substances exist and react.  Regarding water-based solutions, chemist Linus Pauling in 1970 wrote, “One of the most striking properties of water is its ability to dissolve many substances”—including, we might add, ions transmitting the nerve impulses that right now are allowing you to hear or read these words.Thanks to Bob Gramann for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 20 more seconds of “Pack of Neurons.” MUSIC – ~21 sec - Instrumental SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 450, 12-10-18, and Episode 93, 12-19-11. “Pack of Neurons,” from the 2008 album “Mostly Live,” is copyright by Bob Gramann, used with permission.  Bob Gramann's Web site is http://www.bobgramann.com/. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGE Diagram of a neuron.  Image from the National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, “SEER Training Modules: Introduction to the Nervous System—Nerve Tissue,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/nervous/; the specific URL for the diagram was https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/nervous/tissue.html, as of 9-8-21. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT THE HUMAN NERVOUS SYSTEM The following information is quoted from National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, “SEER Training Modules: Review: Introduction to the Nervous System,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/nervous/review.html, accessed 9/10/21. *The nervous system is the major controlling, regulatory, and communicating system in the body. It is the center of all mental activity including thought, learning, and memory. *The various activities of the nervous system can be grouped together as three general, overlapping functions: sensory, integrative, and motor. *Neurons are the nerve cells that transmit impulses.  Supporting cells are neuroglia. *The three components of a neuron are a cell body or soma, one or more afferent processes called dendrites, and a single efferent process called an axon. *The central nervous system consists of the brain and spinal cord.  Cranial nerves, spinal nerves, and ganglia make up the peripheral nervous system. *The afferent division of the peripheral nervous system carries impulses to the CNS; the efferent division carries impulses away from the CNS. *There are three layers of meninges around the brain and spinal cord.  The outer layer is dura mater, the middle layer is arachnoid, and the innermost layer is pia mater. *The spinal cord functions as a conduction pathway and as a reflex center.  Sensory impulses travel to the brain on ascending tracts in the cord. Motor impulses travel on descending tracts. SOURCES Used for Audio Stewart W. Holmes, “You are Nothing but a Pack of Neurons,” ETC: A Review of General Semantics, Vol. 51, No. 4 (Winter 1994-95), pages 406-412, accessed online at https://www.jstor.org/stable/42577594?seq=1#metadata_info_tab_contents(subscription may be needed for access).Nobel Media AB, “The discovery of the molecular structure of DNA—the double helix,” Sept. 30, 2003, online at http://educationalgames.nobelprize.org/educational/medicine/dna_double_helix/readmore.html. Linus Pauling, General Chemistry, Dover Publications, New York, N.Y, 1970).  The quotation used in this episode's audio is found on page 447. Scott K. Powers and Edward T. Howley, Exercise Physiology: Theory and Application to Fitness and Performance, 8th Edition, McGraw-Hill, New York, N.Y., 2012.  See particularly pages 142-148, “Organization of the Nervous System.”Publishers Weekly, “Review of The Astonishing Hypothesis: The Scientific Search for the Soul, by Francis Crick,” Jan. 3, 1994, online at https://www.publishersweekly.com/978-0-684-19431-8. University of Bristol (England), School of Medical Sciences, “Brain Basics: The Fundamentals of Neuroscience,” online at http://www.bris.ac.uk/synaptic/basics/basics-0.html. For More Information about the Human Nervous System Eric Cudler, “Neuroscience for Kids,” online at https://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/neurok.html. National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, “SEER Training Modules: Introduction to the Nervous System,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/nervous/. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Science” subject category. Following are links to other episodes on connections of water to human biology.  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in fall 2021; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes.  Episode 195, 1-6-14 – Water thermodynamics.Episode 287, 10-26-15 – Skeleton system connections to water.Episode 393, 11-6-17 – Disease: Influenza.Episode 450, 12-10-18 – Neurological system connections to water.Episode 466, 4-1-19 – Water intake and sports.Episode 517, 3-23-20 and Episode 519, 4-6-20 – Disease: Water connections to COVID-19.Episode 592, 8-30-21 – Overview of water's roles in the body.Episode 593, 9-6-21 – Circulatory system connections to water. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-3 plus 5: Matter3.3 – Materials interact with water.5.7 – Matter has properties and interactions. Grade 66.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment. Life ScienceLS.2 – All living things are composed of one or more cells that support life processes, as described by the cell theory. BiologyBIO.2 – Chemical and biochemical processes are essential for life.BIO.3 – Cells have structure and function. ChemistryCH.5 – Solutions behave in predictable and quantifiable ways.Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rdgrade.Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade.Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten.Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade.Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade.Episode 403, 1-15-18 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4ththrough 8th grade.Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school.Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school.Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school.Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school.Episode 531, 6-29-20 – on various ways that animals get water, for 3rd and 4th grade.Episode 539, 8-24-20 – on basic numbers and facts about Virginia's water resources, for 4th and 6th grade.

kids new york science bay university agency performance music natural state audio college pack materials accent dark tech water web cells index rain soul pond research ocean government education medicine fitness vol school chesapeake snow environment neuroscience dna powers skeleton holmes va chemistry msonormal stream normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions instrumental environmental citizen times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading biology lyrics chemical nobel prize grade diagram colorful national institutes sensory signature application bio neurons scales motor watershed transcript publishers weekly nervous system cns virginia tech neurological ls atlantic ocean natural resources grades k name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table medical science fredericksburg bristol england acknowledgments physiology mcgraw hill msohyperlink ions crick sections life sciences stormwater cranial james watson policymakers msobodytext bmp new standard virginia department howley cripple creek scott k general chemistry cumberland gap sols maurice wilkins tmdl linus pauling francis crick circulatory virginia standards water center audio notes covid-19
DeviceTalks by MassDevice
The Complete History of the Sapien TAVR – from PVT's Emerging Idea to Edwards Lifesciences' Success

DeviceTalks by MassDevice

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 88:02


Edward Lifesciences' acquisition of Percutaneous Valve Technologies helped mark the birth of one of medtech's great game-changers – the development of the transcatheter aortic valve replacement. In this week's episode, Stanton Rowe, the former CEO of PVT, will walk us through the early days of TAVR, including the enormous doubt the start-up faced as it developed the technology. He also explained how Edwards came to acquire the start-up, which had strong interest from Medtronic, Boston Scientific, and others. Rowe, who is now CEO of the NXT Biomedical incubator, also offers some provocative thoughts on the origins of medtech innovation (and explains why he misses medical device conferences.) Larry Wood, corporate vice president at Edwards Lifesciences, will explain why Edwards opted to pursue PVT rather than continue to develop its own TAVR technology. He also explains why the clinical trial testing of the valve now known as Sapien was so difficult and how he rewrote the compensation packages for his TAVR sales team to help build confidence in the new technology. Scan the QR code for more information about our upcoming DeviceTalks Tuesday discussion with Sagentia! You can subscribe to this podcast on most major podcast players including Amazon, Apple, Google, and Spotify.

Fortinet Cybersecurity Podcast
FortinetLIVE #34 - Ransomware in Life Sciences & Healthcare

Fortinet Cybersecurity Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 10:28


This was recorded live on 09/09/2021 FortiGuardLabs' Derek Manky joins #Fortinet's Troy Ament for another edition of FortinetLIVE to discuss #ransomware and threat landscape trends in #healthIT and life sciences. Tune in to hear the latest developments. Watch the recording on YouTube: https://youtu.be/ZC1D9JUq1Uw

Sales vs. Marketing
How to Pivot In Your Career With Bob Richards, Executive Vice Chairman at Cushman Wakefield

Sales vs. Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 55:58


➡️ Like The Show? Leave A Rating: https://ratethispodcast.com/successstory ➡️ About The Guest Bob Richards is the Executive Vice Chairman and member of the Global Advisory Board at Cushman Wakefield. Locally, Bob leads the Cambridge/Urban team and also heads the Life Science and Healthcare Practice Groups. He also serves on the Boston Office Steering Committee. Bob has represented numerous corporate clients in transactions nationally and internationally. He has successfully completed complex assignments in India, China, Singapore, Australia, The United Kingdom, The Netherlands and Denmark, as well as all major cities in The United States. He counsels tenant clients such as Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Raytheon, Forrester Research, CRISPR Therapeutics, Acceleron, and The Wyss Institute. Prior to joining Cushman & Wakefield, Bob was a founding partner and president of Richards Barry Joyce & Partners, which was acquired by Transwestern in 2013. Prior to co-founding RBJ, he was a Principal at Trammell Crow Company. Beflore entering commercial real estate, Bob spent five years working as a sportscaster for CNN and WTBS in Atlanta. ➡️ Talking Points 00:00 - Intro 09:13 - Being comfortable speaking to anyone. 10:54 - How to manage a career pivot. 22:31 - Moving to Cushman Wakefield 30:26 - Remote work & real estate. 41:06 - Bet on yourself. 43:01 - Your clients are a reflection of you. 48:05 - Always have clarity of purpose. ➡️ Show Links https://www.linkedin.com/in/bob-richards-03a28221/ https://www.cushmanwakefield.com/en/united-states/people/robert-richards ➡️ Podcast Sponsors 1. Hubspot Podcast Network https://hubspot.com/podcastnetwork 2. Ladder - Life Insurance Solutions https://ladderlife.com/successstory

The Cannabis Investing Podcast
180 Life Sciences: Looking At Inflammation With Cannabis

The Cannabis Investing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 62:27


180 Life Sciences' Prof. Sir Marc Feldmann, who co-founded the company with cannabis trailblazer Prof. Raphael Mechoulam, joins Rena with Dr. Jonathan Rothbard, Chief Science Officer. Focusing on pain and inflammation space. Aiming for FDA approval. Human clinical trials. Limitations of bioavailability in CBD; non-psychoactive synthetic CBD. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Cannabis Conversation | Medical Cannabis | CBD | Hemp
EPISODE #130 The Future of Clinical Trials in Cannabis with Jaspreet Grewal & Sabrina Ramkellawan, Founders of Knowde Group

The Cannabis Conversation | Medical Cannabis | CBD | Hemp

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 40:41


This week, we're joined by Jaspreet Grewal & Sabrina Ramkellawan, founders of Knowde Group - Canadian contract research organisation and hybrid consultancy specialising in plant-based therapeutics and psychedelics.In this episode, we explore the complexities of clinical trials within the cannabis industry, including barriers to entry, the three phases of clinical trials, how to navigate the regulatory landscape, and access to funding.About Jaspreet Grewal  MBA, MSc, CCRPJaspreet Grewal is an accomplished clinician, researcher and venture partner bringing over 15 years of experience to companies focused on the Life Sciences. Throughout her career, she has held various positions with increasing responsibilities in various healthcare roles resulting in a broad skillset and robust healthcare and investment network while working in Canada, the US, the UK, the Cayman Islands, and Bermuda. Jaspreet holds a Master's in Clinical Vision Sciences from Georgetown University, an Executive Certificate in Public Health from Harvard University and an MBA from the London School of Economics and Political Science.She is considered an expert in Healthcare and Regulatory Strategy and is a passionate advocate for building Alberta's Life Science ecosystem. She has successfully merged her expertise in innovation, research and finance to become a dynamic leader not only nationally but internationally. Her current roles and affiliations include:Co-Founder & CEO, Knowde Group (Canada, UK and Australia)Founder & CEO, Venn Consulting (Canada)Board Director, BioAlbertaEntrepreneur in Residence, Innovate Calgary (Medical Cannabis)Global Lifesciences Consultant, Calgary Economic DevelopmentExternal Advisor to the Vi Riddell Pain & Rehabilitation Centre, Alberta Children's Hospital  About Sabrina RamkellawanSabrina has over 20 years of clinical research experience in pharma, medical devices, natural health products and plant-based therapeutics including cannabinoids. She has held positions at or advised some top pharmaceutical, cannabis, psychedelic, and research companies. Sabrina has conducted and supported 11 cannabis research studies to date. She has previous experience leading operations at large scale global Contract Research Organisations including INC Research (now Syneos Health) as well as building successful speciality clinics. Sabrina is also passionate about education and has helped to build and currently teaches the first Certified Cannabis Educator Program at Michener Institute of Education at UHN. She has been and continues to be a speaker in the area of research and plant-based medicine. Prior to her role at Knowde Group, she was the VP of Clinical Affairs at TerrAscend Canada which is a licensed producer. In her role as Chief Operating Officer at Knowde Group, she is focused on all aspects of conducting research specialising in plant-based therapeutics and psychedelics. ResourcesJoin Sabrina on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sabrinaramkellawan/?originalSubdomain=caJoin Jaspreet on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jkgrewal/Follow Knowde Group on Twitter: https://twitter.com/knowdegroupKnowde Group's Website: https://www.knowdegroup.com/ 

Investor Connect Podcast
Investor Perspectives – How to Solve the Biotech/Life Sciences Problem: Primary Trends and What Makes for a Successful Company

Investor Connect Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 33:39


This is Investor Perspectives. I'm the host of Investor Connect, Hall T Martin, where we connect startups and investors for funding. In our new Investor Perspectives series entitled “How to Solve the Biotech/Life Sciences Problem”, you'll hear about primary trends and what makes for a successful company in this segment. As the COVID pandemic passes, we emerge into a new world. The biotech space is now undergoing tremendous change as we shift back to a normal way of life. The process for designing and approving vaccines demonstrated a new protocol. Biotech now moves into a new era. We have investors and startup founders describe the changes coming up. Our guests are: , Co-founder, 1:17, CEO and Managing Partner, i 5:58, Founding Partner, l 15:08, President, 17:09, Managing Partner, 20:09, Co-Founder and Managing Partner, 22:57, Chief Executive Officer, 30:45 We hope you enjoy the show. _______________________________ For more episodes from Investor Connect, please visit the site at:       Check out our other podcasts here:    For Investors check out:     For Startups check out:     For eGuides check out:  For upcoming Events, check out For Feedback please contact info@tencapital.group   Music courtesy of .

Grateful Living
Losing our Daughter to Suicide: Kristen and Jeff Durand

Grateful Living

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 74:06


Kristen is a registered nurse in her day to day and Jeff is a Senior VP of Digital Health and Life Sciences at a software company. The two of them have four daughters. In January of 2016, Jeff and Kristine's daughter Meg unfortunately passed away from a mental health battle. In this interview, they talk about: - Meg's story and how they discovered she was having mental health troubles - How they helped as parents by having Meg enter therapy, counseling and a treatment center - The events leading up to her passing - Advice for other parents who may have a child dealing with mental health issues - Advice for other parents who have a lost a child to suicide I really want to thank Kristen and Jeff for being vulnerable and being willing to reflect on their life story. --- Kristen and Jeff's Email: mfoursquad@verizon.net Grateful Living Info: My Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/aroy81547/?... To Listen on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/3Hn4ttt... To Listen on Apple Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast... YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9Bo... Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/gratefulliving4 Approximate Time Stamps: 0:00 - 1:25 Intro to the podcast 1:26 - 2:38 Setting the scene for the Durand family 2:38 - 4:14 Describing Meg as a child 4:15 - 5:12 The first time the Durands found out Meg was dealing with mental health issues 5:12 - 6:25 How they approached the situation 6:26 - 7:56 How Meg responded to therapy and the Durands thought on therapy 7:57 - 10:16 Meg's distrust of adults, being bullied and the Durands house being targeted 10:16 - 12:21 Meg's senior year of high school mental health journey and her first time attempting suicide 12:22 - 17:11 Meg's relationship with her parents, entering a treatment program 17:12 - 20:59 Meg's relationship with her friends 21:00 - 31:59 Meg's experience at college 32:00 - 35:59 Durands on finding out Meg had passed 36:00 - 37:59 Funeral 38:00 - 40:59 Advice to parents 41:00 - 50:59 Reflecting on Meg's battle 51:00 - 1:00:59 How you think about Meg now and do you want to talk about her 1:01:00 - 1:14:07 Positive stories of Meg

Fun with the Maryland STEM Festival
Driving Life Sceince Manufacturing

Fun with the Maryland STEM Festival

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 5:53


Justin Jay, Director of East Coast Technical Operations discusses his work at PSC Biotech and how he got into the Life Science industry https://biotech.com/

Finding Genius Podcast
Treating Distinct Inflammatory Diseases and Finding Solutions for Fibrosis and Pain with Dr. Jim Woody

Finding Genius Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 25:16


How impactful is inflammation on the body, and how can it be treated? Since it can disrupt so many of the body's natural processes, it has the potential to wreak havoc in many areas. Press play to learn: How TNF and inflammation interact with each other Why frozen shoulders develop How inflammation can lead to a range of disabilities Dr. Jim Woody, the CEO of 180 Life Sciences, shares his work researching inflammation and learning how to more effectively treat it to reduce suffering in individuals worldwide. Fibrosis and other forms of inflammation can be very painful and lead to increasingly severe symptoms as it continues over a lifetime. However, researchers have found specific factors that can help treat it before the inflammation becomes disabling. TNF has been discovered to be helpful in treating inflammation through injections, but there is still much research to complete. There is also a significant reduction in pain by reducing inflammation, giving patients who are treated a potential new lease on life For more information, visit 180lifesciences.com. Episode also available on Apple Podcasts: apple.co/30PvU9C

Hi 5
Opportunities for Patient Centricity in Life Sciences

Hi 5

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 25:47


Patient centricity is no longer a buzzword, it's redefining how the pharmaceutical industry operates to deliver the best outcomes and experiences for patients. In this episode, Jen is joined by Vynamic London team members Gemma Pfister and Jack Young to discuss opportunities to become more patient centric throughout the medicine development lifecycle. Inclusiveness, empowerment, and partnership are defining featured of a truly patient centric approach (00:41). There are opportunities for improving patient centricity across the entire lifecycle of a product, from development (03:13) to reimbursement (08:35) to commercialization (12:50). Pharmaceutical companies are uniquely positioned to drive and derive value from patient centricity efforts (19:25), but success in the space requires a focus on strategy, digital, and measurement (21:52). Podcast Tags: patient centricity, patient advocacy, life sciences, pharmaceutical, pharma, HTA Source Links: https://www.zs.com/insights/whats-the-secret-to-becoming-patient-centric https://pharmaceuticalcommerce.com/brand-marketing-communications/accelerating-the-drive-toward-patient-centricity/ https://deep-dive.pharmaphorum.com/magazine/market-access-2021/representation-empowerment-patients-centre-medicine-reimbursement/ https://www.paconsulting.com/industries/life-sciences/patient-centricity/ For additional discussion, please contact us at TrendingHealth.com or share a voicemail at 1-888-VYNAMIC. Gemma Pfister, Executive & London Hub Lead gemma.pfister@vynamic.com   Jack Young, Director jack.young@vynamic.com Jen Burke, Healthcare Industry Strategist jen.burke@vynamic.com

InsideOut with Mike Alkire
Harnessing Data to Solve Healthcare's Toughest Challenges

InsideOut with Mike Alkire

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 20:10


In this episode of InsideOut, Denise Juliano, Group Vice President of Life Sciences at Premier, co-hosts with guest Chris Tackaberry, CEO at Clinithink. Together, they discuss the power of harnessing data to solve healthcare's toughest challenges.

Investor Connect Podcast
Investor Perspectives – How to Solve the Biotech/Life Sciences Problem: Growth in the Biotech/Life Sciences Segment

Investor Connect Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 32:39


This is Investor Perspectives. I'm the host of Investor Connect, Hall T Martin, where we connect startups and investors for funding. In our new Investor Perspectives series entitled “How to Solve the Biotech/Life Sciences Problem”, you'll hear about growth in the biotech/life sciences segment. As the COVID pandemic passes, we emerge into a new world. The biotech space is now undergoing tremendous change as we shift back to a normal way of life. The process for designing and approving vaccines demonstrated a new protocol. Biotech now moves into a new era. We have investors and startup founders describe the changes coming up. Our guests are: , Co-founder, , 01:18, CEO and Managing Partner, i, 05:05, Founding Partner, l, 07:35, President, , 10:34, Managing Partner, , 16:36, Co-Founder and Managing Partner, , 20:31, Chief Executive Officer, , 29:20 I hope you enjoy this episode. ________________________________ For more episodes from Investor Connect, please visit the site at:         Check out our other podcasts here:   For Investors check out:    For Startups check out:    For eGuides check out:    For upcoming Events, check out      For Feedback please contact info@tencapital.group  Music courtesy of .

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 592 (8-30-21): Exploring the Human Body's Uses of Water

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (3:34).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImageExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 8-27-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of August 30, 2021.  This week, we introduce a series episodes on water connections to the human body and human biology.  We start with some mystery sounds.  Have a listen for about 10 seconds, and see if you know what action these sounds have in common.  And here's a hint: I'm not joking when I say the answer “in jest.” SOUNDS  - ~10 sec If you guessed taking water into the body, or ingesting water, you're right!  You heard sounds of sipping water from a glass, slurping water through a straw, and a crunching into an apple.  Taking in water as liquid or in food is, of course, the first part of the human body's use of water.  Once it's inside of us, water's got a lot to do.  As the Mayo Clinic Health System has stated it, “nearly all of your body's major systems depend on water to function and survive.” Here are eight key aspects and functions of water in human biology. Water constitutes a large percentage of body organs and tissues, including over 70 percent of the brain and heart, over 80 percent of the lungs. It's a major component of blood and lymphatic fluid, which transport materials throughout the body. It's the medium for the body's biochemical reactions. It cushions and protects body organs and tissues. It helps the body regulate its temperature. It's involved in the breakdown and transport of foods and the nutrients they provide. It lubricates joints. And it transports waste products out of the body. Water can perform these life-sustaining functions because of its unique physical and chemical properties that allow it to dissolve many substances, absorb and release heat, and withstand being compressed. We'd be nowhere without it, so we close with some music for the body part that's crucial for all of water's functions.  Here's about 15 seconds of “The Mouth Reel,” by No Strings Attached. MUSIC – ~15 sec - instrumental SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS “The Mouth Reel,” from the 1999 album “In the Vinyl Tradition – Volume I,” is copyright by No Strings Attached, used with permission.  More information about No Strings Attached—a long-time Blacksburg- and Roanoke-based band which is no longer performing—is available online at http://www.enessay.com/index.html. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGE Water uses in the human body.  Illustration from the U.S. Geological Survey, “The Water in You: Water and the Human Body,”  https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/water-you-water-and-human-body?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT WATER IN THE HUMAN BODY The following information is quoted from the U.S. Geological Survey, “The Water in You: Water and the Human Body,” https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/water-you-water-and-human-body?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. “According to H.H. Mitchell, Journal of Biological Chemistry 158, the brain and heart are composed of 73% water, and the lungs are about 83% water.  The skin contains 64% water, muscles and kidneys are 79%, and even the bones are watery: 31%. “Each day humans must consume a certain amount of water to survive.  Of course, this varies according to age and gender, and also by where someone lives.  Generally, an adult male needs about 3 liters (3.2 quarts) per day while an adult female needs about 2.2 liters (2.3 quarts) per day.  All of the water a person needs does not have to come from drinking liquids, as some of this water is contained in the food we eat. “Water serves a number of essential functions to keep us all going.*A vital nutrient to the life of every cell, [it] acts first as a building material.*It regulates our internal body temperature by sweating and respiration.*The carbohydrates and proteins that our bodies use as food are metabolized and transported by water in the bloodstream.*It assists in flushing waste mainly through urination.*[It] acts as a shock absorber for brain, spinal cord, and fetus.*[It] forms saliva.*{It] lubricates joints.” SOURCES USED FOR AUDIO AND OFFERING MORE INFORMATION American Society of Hematology, “Blood Basics,” online at https://www.hematology.org/education/patients/blood-basics. Cleveland [Ohio] Clinic, “Lymphatic System,” online at https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/articles/21199-lymphatic-system. Mayo Clinic Health System, “Water: Essential to your body,” online at https://www.mayoclinichealthsystem.org/hometown-health/speaking-of-health/water-essential-to-your-body.  This is the source of the quote used in the audio of this episode. U.S. Geological Survey, “The Water in You: Water and the Human Body,” https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/water-you-water-and-human-body?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Science” subject category. Following are links to other episodes on connections of water to human biology.  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in fall 2021; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes.  Episode 195, 1-6-14 – Water thermodynamics.Episode 287, 10-26-15 – Skeleton system connections to water.Episode 392, 10-30-17 – Circulatory system connections to water.Episode 393, 11-6-17 – Disease: Influenza.Episode 450, 12-10-18 – Neurological system connections to water.Episode 466, 4-1-19 – Water intake and sports.Episode 517, 3-23-20 and Episode 519, 4-6-20 – Disease: Water connections to COVID-19. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-3 plus 5: MatterK.4 – Water is important in our daily lives and has properties.3.3 – Materials interact with water. Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes1.5 – Animals, including humans, have basic life needs that allow them to survive. Grade 66.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment. Life ScienceLS.4 – There are chemical processes of energy transfer which are important for life BiologyBIO.2 – Chemical and biochemical processes are essential for life.Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels.Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rdgrade.Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade.Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten.Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade.Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5thgrade.Episode 403, 1-15-18 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4ththrough 8th grade.Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school.Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school.Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school.Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school.Episode 531, 6-29-20 – on various ways that animals get water, for 3rd and 4th grade.Episode 539, 8-24-20 – on basic numbers and facts about Virginia's water resources, for 4th and 6th grade.

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MID-WEST FARM REPORT - MADISON

Wisconsin Agricultural and Life Sciences Alumni Association Football Fire-Up Tailgate Party and Silent Auction plans are coming together for the 45th annual event. All money raised supports scholarships for deserving students in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, says Rick Daluge, a former CALS assistant dean and former director of the Farm and Industry Short Course program. Daluge and his wife Peggy are handing out the Red Jacket Award at the event. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Coaching for Leaders
543: Leadership Lessons from NASA, with Dave Williams

Coaching for Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 35:41


Dave Williams: Leadership Moments from NASA Dave is an astronaut, aquanaut, jet pilot, emergency physician, scientist, CEO, and bestselling author. He is the former Director of Space & Life Sciences at NASA's Johnson Space Center and has flown in space twice on Space Shuttles Columbia and Endeavour. Dave holds the Canadian spacewalking record and was the first Canadian to live on the world's only undersea research habitat. He is the recipient of six honorary degrees, the Order of Canada, and the Order of Ontario. Along with Elizabeth Howell, he is the author of Leadership Moments from NASA: Achieving the Impossible*. In this conversation, Dave and I discuss some of the key events from NASA's history since its inception. We highlight three principles that Dave has uncovered in his research of interviews with NASA leaders over the years. Plus, a few practical tips that can help all of us lead teams more effectively. Key Points Introspection is a key and necessary practice for all leaders to hold — and often pays off in unexpected ways. Speaking up and listening up are critical values that helped support many of the NASA successes over the years. Cultural norms, such as senior leaders showing up regularly at all levels of the organization, can help ensure that communication is actually happening. NASA is an example of the movement away from a single, heroic leader and towards leadership, followership, and teamwork. Resources Mentioned Leadership Moments from NASA: Achieving the Impossible* by Dave Williams and Elizabeth Howell Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes An Astronaut's Guide To Life On Earth, with Chris Hadfield (episode 149) Leadership Lessons from Space Shuttle Challenger, with Allan McDonald (episode 229) The Path Towards Trusting Relationships, with Edgar Schein and Peter Schein (episode 539) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

三腳貓實驗室 Tripod Cat's Great Adventure - Presented by MTBA
第 011 號實驗:這組數據爛爆了

三腳貓實驗室 Tripod Cat's Great Adventure - Presented by MTBA

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2021 61:12


延續之前對於美國實驗室與研究生活的討論。或許你覺得你只是一個很平凡的研究生,又或者你曾是學弟妹口中的學霸。在念博班的過程中,都可能會因為挑戰而開始自我懷疑。今天三腳貓與朋友想跟你一起聊聊我們自己經歷的故事,和走過黑暗幽谷後發現的一些可行方法。 如果你是第一次收聽三腳貓這系列的 podcast ,建議你考慮先聽 000、001 和 003 號實驗。 000 號實驗中聊到如何建立自己的專業形象。 001 號實驗帶大家認識美國實驗室的文化。 003 號實驗中,我們開始討論如何和論文指導老師建立正向的關係! 另外,由於籌備MTBA年會的關係,九月暫停更新!請大家耐心等待十月的Podcast喲。 --- 內容製作:若晴、Angel、雯薇、浩文 後製:雯薇、浩文 文案:浩文 音樂:雯薇 封面:毓鴻 上架:乃馨、雯薇 宣傳:安琪、Rita、雯薇

Citizen Science
Climate Change and the Environment

Citizen Science

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 64:14


As a citizen scientist, you can help researchers explore the causes, effects and potential responses to global climate change and other environmental issues. And you can do it from home or out in the field! In this episode of Citizen Science: Stories of Science We Can Do Together, we explore six projects coming at the issue from six very different angles.  Discover these and many other climate change-focused and environment-related citizen science volunteer opportunities through the SciStarter Project Finder! Projects featured in this podcast episode include: Caroline Nickerson's Miss Louisiana Earth featured projects Climate Change in Scripted Media OSDG Community Platform Climate History Australia Urban Buzz Ghosts of the Coast Ripple Effects via the Citizen Science, Civics and Resilient Communities program supported by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Find other NOAA-supported citizen science pages hosted by science centers and museums on SciStarter. The article by Max Cawley (of the Museum of Life + Science in Durham, North Carolina) that Caroline mentions in the episode intro is on the SciStarter Blog. Transcript for this episode coming soon on the SciStarter Podcast page.

Deep Breath In
The complexity of primary care - with Rani Lill Anjum

Deep Breath In

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 51:58


There's a plan from the Royal College of General Practitioners, to stop the profession buckling under the huge pressure applied by the workforce crisis and covid 19. The steps outlined are very practical, but do they really get to the heart of the problem with the way in which primary care is practiced in 2021. In this episode, Tom, Jenny and Navjoyt are joined by Rani Lill Anjum, a philosopher from the Norwegian University of Life Sciences who thinks about causation in healthcare - and what this means for the doctor patient relationship.

What If? So What?
What if You Never Had to Go to Your Doctor's Office Again? An Interview With Tom Swanson

What If? So What?

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 30:22


In this episode, Jim talks with Tom Swanson, Head of Industry Strategy & Marketing for Health & Life Sciences at Adobe, about the future of telemedicine and what other industries can learn from what’s happening in the healthcare space. Connect with Tow Swanson, Head of Industry Strategy & Marketing for Health & Life Sciences at Adobe. Connect with our hosts Jim Hertzfeld, Principal and Chief Strategist for Perficient and Kim Williams-Czopek, Director of Digital Strategy at Perficient. 

American Ag Network
NCBA Updates- The Latest from Central Life Sciences

American Ag Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 2:52


Jesse Allen talks with Bryan Hupp from Central Life Sciences about some of their latest products that can help keep flies down in the feedlot!

Frazis Capital Podcast
Episode 50: Reporting season and the next big thing in the life sciences

Frazis Capital Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 49:15


Michael Frazis gives an update

New Books Network
From a Bucket of Ice to a World Leading Life Sciences Innovator

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 35:04


Jonathan Milner was working as a postdoc in a Cambridge oncology lab when he was struck by an 'entrepreneurial seizure'. Inspired by his father, an engineer who ran a small company, he set up a venture to manufacture antibodies for biology research. Having come close to bankruptcy, Abcam is now worth £2.3 billion and renowned for its positive company culture. In this podcast, the first of two podcasts featuring Jonathan Milner, he takes us through this journey, and explains how lessons learned - as well as a single bucket of ice - turned a failing company into a world leader.  To read the podcast transcription please CLICK HERE - Powered by Speechmatics Jonathan, co-Founder and currently Deputy Chairman of Abcam plc, is an entrepreneur and investor and is passionate about supporting UK life science and high-tech start-ups. He has provided considerable investment and support to over 40 companies and has assisted three technology companies to IPO on the London AIM Stock exchange. Jonathan gained his doctorate in Molecular Genetics at Leicester University after graduating in Applied Biology at Bath. From 1992–95, he was a postdoctoral researcher at Bath, following which he worked at the University of Cambridge in the lab of Professor Tony Kouzarides researching the molecular basis of breast cancer. He identified the market opportunity for supplying high-quality antibodies to support protein interaction studies, and in 1998, founded Abcam with David Cleevely and Professor Tony Kouzarides. Jonathan is also a non-executive director of Repositive, HealX and Syndicate Room. He is also Chairman of Axol Bioscience, Cambridge Allergy Therapy, and PhoreMost. In 2015 Jonathan, with Professor Tony Kouzarides, co-founded the Milner Therapeutics Institute at the University of Cambridge. Also in 2015 he co-founded, with Professor Laurence Hurst, the Milner Institute for Evolution at the University of Bath. Produced by Mark Cotton, Twitter. Podcast links: Abcam - assay kits, reagents, and antibodies. An innovator in reagents and tools, they provide the research and clinical communities with tools and scientific support. The Milner Therapeutics Institute - at the University of Cambridge is dedicated to the conversion of groundbreaking science into therapies. 18 JULY 2018COMMENT The NBN Entrepreneurship and Leadership podcast aims to educate and entertain, sharing insights based on the stories of carefully selected guests - entrepreneurs and leaders - in the atmosphere of an informal conversation. About Peter Cowley Peter Cowley, a Cambridge university technology graduate, founded and ran over a dozen businesses in technology and property over the last 40 years. He has built up a portfolio of 75 angel investments with nine good exits (including one that is 107X his investment and returned all the cash he has invested) and thirteen failures. He is a board member of the Global Business Angel Network (GBAN), President Emeritus of the European Business Angel Network (EBAN), former chair of the Cambridge Business Angels and was UK Angel of the Year 2014. He has mentored hundreds of entrepreneurs and is on the board of nine startups. With his son, Alan, Peter is sharing his and others' experience and anecdotes in order to educate angels and entrepreneurs via The Invested Investor which publishes two books and 75+ podcasts. A selection of Invested Investor podcasts are republished here on the Entrepreneurship and Leadership channel on the NBN. This is one of them. Peter is a public speaker on entrepreneurship and angel investing throughout the world. Linkedin Peter's webpage. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

BIOS
26. Genetic & Cellular Engineering: David Schaffer - Professor @ Berkeley

BIOS

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 43:43


David Schaffer is a Professor of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Bioengineering, & Neuroscience @ University of California Berkeley, he also serves as the Director of QB3 - Berkeley. At Berkeley, Schaffer applies engineering principles to enhance Stem Cell & Gene Therapy approaches for Neuro-Regeneration. This work includes mechanistic investigation of stem cell control, as well as molecular evolution & engineering of viral gene delivery vehicles. He has Co-founded six companies including: 4D Molecular Therapeutics - which uses a novel technology platform to engineer optimized, proprietary adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors for gene therapy, Ignite Immunotherapies, which is developing novel oncolytic virus technologies as cancer therapies in partnership with Pfizer, Valitor - which is developing a novel protein-polymer conjugation technology to develop greatly enhanced protein biologics for a range of disease targets, Axent focused on stem cell therapies, & two others in stealth. Schaffer graduated from Stanford University with a B.S. degree in Chemical Engineering in 1993. Afterward, he pursued a PhD @ MIT with Professor Doug Lauffenburger & conducted a postdoctoral fellowship in the laboratory of Fred Gage @ The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, before moving to UC Berkeley in 1999. Thank you for listening!BIOS (@BIOS_Community) unites a community of Life Science innovators dedicated to driving patient impact. Alix Ventures (@AlixVentures) is a San Francisco based venture capital firm supporting early stage Life Science startups engineering biology to create radical advances in human health.Music: Danger Storm by Kevin MacLeod (link & license)

BIOS
25. Advancing Women's Health & Diversity In Biotech: Jennifer Friel Goldstein - Managing Partner @ SVB Capital

BIOS

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 43:43


Jennifer Friel Goldstein is the Managing Partner for Life Science & Healthcare Practice @ SVB Capital and is a founding member of Venture Forward, a nonprofit that provides resources and education toward developing a diverse, equitable and inclusive venture capital (VC) ecosystem. She is also an advisory board member of Springboard Enterprises and the Women's Health Innovation Coalition. Jennifer has more than 20 years of experience in the VC and startup market segments, including leading and building several teams over the past eight years at Silicon Valley Bank. Before that, she was a director on Pfizer's VC team, where she helped lead or co-lead investments into several life sciences companies. She also led fund of funds investment decisions and independently managed Pfizer's $250 million private equity (PE) portfolio. Jennifer served as a consultant on PE deals across Europe while at Bain & Company and held operational and research roles at Chiron, Genelabs, and Genencor. Jennifer graduated magna cum laude with a bachelor's degree in bioengineering and a master's degree in biotechnology from the University of Pennsylvania. She holds an MBA from the Wharton School, where she was named a Joseph Wharton Fellow. She also serves as an independent director at Alexandria Real Estate Equities, Inc. Jennifer lives in the Bay Area with her husband and their twin children.W/ Special Guest Host: Nabiha Saklayen - Cofounder & CEO @ CellinoNabiha Saklayen is a bio-inspired physicist and Co-Founder & CEO @ Cellino. Nabiha launched Cellino to converge physics, biology, and machine learning to enable paradigm shifts in autologous regenerative medicine. Nabiha was recognized as a Pioneer in MIT Tech Review's 35 Innovators under 35 list for her inventions in laser-based delivery methods and is on the 2019 Forbes under 30 List for Healthcare. She received her Ph.D. in Physics from Harvard University as an HHMI International Fellow. She made significant scientific contributions to the field of pulsed-laser delivery to cells, with several peer-reviewed papers published, patents pending, and grants awarded. Nabiha grew up in Saudi Arabia, Bangladesh, Germany, and Sri Lanka and currently lives in Boston, MA.Cellino is on a mission to make personalized, autologous cell therapies accessible for patients. Stem cell-derived regenerative medicines are poised to cure some of the most challenging diseases within this decade, including Parkinson's, diabetes, and heart disease. Patient-specific cells provide the safest, most effective cures for these indications. However, current autologous processes are not scalable due to extensive manual handling, high variability, and expensive facility overhead. Cellino's vision is to make personalized regenerative medicines viable at large scale for the first time. Cellino's platform combines label-free imaging and high-speed laser editing with machine learning to automate cell reprogramming, expansion, and differentiation in a closed cassette format, enabling thousands of patient samples to be processed in parallel in a single facility.Thank you for listening!BIOS (@BIOS_Community) unites a community of Life Science innovators dedicated to driving patient impact. Alix Ventures (@AlixVentures) is a San Francisco based venture capital firm supporting early stage Life Science startups engineering biology to create radical advances in human health.Music: Danger Storm by Kevin MacLeod (link & license)

Artificial Intelligence in Industry with Daniel Faggella
Unlocking Data's Value in Life Sciences, from Diagnosis to Telehealth and Beyond - with Bill Fox of SambaNova

Artificial Intelligence in Industry with Daniel Faggella

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 36:43


Today's guest is Bill Fox, Business Development Executive for Healthcare Strategy at SambaNova Systems. Founded in Paolo Alto, California, SambaNova offers hardware, software, DataFlow-as-a-Service, and more. Today, Bill speaks about what SambaNova's team is seeing in terms of near-term future opportunities for computer vision and artificial intelligence. Bill also discusses use-cases relating to diagnostics and health and what the future of healthcare transformation could potentially look like. This episode is sponsored by SambaNova Systems. If you're interested in reaching Emerj's global audience via our podcast, newsletter, or website, be sure to visit emerj.com/ad1 for more information.

BIOS
24. Tech Eats Bio: Vijay Pande - General Partner @ Andreessen Horowitz (a16z) Bio Fund

BIOS

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 43:43


Vijay Pande is a General Partner @ Andreessen Horowitz (a16z), where he focuses on investments in Biopharma & Healthcare. As the founding investor of a16z's Bio Fund, Vijay leads the firm's investments at the cross section of biology and computer science, including applications in computation, machine learning, and artificial intelligence in healthcare; digital therapeutics; diagnostics; and other novel transformative scientific advances applied to industry that take bio beyond healthcare. Op-eds by Vijay defining trends and issues in this emerging space have been published by The New York Times, Scientific American, and Forbes, among others. He is also an Adjunct Professor of Bioengineering at Stanford University.Previously, Vijay was the Henry Dreyfus Professor of Chemistry and Professor of Structural Biology and of Computer Science at Stanford University, where he led a team of researchers pioneering computational methods and their application to medicine and biology (resulting in over 300 publications, two patents, and two novel drug candidates). Vijay was also concurrently the director of the Biophysics program at Stanford, where he led a team of more than 50 faculty members and propelled the program to the top in the country.During his time at Stanford, Vijay co-founded Globavir Biosciences, where he translated his research advances into a successful startup that aimed to discover cures for Dengue Fever and Ebola. Vijay also founded the Folding@Home Distributed Computing Project for disease research, which pushed the boundaries of computer science techniques (distributed systems, machine learning, and exotic computer architectures) into biology and medicine, in both research as well as the development of new therapeutics.Vijay holds a BA in Physics from Princeton University and a PhD in Physics from MIT. He has been awarded the DeLano Prize in Computation; a Guinness World Record for Folding@Home; the American Chemical Society Thomas Kuhn Paradigm Shift Award; and was selected for MIT TR10. In his teens, Vijay was the first employee at video game startup Naughty Dog Software, maker of Crash Bandicoot.Vijay serves on the board of the following Andreessen Horowitz portfolio companies: Apeel Sciences, BioAge Labs, Ciitizen, Devoted Health, Freenome, Insitro, Nautilus Biotechnology, Omada Health, Scribe Therapeutics, and Q Bio.Thank you for listening!BIOS (@BIOS_Community) unites a community of Life Science innovators dedicated to driving patient impact. Alix Ventures (@AlixVentures) is a San Francisco based venture capital firm supporting early stage Life Science startups engineering biology to create radical advances in human health.Music: Danger Storm by Kevin MacLeod (link & license)

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 590 (8-16-21): Osprey Rescue Reinforces Role of Fishing-line Recycling

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021


CLICK HERE to  listen to episode audio (4:30).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 8-16-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of June 28, 2021.  This is a revised version of an episode from August 2013. MUSIC – ~11 sec – instrumental That's part of “Bass Fisherman's Reel,” an adaptation of a traditional tune called “Fisher's Hornpipe,” by Williamsburg musician Timothy Seaman on his 2004 album, “Virginia Wildlife.”  The music sets the stage for a “reel” story about fishing equipment and a summer bird of prey.  We start with a series of mystery sounds.  Have a listen for about 20 seconds, and see if you can guess how the first two sounds add up to the third. And here's a hint: misplaced line makes for a tangled, feathered fisher.SOUNDS - ~19 secIf you guessed, an Osprey running afoul of some fishing line, you're right!  You heard he call of an Osprey, or “Fish Hawk,”; the sound of fishing line, being reeled in; and part of a rescue of an Osprey chick stuck in fishing line.  The latter sound was taken from the “Osprey Cam,” the Chesapeake Conservancy's real-time video transmission from an Osprey nest on Kent Island, Maryland.  On July 29, 2013, the camera showed that one of that year's three chicks had gotten its legs caught in fishing line.  Some viewers of the bird's predicament went to the site, waded out to the nest with a ladder, and climbed up and disentangled the chick. Unwittingly, this lucky Osprey chick had starred in a documentary about the value of fishing-line recycling stations.  Birds, sea turtles, and other animals can get stuck in, or eat, improperly discarded fishing line, nets, or other plastic items.  Such material can also get caught in boat propellers or intakes.  Recycling programs for fishing line are one way to help reduce these threats.  Virginia began a statewide fishing-line recycling program in 2009, run jointly by the Department of Wildlife Resources—formerly the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries—and the Marine Resources Commission.  Recycling is now available at many boat ramps, parks, and marinas, as well as at some outdoor-equipment businesses.  At those locations, anglers can look for the distinctive plastic tubes with a curved top, and help put plastic back to use, instead of on a beak or fin. Thanks to Lang Elliot and the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs, to Timothy Seaman, and to the Chesapeake Conservancy, respectively, for permission to use this week's sounds of an Osprey, fishing line, and the Osprey chick rescue.  Thanks also to Mr. Seaman for this week's music, and we close with about 20 more seconds of “Bass Fisherman's Reel.” MUSIC – ~20 sec – instrumental SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 175, 8-19-13.The Osprey call sounds were from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott.  Lang Elliot's work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. The fishing line sound and musical excerpt from “Bass Fisherman's Reel,” on the 2004 album “Virginia Wildlife,” is copyright Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  More information about Timothy Seaman is available online at https://timothyseaman.com/en/.The sounds of the rescue of an Osprey chick caught in fishing line were taken from a video recorded by the Chesapeake Conservancy's “Osprey Cam,” available online at http://www.chesapeakeconservancy.org/Osprey-Cam, used with permission.  For more information about the camera or the Conservancy, contact the Conservancy at 716 Giddings Avenue, Suite 42, Annapolis, Maryland 21401; phone (443) 321-3610; e-mail: info@chesapeakeconservancy.org. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Young Osprey in Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge in Virginia.  Photo by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), made available for public use by the USFWS' National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov.  The specific URL for this image was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/12049/rec/9, as of 8-16-21.Osprey in flight, 2016 (location not identified).  Photo by Alvin Freund, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov.  The specific URL for this image was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/17870/rec/11, as of 8-16-21.Fishing-line recycling container at South Holston Lake, Washington County, Virginia, April 15, 2013. SOURCES Used for Audio Boat US Foundation, online at https://www.boatus.org/clean-boating/recycling/fishing-line-recycling/. Chesapeake Conservancy, “Webcams/Osprey,” online at https://www.chesapeakeconservancy.org/ospreycam. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation, “Commission, “Reel. Remove. Recycle – Don't Leave Your Line Behind,”online at https://mrrp.myfwc.com/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org.  The Osprey entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Osprey/.  Video from an Osprey camera at Savannah, Georgia, is available online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/cams/savannah-ospreys/. Outdoor News, “State Agencies Initiate Fishing Line Recycling Program,” 2/10/09. [Easton, Md.] Star Democrat, Osprey cam chick Ozzie is rescued, 8/7/13. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries):“Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/; the Osprey entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040095&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18845; “Recycle Your Fishing Line” is online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/fishing/recycle-your-line/. Virginia Marine Resources Commission, “Introducing the Virginia Fishing Line Recycling Program,” online at https://mrc.virginia.gov/rec_assessment/VFLRP_AD.shtm. For More Information about Birds in Virginia and Elsewhere Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home(subscription required). Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. National Audubon Society, online at https://www.audubon.org/. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf. Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth. Xeno-canto Foundation, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Birds,” ‘Overall Importance of Water,” and “Recreation” subject categories. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes2.5 – Living things are part of a system.4.3 – Organisms, including humans, interact with one another and with the nonliving components in the ecosystem. Grades K-5: Earth ResourcesK.11 – Humans use resources.1.8 – Natural resources can be used responsibly, including that most natural resources are limited; human actions can affect the availability of natural resources; and reducing, reusing, and recycling are ways to conserve natural resources.3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems.4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources. Grade 66.9 – Humans impact the environment and individuals can influence public policy decisions related to energy and the environment. Life ScienceLS.9 – Relationships exist between ecosystem dynamics and human activity. Earth ScienceES.6 – Resource use is complex.ES.8 – Freshwater resources influence and are influenced by geologic processes and human activity. BiologyBIO.8 – Dynamic equilibria exist within populations, communities, and ecosystems, including that natural events and human activities influence local and global ecosystems and may affect the flora and fauna of Virginia. 2015 Social Studies SOLs Civics and Economics CourseCE.3 – Citizenship rights, duties, and responsibilities.CE.7 – Government at the state level.CE.10 – Public policy at local, state, and national levels. Government CourseGOVT.8 – State and local government organization and powers.GOVT.9 – Public policy process at local, state, and national levels.Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rdgrade.Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade.Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten.Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade.Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5thgrade.Episode 403, 1-15-18 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4ththrough 8th grade.Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school.Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school.

society bay humans university agency music recycling photo natural relationships state video audio living game college world rescue accent cd dark tech water xeno web index rain pond research ocean government education public recreation birds foundation maryland native fish chesapeake snow environment suite organisms images reel msonormal commonwealth stream menu normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions fishing williamsburg arial environmental dynamic citizen times new roman calibri trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading remove commission biology civics grade citizenship colorful resource md signature bio ozzie scales washington county govt watershed transcript earth sciences conservancy unwittingly ornithology freshwater hornpipe virginia tech ls annapolis atlantic ocean natural resources wildlife service usfws grades k name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes acknowledgments ar sa seaman zoology national audubon society taxonomy msohyperlink wildlife resources lang elliot audubon society all about birds osprey sections life sciences birdsongs stormwater lang elliott policymakers bmp reinforces new standard virginia department michigan museum cripple creek cumberland gap sols outdoor news florida fish kent island tmdl virginia society wildlife conservation inland fisheries ebird living systems virginia standards water center audio notes
三腳貓實驗室 Tripod Cat's Great Adventure - Presented by MTBA
第 010 號實驗:當我們不在實驗室

三腳貓實驗室 Tripod Cat's Great Adventure - Presented by MTBA

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2021 62:25


很多人在美國求學或工作的階段,都會逐步發展自己的興趣。興趣讓我們從繁忙的日常中尋找一個寄託,協助我們調整生活的節奏。這集三腳貓們各自談及當他們不在實驗室裡,是怎樣的活動讓他們可以放下心中壓力,以及從興趣為出發點如何看待自身的變化,找回自己身為「人」的身份。順便回覆一些留言! --- 內容製作:Angel、雯薇、浩文、Mike 後製:雯薇、Mike 文案:Mike 音樂:雯薇 封面:毓鴻 上架:乃馨、雯薇 宣傳:安琪、Rita、雯薇

HealthcareNOW Radio - Insights and Discussion on Healthcare, Healthcare Information Technology and More
Harlow On Healthcare: Greg Miller, VP of Healthcare and Life Sciences Strategy Talkdesk

HealthcareNOW Radio - Insights and Discussion on Healthcare, Healthcare Information Technology and More

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2021 25:27


Host David speaks with Greg Miller, VP of healthcare and life sciences strategy Talkdesk. “It's not a call center; it's a command center.” They discuss making healthcare patient-centric, making it radically convenient, about leveraging technology to serve customers seamlessly. Why is this important? It's not just about convenience; at the end of the day, patient experience is the new measure of quality. To stream our Station live 24/7 visit www.HealthcareNOWRadio.com or ask your Smart Device to “….Play HealthcareNOW Radio”. Find all of our network podcasts on your favorite podcast platforms and be sure to subscribe and like us. Learn more at www.healthcarenowradio.com/listen

Let's Talk Future™
Oncology Approaches: New Challenges and Keeping up with the Speed of Change

Let's Talk Future™

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 23:07


This episode features Dr. Asher Chanan-Khan, Professor of Medicine and Oncology at the Mayo Clinic, and Stefan Loren, Ph.D. and Managing Director of Life Sciences at Oppenheimer & Co. Inc. Together, they discuss how the field of oncology is booming with  ideas and opportunities for new therapies. From how COVID impacted cancer screening to the rise of telehealth to the modern approach of targeted delivery of radiotheraputics or radio-immuno pharmaceuticals, here's what you should know about oncology approaches of 2021. Listen to Let's Talk Future on Spotify, Apple Podcast, or Google Podcast. Podcast Disclosure: This podcast is the property of Oppenheimer & Co. Inc. and should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information/commentary contained in this recording was obtained from market conditions and professional sources, and is educational in nature. The information presented has been derived from sources believed to be reliable but is not guaranteed as to accuracy and does not purport to be a complete analysis of any strategy, plan, security, company, or industry involved. Opinions expressed herein are subject to change without notice. Oppenheimer has no obligation to provide any updates or changes. Any examples used in this material are generic, hypothetical and for illustration purposes only. All price references and market forecasts are as of the date of recording. This podcast is not a product of Oppenheimer Research, nor does it provide any financial, economic, legal, accounting, or tax advice or recommendations. Any liability therefore (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. Securities and other financial instruments that may be discussed in this report or recommended or sold are not insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation and are not deposits or obligations of any insured depository institution. Investments involve numerous risks including market risk, counterparty default risk and liquidity risk. Securities and other financial investments at times maybe difficult to value or sell. The value of financial instruments may fluctuate, and investors may lose their entire principal investment. Prior to making any investment or financial decisions, an investor should seek advice from their personal financial, legal, tax and other professional advisors that take into account all of the particular facts and circumstances of an investor's own situation. The views and strategies described may not be suitable for all investors. This report does not take into account the investment objectives, financial situation or specific needs of any particular client of Oppenheimer or its affiliates. This presentation may contain forward looking statements or projections regarding future events.  Forward-looking statements and projections are based on the opinions and estimates of Oppenheimer as of the date of this podcast, and are subject to a variety of risks and uncertainties as well as other factors, including economic, political, and public health factors, that could cause actual events or results to differ materially from those anticipated in the forward-looking statements and projections.  Past performance does not guarantee future results. The performance of a benchmark index is not indicative of the performance of any particular investment; however, they are considered representative of their respective market segments.  Please note that indexes are unmanaged and their returns do not take into account any of the costs associated with buying and selling individual securities.  Individuals cannot invest directly in an index. Oppenheimer Transacts Business on all Principal Exchanges and Member SIPC  3688409.1

Fueling Deals
Episode 133: A Deal-Making Salesman with Carson Heady

Fueling Deals

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 44:11


Carson Heady is the best-selling author of the "Birth of a Salesman" series, and is consistently ranked in Top 20 Sales Gurus in the world. He's currently the Sales Director for Microsoft Health & Life Sciences, where he taps into his extensive experience in operations & regional sales leadership, strategic planning, motivational management, P&L, advertising, marketing, and more. Along the way, Carson has proved that he isn't “just” a salesman, as he's become quite a pro at the complexities of deal-making as well.Listen in to learn more about --Sales vs. DealsGetting His StartComparing Sales to DealsStrategic ResourcesDeal TransparencyBirth of a SalesmanAnd more!Listen to the DealQuest podcast today!Guest Contact information:Twitter- https://twitter.com/cvheady007LinkedIn- https://www.linkedin.com/in/carsonvheady/Website- https://carsonvheady.wordpress.com/the-home-of-birth-of-a-salesman-2010-published-by-world-audience-inc-and-the-salesman-against-the-world-2014/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Uncharted Podcast
Uncharted Podcast #95, Driving Transformation in Healthcare with Kara Dennis, Head of Healthcare at Unqork

Uncharted Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 24:27


As Head of Healthcare at Unqork, Kara Dennis leads our healthcare go-to-market strategy, owning our efforts with payers, providers, and life sciences companies. Kara joined Unqork from Clarify Health Solutions, an advanced analytics company where she was SVP and GM of Life Sciences. Prior to Clarify, Kara was VP and Managing Director of Mobile Health at Medidata Solutions, a leading cloud provider of clinical trial technologies. Kara also spent several years in the Healthcare practice at McKinsey & Company, and worked at a biotech focused on developing therapies for intensive care units. Through her experience in healthcare technology and clinical trials, Kara has worked with many global healthcare companies to improve clinical trial efficiency and evidence generation, and has deep experience with healthcare workflows and processes. Connect with Kara: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kara-dennis-5109962/ Connect with Poya Osgouei: https://www.linkedin.com/in/poyaosgouei/ Connect with Robby Allen: https://www.linkedin.com/in/robbyallen/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/uncharted1/support

Medical Device Success - Your Success is Our Mission!
Episode 57 – MedScout – Helping Your Sales Team Prospect and Sell, A Revenue Intelligence Platform

Medical Device Success - Your Success is Our Mission!

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2021 48:52


You all know that data, properly configured can help your sales team.  However, this data can be very expensive and may not be configured in a way that is easy for your sales team to use.  Enter MedScout, a revenue intelligence platform for Life Science companies.  Skylar Talley, CEO, MedScout joins us today to share how they go about pulling together and presenting procedural data, prescription data and firmographic information and then present it in a unique way to help medtech sales teams be more productive.  This is all done very economically when compared to some of the very expensive data companies.  What Skylar, his co-founder, Casey Shattuck and the rest of the MedScout team is doing is impressive.  Some people may say, “Ted, you can get some of this data yourself.” Keyword is ‘some'.  And, you won't have the firmographics to relate it all together in an easy to use platform.  If you are asking your sales team to do this, I guarantee they are missing important prospects and wasting valuable time. Important note – Don't confuse Skylar's company with the German medical tourism company also called Medscout.  Skylar's MedScout can be found at medscout.io. As podcasts go, the Medical Device Success podcast is a bit unusual in that it is almost always set up as a live event for members of the MedTech Leaders Community to attend if they want to.  Today, you will hear me refer to questions from one such attendee, Lisa Bichsel, CEO of the Bichsel Medical Marketing Group.  BMMG is a terrific Life Sciences marketing firm. She is a member of the MedTech Leaders Community.  And, she asks great questions which adds a lot to the depth of the podcast.  Thank you Lisa. For those of you interested in the MedTech Leaders Community, go to medtechleaders.net to learn more.  The Get Involved plan is only $14 per year and there is a free trial. Now Go Win Your Week! Skylar Talley's LinkedIn profile link MedScout website link Ted Newill's LinkedIn Profile link Medical Device Success website link MedTech Leaders Community link Link to Ted's contact page

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - "Learning to Loath GMOs": A Critical Response to the New York Times

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 60:44


"Learning to Loath GMOs": A Critical Response to the New York Times   Richard Gale and Gary Null PhD Progressive Radio Network, July 27, 2021   In its July 19th issue, the New York Times Magazine published a brilliant piece of twisted pseudo-scientific propaganda. The essay, entitled “Learning to Love GMOs,” is truly stunning. Its author, journalist Jennifer Kahn, takes readers who would have little to no understanding of genetic engineering and genetically modified organisms (GMO) through a fictional labyrinth of out-dated and conflated GMO similitudes to an end point where readers might believe GMOs are really cool and there is nothing to be frantically worried about.    Kahn spins the story of Cathie Martin's research to develop a genetically engineered purple tomato high in the anti-oxidant anthocyacin as the work of a solo humanitarian to improve consumers' health by providing nutrient-rich GMO produce. What is missing from Kahn's equation is that the research was conducted at one of the world's oldest and most prestigious independent centers for plant science, the Johns Innes Centre (JIC) in the UK. The Centre, which is registered as a charity, lists over 500 employees and is funded by some of the largest proponents of genetic-modified plants, including the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council. JIC's website includes purple tomatoes as one of its projects that combines “transcription factors, biosynthetic genes and iRNA [interference RNA] with the availability of natural tomato mutants.”  iRNA, or Post-Transcriptional Gene Slicing, is a method to silence certain genes the researchers desire to curtail their expression.     The Times article makes an effort to advance the flawed agro-chemical mantra of “substantial equivalence” without citing the term. The early acceptance of GMOs was largely based upon the unproven hypothesis of “substantial equivalence.” The USDA's adoption of this concept during Bill Clinton's first term in the White House gave GM seed companies a free pass to avoid submitting trial evidence to prove the environmental and health safety of genetically modified crops. Since the ruling claims that GMOs are fundamentally identical genetically to their natural counterparts, no compliance of safety regulations should necessarily apply. Therefore Big Ag firms did not have to worry over strict regulatory hurdles, which otherwise apply to other products such as pharmaceutical drugs, processed foods, pesticides, cosmetics and chemical additives.    However, during the past decade a flurry of research has shown that the “substantial equivalence” hypothesis is patently false. Alexandria University in Egypt, the Permaculture Research Institute and the Norwegian Center for Biosafety each found genetically modified crops to be fundamentally different. In addition, studies have confirmed that nutrient levels in traditional, organically raised grown crops are substantially higher than GM varieties. New technological methods to create concise profiles of a food's molecular composition, notably “omics,” were not available in the early 1990s when Clinton wore the mantle as America's first biotech president. Omic technology destroyed the Big Ag's industry's arguments to support the lie about substantial equivalence. For example, Kings College London published a study in Scientific Reports of Nature revealing unquestionable genetic consequences between GMO Roundup and non-GMO corn. The differences include changes in 117 proteins and 91 metabolites.[1]   Despite “substantial equivalence” having been debunked, the erroneous hypothesis continues to linger in pro-GMO propaganda. However, in Kahn's recent essay, she attempts to shift attention away from the early generation of GMOs, which were engineered solely to sell more toxic pesticides, and emphasize GMO's potential for increasing nutritional health and to advance medicine. In order to add a bit of balance, Kahn quotes James Madison University professor Alan Levinovitz who accurately described one fundamental criticism, among many others, against GMOs. “With genetic engineering there's a feeling that we're mucking about with the essential building blocks of reality,” Levinovitz stated. “We may feel OK about rearranging genes, the way nature does, but we're not comfortable mixing them up between creatures.”     But most disturbing is Kahn's failure to make any mention o the trail of environmental disasters and disease risks due to consuming genetically modified foods. She completely whitewashes the matter; she prefers we may forget that Monsanto's soy and corn, which now represent the majority of these crops grown in the US, was developed solely to allow farmers to spray highly toxic pesticides without injuring the crops. These crops contain notable concentrations of the pesticides that then find their way into numerous consumer food products including baby foods. Nor should we forget that Round-Up grown foods may be destroying people's microbiome.  Last year, researchers at the University of Turku in Finland reported a “conservative estimate that approximately 54% of organisms in our microbiome are “potentially sensitive” to glyphosate. Despite her pro-GMO advocacy, if Kahn's conscience had led her to take a moral high road, she could have at least apologized on Monsanto's behalf for the trail of death and disease the company's glyphosate has left in its wake. The company has yet to atone despite losing three trials with $2.4 billion fines, repeated appeal losses, and being ordered to pay $10.5 billion in settlements. To date Monsanto's glyphosate poisoning has been identified with the suppression of essential gut enzymes and amino acid synthesis, gluten intolerance, disruption of manganese pathways, neurological disease, cancer, amyloidosis and autoimmune disease. Her New York Times article would have better served the improvement of public health as a warning rather than an applause to appease companies such as Bayer/Monsanto and Syngenta. And shame on the New York Times' editors for permitting such biased misinformation to find its way into print.    Kahn is eager to cite findings showing GMO benefits without indicating her sources. She tells us that environmental groups have “quietly walked back their opposition as evidence has mounted that GMOs are both safe to eat and not inherently bad for the environment.” Kahn doesn't mention who these groups might be. She reframes the Philippine story of the destruction of genetically engineered Golden Rice; yet around that time even the pro-industry magazine Forbes published an article questioning Golden Rice's viability and noting that its benefits are only based upon unfounded hypotheses. As for its risks to health, GM Watch in the UK points out the work conducted by David Schubert at the Salk Institute that the rice might potentially generate Vitamin A derivatives that could “damage human fetuses and cause birth defects.”   Kahn, who should be acknowledged as a highly respected science journalist and teaches journalism at the University of California's Berkeley campus, happens to be a contributing author for the Genetic Literacy Project (GLP) at the University of California at Davis, a public relations operation sponsored by the agro-chemical industry.  Monsanto/Bayer, Syngenta and DuPont are among GLP's industry partners.  It is one of the most frequently quoted sources of cherry-picked information by pro-GMO advocates and journalists. In our opinion, it is perhaps one of the most financially compromised and scientifically illiterate organizations, founded and funded to disseminate pro-GMO propaganda in order to prop up public support for GMOs and genetic engineering in general. In effect, some universities now act as private industry's lobbyists. This becomes a greater scandal when the university is a public institution receiving public funding.  GLP and its east coast partner, Cornell University's Alliance for Science, largely funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, serve as the GMO industry's clearing houses for public relations to spin science into advertising, propaganda and character assassination of GM opponents.   The Genetic Literacy Project is a key collaborator with another food industry front organization, the American Council on Science and Health (ACSH). ACSH has nothing to do with actual health science. It has been described by the independent corporate financial watchdog organization Sourcewatch as a thinly veiled corporate front that holds “a generally apologetic stance regarding virtually every other health and environmental hazard produced by modern industry, accepting corporate funding from Coca-Cola, Syngenta, Proctor Gamble, Kellogg, General Mills, Pepsico, and the American Beverage Association, among others.” ACSH also favors toxic pesticides, the use of biphenol A in products, cigarettes and hydrofracking.  It is closely aligned with pseudo-medical front organizations that criticize alternative and natural health modalities, such as Quackwatch and the Science Based Medicine network.    GLP sources a couple thousand corporate-friendly studies favoring GMO safety.  One review of over 1,700 studies, known as the Nicolia Review, for a time was the most cited source making the broadest claims for GMO safety.  However subsequent independent and unbiased reviews of Nicolia's analysis concluded that many of these studies were tangential at best and barely took notice of anything related to crop genetic engineering or GMOs. Many studies are completely irrelevant from a value-added perspective because they have nothing to do with GMO safety. Furthermore, other studies in Nicolia's collection conclude the exact opposite of their intention and give further credibility to GMOs environmental and animal and human health risks. When Nicolia published his review, he intentionally omitted and ignored scientifically sound research that directly investigated GMO safety and found convincing evidence to issue warnings.  For example, one peer-reviewed publication by over 300 independent scientists declared that there is no scientific consensus that GM crops and food are safe.  Not surprisingly, there is no mention of this study in the Nicolia Review.   It is no secret that Monsanto and Big Ag have significant influence over UC-Davis's agricultural department and divisions.  The bogus economic studies trumped up by the Big Ag cartel to defeat California's GMO labeling bill Prop 37 were performed at UC-Davis and then publicized through the GLP. Gary Ruskin, who has been filing Freedom of Information Act requests, has publicly expressed deep concerns that UC Davis is acting as a financial conduit for private corporations and interests to develop and launch PR attacks against academics, professors, activists and other institutions who oppose those same corporate interests.     For GMO opponents, the name Mark Lynas, may send shivers down the spine. As soon as any journalist or researcher mentions Lynas' name approvingly, one can be certain which camp the author represents.  You can be assured you will be reading words on dirty laundry washed in even dirtier water. Therefore when Kahn quotes Lynas as if he were an unbiased authority about GMOs, we know we have boarded the wrong train and will reach a destination of distorted scientific facts and self-righteous corporate praise.    The public watchdog group US Right to Know describes Lynas as “a former journalist turned promotional advocate for genetically engineered foods and pesticides who makes inaccurate claims about those products from his perch at the Gates Foundation-funded Cornell Alliance for Science (CAS).” Lynas has accused those who would inform the public about Round-Up's carcinogenic properties as conducting a “witch hunt” by “anti-Monsanto activists” who “abused science.”  Lynas has denied his role as a shill for Big Ag. However, a decade ago, The Guardian acquired a private memo from the pro-biotechnology organization EuropaBio about its initiative to recruit “ambassadors” to preach the GMO gospel. Mark Lynas was specifically named in the document alongside then UN Secretary General Kofi Annan as a prime candidate to pressure European agencies who were skeptical about GMO claims, promises and health and environmental risks. In short, Lynas has been one of Big Ag's most invaluable foot soldiers for over a dozen years.    Similar to the Genetic Literacy Project, the Cornell Alliance for Science does not conduct any agricultural research; yet its tentacles to attack GMO opponents are far reaching in the media. CAS was launched in 2014 after the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation granted the alliance $5.6 million in start-up monies. The public relations Alliance makes the unfounded claim to represent “balanced” research about genetic engineered products.  One of its missions is to influence the next generation of agricultural scientists to embrace GMO science. For CAS, as for Bill Gates, GMOs are the only food solution for Africa's future. Five years ago, organic New York farmers mobilized to pressure the Trustees of Cornell University to evict CAS from the campus and halt its influence over the school's prestigious College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.   One argument Kahn wants us to buy into is that there were mistakes made during the early roll out of GMOs in the 1990s. But, somehow, mysteriously and without any solid evidence, we are supposed to believe that these same companies now engineering new generations of crops have learned their lessons. All that has really changed has been the genetic technology for altering plant genomes. The same mind-set that only technology and the quest for food dominance remain. After hundreds of thousands of dollars were flushed away during a genetically modified wheat project, a retired professor of plant agriculture at the University of Guelph in Canada remarked:   "We – scientists and the public – are so malleable and gullible (or is it because researchers and research administrators are just desperate for money?), that we swallow and become promoters of the mantra that GM is somehow going to feed the world: by resolving the monumental threat of burnt toast? Or browning in cut apples? Or flower color in carnations? Really? For shame. Let's be honest. The one and only reason these people, corporations, and governments are funding this sorry use of [lab] bench space is because it may yield a proprietary product."   Following Lynas' lead, Kahn wants us to believe that genes exchanged between different plants is common in nature and therefore manipulating genes between species with genetic engineering tools, such as CRISPR, should not worry us. Yes, plants have acquired genes from other organisms in the past – the far distant past – according to the Union of Concerned Scientists. However, it is so exceedingly rare that these should be regarded as anomalies without any correlation whatsoever to the millions of different genes available to bio-engineer new plant organisms. This has been one of Lynas' pet arguments on his bully pulpit since turning traitor on his former Greenpeace activists and joining Monsanto's legions.    It may also be noted that Jennifer Kahn is an active participant in CRISPRcon, a forum dedicated to “the future of CRISPR and gene editing technology applications in agriculture, health, conservation and more.” Among the organization's supporters are Bayer, the Innovative Genomics Institute, Cornell Alliance for Science, Corteva Agriscience and the United Soybean Board.  A mission noted on its website is expressed in one of its mottos, “The public doesn't trust GMOs. Will it trust CRISPR?” This is a public relations pitch that permeates her Times article.    It is important for independent investigators and researchers to identify and publicize the background of cloaked public relations shills posing as unbiased journalists in mainstream news sources. Kahn's New York Times piece is an example of a propaganda effort without credibility; it is an attempt to disingenuously manipulate the narrative so more Americans will love GMOs. In the wake of the agrichemical industry's efforts to bolster favorable images of GMOs and more recently CRISPR editing technologies, the mainstream media willingly rolls out a red carpet. No equal publishing space is awarded to the scientific critics of genetic engineering who uncover the flaws in the industry's public research. Consequently, journalists such as Mark Lynas and Jennifer Kahn are the norm rather than exception. Today the lesson is clear that money, power and influence sustain the lies and deceit of private industry.  Take on any cause critical of GMOs and agro-chemical agriculture, and Big Ag will come after you. Kahn is seemingly just one of many other journalists the GLP and Cornell Alliance can turn towards to advance genetic engineering's mythologies.    Seven years ago, 70 percent of Americans, according to a Consumer Reports National Research Center survey, did not want genetically modified organisms in their food. In 2018, the Pew Research Center reported that only five percent of Americans said GM foods were better for one's health – which about makes up the number of people who are in one way or another invested in the agrichemical industry. Still over half believe they endanger health. Yet too much has been invested into agro-biotechnology to expect GMOS to disappear at any time. As the public increasingly turns away from genetically modified organisms in their produce, we will expect new volleys of industry propaganda like that penned by Jennifer Kahn to dangle new carrots. For Kahn, one of these rotten carrots is to improve nutritional content. Yet, similar to the Golden Rice, this will need to be proven beyond being an infomercial. We can also expect to hear ever wilder and more irrational claims about how GMO-based agriculture might reduce CO2 greenhouse pollution and save humanity. And we expect much of this PR campaign to be backed by the World Economic Forum's full-throttle Great Reset invasion. In other words, out of desperation to reach global food dominance, the agro-chemical industry backed by western governments will be declaring a full food war against the peoples of the world.  It is time for us to unlearn any illusory attachment we might have to Big Agriculture and learn to loath GMOs.