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Best podcasts about badly

Latest podcast episodes about badly

Screaming in the Cloud
Breaking the Tech Mold with Stephanie Wong

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 45:02


About StephanieStephanie Wong is an award-winning speaker, engineer, pageant queen, and hip hop medalist. She is a leader at Google with a mission to blend storytelling and technology to create remarkable developer content. At Google, she's created over 400 videos, blogs, courses, and podcasts that have helped developers globally. You might recognize her as the host of the GCP Podcast. Stephanie is active in her community, fiercely supporting women in tech and mentoring students.Links: Personal Website: https://stephrwong.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/stephr_wong TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. Spelled V-U-L-T-R because they're all about helping save money, including on things like, you know, vowels. So, what they do is they are a cloud provider that provides surprisingly high performance cloud compute at a price that—while sure they claim its better than AWS pricing—and when they say that they mean it is less money. Sure, I don't dispute that but what I find interesting is that it's predictable. They tell you in advance on a monthly basis what it's going to going to cost. They have a bunch of advanced networking features. They have nineteen global locations and scale things elastically. Not to be confused with openly, because apparently elastic and open can mean the same thing sometimes. They have had over a million users. Deployments take less that sixty seconds across twelve pre-selected operating systems. Or, if you're one of those nutters like me, you can bring your own ISO and install basically any operating system you want. Starting with pricing as low as $2.50 a month for Vultr cloud compute they have plans for developers and businesses of all sizes, except maybe Amazon, who stubbornly insists on having something to scale all on their own. Try Vultr today for free by visiting: vultr.com/screaming, and you'll receive a $100 in credit. Thats v-u-l-t-r.com slash screaming.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of "Hello, World" demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking, databases, observability, management, and security. And—let me be clear here—it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. This means you can provision a virtual machine instance or spin up an autonomous database that manages itself all while gaining the networking load, balancing and storage resources that somehow never quite make it into most free tiers needed to support the application that you want to build. With Always Free, you can do things like run small scale applications or do proof-of-concept testing without spending a dime. You know that I always like to put asterisks next to the word free. This is actually free, no asterisk. Start now. Visit snark.cloud/oci-free that's snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. One of the things that makes me a little weird in the universe is that I do an awful lot of… let's just call it technology explanation slash exploration in public, and turning it into a bit of a brand-style engagement play. What makes this a little on the weird side is that I don't work for a big company, which grants me a tremendous latitude. I have a whole lot of freedom that lets me be all kinds of different things, and I can't get fired, which is something I'm really good at.Inversely, my guest today is doing something remarkably similar, except she does work for a big company and could theoretically be fired if they were foolish enough to do so. But I don't believe that they are. Stephanie Wong is the head of developer engagement at Google. Stephanie, thank you for volunteering to suffer my slings and arrows about all of this.Stephanie: [laugh]. Thanks so much for having me today, Corey.Corey: So, at a very high level, you're the head of developer engagement, which is a term that I haven't seen a whole lot of. Where does that start and where does that stop?Stephanie: Yeah, so I will say that it's a self-proclaimed title a bit because of the nuance of what I do. I would say at its heart, I am still a part of developer relations. If you've heard of developer advocacy or developer evangelist, I would say this slight difference in shade of what I do is that I focus on scalable content creation and becoming a central figure for our developer audiences to engage and enlighten them with content that, frankly, is remarkable, and that they'd want to share and learn about our technology.Corey: Your bio is fascinating in that it doesn't start with the professional things that most people do with, “This is my title and this is my company,” is usually the first sentence people put in. Yours is, “Stephanie Wong is an award-winning speaker, engineer, pageant queen, and hip hop medalist.” Which is both surprising and more than a little bit refreshing because when I read a bio like that my immediate instinctive reaction is, “Oh, thank God. It's a real person for a change.” I like the idea of bringing the other aspects of what you are other than, “This is what goes on in an IDE, the end,” to your audience.Stephanie: That is exactly the goal that I had when creating that bio because I truly believe in bringing more interdisciplinary and varied backgrounds to technology. I, myself have gone through a very unconventional path to get to where I am today and I think in large part, my background has had a lot to do with my successes, my failures, and really just who I am in tech as an uninhibited and honest, credible person today.Corey: I think that there's a lack of understanding, broadly, in our industry about just how important credibility and authenticity are and even the source of where they come from. There are a lot of folks who are in the DevRel space—devrelopers, as I insist upon calling them, over their protests—where, on some level, the argument is, what is developer relations? “Oh, you work in marketing, but they're scared to tell you,” has been my gag on that one for a while. But they speak from a position of, “I know what's what because I have been in the trenches, working on these large-scale environments as an engineer for the last”—fill in the blank, however long it may have been—“And therefore because I have done things, I am going to tell you how it is.” You explicitly call out that you don't come from the traditional, purely technical background. Where did you come from? It's unlikely that you've sprung fully-formed from the forehead of some god, but again, I'm not entirely sure how Google finds and creates the folks that it winds up advancing, so maybe you did.Stephanie: Well, to tell you the truth. We've all come from divine creatures. And that's where Google sources all employees. So. You know. But—[laugh].Corey: Oh, absolutely. “We climbed to the top of Olympus and then steal fire from the gods.” “It's like, isn't that the origin story of Prometheus?” “Yeah, possibly.” But what is your background? Where did you come from?Stephanie: So, I have grown up, actually, in Silicon Valley, which is a little bit ironic because I didn't go to school for computer science or really had the interest in becoming an engineer in school. I really had no idea.Corey: Even been more ironic than that because most of Silicon Valley appears to never have grown up at all.Stephanie: [laugh]. So, true. Maybe there's a little bit of that with me, too. Everybody has a bit of Peter Pan syndrome here, right? Yeah, I had no idea what I wanted to do in school and I just knew that I had an interest in communicating with one another, and I ended up majoring in communication studies.I thought I wanted to go into the entertainment industry and go into production, which is very different and ended up doing internships at Warner Brothers Records, a YouTube channel for dance—I'm a dancer—and I ended up finding a minor in digital humanities, which is sort of this interdisciplinary minor that combines technology and the humanities space, including literature, history, et cetera. So, that's where I got my start in technology, getting an introduction to information systems and doing analytics, studying social media for certain events around the world. And it wasn't until after school that I realized that I could work in enterprise technology when I got an offer to be a sales engineer. Now, that being said, I had no idea what sales engineering was. I just knew it had something to do with enterprise technology and communications, and I thought it was a good fit for my background.Corey: The thing that I find so interesting about that is that it breaks the mold of what people expect, when, “If someone's going to talk to me about technology—especially coming from a”—it's weird; it's one of the biggest companies on the planet, and people still on some level equate Google with the startup-y mentality of being built in someone's garage. That's an awfully big garage these days, if that's even slightly close to true, which it isn't. But there's this idea of, “Oh, you have to go to Stanford. You have to get a degree in computer science. And then you have to go and do this, this, this, this, and this.”And it's easy to look dismissively at what you're doing. “Communications? Well, all that would teach you to do is communicate to people clearly and effectively. What possible good is that in tech?” As we look around the landscape and figure out exactly why that is so necessary in tech, and also so lacking?Stephanie: Exactly. I do think it's an underrated skill in tech. Maybe it's not so much anymore, but I definitely think that it has been in the past. And even for developers, engineers, data scientists, other technical practitioner, especially as a person in DevRel, I think it's such a valuable skill to be able to communicate complex topics simply and understandably to a wide variety of audiences.Corey: The big question that I have for you because I've talked to an awful lot of folks who are very concerned about the way that they approach developer relations, where—they'll have ratios, for example—where I know someone and he insists that he give one deeply technical talk for every four talks that are not deeply technical, just because he feels the need to re-establish and shore up his technical bona fides. Now, if there's one thing that people on the internet love, it is correcting people on things that are small trivia aspect, or trying to pull out the card that, “Oh, I've worked on this system for longer than you've worked on this system, therefore, you should defer to me.” Do you find that you face headwinds for not having the quote-unquote, “Traditional” engineering technical background?Stephanie: I will say that I do a bit. And I did, I would say when I first joined DevRel, and I don't know if it was much more so that it was being imposed on me or if it was being self-imposed, something that I felt like I needed to prove to gain credibility, not just in my organization, but in the industry at large. And it wasn't until two or three years into it, that I realized that I had a niche myself. It was to create stories with my content that could communicate these concepts to developers just as effectively. And yes, I can still prove that I can go into an hour-long or a 45-minute-long tech talk or a webinar about a topic, but I can also easily create a five to ten-minute video that communicates concepts and inspires audiences just the same, and more importantly, be able to point to resources, code labs, tutorials, GitHub repos, that can allow the audience to be hands-on themselves, too. So really, I think that it was over time that I gained more experience and realized that my skill sets are valuable in a different way, and it's okay to have a different background as long as you bring something to the table.Corey: And I think that it's indisputable that you do. The concept of yours that I've encountered from time to time has always been insightful, it is always been extremely illuminating, and—you wouldn't think of this as worthy of occasion and comment, but I feel it needs to be said anyway—at no point in any of your content did I feel like I was being approached in a condescending way, where at every point it was always about uplifting people to a level of understanding, rather than doing the, “Well, I'm smarter than you and you couldn't possibly understand the things that I've been to.” It is relatable, it is engaging, and you add a very human face to what is admittedly an area of industry that is lacking in a fair bit of human element.Stephanie: Yeah, and I think that's the thing that many folks DevRel continue to underline is the idea of empathy, empathizing with your audiences, empathizing with the developers, the engineers, the data engineers, whoever it is that you're creating content for, it's being in their shoes. But for me, I may not have been in those shoes for years, like many other folks historically have been in for DevRel, but I want to at least go through the journey of learning a new piece of technology. For example, if I'm learning a new platform on Google Cloud, going through the steps of creating a demo, or walking through a tutorial, and then candidly explaining that experience to my audience, or creating a video about it. I really just reject the idea of having ego in tech and I would love to broaden the opportunity for folks who came from a different background like myself. I really want to just represent the new world of technology where it wasn't full of people who may have had the privilege to start coding at a very early age, in their garages.Corey: Yeah, privilege of, in many respects, also that privilege means, “Yes, I had the privilege of not having to have friends and deal with learning to interact with other human beings, which is what empowered me to build this company and have no social skills whatsoever.” It's not the aspirational narrative that we sometimes are asked to believe. You are similar in some respects to a number of things that I do—by which I mean, you do it professionally and well and I do it as basically performance shitpost art—but you're on Twitter, you make videos, you do podcasts, you write long-form and short-form as well. You are sort of all across the content creation spectrum. Which of those things do you prefer to do? Which ones of those are things you find a little bit more… “Well, I have to do it, but it's not my favorite?” Or do you just tend to view it as content is content; you just look at different media to tell your story?Stephanie: Well, I will say any form of content is queen—I'm not going to say king, but—[laugh] content is king, content is queen, it doesn't matter.Corey: Content is a baroness as it turns out.Stephanie: [laugh]. There we go. I have to say, so given my background, I mentioned I was into production and entertainment before, so I've always had a gravitation towards video content. I love tinkering with cameras. Actually, as I got started out at Google Cloud, I was creating scrappy content using webcams and my own audio equipment, and doing my own research, and finding lounges and game rooms to do that, and we would just upload it to our own YouTube channel, which probably wasn't allowed at the time, but hey, we got by with it.And eventually, I got approached by DevRel to start doing it officially on the channel and I was given budget to do it in-studio. And so that was sort of my stepping stone to doing this full-time eventually, which I never foresaw for myself. And so yeah, I have this huge interest in—I'm really engaged with video content, but once I started expanding and realizing that I could repurpose that content for podcasting, I could repurpose it for blogs, then you start to realize that you can shard content and expand your reach exponentially with this. So, that's when I really started to become more active on social media and leverage it to build not just content for Google Cloud, but build my own brand in tech.Corey: That is the inescapable truth of DevRel done right is that as you continue doing it, in time, in your slice of the industry, it is extremely likely that your personal brand eclipses the brand of the company that you represent. And it's in many ways a test of corporate character—if it makes sense—as do how they react to that. I've worked in roles before I started this place where I was starting to dabble with speaking a lot, and there was always a lot of insecurity that I picked up of, “Well, it feels like you're building your personal brand, not advancing the company here, and we as a company do not see the value in you doing that.” Direct quote from the last boss I had. And, well, that partially explains why I'm here, I suppose.But there's insecurity there. I'd see the exact opposite coming out of Google, especially in recent times. There's something almost seems to be a renaissance in Google Cloud, and I'm not sure where it came from. But if I look at it across the board, and you had taken all the labels off of everything, and you had given me a bunch of characteristics about different companies, I would never have guessed that you were describing Google when you're talking about Google Cloud. And perhaps that's unfair, but perceptions shape reality.Stephanie: Yeah, I find that interesting because I think traditionally in DevRel, we've also hired folks for their domain expertise and their brand, depending on what you're representing, whether it's in the Kubernetes space or Python client library that you're supporting. But it seems like, yes, in my case, I've organically started to build my brand while at Google, and Google has been just so spectacular in supporting that for me. But yeah, it's a fine line that I think many people have to walk. It's like, do you want to continue to build your own brand and have that carry forth no matter what company you stay at, or if you decide to leave? Or can you do it hand-in-hand with the company that you're at? For me, I think I can do it hand-in-hand with Google Cloud.Corey: It's taken me a long time to wrap my head around what appears to be a contradiction when I look at Google Cloud, and I think I've mostly figured it out. In the industry, there is a perception that Google as an entity is condescending and sneering toward every other company out there because, “You're Google, you know how to do all these great, amazing things that are global-spanning, and over here at Twitter for Pets, we suck doing these things.” So, Google is always way smarter and way better at this than we could ever hope to be. But that is completely opposed to my personal experiences talking with Google employees. Across the board, I would say that you all are self-effacing to a fault.And I mean that in the sense of having such a limited ego, in some cases, that it's, “Well, I don't want to go out there and do a whole video on this. It's not about me, it's about the technology,” are things that I've had people who work at Google say to me. And I appreciate the sentiment; it's great, but that also feels like it's an aloofness. It also fails to humanize what it is that you're doing. And you are a, I've got to say, a breath of fresh air when it comes to a lot of that because your stories are not just, “Here's how you do a thing. It's awesome. And this is all the intricacies of the API.”And yeah, you get there, but you also contextualize that in a, “Here's why it matters. Here's the problem that solves. Here is the type of customer's problem that this is great for,” rather than starting with YAML and working your way up. It's going the other way, of, “We want to sell some underpants,” or whatever it is the customer is trying to do today. And that is the way that I think is one of the best ways to drive adoption of what's going on because if you get people interested and excited about something—at least in my experience—they're going to figure out how the API works. Badly in many cases, but works. But if you start on the API stuff, it becomes a solution looking for a problem. I like your approach to this.Stephanie: Thank you. Yeah, I appreciate that. I think also something that I've continued to focus on is to tell stories across products, and it doesn't necessarily mean within just Google Cloud's ecosystem, but across the industry as well. I think we need to, even at Google, tell a better story across our product space and tie in what developers are currently using. And I think the other thing that I'm trying to work on, too, is contextualizing our products and our launches not just across the industry, but within our product strategy. Where does this tie in? Why does it matter? What is our forward-looking strategy from here? When we're talking about our new data cloud products or analytics, [unintelligible 00:17:21], how does this tie into our API strategy?Corey: And that's the biggest challenge, I think, in the AI space. My argument has been for a while—in fact, I wrote a blog post on it earlier this year—that AI and machine learning is a marvelously executed scam because it's being pushed by cloud providers and the things that you definitely need to do a machine learning experiment are a bunch of compute and a whole bunch of data that has to be stored on something, and wouldn't you know it, y'all sell that by the pound. So, it feels, from a cynical perspective, which I excel at espousing, that approach becomes one of you're effectively selling digital pickaxes into a gold rush. Because I see a lot of stories about machine learning how to do very interesting things that are either highly, highly use-case-specific, which great, that would work well, for me too, if I ever wind up with, you know, a petabyte of people's transaction logs from purchasing coffee at my national chain across the country. Okay, that works for one company, but how many companies look like that?And on the other side of it, “It's oh, here's how we can do a whole bunch of things,” and you peel back the covers a bit, and it looks like, “Oh, but you really taught me here is bias laundering?” And, okay. I think that there's a definite lack around AI and machine learning of telling stories about how this actually matters, what sorts of things people can do with it that aren't incredibly—how do I put this?—niche or a problem in search of a solution?Stephanie: Yeah, I find that there are a couple approaches to creating content around AI and other technologies, too, but one of them being inspirational content, right? Do you want to create something that tells the story of how I created a model that can predict what kind of bakery item this is? And we're going to do it by actually showcasing us creating the outcome. So, that's one that's more like, okay. I don't know how relatable or how appropriate it is for an enterprise use case, but it's inspirational for new developers or next gen developers in the AI space, and I think that can really help a company's brand, too.The other being highly niche for the financial services industry, detecting financial fraud, for example, and that's more industry-focused. I found that they both do well, in different contexts. It really depends on the channel that you're going to display it on. Do you want it to be viral? It really depends on what you're measuring your content for. I'm curious from you, Corey, what you've seen across, as a consumer of content?Corey: What's interesting, at least in my world, is that there seems to be, given that what I'm focusing on first and foremost is the AWS ecosystem, it's not that I know it the best—I do—but at this point, it's basically Stockholm Syndrome where it's… with any technology platform when you've worked with it long enough, you effectively have the most valuable of skill sets around it, which is not knowing how it works, but knowing how it doesn't, knowing what the failure mode is going to look like and how you can work around that and detect it is incredibly helpful. Whereas when you're trying something new, you have to wait until it breaks to find the sharp edges on it. So, there's almost a lock-in through, “We failed you enough times,” story past a certain point. But paying attention to that ecosystem, I find it very disjointed. I find that there are still events that happen and I only find out when the event is starting because someone tweets about it, and for someone who follows 40 different official AWS RSS feeds, to be surprised by something like that tells me, okay, there's not a whole lot of cohesive content strategy here, that is at least making it easy for folks to consume the things that they want, especially in my case where even the very niche nature of what I do, my interest is everything.I have a whole bunch of different filters that look for various keywords and the rest, and of course, I have helpful folks who email me things constantly—please keep it up; I'm a big fan—worst case, I'd rather read something twice than nothing. So, it's helpful to see all of that and understand the different marketing channels, different personas, and the way that content approaches, but I still find things that slip through the cracks every time. The thing that I've learned—and it felt really weird when I started doing it—was, I will tell the same stories repeatedly in different forums, or even the same forum. I could basically read you a Twitter thread from a year ago, word-for-word, and it would blow up bigger than it did the first time. Just because no one reads everything.Stephanie: Exactly.Corey: And I've already told my origin story. You're always new to someone. I've given talks internally at Amazon at various times, and I'm sort of loud and obnoxious, but the first question I love to ask is, “Raise your hand if you've never heard of me until today.” And invariably, over three-quarters of the room raises their hand every single time, which okay, great. I think that's awesome, but it teaches me that I cannot ever expect someone to have, quote-unquote, “Done the reading.”Stephanie: I think the same can be said about the content that I create for the company. You can't assume that people, A) have seen my tweets already or, B) understand this product, even if I've talked about it five times in the past. But yes, I agree. I think that you definitely need to have a content strategy and how you format your content to be more problem-solution-oriented.And so the way that I create content is that I let them fall into three general buckets. One being that it could be termed definition: talking about the basics, laying the foundation of a product, defining terms around a topic. Like, what is App Engine, or Kubeflow 101, or talking about Pub/Sub 101.The second being best practices. So, outlining and explaining the best practices around a topic, how do you design your infrastructure for scale and reliability.And the third being diagnosis: investigating; exploring potential issues, as you said; using scripts; Stackdriver logging, et cetera. And so I just kind of start from there as a starting point. And then I generally follow a very, very effective model. I'm sure you're aware of it, but it's called the five point argument model, where you are essentially telling a story to create a compelling narrative for your audience, regardless of the topic or what bucket that topic falls into.So, you're introducing the problem, you're sort of rising into a point where the climax is the solution. And that's all to build trust with your audience. And as it falls back down, you're giving the results in the conclusion, and that's to inspire action from your audience. So, regardless of what you end up talking about this problem-solution model—I've found at least—has been highly effective. And then in terms of sharing it out, over and over again, over the span of two months, that's how you get the views that you want.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by something new. Cloud Academy is a training platform built on two primary goals. Having the highest quality content in tech and cloud skills, and building a good community the is rich and full of IT and engineering professionals. You wouldn't think those things go together, but sometimes they do. Its both useful for individuals and large enterprises, but here's what makes it new. I don't use that term lightly. Cloud Academy invites you to showcase just how good your AWS skills are. For the next four weeks you'll have a chance to prove yourself. Compete in four unique lab challenges, where they'll be awarding more than $2000 in cash and prizes. I'm not kidding, first place is a thousand bucks. Pre-register for the first challenge now, one that I picked out myself on Amazon SNS image resizing, by visiting cloudacademy.com/corey. C-O-R-E-Y. That's cloudacademy.com/corey. We're gonna have some fun with this one!Corey: See, that's a key difference right there. I don't do anything regular in terms of video as part of my content. And I do it from time to time, but you know, getting gussied up and whatnot is easier than just talking into a microphone. As I record this, it's Friday, I'm wearing a Hawaiian shirt, and I look exactly like the middle-aged dad that I am. And for me at least, a big breakthrough moment was realizing that my audience and I are not always the same.Weird confession for someone in my position: I don't generally listen to podcasts. And the reason behind that is I read very quickly, and even if I speed up a podcast, I'm not going to be able to consume the information nearly as quickly as I could by reading it. That, amongst other reasons, is one of the reasons that every episode of this show has a full transcript attached to it. But I'm not my audience. Other people prefer to learn by listening and there's certainly nothing wrong with that.My other podcast, the AWS Morning Brief, is the spoken word version of the stuff that I put out in my newsletter every week. And that is—it's just a different area for people to consume the content because that's what works for them. I'm not one to judge. The hard part for me was getting over that hump of assuming the audience was like me.Stephanie: Yeah. And I think the other key part of is just mainly consistency. It's putting out the content consistently in different formats because everybody—like you said—has a different learning style. I myself do. I enjoy visual styles.I also enjoy listening to podcasts at 2x speed. [laugh]. So, that's my style. But yeah, consistency is one of the key things in building content, and building an audience, and making sure that you are valuable to your audience. I mean, social media, at the end of the day is about the people that follow you.It's not about yourself. It should never be about yourself. It's about the value that you provide. Especially as somebody who's in DevRel in this position for a larger company, it's really about providing value.Corey: What are the breakthrough moments that I had relatively early in my speaking career—and I think it's clear just from what you've already said that you've had a similar revelation at times—I gave a talk, that was really one of my first talks that went semi-big called, “Terrible Ideas in Git.” It was basically, learn how to use Git via anti-pattern. What it secretly was, was under the hood, I felt it was time I learned Git a bit better than I did, so I pitched it and I got a talk accepted. So well, that's what we call a forcing function. By the time I give that talk, I'd better be [laugh] able to have built a talk that do this intelligently, and we're going to hope for the best.It worked, but the first version of that talk I gave was super deep into the plumbing of Git. And I'm sure that if any of the Git maintainers were in the audience, they would have found it great, but there aren't that many folks out there. I redid the talk and instead approached it from a position of, “You have no idea what Git is. Maybe you've heard of it, but that's as far as it goes.” And then it gets a little deeper there.And I found that making the subject more accessible as opposed to deeper into the weeds of it is almost always the right decision from a content perspective. Because at some level, when you are deep enough into the weeds, the only way you're going to wind up fixing something or having a problem that you run into get resolved, isn't by listening to a podcast or a conference talk; it's by talking to the people who built the thing because at that level, those are the only people who can hang at that level of depth. That stops being fodder for conference talks unless you turn it into an after-action report of here's this really weird thing I learned.Stephanie: Yeah. And you know, to be honest, the one of the most successful pieces of content I've created was about data center security. I visited a data center and I essentially unveiled what our security protocols were. And that wasn't a deeply technical video, but it was fun and engaging and easily understood by the masses. And that's what actually ended up resulting in the highest number of views.On top of that, I'm now creating a video about our subsea fiber optic cables. Finding that having to interview experts from a number of different teams across engineering and our strategic negotiators, it was like a monolith of information that I had to take in. And trying to format that into a five-minute story, I realized that bringing it up a layer of abstraction to help folks understand this at a wider level was actually beneficial. And I think it'll turn into a great piece of content. I'm still working on it now. So, [laugh] we'll see how it turns out.Corey: I'm a big fan of watching people learn and helping them get started. The thing that I think gets lost a lot is it's easy to assume that if I look back in time at myself when I was first starting my professional career two decades ago, that I was exactly like I am now, only slightly more athletic and can walk up a staircase without getting winded. That's never true. It never has been true. I've learned a lot about not just technology but people as I go, and looking at folks are entering the workforce today through the same lens of, “Well, that's not how I would handle that situation.” Yeah, no kidding. I have two decades of battering my head against the sharp edges and leaving dents in things to inform that opinion.No, when I was that age, I would have handled it way worse than whatever it is I'm critiquing at the time. But it's important to me that we wind up building those pathways and building those bridges so that people coming into the space, first, have a clear path to get here, and secondly, have a better time than I ever did. Where does the next generation of talent come from has been a recurring question and a recurring theme on the show.Stephanie: Yeah. And that's exactly why I've been such a fierce supporter of women in tech, and also, again, encouraging a broader community to become a part of technology. Because, as I said, I think we're in the midst of a new era of technology, of people from all these different backgrounds in places that historically have had more remote access to technology, now having the ability to become developers at an early age. So, with my content, that's what I'm hoping to drive to make this information more easily accessible. Even if you don't want to become a Google Cloud engineer, that's totally fine, but if I can help you understand some of the foundational concepts of cloud, then I've done my job well.And then, even with women who are already trying to break into technology or wanting to become a part of it, then I want to be a mentor for them, with my experience not having a technical background and saying yes to opportunities that challenged me and continuing to build my own luck between hard work and new opportunities.Corey: I can't wait to see how this winds up manifesting as we see understandings of what we're offering to customers in different areas in different ways—both in terms of content and terms of technology—how that starts to evolve and shift. I feel like we're at a bit of an inflection point now, where today if I graduate from school and I want to start a business, I have to either find a technical co-founder or I have to go to a boot camp and learn how to code in order to build something. I think that if we can remove that from the equation and move up the stack, sure, you're not going to be able to build the next Google or Pinterest or whatnot from effectively Visual Basic for Interfaces, but you can build an MVP and you can then continue to iterate forward and turn it into something larger down the road. The other part of it, too, is that moving up the stack into more polished solutions rather than here's a bunch of building blocks for platforms, “So, if you want a service to tell you whether there's a picture of a hot dog or not, here's a service that does exactly that.” As opposed to, “Oh, here are the 15 different services, you can bolt together and pay for each one of them and tie it together to something that might possibly work, and if it breaks, you have no idea where to start looking, but here you go.” A packaged solution that solves business problems.Things move up the stack; they do constantly. The fact is that I started my career working in data centers and now I don't go to them at all because—spoiler—Google, and Amazon, and people who are not IBM Cloud can absolutely run those things better than I can. And there's no differentiated value for me in solving those global problems locally. I'd rather let the experts handle stuff like that while I focus on interesting problems that actually affect my business outcome. There's a reason that instead of running all the nonsense for lastweekinaws.com myself because I've worked in large-scale WordPress hosting companies, instead I pay WP Engine to handle it for me, and they, in turn, hosted on top of Google Cloud, but it doesn't matter to me because it's all just a managed service that I pay for. Because me running the website itself adds no value, compared to the shitpost I put on the website, which is where the value derives from. For certain odd values of value.Stephanie: [laugh]. Well, two things there is that I think we actually had a demo created on Google Cloud that did detect hot dogs or not hot dogs using our Vision API, years in the past. So, thanks for reminding me of that one.Corey: Of course.Stephanie: But yeah, I mean, I completely agree with that. I mean, this is constantly a topic in conversation with my team members, and with clients. It's about higher level of abstractions. I just did a video series with our fellow, Eric Brewer, who helped build cloud infrastructure here at Google over the past ten decades. And I asked him what he thought the future of cloud would be in the next ten years, and he mentioned, “It's going to be these higher levels of abstraction, building platforms on top of platforms like Kubernetes, and having more services like Cloud run serverless technologies, et cetera.”But at the same time, I think the value of cloud will continue to be providing optionality for developers to have more opinionated services, services like GKE Autopilot, et cetera, that essentially take away the management of infrastructure or nodes that people don't really want to deal with at the end of the day because it's not going to be a competitive differentiator for developers. They want to focus on building software and focusing on keeping their services up and running. And so yeah, I think the future is going to be that, giving developers flexibility and freedom, and still delivering the best-of-breed technology. If it's covering something like security, that's something that should be baked in as much as possible.Corey: You're absolutely right, first off. I'm also looking beyond it where I want to be able to build a website that is effectively Twitter, only for pets—because that is just a harebrained enough idea to probably raise a $20 million seed round these days—and I just want to be able to have the barks—those are like tweets, only surprisingly less offensive and racist—and have them just be stored somewhere, ideally presumably under the hood somewhere, it's going to be on computers, but whether it's in containers, or whether it's serverless, or however is working is the sort of thing that, “Wow, that seems like an awful lot of nonsense that is not central nor core to my business succeeding or failing.” I would say failing, obviously, except you can lose money at scale with the magic of things like SoftBank. Here we are.And as that continues to grow and scale, sure, at some point I'm going to have bespoke enough needs and a large enough scale where I do have to think about those things, but building the MVP just so I can swindle some VCs is not the sort of thing where I should have to go to that depth. There really should be a golden-path guardrail-style thing that I can effectively drag and drop my way into the next big scam. And that is, I think, the missing piece. And I think that we're not quite ready technologically to get there yet, but I can't shake the feeling and the hope that's where technology is going.Stephanie: Yeah. I think it's where technology is heading, but I think part of the equation is the adoption by our industry, right? Industry adoption of cloud services and whether they're ready to adopt services that are that drag-and-drop, as you say. One thing that I've also been talking a lot about is this idea of service-oriented networking where if you have a service or API-driven environment and you simply want to bring it to cloud—almost a plug-and-play there—you don't really want to deal with a lot of the networking infrastructure, and it'd be great to do something like PrivateLink on AWS, or Private Service Connect on Google Cloud.While those conversations are happening with customers, I'm finding that it's like trying to cross the Grand Canyon. Many enterprise customers are like, “That sounds great, but we have a really complex network topology that we've been sitting on for the past 25 years. Do you really expect that we're going to transition over to something like that?” So, I think it's about providing stepping stones for our customers until they can be ready to adopt a new model.Corey: Yeah. And of course, the part that never gets said out loud but is nonetheless true and at least as big of a deal, “And we have a whole team of people who've built their entire identity around that network because that is what they work on, and they have been ignoring cloud forever, and if we just uplift everything into a cloud where you folks handle that, sure, it's better for the business outcome, but where does that leave them?” So, they've been here for 25 years, and they will spend every scrap of political capital they've managed to accumulate to torpedo a cloud migration. So, any FUD they can find, any horse-trading they can do, anything they can do to obstruct the success of a cloud initiative, they're going to do because people are people, and there is no real plan to mitigate that. There's also the fact that unless there's a clear business value story about a feature velocity increase or opening up new markets, there's also not an incentive to do things to save money. That is never going to be the number one priority in almost any case short of financial disaster at a company because everything they're doing is building out increasing revenue, rather than optimizing what they're already doing.So, there's a whole bunch of political challenges. Honestly, moving the computer stuff from on-premises data centers into a cloud provider is the easiest part of a cloud migration compared to all of the people that are involved.Stephanie: Yeah. Yeah, we talked about serverless and all the nice benefits of it, but unless you are more a digitally-born, next-gen developer, it may be a higher burden for you to undertake that migration. That's why we always [laugh] are talking about encouraging people to start with newer surfaces.Corey: Oh, yeah. And that's the trick, too, is if you're trying to learn a new cloud platform these days—first, if you're trying to pick one, I'd be hard-pressed to suggest anything other than Google Cloud, with the possible exception of DigitalOcean, just because the new user experience is so spectacularly good. That was my first real, I guess, part of paying attention to Google Cloud a few years ago, where I was, “All right, I'm going to kick the tires on this and see how terrible this interface is because it's a Google product.” And it was breathtakingly good, which I did not expect. And getting out of the way to empower someone who's new to the platform to do something relatively quickly and straightforwardly is huge. And sure, there's always room to prove, but that is the right area to focus on. It's clear that the right energy was spent in the right places.Stephanie: Yeah. I will say a story that we don't tell quite as well as we should is the One Google story. And I'm not talking about just between Workspace and Google Cloud, but our identity access management and knowing your Google account, which everybody knows. It's not like Microsoft, where you're forced to make an account, or it's not like AWS where you had a billion accounts and you hate them all.Corey: Oh, my God, I dread logging into the AWS console every time because it is such a pain in the ass. I go to cloud.google.com sometimes to check something, it's like, “Oh, right. I have to dig out my credentials.” And, “Where's my YubiKey?” And get it. Like, “Oh. I'm already log—oh. Oh, right. That's right. Google knows how identity works, and they don't actively hate their customers. Okay.” And it's always a breath of fresh air. Though I will say that by far and away, the worst login experience I've seen yet is, of course, Azure.Stephanie: [laugh]. That's exactly right. It's Google account. It's yours. It's personal. It's like an Apple iCloud account. It's one click, you're in, and you have access to all the applications. You know, so it's the same underlying identity structure with Workspace and Gmail, and it's the same org structure, too, across Workspace and Google Cloud. So, it's not just this disingenuous financial bundle between GCP and Workspace; it's really strategic. And it's kind of like the idea of low code or no code. And it looks like that's what the future of cloud will be. It's not just by VMs from us.Corey: Yeah. And there are customers who want to buy VMs and that's great. Speed up what they're doing; don't get in the way of people giving you their money, but if you're starting something net-new, there's probably better ways to do it. So, I want to thank you for taking as much time as you have to wind up going through how you think about, well, the art of storytelling in the world of engineering. If people want to learn more about who you are, what you're up to, and how you approach things, where can they find you?Stephanie: Yeah, so you can head to stephrwong.com where you can see my work and also get in touch with me if you want to collaborate on any content. I'm always, always, always open to that. And my Twitter is @stephr_wong.Corey: And we will, of course, put links to that in the [show notes 00:40:03]. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me.Stephanie: Thanks so much.Corey: Stephanie Wong, head of developer engagement at Google Cloud. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment telling me that the only way to get into tech these days is, in fact, to graduate with a degree from Stanford, and I can take it from you because you work in their admissions office.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

IVM Likes
The Badly Described Movie Game

IVM Likes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 46:00


Reccos:Antariksh - Lil Dicky Freestyle rap vid (Music video)Zalak - The Midnight Gospel (Netflix Animated Series)Vinay - BhaDiPa (YouTube channel)Abhineet - Beluga (YouTube channel)It's time to play some games on IVM Likes this week. In today's episode, Antariksh is joined by fellow IVM producers, Zalak, Abhineet and Vinay. In Part 1 of this series, the squad plays a game of 'Badly Described Movies' and the winner gets to call the host of the game, Zalak, by her infamous nickname - 'Zalak Dikhlaja'. Tune in to find out who wins this round, and come back again next week where Antariksh will host his 'oRiGiNaL' game show idea - The Rajeev Masand Game.Till then, try guessing this badly described movie - Small town doctor brings 3 people closer together. Hint : It's a Hollywood movie. Hint : Not everyone can watch this movie. Let us know your answers on our Instagram page - https://www.instagram.com/ivmpodcasts/Recommendations of the week - Vinay recommends BhaDiPa's YouTube channel, Zalak talks about Netflix's 'The Midnight Gospel', Abhineet recommends the YouTube channel 'Beluga', and Antariksh fanboys over Lil Dicky's Freestyle on 'Sway in the Morning' on YouTube.Follow Zalak on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tgen_zak/Follow Antariksh on Instagram:https://instagram.com/antarikshtFollow Vinay on Instagram:https://instagram.com/iamvinyaFollow Abhineet on Instagram:https://instagram.com/abhineetmandalHave topics or things that you'd like for us to cover on the show? Reach out to us at talktous@indusvox.comYou can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the IVM Podcasts app on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/ios, or any other podcast app.

The Patriotically Correct Radio Show with Stew Peters | #PCRadio
Young Girl BADLY Injured by ”Shedding” - Wife: Hospital KILLING My Husband - PROOF: Pfizer KNEW!

The Patriotically Correct Radio Show with Stew Peters | #PCRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 55:52


 If you watch fake news on TV, they'll tell you that the Covid 19 vaccines are 100 percent safe and anything suggesting otherwise is “misinformation.” Sarah Steadman KNOWS they aren't safe. A holistic medicine specialist says bleeding her daughter is experiencing is caused by transmission of the vaccine through “vaccine shedding," from her own dad. She joins Stew today to discuss how the vaxxed truly are a threat to the unvaxxed. Things are getting worse and worse every day in America. The U.S. military is falling apart. Infrastructure is decaying. The murder rate was up 30 percent last year and it will be up again this year. Our elites are egging on violent riots, and then sending prosecutors to arrest people who defend themselves from the mob. Paul Haulinski with GunsAmerica.com, America's oldest online platform for buying and selling guns, joins Stew to discuss the shortages and how to prepare for them. We've received letter after letter telling us horrifying stories of what's going on in the nation's hospitals. One letter was from Erin Jones, who is desperately trying to save her husband Jason, after he was placed on a ventilator, now, for more than a month. The doctors of Hugly Memorial Hospital in Texas have refused alternative treatments, and is essentially being killed by lack of care. The vaccines haven't worked the way our leaders told us they would. Now, they need to force them into our children. It's a religious imperative for the left, in their new coronavirus death cult. The CEO of Pfizer is going around saying that people who question the official story on the vaccines are “criminals.” Karen Kingston joins Stew to discuss who the real criminals are, especially those involved in disabling and killing kids through vaccine trials. Today on ASK DR. JANE, we address whether Covid and election fraud tie together through the same group of criminals. We also discuss when Dr. Jane believes all mandates will be done with, and which cities will keep them, as well as what will happen to the PCR test when it loses its emergency use authorization status at the end of the year. Get Dr. Zelenko's Anti-Shedding Treatment, NOW AVAILABLE FOR KIDS: www.zStackProtocol.com Go Ad-Free, Get Exclusive Content, Become a Premium user: https://redvoicemedia.com/premium Follow Stew on social media: http://evrl.ink/StewPeters See all of Stew's content at https://StewPeters.TV Watch full episodes here: https://redvoicemedia.net/stew-full-shows Check out Stew's store: http://StewPeters.shop Support our efforts to keep truth alive: https://www.redvoicemedia.com/support-red-voice-media/ Advertise with Red Voice Media: https://redvoicemedia.net/ads

Locked On Lakers - Daily Podcast On The Los Angeles Lakers
The Bulls Slow Anthony Davis and Torch the Lakers' Defense. Could Frank Vogel's Seat Get Hot?

Locked On Lakers - Daily Podcast On The Los Angeles Lakers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 34:39


Through 14 games, the 2021-22 season for the Lakers had been a struggle, filled with injuries, frustration and inconsistency. But there had been at least some signs, here and there, that things might be improving. Anthony Davis has been pretty excellent throughout. Russell Westbrook has been growing incrementally better, some intermittent Westbrookian hiccups notwithstanding. LeBron James should be returning soon. So with all that, the Lakers took the floor Monday against the Chicago Bulls in something of a test game, as they head out Tuesday to start their first real road trip of the season. They failed. Badly. Chicago outplayed L.A. in every meaningful facet, reminding everyone that this Lakers group is a very long way from true title contention. How they navigate the path towards that elite level remains to be seen, but it'll be one with a lot more tension and speculation than anything they've seen over the last two seasons. Monday's game reinforced how dependent the team is on having the Big Three intact, and particularly the dependence on LeBron James. The supporting cast showed its limitations (though Talen Horton-Tucker finished with 28 points and six rebounds). And we're all left asking just how good this group can reasonably be expected to be, particularly on defense. At least until they get healthy. And with any team with this kind of profile, star power and expectations, a slow start is going to focus attention on the head coach. How much of this - whether looking just at Monday's loss or the season as a whole - is on Frank Vogel? How much is on Rob Pelinka? How much is on circumstance and bad luck? More fans are having that conversation, and the natives are getting restless. Without question, the first 15 games have turned the fate of the head coach into a talking point in ways it hasn't been since Vogel was hired. HOSTS: Andy and Brian Kamenetzky SEGMENT 1: What went wrong vs. Chicago. The Bulls had a great plan for Davis. What was the counter? SEGMENT 2: Should we still be surprised when the team doesn't defend well, especially when LeBron is out? Is the bigger problem the offense? SEGMENT 3: The conversations about Frank Vogel's future have started. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Barnstorming PA
Straight Ahead- Prison Reform Badly Needed in PA- Interview With David Garlock and Tyree Little (s4e11)

Barnstorming PA

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 56:09


Ahead of a public forum in Williamsport on Saturday, Nov 3 at 1 in Brandon Park, Jordi was honored to have David Garlock (https://twitter.com/DavidLeegarlock) and Tyree Little of the newly formed Straight Ahead organization in PA (https://twitter.com/TowardAbolition). Thanks to Jennifer Black for helping to produce this episode. David and Tyree share their stories of being...

Everyday Truth with Kurt Skelly
Thursday, November 11 | Starting Well and Finishing Badly (1 Samuel 15:1-7)

Everyday Truth with Kurt Skelly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 13:42


1 Samuel 15:1-7

Magic in the Midwest Podcast
Magic in the Midwest Podcast #78 JB and Ash review Velocicoaster! Talk line cutting! Jurassic Park River Adventure needs a refurb! Badly!

Magic in the Midwest Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 46:27


Subscribe: www.magicinthemidwespodcast.bandcamp.com Insta; www.instagram.com/magicinthemidwestpodcast FB: www.facebook.com/magicinthemidwestpodcast.com Email: magicinthemidwestpodcast@gmail.com www.mistermichaels.com

AP Audio Stories
Defense witnesses: Rittenhouse badly shaken by shootings

AP Audio Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 1:31


Easy Thrills
How badly do you want it

Easy Thrills

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 4:46


For real - how badly do you want it?

NOTES X NOKES
NXN Season 3 Episode 5 Good Teams Beat Bad Teams, Badly

NOTES X NOKES

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 78:23


Jai and K Dot evaluate the Cowboys performance through 3 weeks of play, Preseason NBA odds, if Kyrie Irving is being selfish, how good some 1-2 teams are, and their thoughts about the Super Bowl Halftime lineup. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/notesxnokes/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/notesxnokes/support

BROADly Speaking
All Tricks, No Treats

BROADly Speaking

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 34:13


Cassie explains how she ended up in urgent care on Halloween after a freak accident and Davi's gotta tell you about how her husband - dressed up as a French knight - totally pissed off a dude dragging a wagon full of beer and it almost ended BADLY. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

ArchaeoAnimals
"Player One Needs Food Badly" - The Zooarchaeology of Video Game Cuisine - Ep 40

ArchaeoAnimals

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 57:56


On this episode of ArchaeoAnimals, Simona and Alex are heading back into the world of video games - this time all about the culinary archaeology of popular video games. Learn more about what the rubbish pits of games such as The Witcher and Dragon Age would look like; also endless Skyrim quotes and Alex trying to eat everything. Links Inexplicably Preserved Dungeon Meat - TV Tropes New insights into Irish bog butter - Current Archaeology Making 2,000-year-old Roman bread - British Museum Blog RECIPES | Witcher Kitchen - Fan Project Binford, L. (1981) Bones: Ancient Men and Modern Myths. New York: Academic Press. Gelinas, B. et al. (2015) Dragon Age: The World of Thedas, Volume 2. Milwaukie, OR: Dark Horse Comics. Monroe-Cassel, C. (2019) The Elder Scrolls: The Official Cookbook. San Rafael, CA: Insight Editions Contact Alex FitzpatrickTwitter: @archaeologyfitz Simona FalangaTwitter: @CrazyBoneLady Alex's Blog: Animal Archaeology Music "Coconut - (dyalla remix)" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_2UiKoouqaY Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed
"Player One Needs Food Badly" - The Zooarchaeology of Video Game Cuisine - Animals 40

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 57:56


On this episode of ArchaeoAnimals, Simona and Alex are heading back into the world of video games - this time all about the culinary archaeology of popular video games. Learn more about what the rubbish pits of games such as The Witcher and Dragon Age would look like; also endless Skyrim quotes and Alex trying to eat everything. Links Inexplicably Preserved Dungeon Meat - TV Tropes New insights into Irish bog butter - Current Archaeology Making 2,000-year-old Roman bread - British Museum Blog RECIPES | Witcher Kitchen - Fan Project Binford, L. (1981) Bones: Ancient Men and Modern Myths. New York: Academic Press. Gelinas, B. et al. (2015) Dragon Age: The World of Thedas, Volume 2. Milwaukie, OR: Dark Horse Comics. Monroe-Cassel, C. (2019) The Elder Scrolls: The Official Cookbook. San Rafael, CA: Insight Editions Contact Alex FitzpatrickTwitter: @archaeologyfitz Simona FalangaTwitter: @CrazyBoneLady Alex's Blog: Animal Archaeology Music "Coconut - (dyalla remix)" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_2UiKoouqaY Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular

Grits and Grinds: Memphis Grizzlies
Grizzlies lose [badly]

Grits and Grinds: Memphis Grizzlies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 27:43


The Grizzlies collapse in the second half against the Trail Blazers and accomplish something not done in the team's 21 seasons in Memphis (hint: it's not good). On this episode, Keith looks at the loss and tries to figure out which issues are concerning, plus highlights a couple of positive takeaways.

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive
Heather du Plessis-Allan: Three Waters fiasco has potential to go badly for Labour

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 2:42


Nanaia Mahuta's just pushed the nuclear button on the Three Waters reform and potentially picked herself a big fight. The Minister for Local Government has done exactly as predicted and announced she's confiscating the water assets of every single council and territorial authority up and down this country  She's had to confiscate the assets, because after asking nicely, the vast majority of local bodies told her no, they wouldn't willingly hand them over  This has the potential to go badly for Mahuta and the Labour Government in so many ways, but here are the three most obvious problems  Number one: The confiscation issue.  Who likes having their assets confiscated off them?  Answer: no one. So, you can expect ratepayers up and down this country to object to that big time  Number two: The Māori issue. The water infrastructure confiscated from your council, will be given to four new big organisations. They will be governed by a group appointed in a complicated system starting with a fifty –fifty power sharing of the local council and the local iwi.   Let's not beat around the bush here; that is going to raise the hackles of a lot of people who see this as giving power to unelected iwi who haven't funded the assets, and that's a potential problem for Labour because they are seen to be pushing too hard on Māori issues. So, they've only got themselves to blame if they get a racially-charged backlash on this.  Number three: The election issue. The confiscations might be law this year, but they don't' take effect until 2024.  But between now and then we have two sets of elections. The local government elections next year, and then the central government elections in 2023.   So Mahuta has just given mayoral candidates and council candidates in every single territorial authority something to complain about next year. And they will. And the targets of their complaints will be Mahuta, Labour and confiscation and iwi governance.   It cannot be good to have election campaigns up and down New Zealand fought on whether Labour are a “revolting pack of thieving liars” as one councillor said today.  So, politically, this feels like a bad idea all round. 

The Rebel Capitalist Show
News: Biden Now Wants To Crack Down On Domestic Terrorists This Ends Badly

The Rebel Capitalist Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 20:41


Check out the Rebel Capitalist Live event Jan 7th - 9th!! https://rebelcapitalistlive.com

Empowering People
How badly do you want the great benefits?

Empowering People

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 15:42


Proverbs 2 is the a discourse on the process of gaining wisdom. It begins with an "If" and is followed by two "Then"s which tell us the great benefits of seeking wisdom. Question: Do you want to gain the benefits?

The Lynda Steele Show
The Full Show: Surrey Police transition is too far along to halt says Chief Lipinksi, How badly are businesses going to be impacted by the end of pandemic benefits and illegal ride hailing companies still pinching business from Uber and Lyft

The Lynda Steele Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 58:17


Surrey police transition past the point of no return, Chief Lipinski tells the Jas Johal Show For more on the controversial transition away from the Surrey RCMP, we are joined by one of the city's councillors, Linda Annis How the end of pandemic subsidies are impacting local small businesses Is it time to end pandemic benefits? We chat with Ryan Goodwin, owner of the El Guapo restaurant in Yaletown in Vancouver Ride hailing companies are still having to compete with illegal operators Illegal ride hailing companies are still operating within Metro Vancouver? With more we check in with Martin van den Hemel, Director Of Communication, GoKabu Pandemic wage and rent subsidies end this Saturday With more, we check in with Laura Jones, Executive Vice-President and Chief Strategic Officer of the Canadian Federation of Independent Business Vancouver Giants unveil two new jerseys and will have full capacity back at the Langley Events Centre starting October 25 There's a lot of excitement shared by sports fans across the Lower Mainland because of the announcement yesterday-- If you missed it, certain sporting events will be allowed to have full capacity starting next week. Our show contributor Jawn Jang checked in with one local team that's looking forward to a full barn. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Ask Kati Anything!
Why Do I Want Attention So Badly? Ask Kati Anything! ep.83

Ask Kati Anything!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 77:31


Ask Kati Anything! the Kati Morton podcast ep.83 Audience Questions1. Can you give us an overview of what a therapist does vs a psychologist? What's the difference between therapy and psychotherapy? Would someone who struggles in all different areas benefit from seeing a psychologist rather than a therapist? For example, if someone has autism, C-PTSD, OCD, and an eating disorder, would a therapist be able to help them... 2. If you (as a therapist) have seen a client for a long time, do you notice if he or she feels sadder in a therapy session than usual?  3. What is the first thing that goes through your head (a therapist's head) when a client starts to cry? (COMMENT: Or has a panic attack or starts dissociating badly (as in can not move, see or talk) in session? 4. I hope you're having a great week! I got sick a while ago and was in the hospital for a few weeks. Ever since then, I've been missing and craving the kindness and attention I received from nurses and doctors while there. I've never experienced anything...5. How can I stop myself from being annoyed by little things out of my control? Often, I get upset about unreasonable stuff like people talking in a car, waking up 15 mins late even when I can afford to, shops not having what I want...6. Did you have a favourite patient you were seeing? I guess you´re not supposed to have favourites but I imagine it's hard not to like some patients more than others. Also I want my therapist to like me the most and I wish she would tell me I'm her favourite...7. A little while ago as I was crying on the floor I just completely lost my ability to feel any emotions for about 15 hours where it eventually slowly came back. It felt like losing a sense and I'm really confused by it and didn't like it...8.  I have a difficult relationship with food. It's almost impossible for me to eat if I am with people. I make it look like I eat most of the time. If there is absolutely no getting around it,  then I can force myself, just so there isn't a scene but it makes me really uncomfortable...9. I hope you have a wonderful day. My question is; how can I notice when my eating disorder thoughts are trying to sneak in on me again? I find that my eating disorder voice is difficult to distinguish from me and my other thoughts and therefore I do not notice the signs until my therapist eventually notices them for me. I hope it makes sense... Video of episodes https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCs58xfxPpjVARRuwjH8usfwKati's books in stores now!TRAUMATIZED - https://geni.us/Bfak0jARE U OK? - http://bit.ly/2s0mULyAmazon Suggestions https://www.amazon.com/shop/katimortonONLINE THERAPY  I do not currently offer online therapy.  BetterHelp can connect you with a licensed, online counselor, please visit: https://tryonlinetherapy.com/katimortonI receive commissions on referrals to BetterHelp. I only recommend services I know and trust.PATREON   https://www.katimorton.com/kati-morton-patreon/Opinions That Don't Matter! (2nd podcast)video https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCs58xfxPpjVARRuwjH8usfwaudio https://opionstdm.buzzsprout.com/BUSINESS EMAIL linnea@toneymedia.comSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/katimorton)

The Uncharted Veterinary Podcast
UVP 147 The Team is Acting Badly

The Uncharted Veterinary Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 59:11


This week on the podcast, Dr. Roark and Stephanie tackle a topic they were discussing with a colleague recently. This colleague is in a position where they bought a practice a few years ago that came with a handful of toxic team members. Those people have self ejected or been weeded out and the team has been working in synergy for some time. However the last few months, the griping and the passive aggressive comments have snuck in. People are eye rolling at each other and biting each other's heads off over little things. This practice owner is feeling defeated and is also determined to get their positive culture back and hold the team accountable. Since everyone is involved, they are planning a team meeting to discuss. The practice owner wanted to know a few things about how best to set it up - they asked some great specific questions: Do I bring up specific examples of things people have done/have been doing? How hard do I come down on them for future incidents? How do I get them to correct their behavior and be accountable for their actions, without driving them out? Let's get into this... Links: Upcoming events: https://unchartedvet.com/upcoming-events/ LAST CHANCE!!! Registration is closing TODAY (Oct 20, 2021) for the October Uncharted Veterinary Culture Conference. This is your absolute last chance to come join us and work intentionally on your practice instead of in it: https://unchartedvet.com/uvc-culture/ This is the workshop Stephanie was talking about: Communication Foundations - A Little Less (Ineffective) Conversation, A Lot More Action! You can find common ground with anyone, anywhere, at any time whether the communication is personal or professional, it just takes a strong foundation. We are going to nerd out and learn how to recognize the stories we make up in our heads and hear through the communication noise. We will also talk about how to take some of the stress and anxiety out of hard conversations with 8 key elements that you can take back to your practice to build a team filled with strong, effective communicators. November 7 from 4 – 6 PM ET | 1 – 3 PM PT Registration is $99 (Free for Uncharted Members). All Links: https://linktr.ee/UnchartedVet Got a question for the mailbag? Submit it here: unchartedvet.com/mailbag

Ben Fordham: Highlights
Leading Child Psychologist explains China's plan to punish parents of badly behaved children

Ben Fordham: Highlights

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 3:42


Leading Child Psychologist Dr Michael Carr-Gregg on China considering new laws to punish the parents of badly behaved children. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Alan Jones Daily Comments
Leading Child Psychologist explains China's plan to punish parents of badly behaved children

Alan Jones Daily Comments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 3:42


Leading Child Psychologist Dr Michael Carr-Gregg on China considering new laws to punish the parents of badly behaved children. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

From the Pressbox
Giants lose badly, Kyrie suspended

From the Pressbox

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 60:34


Hosted by Rob Leonard and Tim Leonard

The Jordan Harbinger Show
573: David Buss | When Men Behave Badly

The Jordan Harbinger Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 86:48


David Buss (@profdavidbuss) is considered the world’s leading scientific expert on the evolutionary psychology of human mating strategies. He is the author of several books on the subject, most recently When Men Behave Badly: The Hidden Roots of Sexual Deception, Harassment, and Assault. What We Discuss with David Buss: Why, from an evolutionary standpoint, the reproductive interests of males and females sometimes diverge. Why metabolizing alcohol differently makes women more susceptible to an expectation of bonding (and how some men exploit this). The Dark Triad traits that mark the men most likely to have short-term relationships and cheat. How do women use active signaling to show they're more open to short-term relationships? She's not playing hard to get. If she rejects you softly, it isn't an invitation to try harder -- it's a survival tactic meant to avoid prompting a violent reaction. And much more... Full show notes and resources can be found here: jordanharbinger.com/573 Sign up for Six-Minute Networking -- our free networking and relationship development mini course -- at jordanharbinger.com/course! Like this show? Please leave us a review here -- even one sentence helps! Consider including your Twitter handle so we can thank you personally!

(Almost) Entirely Sports
The Chiefs fall badly to the Bills, 10/10/21

(Almost) Entirely Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 141:12


Joshua Brisco hosts the Sports Radio 810 WHB's Postgame Show as the Chiefs fall to the Buffalo Bills in a dominating fashion. Hear Josh break down the game and take your calls. Plus hear from Andy Reid, Patrick Mahomes and more. Matt Derrick joins the show live from Arrowhead to break the game down. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Capes And Scowls
Tapes And Scowls Episode 124 - "Connie or Alien Warlords Make The News."

Capes And Scowls

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 21:14


Dearest Connie. I hope this podcast finds you well. Many a night we have stared at our ceilings wondering how your evenings are spent. Are you happy? Do you miss our smile? Can we watch a movie with you again? We miss you Connie. Badly and all. We review an alien murder machine, take a quest across the entire galaxy, reinvent Charlie Brown lore and miss the foul shot. Ugh, Connie. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/capesandscowls/support

The Saad Truth with Dr. Saad
My Chat with Dr. David Buss, Author of When Men Behave Badly (The Saad Truth with Dr. Saad_295)

The Saad Truth with Dr. Saad

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 77:05


Topics covered include evolutionary psychology, sexual variety, sexual conflict, human mating, infidelity, sex differences, social constructivism, science denialism, the dark triad of personality, gift giving, intellectual variety, nomological networks of cumulative evidence, public engagement, regret in life, and Hammurabi's Code. _______________________________________ Dr. David Buss is one of the pioneers of evolutionary psychology and a leading scientist on the evolutionary roots of human mating preferences. He is a professor of psychology at the University of Texas-Austin. He has previously held professorships at Harvard University and the University of Michigan. He has authored countless scientific publications and several books including his most recent one titled When Men Behave Badly: The Hidden Roots of Sexual Deception, Harassment, and Assault. _______________________________________ If you appreciate my work and would like to support it: https://subscribestar.com/the-saad-truth https://patreon.com/GadSaad https://paypal.me/GadSaad _______________________________________ This chat was posted earlier today (October 8, 2021) on my YouTube channel as THE SAAD TRUTH_1311: https://youtu.be/jLdLgNc0Qpk _______________________________________ The Parasitic Mind: How Infectious Ideas Are Killing Common Sense (paperback edition) was released on October 5, 2021. Order your copy now. https://www.amazon.com/Parasitic-Mind-Infectious-Killing-Common/dp/162157959X/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= https://www.amazon.ca/Parasitic-Mind-Infectious-Killing-Common/dp/162157959X https://www.amazon.co.uk/Parasitic-Mind-Infectious-Killing-Common/dp/162157959X _______________________________________ Please visit my website gadsaad.com, and sign up for alerts. If you appreciate my content, click on the "Support My Work" button. I count on my fans to support my efforts. You can donate via Patreon, PayPal, and/or SubscribeStar. _______________________________________ Dr. Gad Saad is a professor, evolutionary behavioral scientist, and author who pioneered the use of evolutionary psychology in marketing and consumer behavior. In addition to his scientific work, Dr. Saad is a leading public intellectual who often writes and speaks about idea pathogens that are destroying logic, science, reason, and common sense. _______________________________________  

The Saad Truth with Dr Gad Saad
My Chat with Dr. David Buss, Author of When Men Behave Badly (The Saad Truth with Dr. Saad_295)

The Saad Truth with Dr Gad Saad

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 77:05


Topics covered include evolutionary psychology, sexual variety, sexual conflict, human mating, infidelity, sex differences, social constructivism, science denialism, the dark triad of personality, gift giving, intellectual variety, nomological networks of cumulative evidence, public engagement, regret in life, and Hammurabi's Code. _______________________________________ Dr. David Buss is one of the pioneers of evolutionary psychology and a leading scientist on the evolutionary roots of human mating preferences. He is a professor of psychology at the University of Texas-Austin. He has previously held professorships at Harvard University and the University of Michigan. He has authored countless scientific publications and several books including his most recent one titled When Men Behave Badly: The Hidden Roots of Sexual Deception, Harassment, and Assault. _______________________________________ If you appreciate my work and would like to support it: https://subscribestar.com/the-saad-truth https://patreon.com/GadSaad https://paypal.me/GadSaad _______________________________________ This chat was posted earlier today (October 8, 2021) on my YouTube channel as THE SAAD TRUTH_1311: https://youtu.be/jLdLgNc0Qpk _______________________________________ The Parasitic Mind: How Infectious Ideas Are Killing Common Sense (paperback edition) was released on October 5, 2021. Order your copy now. https://www.amazon.com/Parasitic-Mind-Infectious-Killing-Common/dp/162157959X/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= https://www.amazon.ca/Parasitic-Mind-Infectious-Killing-Common/dp/162157959X https://www.amazon.co.uk/Parasitic-Mind-Infectious-Killing-Common/dp/162157959X _______________________________________ Please visit my website gadsaad.com, and sign up for alerts. If you appreciate my content, click on the "Support My Work" button. I count on my fans to support my efforts. You can donate via Patreon, PayPal, and/or SubscribeStar. _______________________________________ Dr. Gad Saad is a professor, evolutionary behavioral scientist, and author who pioneered the use of evolutionary psychology in marketing and consumer behavior. In addition to his scientific work, Dr. Saad is a leading public intellectual who often writes and speaks about idea pathogens that are destroying logic, science, reason, and common sense. _______________________________________  

District Divided
WFT Preview Show! New Orleans Saints vs Washington Football Team Preview, Predictions + Week 5 Picks

District Divided

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 45:51


The Washington Football Team (2-2) play host to the unpredictable New Orleans Saints (2-2) this Sunday at 1pm on CBS, led by QB Jameis Winston and superstar RB Alvin Kamara. We begin with a general overview of the New Orleans Saints and the 4 games they have played so far. They beat the Green Bay Packers and New England Patriots, but fell to the Carolina Panthers and New York Giants. What can we expect from them this Sunday? How about the rest of the season? We discuss Jameis Winston, Alvin Kamara, Demario Davis, Deonte Harris, Marshon Lattimore, Marcus Williams and more! (2:10 - 5:59)Then we quickly jump into the injury report, where our Washington Football Team is hurting BADLY. We may be without Dyami Brown, Curtis Samuel and Cam Sims in our WR corps. Add the fact that Logan Thomas is missing the game, and Taylor Heinicke is suddenly in a new position of having to ball out without his usual weapons. Brandon Scherff has also missed 2 straight practices. On the flip side, the New Orleans Saints could be without their starting center, Erik McCoy, and left tackle, Terron Armstead, for the 2nd straight game. Can we take advantage of that? (6:00 - 7:35)We transition into the WFT defense vs the New Orleans offense. Jameis Winston is balling with 3 games over a 110 passer rating and is 4th in the NFL in QBR, but did you know that the Saints lead the league in rush play percentage at 58%? That means it is critical we stop Alvin Kamara, who is receiving career high carries by the week. Will the defense finally wake up?? (7:36 - 15:19)Flipping sides to the WFT offense vs the New Orleans defense. Taylor Heinicke has been nothing short of spectacular this season. From backup QB to legitimate starter, what does he need to do to help us win this game? Will we be able to run the ball on the Saints? They are 3rd in the NFL in yards allowed per attempt on the ground. (15:20 - 29:22)We have a guest on the podcast this week, Thomas Carter (@Carter4Mayor), who went 15/15 on his parlay picks and turned $11 into over $50,000! He walks us through the emotional rollercoaster ride of the parlay, whether he thought about hedging his bets, and what it was like rooting for the Dallas Cowboys on Monday Night Football. (31:32 - 35:49)We conclude the episode by giving you our game prediction (29:23 - 31:31), as well as all of our NFL week 5 picks! (35:50 - end)

Scilence
Innervation: S2 Ep 16 If anything is worth doing, do it badly!

Scilence

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 47:48


Michelle Bui is a gene editor.  She is passionate about reducing the spread of infectious diseases via mosquitoes.  Her work is badass and she is so chill, which she believes is down to living in San Diego, California.  I reckon being a Vietnamese-American woman in STEM has trained her to be confident and comfortable in her own skin, especially because she does not fit convention.  Be inspired by her vibe, to be the best version of yourself - that's what happened to me whilst hosting this episode!

Wrestling With FanBoy Mark Jabroni's Ring Rust
Episode 4: Naming Tag Teams, Badly!

Wrestling With FanBoy Mark Jabroni's Ring Rust

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 119:51


My #ExtremeRules pay-per-review & #KnockoutsKnockdown pre-per-view... then I badly explain my concept for naming some tag teams... & celebrate the #HappyBirthday of a blues wrestling comedian legend, in this week's #3WayDanceOff! ~ ~ ~I'd like to hear from you! Please drop me a line @ ring-rust@hotmail.com {Subject Line: Ring Rust} & let me know what you like {or dislike} about my show! I'm always on the lookout for constructive criticism {if you want playlists, start giving me feedback, people!} ~ ~ ~Check out my #Unboxing videos, all that snazzy anti-social media & support all my shows http://markjabroni.mysite.com/~ ~ ~RECORDED LIVE @ CHMR Studios in Sunny St. John's NL!

Ask Women Podcast: What Women Want
Ep. 409 Talking "Why Men Behave Badly" by David Buss WITH David Buss

Ask Women Podcast: What Women Want

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 40:37


David Buss is an American Evolutionary Psychologist at the University of Texas at Austin, researching human sex differences in mate selection. He is considered one of the founders of evolutionary psychology and just released his new book called "Why Men Behave Badly". We talk all about WHY it is men do what they do and how come it's not really their fault ;) We also talk about how to fix these things so you can attract the right woman for you. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/AskWomen/support

The Ex Boyfriend Recovery Podcast
My Relationship Ended Badly; Can I Sill Get Him Back?

The Ex Boyfriend Recovery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 19:18


Today, we're going to be talking about what to do if your relationship ended badly, if you should still be trying to repair that relationship, get that ex back or simply trying to move on. So let's tackle the big question first, should you get your ex back? Can you get them back? Well the […] The post My Relationship Ended Badly; Can I Sill Get Him Back? first appeared on Ex Boyfriend Recovery.

My Take On It with Your Angelic Karma®
I Love It !! He Loves and Wants You Badly. He Will Never Let You Go !!

My Take On It with Your Angelic Karma®

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 45:29


Mixed Feelings with Kiera Breaugh
These 2 Things Messed Us Up...BADLY

Mixed Feelings with Kiera Breaugh

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 30:29


Let's talk about society's obsession with the teenage years and finding our soulmate. Watch on Youtube: https://youtu.be/iYnSEqenzW0 Follow me on IG: @kierabreaugh

Location Lanesboro
People acting badly in Lanesboro.

Location Lanesboro

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 82:15


We talk about People acting badly in Lanesboro Minnesota during the tourist season. We covering things like where you should not park bikes, yelling at staff, dumping trash, and other inappropriate behavior. We might be talking about you.  Paul talks about his new wild plum bourbon and we all have samples.   

Coast Mornings Podcasts with Blake and Eva
9 - 22 - 21 DESCRIBE THE MOVIE BADLY GAME GOES BADLY

Coast Mornings Podcasts with Blake and Eva

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 4:44


9 - 22 - 21 DESCRIBE THE MOVIE BADLY GAME GOES BADLY by Maine's Coast 93.1

Locked On Yankees - Daily Podcast On The New York Yankees
Gerrit Cole gets booed off the mound and the Yankees lose to Cleveland, badly

Locked On Yankees - Daily Podcast On The New York Yankees

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 32:31


On today's episode of Locked On Yankees, Stacey discusses the lost weekend for the Yankees against Cleveland, previews the Texas series, talks about Gerrit Cole getting booed and honors her Bronx-born, Yankee fan dad for his 80th birthday. The Yankees dropped the ball against Cleveland (literally) and ended up losing the series over the weekend (not what they needed). What they did need was a big game from their ace to stop the bleeding and they didn't get that either as Gerrit Cole was booed off the Yankee Stadium mound. Was it justified? Stacey discusses. Plus Stacey previews the pitching matchups against Texas and honors her late father for what would have been his 80th birthday. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Molecule Mattress Visit OnMolecule.com and save twenty percent with promo code LOCKEDON.  NetSuite NetSuite is offering a one-of-a-kind financing program only for those ready to switch today! Head to NetSuite.com/LockedOn Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Episode 1 - Interference in the Dem primaries
Show 4 - Our Government is so badly disorganized - it needs us to set it straight. John P. Flannery & John McLaughlin

Episode 1 - Interference in the Dem primaries

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 54:35


John P. Flannery and John McLaughlin discuss how badly disorganized we are, requiring that we all have to work to get things straight. Join the discussion. John P. Flannery (jonflan@aol.com, @jonflan) and John McLaughlin (@Harvard1988).

Talks With Jae Podcast
Aces beat the Sky badly

Talks With Jae Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 3:23


Giving my thoughts on the Sky losing badly to the Aces --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/ms-jae2/message

Legal Talk Network - Law News and Legal Topics
Lawyers Behaving All Kinds Of Badly

Legal Talk Network - Law News and Legal Topics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 29:21


We talk about misbehaving lawyers a lot, but there must be a full moon (per statute a moon "at least 95 percent wholly spherical when measured by appropriate telescopic instruments") or something for lawyers right now because they're wild this week! We've got Biglaw attorneys injecting food with blood, lawyers waving loaded guns around over COVID protocols, a deeply scandalous and tragic situation out of South Carolina, and Justice Amy Coney Barrett running her mouth off with the lack of self-awareness you'd expect from someone who spread a deadly infection to the White House. Special thanks to our sponsors, Lexicon and Nota.

Above the Law - Thinking Like a Lawyer
Lawyers Behaving All Kinds Of Badly

Above the Law - Thinking Like a Lawyer

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 29:21


We talk about misbehaving lawyers a lot, but there must be a full moon (per statute a moon "at least 95 percent wholly spherical when measured by appropriate telescopic instruments") or something for lawyers right now because they're wild this week! We've got Biglaw attorneys injecting food with blood, lawyers waving loaded guns around over COVID protocols, a deeply scandalous and tragic situation out of South Carolina, and Justice Amy Coney Barrett running her mouth off with the lack of self-awareness you'd expect from someone who spread a deadly infection to the White House. Special thanks to our sponsors, Lexicon and Nota.

KNX In Depth
KNX In Depth: U.S. military leadership took extraordinary steps to reign in Trump -- How did poverty in the U.S. shrink in the middle of the COVID pandemic -- How badly did the LAPD mess up fireworks detonation in South LA?

KNX In Depth

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 48:00


We are learning more about behind-the-scenes chaos in the Trump administration, thanks to a new book from Bob Woodward, including this: US military leadership went to extraordinary lengths to prevent the former president from starting a nuclear war. So we'll go In Depth. We'll look at how poverty rates in this country actually managed to FALL in the middle of an economy-killing pandemic. And new research out of the UK shows that cases of "Long COVID" -- while extremely rare -- have happened in people who are fully vaccinated but get "breakthrough" cases.  A group of LA city firefighters is about to join some police officers in challenging the city's employee vaccine mandate. And that cat that took a dive off a deck of a stadium in Florida ... in the middle of a college football game ... and was caught. The video made it all over the Internet. Well, now nobody knows where that cat is. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Rock N Roll Pantheon
History in Five Songs 116: Recording Badly on Purpose

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 36:41


In episode 116, Martin talks about Recording Badly on Purpose with these five songs: 1. The Stooges – “1970”  2. Motörhead – “Damage Case”  3. The Damned – “Liar”  4. Gillan – “Hadely Bop Bop”  5. Venom – “Raise the Dead”  To connect or learn more about Martin head over to: www.martinpopoff.com This show is part of Pantheon Podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

History in Five Songs with Martin Popoff
History in Five Songs 116: Recording Badly on Purpose

History in Five Songs with Martin Popoff

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 37:41


In episode 116, Martin talks about  Recording Badly on Purpose with these five songs: 1. The Stooges – “1970”  2. Motörhead – “Damage Case”  3. The Damned – “Liar”  4. Gillan – “Hadely Bop Bop”  5. Venom – “Raise the Dead”  To connect or learn more about Martin head over to: www.martinpopoff.com This show is part of Pantheon Podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

WhatCulture Gaming
10 Gaming Achievements That Mocked You For Playing Badly - Dead Or Alive 4! Superman Returns! Payday 2! Bourne Conspiracy - Need Glasses?!

WhatCulture Gaming

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 8:56


Permanently adding salt to the wounds. Jess McDonell presents 10 Gaming Achievements That Mocked You For Playing Badly... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Radio Free Mormon
Mormonism LIVE: 039: When Mission Presidents Behave Badly

Radio Free Mormon

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 103:05


In this weeks episode of Mormonism LIVE, RFM and Bill Reel delve into some debauchery among past Mission Presidents. What they find is a common theme creating a pattern of bad behavior learning once again that unethical behavior can be made righteous within Mormonism. RESOURCES: https://byteline.blogspot.com/2007/09/sects-and-violence-part-5-continued.html https://www.dialoguejournal.com/wp-content/uploads/sbi/articles/Dialogue_V21N03_29.pdf https://www.exmormon.org/d6/drupal/France-and-Polygamous-Mormon-Missionaries https://www.reddit.com/r/exmormon/comments/8fbs7u/1980s_australia_sydney_mission_prez_was_aspiring/ https://www.mormonstories.org/podcast/dr-dave-christian-on-epistemology-and-the-polygamous-mission-president/ https://www.legacy.com/us/obituaries/deseretnews/name/orson-wright-obituary?pid=186032306 https://www.reddit.com/r/exmormon/comments/8f98mh/philander_knox_smartt_the_excommunicated_puerto/ https://voices.uchicago.edu/religionculture/2018/05/20/1522/ https://www.sltrib.com/news/2018/04/26/the-case-of-puerto-rico-when-the-mormon-church-promptly-removed-a-mission-president-who-deceived-and-victimized-young-female-missionaries/ https://universe.byu.edu/2018/04/27/mormon-church-kicks-out-man-who-supervised-young-women/ […] The post Mormonism LIVE: 039: When Mission Presidents Behave Badly appeared first on Radio Free Mormon.

Mormon Discussions Podcasts – Full Lineup
Mormonism LIVE: 039: When Mission Presidents Behave Badly

Mormon Discussions Podcasts – Full Lineup

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 103:05


In this weeks episode of Mormonism LIVE, RFM and Bill Reel delve into some debauchery among past Mission Presidents. What they find is a common theme creating a pattern of bad behavior learning once again that unethical behavior can be made righteous within Mormonism. RESOURCES: https://byteline.blogspot.com/2007/09/sects-and-violence-part-5-continued.html https://www.dialoguejournal.com/wp-content/uploads/sbi/articles/Dialogue_V21N03_29.pdf https://www.exmormon.org/d6/drupal/France-and-Polygamous-Mormon-Missionaries https://www.reddit.com/r/exmormon/comments/8fbs7u/1980s_australia_sydney_mission_prez_was_aspiring/ https://www.mormonstories.org/podcast/dr-dave-christian-on-epistemology-and-the-polygamous-mission-president/ https://www.legacy.com/us/obituaries/deseretnews/name/orson-wright-obituary?pid=186032306 https://www.reddit.com/r/exmormon/comments/8f98mh/philander_knox_smartt_the_excommunicated_puerto/ https://voices.uchicago.edu/religionculture/2018/05/20/1522/ https://www.sltrib.com/news/2018/04/26/the-case-of-puerto-rico-when-the-mormon-church-promptly-removed-a-mission-president-who-deceived-and-victimized-young-female-missionaries/ https://universe.byu.edu/2018/04/27/mormon-church-kicks-out-man-who-supervised-young-women/ […] The post Mormonism LIVE: 039: When Mission Presidents Behave Badly appeared first on Mormon Discussions Podcasts - Full Lineup.

LensWork - Photography and the Creative Process

HT0912 - I Failed, Badly I received an email from a fellow who had seen my latest book, Dreams of Japan. He wrote to advise that I might want to consider getting a better lens because all the images were slightly soft and, to make matters worse he continued, the highlights were fogged due to lens flare. Evidently, this fellow completely missed the idea that I was trying to present dream-like images, hence the title Dreams of Japan. With him, I clearly failed to communicate how my chosen aesthetic made sense in the context of the project.

The Roof Strategist Podcast
ETHICS OBJECTION? Selling Hail Damaged Roofs That Are NOT Leaking? NOT Badly Damaged? Seems Fine?

The Roof Strategist Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 16:31


The 2 most common ethical sales concerns: “I don't feel right selling hail damaged roofs that look fine now?” -AND- “My customer said that the damage was minor and they didn't want to file a claim. How can I ethically sell them a new roof?” Here are 3 ethical reasons to replace hail damaged roofs. Even if it's not leaking or looks fine now.FREE RESOURCES“Pitch” Like a Pro! 240+ Videos: https://www.theroofstrategist.com/Fast Action Results (FAR) Snapshot for every episode: https://www.theroofstrategist.com/farWHICH STRATEGY IS BEST FOR YOU?The best option is to get EVERYTHING in the Roofing Sales Success Formula: https://www.theroofstrategist.com/get-roofing-sales-success-formulaMost affordable way starts with the Marketing Battle Pack: https://www.theroofstrategist.com/storm-battle-packWEBSITE & CONTACT https://www.theroofstrategist.com/homeadam@roofstrategist.comFOLLOWhttps://www.facebook.com/RoofStrategist/https://www.instagram.com/roofstrategist/https://www.linkedin.com/in/roofstrategist/