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Data Gurus
James Norman – Founder of Piloty | Ep. 154

Data Gurus

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 31:54


Welcome to another exciting and informative episode of the Data Gurus podcast! Sima is happy to have James Norman, the CEO and Founder of Pilotly, joining her today. In this episode, James talks about his varied career and highlights the difficulties he experienced as a person of color, raising investment capital. He also discusses his initiatives to help black founders raise money for their businesses and explains how Pilotly came about and why Pilotly is such an important company for the United States. James's career trajectory James started his career selling video games. After that, he spent some time selling car audio and then started his first “real” company, MJH Sound.com, in 1995 and sold car audio online. After running that business for about four years, James went to the University of Michigan and got a degree in electrical engineering. Pivoting James's audio business pivoted during that time, and they started creating custom parts and building unique cars for vehicle manufacturers. Custom cars for movies Then, in 2005, James moved to LA and started building custom cars for movies like The Fast and the Furious. Video streaming In 2008, when the recession hit, James got into streaming video. After encountering several challenges, he realized that most people could not do what he was doing. So he shifted away from the failing auto industry and seized the opportunity to create a streamlined video streaming product. A product planner James also spent some time working as a product planner for Mitsubishi and then went back to doing his own thing. New ways of raising money When his friend started Dropbox, it opened James's eyes to new ways of raising money for companies. Before that, he had no idea of what it would take to get enough capital together to scale a team and build an organization. Ubi James built Ubi, the first online electronic programming guide, and spent his time between 2008 and 2013 doing his best to convince people that nobody would have cable by 2020. Getting feedback from some high-level executives who shared his point of view encouraged James to keep on with what he was doing. He spent the next five or six years running Ubi and ran into many different problems during that time. Becoming a shining star In 2011, James applied for the NewMe program, designed to help people of color break into Silicon Valley. He got into the program, and that was his introduction to the San Francisco Bay Area. He was blown away by all the opportunities there, so he decided to stay on and become a shining star! Software development James spent a year working as a software developer for a publishing company and learned a lot about software structure. He also learned how toxic the development environment was because of people's unconscious bias towards black people. Communication  James learned that as a CEO, you need to communicate effectively. No investment capital After putting a rock star team together, James started pitching his ideas to potential investors. Some investors told him that if he could get the content contracts they would give him the money he needed. Even though he managed to get several content contracts for an electronic sell-through model he developed for a subscription TV service, including one from Warner Brothers, nobody ever showed up with any investment capital. Testing content and starting Pilotly James learned the necessary processes from experienced experts and started Pilotly because he needed to test pilot his content effectively with the right audience. Creating a program for investment James and his team knew all the right people, but nobody wanted to give them any funding. So they created a program to put the best people of color in front of potential investors and decided to call the investors out if they were still not willing to give them any funding after that. Transparent Collective

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
Did Your Computer Have "Intel Inside"? It Won't For long!

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 85:08


Did Your Computer Have "Intel Inside"? It Won't For long! We're going to talk a little bit about shopping right now. Then we'll get into our chip crunch, and why Intel is being left on the side of the computer road. [Following is an automated transcript.] [00:00:16] There's lots of fun stuff to do. And it's kind of fun getting out of the house. Isn't it getting out, going out, going around? There's a, an outlet store close by where I live and it's kind of one of these outdoor. Outlet things. And it was fun. Just walking around, enjoying the little bit of fresh air, no matter what the weather has. [00:00:40] Uh, I even enjoy going up there when there's some snow on the ground. Because again, it's a little bit of a, uh, it's, it's fun. It's a little bit of a change, which is not. Part of what I love about living in the Northeast. You really get all four seasons and they can be really, really nice. Well, black Friday of course came and went. [00:01:01] It was not a bad black Friday, but one of the questions I been asked all week long, all month long, frankly, has to do. When should I buy, what should I buy? What are the deals? And it is weird this year. Let me tell you really weird. And the reason I say that is I didn't my show prep. And I spent some hours just looking on different websites and looking at opinion pieces, looking at news sources, just trying to find, okay, what's going on? [00:01:36] What's the real word out there. Our items, as rare as everybody seems to be saying they are, or is it easy enough to find. Well, that's what we're going to talk about right now. Really. We've had a very turbulent two years for retail, every branch of retail, whatever it is, it's been been terrible. So many people have lost their businesses. [00:02:03] So many small businesses, small retail restaurants, some restaurants that I, I enjoy and just haven't been to in years, really. Completely gone, which is such a crying shame. And a lot of people have put a lot of the blame for the general retail malaise on Amazon and Walmart. Because again, you know, I had a discussion just this last weekend with. [00:02:35] Oh, friend's father. And he was saying, well, you know, I've been a biologist in pharmacology for years. And, uh, you know, th this is just as just a science. It's all science talking about the lockdown. And so I pointed out how, well, let me see, let me see. I got family from Canada. They cannot drive across the border because of the lockdown, but in, in the states, they won't let us, us, we won't let them fly. [00:03:03] But they drive in, I should say, but they will let them fly in. How does that science, right. There's coronavirus not survive at 30,000 feet. Is that what it is? You know? No, come on. People it's politics and part of the politics was. Walmart got to stay open and all of these other small businesses couldn't so what are they supposed to do? [00:03:29] How are they supposed to compete? And yet, Hey, I understand you need clothes, right? And you need food. Most Walmarts have both. You might need medicine in order to even survive. So that kind of makes sense, but why. Walmart. Why did the government choose Walmart and target are going to survive all of you, little mom and pops stores, you know, that maybe have been multi-generational where it's your parents. [00:04:00] And maybe even your grandparents that started the store, started the restaurant. And now all of a sudden there's a lockout and you cannot be over. It just, it entirely political, entirely political. And I understand the science behind all of this. I have spent a lot of time studying it and you might remember if you've listened to me even. [00:04:26] Dean or 20 years ago, I'm trying to remember when it was, I started talking with scientists about RNI, RNA interference and the coolest stuff that was happening with African violets and getting the, the purple flowers to change to white and all of the stuff they were doing. It it's exciting. It's fun. But why. [00:04:49] Did we use politics here. And so many people lost their livelihood. So many people lost their businesses. It's, it's absolutely incredible. And just pain companies basically to stay closed. Uh, doesn't make sense either. Because now you're pumping more money into the economy and that's causing inflation because there are not more products or not more vendors. [00:05:15] There's not enough competition. So the prices go up. And when there's inflation, how about people who are retired, who have saved something. And now their money is worth what the inflation rates are. Again, it's a hidden tax, but it's really hard on retirees because their money that they've saved, you know, they're getting the pitons, you put it in a savings account and you're making a fraction of 1%. [00:05:43] And yet we're seeing inflation rates on things like fuel being almost a hundred percent. Think about what it was like in 2019, what the gas prices were. It is insane. So small businesses have to be supported. They are the backbone. They are the innovators. Walmart didn't start as a big company. They started very small. [00:06:10] He innovated his claim to fame. That old Sam Walton was let's go ahead and have the best prices and anywhere. Right. And so they got the best prices by beating up their suppliers, et cetera, but it all worked. And Walmart increased, raised its it's demonstrable again through real science, but they raise the standard of living in every community. [00:06:39] They opened a store. It's absolutely funneling. But Walmart stopped innovating a long time ago. Now again, the innovations come just like they do in the tech world. Typically not from the existing companies, right. Facebook isn't innovating, they bought WhatsApp, they bought so much of the technology they're using to drive their company. [00:07:02] Oculus. You look at it, right? That's their future. According to of course, uh, you know, Mr. Mark. What did it come from? What was the cost? Right. They by their competition. So I want to encourage everybody to really try and go out of your way, try and shop at these small places. There are. And so many of these malls nowadays kind of local stores where they've got together and they're running their co-op or where someone's managing a bind product from local craftsman, really that they, everything from these women that are knitting doilies all the way on out, through very cool black iron work things, things that you can find there. [00:07:54] That maybe you can find on Amazon, maybe they come from China. Maybe they're locally sourced. Not very likely, but it's been a very, very tough, tough time here for so many of these industries. One of the things that I did talk about this week, I, one of my radio appearances is. Tik TOK live shopping. If you haven't heard of tick tock, tick tock is this short form video site. [00:08:21] And it kind of started by people saying, okay, well with this song, uh, use that song to make a funny little 32nd. And 22nd and that's what people did. And it was really quite cool to see they there's some innovative people out there. Tick talk has a lot of, I share nowadays way more popular amongst the younger people than Facebook is Facebook has kind of become something for the older people. [00:08:49] But what tech talk is now doing is providing live shop. And this is an innovation that really started in China, which of course is where tick-tock is located. But in 2020, there was a survey done that found that two thirds of Chinese consumers said that they bought products via live stream in the past year. [00:09:13] So what's live stream. I want you to think about QVC online share or a television shop. Those channels, those infomercials that come on at night, but particularly the channels that are constantly selling stuff like micro did a little bit of that at one point in time, right? His interview was, he came in and the, he, the guy who was interviewing him, held up a pen. [00:09:37] Is that okay, you sell me this pencil. And so micro went on and on for 10 minutes or more just talking about the pencil and everything related to the pencil and what a great quality was. All he course, she didn't know anything about it. Right? And that's part of what bothers me about some of these things, right? [00:09:55] These people are just making stuff up, but talk live now is allowing you to go ahead and make funny little things. Gain an audience. Maybe they're not funny. Maybe they're just informative. Have them inserted into people's streams and then sell it right there. In fact, instant purchasing of a featured product during a live stream. [00:10:22] And then obviously audience participation, they got chat functions, reaction buttons. This is what's coming our way. And so all of you, small businesses out there, I really want to encourage you pay attention to social media. This is the sort of thing that you can do. You can target your local area, which is where most small businesses operate, right? [00:10:48] It's in, in your town. It's maybe a 10, 20 mile radius, depending on what, what you're doing, what you're selling. And you can micro target nowadays. That's the joy. That's the beauty of the online world. Micro-targeting Hey, and if you're interested, let me know. We can talk a lot more about this because I have studied this for years now. [00:11:12] Hey, stick around Craig peterson.com online. [00:11:20] So while you're shopping online, what are some of the things you should do or look out for? I've got a few ideas. I'm going to tell you what I do, and it has worked wonders for me. So here we go. [00:11:35] When you're shopping online, there are some obvious tips, just run through them very, very quickly because I don't, I think you guys being the best and the brightest really know these things. [00:11:50] So just very quickly, make sure your security. Today, make sure that everything is patched up the way that it should be, that you have some really great anti-malware hopefully advanced anti-malware, but apply any updates before you start doing shopping, because this is a bad time of year to lose all of your personal information and to have your money stolen. [00:12:18] Uh, number two. If you're seeing an email or you're seeing a deal that really looks too good to be true. Take, take caution here. Right? Do you see a place? Oh, I got five brand new Sony PlayStation fives for sale. You might not want. To buy those, right? The minister, Jeff Foxworthy. Here's your sign. So be careful about that. [00:12:46] Criminals are really taking advantage of consumers who, uh, you know, life's been tough, money's been tight. You're trying to find a deal. So be careful about that. Okay. Coupons or other way, the bad guys have been trying to get consumers. To compromise their own cyber security. Okay. Uh, 12% of emails out there are considered to be spam emails. [00:13:15] I think it's more like 80% or 90%, but then I've had the same email address for 30 years. Okay. Uh, so don't click on link. Be sure you shop on the real website and apply coupons there by manually typing out the code. So for instance, if, if let's say you use duck, duck, go for your search engine, which you should be using for most cases, most searches a duck duck go says, okay, let me see where coupons here you go. [00:13:46] Here's a site that has a lot of coupons be careful about those sites, because some of them are trying to lure you in. Are the websites you're going to the real ones, the legit one. Are you clicking a link in your email in order to get to that sale site? Double check, because what they're doing is using some of these URLs that aren't. [00:14:14] Right. And we see those all of the time. They'll have a misspelling of the business name or they'll, they'll do something else. So they might have Amazon Dodd bad guys.com. Oh, okay. Amazon. Okay. Is Amazon, uh, obviously they wouldn't say bad guys, but yeah. That's kind of what they're doing. So be careful. So once you're on a website, look for that little padlock that's to the side, click on it and double. [00:14:43] To make sure that it is legit because they might have us. What's called a secure, sir. And they might have a certificate that's valid for the site that you just went to, but it's not, there's a different kit for Amazon or Walmart or target or w you know, whatever Joe's clothing.com. It might be something entirely different. [00:15:07] So be careful, okay. Is what you're looking at on the ad. Because there are a lot of fake advertisements out there that looked like they got great deals. And even though black Friday has come and gone, they're going to continue to do this through the end of the year and be on. Okay. So rather than clicking on the ad, just type in the retailer. [00:15:35] Information, because some of these ads that are showing up are in fact, almost every last one of them is coming from what's called an ad network. So that ad network is where people go and buy ads and they say, Hey, I want to retarget people that were at this site or clicked on this link, et cetera, et cetera. [00:15:54] And now. If you are a bad guy, all you have to do is sneak into one of those big ad networks. And all of a sudden your bad guy ads are showing up everywhere. So you see a great ad for a Chromebook. For instance, we've talked about those before you can just go ahead. Okay. Chromebook. No problem. Wow. Yeah. [00:16:14] Yeah. Type it in. If the ads for a Chromebook from Walmart, just type in walmart.com. Okay. Avoid clicking on ads. Isn't it terrible how bad it's gotten, man. I liked the internet better back in the 1980s and nineties. Uh, how should you pay? We're going to talk about that in a minute. Public why fi is a potential problem. [00:16:40] The bad guys will often create fake hot spots and you are now using their hot spot. Now this isn't as much of a problem as a used to be because your visits to most websites nowadays are encrypted. Do you remember that lock? I mentioned in the URL. Well, that means it is using SSL or TLS, which is a secure communications pro protocol. [00:17:07] So if you're seeing that, you know that you basically have a VPN, you don't have to buy a VPM service. You don't have to use a VPN service. You have a VPN that's being provided by the website, your. And that's really what that lock means. So the public wifi is less of an issue for the monitoring, what you're doing, although yeah, they can still do some monitoring. [00:17:33] They might play with DNS and things, but they can also scan you, which is the biggest problem from my perspective about using public wifi and never. Share your personal data. If you can avoid it, one of the things we're going to be covering in the upcoming boot camps and workshops is using fake or alternate email addresses. [00:17:57] I do it all of the time. That's why I have 3000, 3000. Yes. You heard it right different log-ins right now in use active use on. Uh, in my password manager, at least over the last decade. So I've accumulated a lot of them. So I use a different email address pretty much all of the time. And I'll, I explain how to do that in the boot camps and workshops that are coming up. [00:18:25] So keep an eye on. On my weekly emails again, Craig peterson.com/subscribe. So you can find out about them, you know, these, the free ones. I really want to give you guys all of the basics, right? So that's what I'm going to be doing anyways. How should I pay? This is maybe the even bigger side of things. It is very, very rare that I actually put my credit card number in on a website at least. [00:18:54] Real credit card number. There's a number of options that are available to you now that weren't before, even if it's not a credit card, even if it's a debit card and generically, this is known as single use credit cards. So we've got a few things. I use typically capital one's email E N O. If you have a capital one card of any sort, this is a little browser plugin that you can put on. [00:19:25] Now, the downside of this is they will by default, try and look. Every web page you visit. So from their perspective, it's worth it because now they get that data from you. However, in all modern browsers, you can restrict when it runs. But what happens is I go to a website, it wants a credit card and I can pop up that little Eno browser plugin. [00:19:53] And now. Todd, uh, I can generate a virtual credit card number that's tied in behind the scenes to my real credit card number. I can even put an expiration date on that credit card number. So it can't be used after a certain. Some of these virtual credit card options, even allow you to say, Hey, it really is only single use. [00:20:18] It can only ever be used once. And that way the bad guys can't run up your credit card. Bill Citibank, American express, JP Morgan, and the more have these types of options and basically any visa or MasterCard. Look for virtual credit cards. From your bank or whoever's providing your credit card. Hey, stick around. [00:20:42] You're listening to Craig Peterson and I'll be right back. [00:20:46] We're going to talk a little bit now, since it's getting near the end of the year, about what kind of technology do we think is going to be big next year. And I've got to mention this project. My daughter has been working on it. Finally hit the ocean. [00:21:02] My daughter has been busy. You might know she's been in the maritime industry for quite a while now. [00:21:11] And a man, she went to, she graduated 2008. I think it was this, this daughter. And you probably already know I have five daughters, right? Uh, three sons too. So it was kind of a mix, but she has been working on a ship called the Yarra Burkland it's over in Norway. And what the ship is doing here is hauling fertilizer, anything. [00:21:38] Oh, wow. Isn't that exciting? Wow. Craig, I'm so excited for you. Well, it is the world's first autonomous electric ship period. Okay, cargo ship and what it is doing ultimately, is it to eliminating the need for about 40,000 truck round trips a year. See what's happening over there in Norway is there's a factory that's right. [00:22:07] Located right next to a mine. That's making all of this fertilizer and it needs to be hauled down through some fjords. To get to the main shipping Depot where it can be loaded onto the big ocean ship. So these trucks are going up and over the mountains alongside the fjords. And this is a ship that's going to take a trip that's about seven and a half nautical mile. [00:22:34] So give or take eight miles and on the water. And now Norway is doing this in its own waterways. So there's no problem with international rules and regulations about ships here. This is just local and it loads itself. It drives itself and it unloads itself. I think that's really, really cool. And what it does is it plugs itself. [00:23:02] When it is on either port w now we've seen this with some ships, right? You might've been on some of these ferries that are electric. They work pretty well for electric ferries. Cause they're usually short haul. They connect up to shore power and they do a rapid charge and they're ready for. The next leg of their ship while they are busy taking all of their load in right. [00:23:26] Makes sense. And you might've done it, but this is, this is different. And a lot of the incidents that happen in shipping are due to human error. Think about all of the problems we've had with Navy ships, even running into things, human error, and a lot of that's due to fatigue. On the ships. I don't know if you know it. [00:23:47] I have two kids that, well, three actually that have been in the maritime industry, uh, the, the big maritime industry and they take four hour shifts. So four on four off four on four off every day. So fatigue is a very big deal for a lot of the shipping industry. And for the first few years, they're planning on having the ship be. [00:24:15] They're going to be up, of course, on the bridge monitoring everything, because you've got a problem with artificial intelligence machine learning. If a big ship is coming along and there's a kayak in the way, it's actually the kayaks job to get out of the way. But if you run over a kayaker things, aren't going to go very well for you, frankly. [00:24:37] But how does a computer recognize a kayak? Maybe Marine life or even some sort of a swell that's out there. So they think they've got most of this solved. And this is the project that my daughter's been working on for a few years here. She's a Mariner. She has her captain's license unlimited. Tonnage unlimited vessels on unlimited waterways anywhere in the world is just incredible. [00:25:06] All of the stuff she's done. So the wheelhouse could disappear all together, but they've got to make sure that everything is working pretty darn well. Okay. Uh, large vessels. Do anything about the kayak? All they can do is warn, but they definitely can't maneuver. And that's why the deep draft vessels have priority over sailboats or pretty much anything else that's out there. [00:25:32] But, and what that brings up is the fact that we don't have the regulations yet for these autonomous ship. Well, we don't have the regulations yet for the autonomous cars, right? This is normal. The technology tends to proceed the regulations, and we have regulations in place right now for autonomous vehicles in certain areas. [00:25:57] But they're nowhere near mature. It's going to take a while before everything has all frigging. And now that is leading us into our friends at Ford. Ford's done a couple of interesting announcements over the last couple of weeks. So I have to bring the. And an effort really to deal with this ongoing chip shortage. [00:26:21] Ford has made a deal with global founders. Global foundries is a chip maker and they have a non-binding agreement. Now that makes it interesting. If it's non-binding. Why even bother, but the press release says opening the door for global foundries to deliver more chips to Ford in the short term. But what's happening right now because of the chip shortages. [00:26:50] Well, companies are designing their own. Purpose built chips rather than relying on the general purpose chips made by Intel or AMD Qualcomm, Samsung and video media tech, depending on what kind of chips we're talking about. This is fascinating because it is hurting Intel. No question about it. And AMD. So what does Intel done? [00:27:15] Intel is moving its stance to being more of a contracted chip manufacturer. So you can go to Intel and say, here's my chip design. Go ahead and make that for us. And off they'll go and they will manufacture it and they probably even help you with some of the design things. Fascinating. Now, the other thing that's been happening for a while is if you look at apple, for instance, they have been using their own chips in their I phones and eye pads. [00:27:52] Now they also are using their own chips in the laptops and various desktop computers. So apple is the highest profile example I can think of offhand. That have replaced Intel's chips. That's absolutely amazing. Google has also created its own chip for the latest pixel phone. So if you buy the latest flagship pixel, which I would not do, because this is the first time they're really using their own chip, but they've got their own chip now. [00:28:28] Amazon has been deploying its own chips in its internal servers to improve performance as well as to make it better for the Alexa voice assistant. You see how long tail that's a marketing term, but really how special purpose purpose designed purpose built chips are. So it's huge. Intel's changing course. [00:28:55] They've never been a great chip designer. If he asked me and a few know my history, you know, I've been down at the chip level. I was down there for many years in the kernel of operating systems and dealing directly with all. From chips, you know, when you're thinking about drivers and the low end and the operating system, that's what I did for a lot of years. [00:29:18] So I'm, I'm glad to see this happen. It's going to be better for you because the devices can be cheaper because they don't use a general purpose chip. The chip is built and designed. For what it's being used for. So good news there for four, because Ford is going to be kind of doing the same sort of thing. [00:29:39] I bet mark my words. Okay. Well, I didn't get to the predictions for this year, but I will, when we get back this upcoming year, stick around, of course you listening to Craig, Peter Sohn, you can get all kinds of information. And in fact, if you sign up for my email list, which is not a heavy marketing. [00:30:02] Believe me, you'll get a bunch of different special reports. So ones I think are going to help you out the most. Craig peterson.com. [00:30:13] Well, we just talked about the future when it comes to chips and our computers, we're going to continue that discuss discussion right now on artificial intelligence and machine learning. What else is going to be important next? [00:30:29] So, what is the future? [00:30:31] We're getting close to, you know, the end of the year and the beginning of the year. So what am I looking forward to? Well, you just got my basic predictions about what's going to happen with chip manufacturing. These various vendors of various devices are going to continue to move away from Intel AMD, et cetera, these general purpose chips and move more to special purpose chips. [00:31:02] Now there's a number of special purpose type designs that have been out there for a very long time. For instance, a six OCB in industry. No, those I programmed some way back when. I have gotten much more complicated, but for instance, when we're putting in systems for a business, we will typically use Cisco systems that have a basics so that everything is extremely fast. [00:31:29] You don't notice any delay and yet it can do very heavy duty filtering. Packet examination, stream examination, because it's being done in hardware. That's the advantage to it. So we're going to see more and more that since Apple's already moved to their own chips, Google has already moved to their own chips, Amazon, their own chips, et cetera. [00:31:53] And there'll always be a need for general purpose chips. In fact, you can say that the apple chips for instance, are fairly. The purpose they're being used in your iOS devices, your iPhone, your iPad, but they're also being used in desktop applications. But if you look more closely at what Apple's done, it has a couple of different types. [00:32:16] Of CPU's inside the chip. So it has the high-performance CPU's that are only engaged when it needs some serious computing going on. It has the low power, lower performance CPU's that are also built into that same chip that now handle kind of background tasks, things. Dated the don't need a whole lot of CPU or don't need to be really fast. [00:32:42] And then it also has graphics processing units that will handle things like screen updates, moving stuff around on the screens. There is a lot of technology in that chip in reality, it's it would use to take three. Completely different sets of chips to do what the one apple chip can do. So it is an example of a special purpose CPU. [00:33:11] We're going to be seeing more and more of those now as a consumer, you're not really going to notice other than, wow, this thing's fast or wow. This battery lasts forever. You're going to have some great, great functionality. And I think we are seeing, because they're spinning. $2 billion a week right now in the industry, you're going to be seeing more of these fabs come online, chip fabrication plants, and they take a long time to build and put up online, but they're going to be making more specialized chips, which I really. [00:33:46] Well, there's an article that came out based on a survey from the I Tripoli. And this is called the impact of technology in 2022. And beyond of these are some global technology leaders. Of course I Tripoli was all about electrical engineering back in the day today, it's more about general technology. But here's the results. [00:34:12] What is important for next year? Now, remember, I don't give investment advice. So don't look at this as things you should be putting your money into. This is just stuff that is good to know and probably should be considered, but this is not again, investment advice. So. Technologies will be the most important in 2022. [00:34:33] While according to this kind of little, little brain trust, if you will, amongst the respondents more than one in five, say that AI and machine learning are going to be very important. What's the difference between artificial intelligence and machine learning. Uh, the lines are blurred nowadays. They used to be a lot more clear machine learning used to be the, the machine, the computer learns it. [00:35:02] Let's say it's working on a factory floor and it has to do some welding on a joint. And the, it has sensors and it learns, oh, okay. Well, this part, when it comes into me may be here, but I might be there and I might be here. So I got to kind of move around a little bit. That's basic machine. Artificial intelligence, which I think is a super set of machine learning, but other people argue the other way, but you know, they don't know what they're talking about. [00:35:30] There is artificial intelligence is where it doesn't even have to be taught how to learn. It. Just figures things out. So it's. When it's built, talk to learn where that piece that it needs to weld is likely going to be and how to find it. It just knows. Okay, well, I'm supposed to weld. So how do I do that? [00:35:56] That's much more of an artificial intelligence. So that's number one, artificial intelligence next. Cloud computing 20%. Now my opinion on cloud computing is not very high, frankly, because cloud is just the name for somebody else's computer cloud computing does not mean it's safer. It does not mean that it requires less work on your part where I think cloud computing can help a business is where. [00:36:30] Push over flow to the cloud. The many businesses that have moved technology to the cloud have moved it back now because frankly, the cloud did not provide them with what they thought they'd get, which is cheaper, better computing. And a lot of the breaches that we're getting nowadays are in the cloud. [00:36:53] People's databases being exposed, applications, being exposed. It's great for hackers because they know. Okay, well, let me see. Amazon has the majority of all cloud computing in the world, so let's just scan Amazon computers and see what we can find. Right. And they're going to find that this bank has this opener, that company has that database available, et cetera, et cetera. [00:37:17] So be careful with that, but they think cloud's number two, five G. 17% that I am very excited about it. And here's why five G is kind of a generic term for the high speed, uh, room wireless data. So think cell phone basically, but why it really matters is it's designed to handle billions of devices. So that you can have a lot of people sharing data and getting to data, sharing a network connection in a densely populated area. [00:37:58] That's where it really, really shined. And then it also has a faster data rate than the older technology. One of the things you'll find as you compare, if you really dig into the technology compare, the various cell companies is that for instance, T mobile, which is who I use has a lower frequency spectrum. [00:38:24] Lower frequencies can not carry as much data for, but what they can do, I'm really oversimplifying. But what they can do is more readily peers, glass, and brick and walls. So T-Mobile's frequencies are lower than Verizon, for instance. So Verizon can get you faster data. But can't get it into as many places and not as well as T-Mobile just really putting this quite simply. [00:38:57] And in fact, just what was it? Two weeks ago, we had a court order stopping the deployment of these higher frequency, 5g networks. Because of complaints from some people, uh, particularly in the avionics, in the airline industry where they're saying, well, they could be squashing some of our critical systems because they're using some of the old satellite frequencies for 5g up in the upper bands. [00:39:25] Anyhow, one of the things that 5g. Which has already been used for is what I was involved with. You know, I was involved with emergency medicine for a long time and I was an EMT I P D uh, back in the day. So almost a paramedic. And think about what could happen now, you're in the back of an ambulance that you could be the hands for the doctor who can be seeing the patient as you're driving down the highway, bringing that person in, because historically I remember this one woman. [00:40:01] Placenta previa and had just soaked through some towels with blood. She was in really bad shape and we were squeezing IVs to get fluid into her. It was, it was incredible. It was something else. And we brought her right in on the gurney, in emergency room and right up to the operating room and put her on the table, right from her ambulance gurney while with five G. [00:40:27] They can be doing that now, not just in an ambulance, but in, in more rural areas, doctors can be operating remotely on someone. It's very cool. This whole tele medicine, including remote surgery. It's huge. So these technology leaders agreed with me on that 24% is the number one, most benefit four or five G telemedicine. [00:40:53] Number two, remote learning and education 20%. Personal and professional day-to-day communications. Think of all of the stuff we're doing now, how much better that's going to get entertainment, sports, live streaming, manufacturing, and assembly transportation, traffic control. Now we're down to 7% and by the way, that's where the cars are talking to each other. [00:41:16] If you have five G. You don't need a mesh because you can use 5g, carbon footprint reduction in energy efficiency. That's 5% and 2% farming and agriculture. Our farming equipment is already using GPS in order to plow fields, planned fields, harvest fields. It's amazing. So there you go. Those are the top pieces of technology that are predicted to influence us next year. [00:41:46] I think it's absolutely correct. And I've got to give you a bit of good news here again. 97% of these people polled agree that their teams are working more closely than ever before. Because of these working from home workplace technologies and apps for office check-in, et cetera. Good news. All around. [00:42:11] Hey, if you want more good news. If you want to know what's happening, even some bad news, I got the right place for you to go. I have five minute little trainings in my emails every week. I have bootcamps again, all of this is the freeze stuff. You imagine what the paid stuff is like, but I want you to understand this. [00:42:32] Okay. Craig, peter.com/subscribe. Do it right now. [00:42:39] I had a good friend this week that had his life's work stolen from him. Yeah. And you know what caused it? It was his passwords. Now, you know what you're supposed to be doing? I'm going to tell you exactly what to do right now. [00:42:55] Well, let's get right down to the whole problem with passwords. [00:43:00] I'm going to tell you a little bit about my friend this week. He has been building a business for. Maybe going on 10 years now, and this business relies on advertising. Most businesses do so in some way, we need to have new customers. There's always some attrition there's customers that go away. So how do we keep them? [00:43:25] Well, we do what we can. How do we get new customers? Well, for him, it was. Advertising, primarily on Facebook. He did some Google ads as well, but Facebook is really where he was focused. So how did he do all of that? Here's the bottom line. You have to, if you are going to be advertising on Facebook, you have to have an advertising account. [00:43:51] Same thing's true with Google. And then on that account, you tie in either your bank account or your credit card. I recommend a credit card so that those transactions can be backed up. And on top of all of that now, of course you have to use a pixel. So the way the tracking works is there are pixels on websites, you know, about those already. [00:44:17] And the bottom line with the pixels. Those are also. Cookie's about the pixels are used to set a cookie so that Facebook knows what sites you've gone to. So he uses those. I use those. In fact, if you go to my website, I have a Facebook pixel, the get set. And the reason for all of that is so that we know with. [00:44:39] I'd be interested in something on the site. So I know that there's a lot of people that are interested in this page or that page. And so I could, I have not ever, but I could now do some advertising and I could send ads to you so that if you were looking at something particular, you'd see ads that were related to that, which is what I've always said. [00:45:04] Is the right way to go. If I'm looking to buy a pickup truck, I love to see ads for different pickup trucks, but if I don't want a car or truck, I don't want to see the ads. Right. It isn't like TV where it seems sometimes every other ad is about. Car or a pickup truck. It drives me kinda crazy because it's a waste of their money in advertising to me because I don't want those things. [00:45:33] And it's also not only just annoying in money wasting. There are better ways to do targeting. And that's what the whole online thing is. Anyways, I told you about that because he had set up this pixel years ago. Basically the Facebook pixel gets to know you gets to know. All of the people who like you, that might've bought from you. [00:45:58] Cause you can have that pixel track people through your site, your purchase site, they know what you purchase on the shopping cart, et cetera. And you can identify these people over on Facebooks and them ads because they abandoned the cart or whatever it is you want to do there. There's just a whole ton of stuff that you can do for these people. [00:46:19] And it's so bad. It is so valuable. It takes years to build up that account years to put that pixel in place. And our friend here, he had done exactly that. Then he found that his account had been compromised. And that is a very bad thing in this case because the bad guy used his account to place ads. Now there's really two or three problems here. [00:46:52] We'll talk about one of them is. Why was the bad guy going after him? Well, he has been running ads on Facebook for a long time. So as far as Facebook is concerned, his account is credible. All of the ads he runs don't have to be reviewed by a human being. They can, can go up almost immediate. He doesn't have to wait days for some of these things to go up. [00:47:21] So our bad guy can get an account like his, that has years worth of advertising credibility, and now start advertising things that are not correct. So there again is part of the value of having one of these older accounts for advertising. And so the bad guy did that use his credibility. And then secondly, he used 25 grand worth of my friend's money to run ads. [00:47:51] Also of course, very bad, very, very bad. So I sat down with him. In fact, it was this last week and I was out on a trip with just kind of a vacation trip. It was absolutely wonderful. You know, I, I never just do vacation. Right. It's always business plus work whenever I do anything like this, but I was on. [00:48:11] Trip last week. And so my eldest son who works closely with me, and he's also part of the FBI InfraGuard program. I had him reach out to my friend and they, he helped them out and they talked back and forth. Here's the problem that he has. And I'm trying to figure out a really good way to solve this. And I haven't figured that out yet. [00:48:35] And you know, if you guys have an idea because you are the best and brightest, you really are. Go ahead and drop me an email me@craigpeterson.com if you know, a good way around this particular problem, which is he has. This Facebook could count as well as many other accounts, including his website, hosting account, his email account, et cetera. [00:48:57] And. Uh, he has people who manage his ads for him who manages website for him, who put up some of the promotions for him, you know, the advertising and everything else. So these are third-party. This is what we generically call a supply chain, risk people who are not him have access to his stuff, his private stuff. [00:49:24] And, well, how does he do it or how did he do it? Is he went ahead and gave them. Access by giving them accounts or passwords. How well were they guarding their passwords and their accounts? So the first thing I had my friend do was go to have I been poned.com. You'll find that online at have HIV. E I been. [00:49:50] Poem dispelled PW, N E d.com. So I took him to have I been poned and I had him put in his email address, the one he uses the most and it showed up in five different. Hacks data dumps. So these are five different sites where he had used that same email address in this case. And he found out that in those five cases, the bad guy's got his passwords and personal information. [00:50:21] All bad. Right. And he went ahead and cleaned it up. So I said, well, put in the password because have I been, poned also let you check your password, just see if it has been used by someone else and then stolen. So there are billions of passwords in this database. It's incredibly. Of all of these known passwords. [00:50:44] So he put in his password and no it had not been stolen, but the problem is how about the people that were managing his ads on Facebook and managing his Facebook ad. We're the usernames, which are typically the email addresses and the passwords kept securely. That's a supply chain thing I'm talking about, and that's where I I'd love to get him. [00:51:12] But from you guys, me@craigpeterson.com. If you think you have a good answer, What we've been doing. And our advice to him was use one password. That's the only one to use. I don't trust the last pass anymore. After their last big hack where they got hacked, uh, one password, the digit one password. And go ahead. [00:51:33] And set it up. And in a business scenario, you can have multiple vaults. So have a vault. That's just for people that are dealing with your Facebook ad account, maybe have another vault for people who are posting for you on Facebook. Or better yet when it comes to Facebook, go ahead and have an intermediary that is trusted, uh, kind of like the, if this, then that, or there's a few of them out there that can see that you put the post up on the website and automatically posted on Facebook. [00:52:09] So you don't have to get. All of these people, your passwords, but again, it's up to you. You got to kind of figure out if that makes sense to you that those are the types of things that I think you can do. And that is what we do as well. Now, one of the beauties of using one password like that, where you're not sharing all of your passwords to everything you're sharing, the minimum amount of login information that you possibly can share is that if they leave your employees, All you have to do is remove their access to the appropriate vault or volts, or maybe all of your volts. [00:52:49] And this is what I've done with people that worked for me in the U S and people would work for me overseas and there have been a lot of them and it has worked quite well for me. So with one pass, We can enforce password integrity. We can make sure the passwords on stolen. One password ties automatically into have I been postponed. [00:53:12] So, you know, if a password has been exposed, if it's been stolen online, it's a great way to go. Now I've got an offer for you guys who are listening. I have a special report that I've sold before on passwords, and it goes through talks about one password. He talks about last pass, which I'm no longer really recommending, but give some comparisons and how you can use these things. [00:53:35] Make sure you go and email me right now. Me, M e@craigpetersohn.com. That's Emmy at Craig Peter Sohn, S O. Dot com and just ask me for the password special report, and I'll be glad to get that on off to you. There is a lot of good detail in there and helps you, whether you're a home user or a business. [00:54:02] So the next step in your security is multi-factor authentication. Interesting study out saying that about 75% of people say that they've used it for work or for business, but the hard numbers, I don't think the. [00:54:18] One of the things that you have to do is use good passwords. And the best way to do that is to use a password manager. [00:54:27] I was talking about a friend of mine who had been hacked this last week and his account was hacked. His Facebook ad account was hacked. We asked him if we could reach out to. BI and he said, sure. So we checked with the FBI and they're looking to turn this into a case, a real case, because they've never seen this type of thing, the hijacking of an advertising account who hijacked it. [00:54:56] And why did they hide jacket? Was this in preparation maybe for. Playing around with manipulating our next election cycle coming up. There could be a lot of things that they're planning on doing and taking over my friend's account would be a great way to have done it. So maybe they're going to do other things here. [00:55:15] And our friends at the FBI are looking into it. How now do you also keep your data safe? Uh, easily simply. Well, when we're talking about these types of accounts, the thing to look at is known as two factor authentication or multifactor authentication. You see my friend, if he had been using multi-factor authentication. [00:55:42] I would not have been vulnerable. Even if the bad guys had his username, email address and his password, they still would not be able to log in without having that little six digit code. That's the best way to do multi-factor authentication. When we're talking about this code, whether it's four or 5, 6, 8 digits long, we should not be using our cell phones to receive those. [00:56:16] At least not as text messages, those have a problem because our phone numbers can be stolen from us and they are stolen from us. So if we're a real target, in other words, they're going after you. Joe Smith and they know you have some, $2 million in your account. So they're going after you while they can, in most cases take control of your phone. [00:56:45] Now you might not know it and it doesn't have to be hacked. All they have to do is have the phone company move your phone number to a new phone. Once. So that means one of the things you need to do is contact your telephone vendor, whoever it is, who's providing new that service. That's a company like Verizon sprint T-Mobile, uh, a T and T one of those companies that are giving you cell service, you have to contact them and set up a pass. [00:57:15] So that if they have a phone call coming in and that phone call can be faked. So it looks like it's coming from your phone, even if there was a phone call coming in, whether it's coming from your phone or not, they have to get that password or pass code that you gave them. And once they have that pass code now, Right. [00:57:37] Uh, and that's great, but if you don't have that in there targeting you specifically, then you're in trouble. So for many of us really, it, it may not make a huge difference. Uh, but I would do it anyways. I have done it with every one of my cell phone carriers now. A couple of decades set up a password. So the next step is this multifactor authentication. [00:58:03] If I'm not supposed to get it via text message to my phone, how do I get it? Well, there are a couple of apps out there. There's a free one called Google authentic. And Google authenticator runs on your phone. And once it's there on your phone and you are setting it up on a website, so Facebook, for instance, your bank, most websites out there, the bigger ones, all you have to do is say, I want to set up multi-factor authentication, and then it'll ask you a case. [00:58:34] So how do you want to do it? And you can say, I want an app and they will display. A Q R code. That's one of those square codes with a bunch of little lines inside of it. You're seeing QR codes before they become very common. And you take your phone with the Google authenticator app. Take a picture. Of that little QR code on the screen, and now it will start sinking up so that every 30 seconds Google authenticator on your phone will change that number. [00:59:08] So when you need to log back into that website, it's going to ask you for the code. You just pull up Google authenticator and there's the code. So that's the free way to do it. And not necessarily the easiest way to. Again, going back to one password. I use this thing exclusively. It is phenomenal for keeping my passwords, keeping them all straight and then encrypted vault, actually in multiple encrypted vault it's so that I can share some of them. [00:59:37] Some of them are just strictly private, but it also has that same authenticator functionality built right into it. Microsoft has its own authenticator, but you can tell Microsoft that you want to use the standard authenticator. Of course, Microsoft has to do everything differently. Right. But you can tell it. [01:00:00] And I do tell it, I want to use a regular authenticator app, not Microsoft authentication. By the way. That's why I advise you to do don't use the Microsoft authenticator, just use one authenticator for all of the site, and then Microsoft will give you that same QR code. And then you can take that picture and you're off and running. [01:00:20] Next time you log in, it asks you for the code and instead of texting it to you to your phone smarter, otherwise it will not. That require you to open up your authenticator. So for me, for instance, when I'm logging into a website, it comes up and asks for the username, asked for the password. Both of those are filled out automatically by one password for me. [01:00:44] And then it asks for that code, uh, indication code and. One password automatically puts it into my pace to buffer copy paste, buffer, and I just paste it in and they they've got the code. So I don't have to remember the codes. I don't remember passwords. I don't have to remember usernames or email addresses. [01:01:05] One password remembers them all for me. Plus it'll remember notes and other things. So you can tell, I really like one password. We use it with all of our clients. That's what we have for them. And it does meet even a lot of these DOD requirement on top of. Depending again, how much security you need. We will use duo D U O and it also has this authenticator functionality and we will also use UBI keys. [01:01:37] These are those hardware key. They do oh, can provide you with hardware tokens. Those are those little tokens that can go onto your key ring. That show a changing six digit number every 30 seconds. And that's the same number that would be there in your smartphone app. Your one password or Google authenticator smartphone. [01:01:59] Hopefully, I didn't confuse you too much. I think most of the reason we're not using the security we should is because we're not sure how to, and we don't know what we're going to be. And I can see that being a big problem. So if you have questions about any of this, if you would like a copy of my password security, special report, just send an email to me. [01:02:25] M e@craigpetersohn.com. That's me M e@craigpeterson.com. That's S O n.com. I'll be glad to send it to you. Also, if you sign up for my newsletter there on my website@craigpeterson.com, you are going to get. I was hold little series of these special reports to help you out, get you going. And then every week I send out a little bit of training and all of my articles for the week. [01:02:56] It's usually six to 10 articles that I consider to be important so that, you know, what's going on in the cybersecurity world. So you can. With it for yourself, for your family, for your business. Craig peterson.com. Stick around everybody. We'll be right back again. Craig peterson.com. . [01:03:20] According to researchers. 32% of teen girls said that when they felt bad about their bodies, Instagram made them feel worse. And you know what Facebook knew and knows Instagram is toxic for teen girls. [01:03:37] There's a great article that came out in the wall street journal. [01:03:40] And I'm going to read just a little bit here from some of the quotes first. When I went on Instagram, all I saw were images of chiseled bodies, perfect. Abs and women doing 100 burpees in 10 minutes, said, Ms. Uh, now 18, who lives in Western Virginia. Amazing. Isn't it. The one that I opened now with 32% of teen girls said that when they felt bad about their bodies, Instagram, I made them feel worse. [01:04:12] So that is some studies again, that looks like, um, yeah, these were researchers inside Instagram and they said this in a March, 2020 slide presentation that was posted to Facebook's internal message board that was reviewed by the wall street journal quote comparisons on Instagram can change how young women view and describe themselves. [01:04:38] Apparently for the past three years, Facebook has been conducting studies into how Instagram is affecting its millions of young users. Now, for those of you who don't know what Instagram is, it allows these users to create little stories, to have. Pictures videos of things that they're doing, and it it's a lifestyle type thing you might've heard of course, of how this, this, uh, I don't know what it is. [01:05:09] Kidnapping murder plot. These, this young couple and the body I think was found up in Wyoming. Uh, I'm trying to remember, but, uh, of her and it's yeah, there it is. It wasn't my OMI. And I'm looking up right now, Gabby potato. That's who it is. She was what they called a micro influence. And I know a lot of people who can loom, that's what they want to be. [01:05:37] There's a, a young lady that stayed with us for a few months. She had no other place to live. And so we invited her in here and, uh, we got some interesting stories to tell about that experience. And it's, you know, a little, a little sad, but anyhow, she got back up on her feet and then she decided she was going to become an influence. [01:06:01] And what an influencer is, is someone that has a lot of followers. And of course, a lot means different numbers. You get these massive influencers that have tens of millions of people that quote, follow unquote them. And of course, just think of the Kardashians they're famous for. Being famous, nothing else. [01:06:23] Right. Uh, they have subsequently done some pretty amazing things. At least a few of them have. And we've got one of those daughters who now was the first earliest billionaire, I think it was ever youngest. So they have accomplished some amazing things after the fact, but they got started. By just becoming famous by posting on these social media sites. [01:06:48] So you get a micro influencer, like Gabby Petito, who is out there posting things and pictures. And you look at all of these pictures and, oh my gosh, they're up at this national park. Oh, isn't she so cute. Oh, look at her boyfriend. They'll look so good together. And people. Fall for that image, right? It's just like Photoshopping these pictures of models, changing them. [01:07:16] There've been some real complaints about those over the years. So Instagram sets these kids up with these pictures of people that are just totally unrealistic. One of the slides from a 2019 presentation says, quote, we make body. Excuse me. We make body image issues worse for one in three teenage girls teams, blame Instagram for increases in the rate of anxiety. [01:07:49] And depression said another slide. This reaction was unprompted and consistent across. Groups among teens is this according to the wall street journal who reported suicidal thoughts, 13% of British users, and 6% of American users trace the desire to kill themselves to Instagram. Again, according to one of these presentations, isn't this just absolutely amazing. [01:08:18] And you might've heard it discussed a little bit. I saw some articles about it, obviously in the news wall street journal had it, but this is a $100 billion company, Instagram. That's what their annual revenues. More than 40% of Instagram users are 22 years old and younger. And about 22 million teens log into Instagram in the U S each day, compared with 5 million that log into Facebook, the younger users have been declining. [01:08:57] Facebook it's getting, uh, the population there is getting older and older on Facebook. In average teens in the us spend 50% more time on Instagram than they do on Facebook. Uh, and also tick-tock, by the way I took talk has now surpassed YouTube in some of these metrics, quote, Instagram is well-positioned to resonate. [01:09:20] And when with young people said a researcher's slide posted internally. Inside Facebook and post said there is a path to growth. If Instagram can continue their trajectory. Amazing. So Facebook's public phase has really tried to downplay all of these negative effects that the Instagram app has on teens, particularly girls, and hasn't made its research public or available to academics or lawmakers who have asked for it. [01:09:54] Quote, the research that we've seen is that using social apps to connect with other people. Positive mental health benefits said mark Zuckerberg. He's the CEO of course of Facebook. Now this was 2020. In March one at a congressional hearing, he was asked about children and mental health. So you see how he really lawyered the words that they can have, can have positive mental health benefits, but Facebook's own internal research seems to show that they know it has a profound negative effect on a large percentage of their users. [01:10:36] Instagram had Adam Moseri told reporters in may of this year, that research he had seen suggest the app's effect on team's wellbeing is likely quote quite small. So what the wall street journal seems to be pointing out here is that Facebook is not giving us the truth on any of this stuff. It's really sad. [01:10:58] We've got to be careful. No, apparently Mr. Moseri also said that he's been pushing very hard for Facebook to really take their responsibilities more broadly. Uh, he says they're proud of this research. I'm just kind of summarizing this before we run out of time here, but it shows the document. Uh, internal documents on Facebook show that they are having a major impact on teen, mental health, political discourse, and even human trafficking. [01:11:36] These, this internal research offers an unparalleled picture. Uh, Courtney told the wall street journal of how Facebook is acutely aware that the products and systems central to its business success routine. Fail great article. I've got it in this week's newsletter. You can just open it up and click through on the link to the wall street journal. [01:12:01] They have a pay wall and I kind of hate to use payroll articles, but this one, this one's well worth it. And they do give you some free articles every month. So if you're not on that newsletter, you can sign up right now. Craig peterson.com. You'll get the next one. If you miss a link today, if you want some, you know, the special report on passwords, et cetera, just email me directly. [01:12:29] Give me a few days to respond. Uh, but me M e@craigpeterson.com. That's me M e@craigpeterson.com. [01:12:41] We've all worked from home from time to time. At least if we're somehow in the information it industry, I want to talk right now about why you need a personal laptop. Even if the business is providing you with a laptop. [01:12:57] Laptops are something that was designed to be personal, but many of us are using them as our main computer. [01:13:06] I know I often am using my laptop, a couple of my kids and my wife. It's really their main computer, even though they all have other computers that they could potentially be using, laptops are just handy and you have them with, you can take them with you. We've got workstation set up that are kind of. [01:13:27] Workstations, if you will, where there are three screens set up and they're all hooked up into one central screen controller that then has a USBC connection that goes right into the, your laptop. So you can be sitting there with four screens on your Mac laptop on your Mac pro if you needed four screens, it's really handy. [01:13:53] No question. Many of us have a laptop for home and a laptop for business. And many of us also look at it and say, oh wow, this is a great laptop I got from work. It's much better than my home laptop. And you start to use the business laptop for work. At home. Okay. That's what it's for. Right. But then we start to use that business laptop for personal stuff. [01:14:25] That's where the problems start. We've seen surveys out there that are shown. Then half of workers are using work issue devices for personal tasks that might be doing it at home. They might be doing it at the office. Things like personal messages, shopping, online, social media, reading the news. So the prospect of using your work laptop as your only laptop, not just for work, but also for maybe watching some movies, group chat and messaging, reading, fan fiction, paying bills, emailing to family or friend. [01:15:06] It just seems not. It's so tempting. It's just natural. I'm on it. I'm on it all day long. Why wouldn't I just use it? And this is particularly true for people who are working from home, but we have to be careful with that. It's really something that you shouldn't be doing for a couple of reasons. One that. [01:15:30] Top that's a business. Laptop is the property of the business. It's just like walking home with boxes, full of pencils and paper back in the old days, it is not yours to use for personal use. We also have to assume, assume since it is the company's laptop that hopefully it's been secure. Hopefully they haven't set up. [01:15:57] So it's going through a special VPN at the office and it's going through special filters, maybe snort filters or something else. That's doing some deeper inspection on what's coming through your laptop. Well, there are also likely on that laptop. Tools that are monitoring your device. Things like key loggers, biometric tracking, Jill location, software that tracks your web browser and social media behavior, screenshot, snapshot software, maybe even your cam. [01:16:34] Is being used to keep track of you. I know a number of the websites that I've used in the past to hire temporary workers. Those workers have to agree to have you monitor what they're doing. These hourly workers, subtle take screenshots of their screen, unbeknownst to them. Yeah. Pictures from the cameras at random intervals. [01:16:58] Again, unbeknownst to them, it'll track what they're doing. And so I can now go in and say, okay, well he billed me five hours for doing this. And I look at his screen and guess what? He wasn't doing that for all of those five hours that he just billed me. Well, the same thing could be true for your company, even if you're not paid by the hour. [01:17:23] Right now, we're looking at stats that show over half of the businesses that are providing laptops for the employees to use more than half of them are using monitoring software. And through this whole lockdown, the usage of these different types of monitoring systems has grown. Now there's some of the programs you're using. [01:17:50] You might be VPN in, you might be using slack or G suite enterprise, all good little pieces of software. They can monitor that obviously, but it goes all the way through to the business. And using your slack access as paid for, by the businesses also idiotic to do things like send messages to your buddies, set up drinks after work, complain to other people about someone else in the business, your boss, or otherwise your it, people at the business can see all of that. [01:18:31] They can see what you're doing with slack. Even if you have a separate personal account. It's still more likely that you'll end up mixing them up if you're logged into both on the same computer. So the bottom line is if you are on a work computer, whether it's a laptop or something else, you can reasonably assume that I T can see everything. [01:18:56] That's not. They own it. Okay. And they have to do some of this stuff to protect themselves. We put software on laptops for companies not to spy on employees. That's none of our business, but we put software on computers for employees. To make sure they stay safe. Think of what happens when your computer, your laptop, whatever it might be connects to the company's network. [01:19:25] Now that can be through a VPN. It can be because you take your laptop home or on the road when you're traveling and you bring it back into the office. If that computer is infected, somehow now you've brought that infection into the office. And that's how a lot of the malware works. It goes from computer to computer. [01

Beneath the Dirt
#163 - Prettier Ugly

Beneath the Dirt

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 64:02


This week we got new music from Jarren Benton, Ubi, Stu Bangas, Maez 301, and Jedi Mind Tricks. Ouija Macc drops the "Pretty Ugly 2" mixtape. ICP announces A Carnival Christmas streams for December. Astronomicon 5 has a new venue, and much more. Support the channel by donating: streamlabs.com/beneathdirt Cash App - $beneathdirt Everything else Beneath the Dirt: beneathdirt.com

Shit You Don't Learn in School
41. The Future of Work: What Comes Next? (Part 2)

Shit You Don't Learn in School

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 50:12


In the second part of this series on the future of work, Steph and Cal dive into new products and services, alongside macro trends that they predict are in full flux.These include mass migration, global tax infrastructure, opportunities for services to specialize, increased isolation, UBI, and of course... the metaverse. :)

Creating Wealth Real Estate Investing with Jason Hartman
1765: Radical Rent Control, Limited Housing Supply, Inflation & Universal Basic Income and Mobility, Rittenhouse Trial, Corporate Profits Soar By Promoting Hate, Best Investment Strategy

Creating Wealth Real Estate Investing with Jason Hartman

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 39:08


Welcome to the Jungle!     Reality always surpasses imagination and it's wild out there! Jason breaks down what is happening out there today in the jungle:      Reason Magazine reports how developers in St. Paul Minnesota halt projects and the mayor demands reform after voters approve a radical rent control ballot initiative; if there's no exemption for new construction, of course they stop building! More dollars than ever are chasing a limited supply of housing inventory. Homes now typically sell within a week and this is forcing buyers to take risks.     Universal Basic Income (UBI) proposals have gone even further with the Universal Basic Mobility proposal (UBM),  while the rich greenwash their environmental sins by buying carbon credits. The news media profits by getting us to hate each other and today, with the resolution of the Kyle Rittenhouse trial, the country is primed to explode. The powers that be are now trying to convince us that inflation is a good thing, but how can we fight back? Jason's inflation induced debt destruction strategy will help you counteract this madness! Learn more at www.JasonHartman.com.  Key Takeaways: [1:22] Introduction to the Craziness [1:45] Radical Rent Control  [4:30] Financial Repression: Savers are Losers [6:04] WTF1971.com [9:49] Don't Steal- the Government Hates Competition [11:08] Further Out on the Risk Curve [12:11] UBI and UBM; Let's Go Brandon! [14:54] Spin Doctor, Spin! Inflation is Good for the Common Man! [16:52] Universal Basic Mobility and the Green Washing Scam [21:37] Free Bus Passes! [22:57] "As America falls apart, profit soar" - Matt Taibbi [31:54] "Nobility Obligates" [33:46] The Most Historically Proven Wealth Creator   Tweetables: There is nothing so permanent as a temporary government program- Milton Friedman You cannot solve every problem by printing money- Jason Hartman As America falls apart, profit soar - Matt Taibbi Borrow at negative interest rates, get inflation induced debt destruction; it's a phenomenal opportunity!- Jason Hartman Website and Mentions: WTF1971.com Hate Inc.: Why Today's Media Makes Us Despise One Another  by Matt Taibbi Taibbi.Substack.com PandemicInvesting.com The WEALTH TRANSFER is happening FAST! Protect your financial future now! Did you know that 25% to 40% of all dollars ever created were dumped into the economy last year???  This will be devastating to some and an opportunity to others, be sure you're on the right side of this massive wealth transfer. Learn from our experiences, maximize your ROI and avoid regrets. Free Mini-Book on Pandemic Investing: https://www.PandemicInvesting.com Jason's TV Clips: https://vimeo.com/549444172  Asset Protection, Tax Savings & Estate Planning: http://JasonHartman.com/Protect What do Jason's clients say? http://JasonHartmanTestimonials.com Easily get up to $250,000 in funding for real estate, business or anything else  http://JasonHartman.com/Fund  Call our Investment Counselors at: 1-800-HARTMAN (US) or visit www.JasonHartman.com Guided Visualization for Investors: http://jasonhartman.com/visualization

Grimerica Outlawed
#51 - David Mathisen

Grimerica Outlawed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 61:15


David Mathisen joins us for a different type of chat. No star myths here...:( just a good chat about nations, modernity, fascism and solutions. We get into global research, WW1, natural immunity from Sars and T cells, dissolving nations, transnational empires, the feudal system imposed on Europe, cash crops, Matthew Ehret's work in Canada, and Michael Hudson's work on economics.   In the second half we chat about war crimes of Empire, revolutions and color revolutions, corporations and their rights, restrictions on freedom, bill of rights, UBI vs guaranteed jobs, boosters and solutions. Is there any way out of this? Is it too late? Can we even use voting and the governments anymore? What are the solutions? Be the change? Be happy? Don't buy into the fear...? Exit the system and create our own reality? The bigger solutions are hard to comprehend and are not for us to figure out.   https://www.starmythworld.com/myths/   See links to stuff we chatted about during the show:   globalresearch.ca   https://canadianpatriot.org/   https://michael-hudson.com/   https://solarmythology.com/   https://www.readbookpage.com/pdf/the-cosmopolitan-railway/   https://childrenshealthdefense.org/   Thank you for your support.  To gain access to the second half of show and our Plus feed please clink the link http://www.grimericaoutlawed.ca/support. Help support the show because without your help we can't continue to address these controversial topics. If you value this content with 0 ads, 0 sponsorships, 0 breaks, 0 portals and links to corporate websites, please assist. Many hours of unlimited content for free. Thanks for listening!!   Support the show directly: https://www.patreon.com/grimericaoutlawed   Get your Magic Mushrooms delivered from: Mushroom Spores, Spore Syringes, Best Spore Syringes,Grow Mushrooms   Spores Lab   Get Psychedelics online   Our audio book page: www.adultbrain.ca Darren's book www.acanadianshame.ca   Other affiliated shows: https://www.13questionspodcast.com/ Our New Podcast - 13 Questions www.grimerica.ca The OG Grimerica Show www.Rokfin.com/Grimerica Our channel on free speech Rokfin   Join the chat / hangout with a bunch of fellow Grimerican's  www.grimerica.ca/chats   1-403-702-6083 Call and leave a voice mail or send us a text   GrimericaFM https://s2.radio.co/s053ed3122/listen Check out our next trip/conference/meetup - Contact at the Cabin www.contactatthecabin.com   Leave a review on iTunes and/or Stitcher: https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/grimerica-outlawed http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/grimerica-outlawed   Sign up for our newsletter http://www.grimerica.ca/news   SPAM Graham = and send him your synchronicities, feedback, strange experiences and psychedelic trip reports!! graham@grimerica.com InstaGRAM https://www.instagram.com/the_grimerica_show_podcast/    Tweet Darren https://twitter.com/Grimerica   Connect through other platforms: https://www.reddit.com/r/grimerica/  https://gab.ai/Grimerica    Purchase swag, with partial proceeds donated to the show www.grimerica.ca/swag Send us a postcard or letter http://www.grimerica.ca/contact/ ART Napolean Duheme's site http://www.lostbreadcomic.com/  MUSIC Tru North Felix's Site sirfelix.bandcamp.com 

Yang Daily - Andrew Yang News
Episode 454 – 11/11 – Why inflation hit 6%, CoMingle‘s redistributive UBI app, and Miami announces crypto-UBI!

Yang Daily - Andrew Yang News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 11:29


In today's episode: Inflation hits 6% and we dig into the how and why, CoMingle apps aims to create redistributive UBI, and Miami announces a crypto-funded UBI! Links and transcript found here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1-M0vTHpynGrSgj2hhkxAgHGn4MUC-sNinQQNSTbRXpU/edit?usp=sharing Help make this podcast possible at: https://www.patreon.com/YangDaily Message me @YangDailyCast or YangDailyPodcast@gmail.com! YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcx_EbiZhhRhvvjFdZryPCQ/videos

The Meb Faber Show
#367 – Robert Lawson, SMU - Initially This Whole Thing Was A Tax Dodge So I Could Go Drink In Cuba

The Meb Faber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 57:05


In episode 367, we welcome our guest, Robert Lawson, director of the Bridwell Institute for Economic Freedom at (SMU) and author of Socialism Sucks: Two Economists Drink Their Way Through the Unfree World. In today's episode, we're talking about some of my favorite topics – capitalism, travel, and beer! Robert traveled around the world to visit socialist countries and let's just say the crappy beer wasn't the only thing he didn't like about the trip.   We start by defining what true socialism is, why Sweden isn't actually a socialist country, and look at Venezuela, Cuba, and North Korea to see what true socialism looks like in the world today. Surprise, surprise: it's not good.  Next, we discuss why socialism has a false utopian vision for the world and the reasons why this terrible idea just won't go away. As we wind down, we chat about some current topics in the U.S., including UBI, student-loan forgiveness, and the lack of financial education in schools.   ----- Follow Meb on Twitter, LinkedIn and YouTube For detailed show notes, click here To learn more about our funds and follow us, subscribe to our mailing list or visit us at cambriainvestments.com ----- Today's episode is sponsored by Masterworks. Masterworks is opening the doors to top-tier, blue-chip art investments to everyone. Visit masterworks.io/meb to skip their wait list. Today's episode is sponsored by The Idea Farm. The Idea Farm gives you access to over $100,000 worth of investing research, the kind usually read by only the world's largest institutions, funds, and money managers. Join today and get access to quarterly CAPE ratios, an excel quant backtester and the entire research library.

The Rich Roll Podcast
Andrew Yang On Grace, Tolerance & Human-Centered Government

The Rich Roll Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 81:42


Like many, I despair of our country's division, which is rapidly expanding in lockstep with our inability to productively communicate alongside growing distrust in institutions and the media.Also like many, I want solutions. Much of this rests with us. But we also need leadership.Across the political landscape, most elected officials understand this problem and its gravity. However, very few proffer solutions beyond the beaten path. Even fewer demonstrate a good-faith willingness to tackle the dilemma with solution-based action.Today's guest Andrew Yang is an exception to this pattern.For those unfamiliar, Andrew is an entrepreneur turned politician best known for his 2020 presidential run and subsequent New York City mayoral bid. He's the man who pioneered a national conversation on the power of universal basic income (UBI) to address maladies produced by widening wealth disparity. And he's a leader I find genuine in his commitment to the greater potential of our democratic experiment, bringing forth original and bold ideas to the national conversation—ideas not always in his best self-interest.Part memoir, part campaign trail exposé, Andrew's latest book, Forward: Notes on the Future of Our Democracy, is an instructive read on the damaged state of politics and political media as well as the broadening national divide that is eroding our humanity. A roadmap on how to repair the broken spokes of our democratic system, it also serves to announce the creation of a new third party—the Forward Party—part of Andrew's plan to redress democratic dysfunction by disrupting America's two-party duopoly.Today Andrew shares his story and vision.This is a relatively partisan-fee conversation about how to reimagine the democratic experiment for the betterment of all.We discuss the merits of universal basic income, human-centered capitalism, the problems with our gerontocracy, and what we need to truly progress as a nation.In addition, we discuss the perils and merits of a third political party; the role of new media in politics; the advantage of open primaries and rank choice voting; the importance of grace and tolerance; and how to modernize government's anachronistic bureaucracy.To read more click here. You can also watch listen to our exchange on YouTube. And as always, the podcast streams wild and free on Apple Podcasts and Spotify.This conversation was an absolute pleasure. I sincerely hope you enjoy it in the spirit in which it is offerredPeace + Plants, See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Gubmint Name Podcast
Ep. 287 I Want My 2000 $

Gubmint Name Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 120:47


Ep. 287 I Want My 2000 $ This podcast is exclusively a part of The BYNK Podcast Network bynkradio.net/podcasts Listen and Watch: https://linktr.ee/Gubmintnamepodcast https://linktr.ee/bynkradio This week Shogun and Cole talk about if you're man doesn't want you to get a BBL and you get one anyway should you still be in that relationship, Amazon worker delivering a meat package, why Michael Myers got to be homophobic, the government took Shoguns money and he not happy, Shogun's Halloween, and Will Smith needing us. THE RUNDOWN -Multi million dollar coupon scam -Pilot UBI program in 2 states -Tik Toker muders wife -The Alzheimer scam -Ice Cube, the vaccine and COVID - #poopypants THANK YOU FOR THE SUPPORT ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- CHAPTERS BBL vs Relationship (20:05) Amazon Truck Sex (25:00) Michael Myers is homophobic (28:50) Shogun wants his $2000 (36:25) Shogun's Halloween (41:30) The Last Duel controversy (45:23) Will Smith (47:30) Paul vs Tyson (54:32) THE RUNDOWN (59:53) Coupon scam gets you 12 yrs in prison (1:08:38) UBI follow up (1:17:13) Tik Toker murders wife (1:21:34) The Alzheimer scam (1:25:33) Ice Cube, the vaccine and Covid (1:51:21) #poopypants

Micromobility
123: Andrew Yang and the future of politics, transport and micromobility

Micromobility

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 32:12


This week we're releasing the first of the content from the recent Micromobility America conference. In this interview, Lauren Goode from Wired interviews Andrew Yang who was one of the headline speakers. Lauren and Andrew talk about Forward, his new American political party, before moving on to talk about role of micromobility in the future of transport. It's a great conversation and we in the team really appreciate it when politicians have such progressive takes and are willing to embrace technology in transport like this.Specifically they dig into: - Andrew's new political party, Forward, and why its important- How local, state and federal regulations play a part in Micromobility's future- How many scooters Andrew owns- Why micromobility is important for health, both mental and physical- The need for cities to better accomodate these new modes- Why he likes small companies and innovation, and why micromobility is well suited to this- The challenges of electrifying other parts of the fleets. - The links between UBI and micromobility

Wealth Power & Influence with Jason Stapleton
Predictions: What the Next 24 Months Might Look Like

Wealth Power & Influence with Jason Stapleton

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 84:52


As inflation begins to set in and supply chains start breaking down, the White House says these are all good signs and there's only good times ahead.Well, that may be true for some people.We're moving into a world of sharply divided classes, the have's at the top and have-not's at the bottom.Those on the bottom will be dependent upon the system because they didn't take the steps necessary to secure their own liberty.*******If you're ready to take control of your life, income, and future, go to www.nomadnetwork.app and join the Nomad Network to get started. Brand new app in app stores now!Give your business an unfair advantage in less than 3 minutes a day. Get the daily newsletter that delivers the most actionable and tactical growth strategies available today, straight from the mind of a marketing genius: http://dailyalchemy.me.Learn the blueprint for generating predictable and sustainable income from anywhere on earth: http://www.nomadicwealthoffer.com.Jason on Twitter: https://twitter.com/jason_stapletonJason on IG: https://www.instagram.com/thejasonstapletonJason's website: https://jasonstapleton.comMatt on Twitter: https://twitter.com/realkingpilledDon't forget to like and subscribe, and please share the show!

Public lecture podcasts
Is basic income the right response to future needs?

Public lecture podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 55:13


What is wrong with our welfare state and what can we do to fix it? Is UBI an answer, or hopelessly unrealistic? UBI vs reformed welfare states and better public services – is there a trade off? With Andrew Fisher, Clare McNeil, Paul Mason and Kate Soper. Chaired by Neal Lawson. This event took place as part of the University of Bath Institute for Policy Research (IPR) and Bristol Ideas conference, 'Is it time for Universal Basic Income?': https://www.bristolideas.co.uk/attend/is-it-time-for-universal-basic-income/ This event took place on 6 October 2021.

Public lecture podcasts
What is the relationship between UBI and monetary and fiscal policy?

Public lecture podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 58:53


The Covid pandemic has seen governments spending big to keep households afloat and to prevent mass unemployment. Central Banks have injected trillions to prevent the global economy from sinking into depression. If we can afford to tackle the Covid crisis, why can't we afford a UBI? Can we issue Sovereign Money, that doesn't have to be financed by government debt? And does the era of digital Central Bank currencies mean that we can pay individuals a UBI directly, into digital wallets or accounts? With Bernhard Neumärker and Thomas Palley. Chaired by Paola Subacchi. This event took place as part of the University of Bath Institute for Policy Research (IPR) and Bristol Ideas conference, 'Is it time for Universal Basic Income?': https://www.bristolideas.co.uk/attend/is-it-time-for-universal-basic-income/ This event took place on 6 October 2021.

Public lecture podcasts
How do we build a new welfare state after COVID-19?

Public lecture podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 65:38


The pandemic has had a fundamental impact on lives, work and economies. Welfare states around the world have faced huge challenges. What have the lessons been in the UK and internationally? And is it time for a radical renewal with UBI? With Young Jun Choi, Sarath Davala, S Mahendra Dev and Cleo Goodman. Chaired by Jane Millar. This event took place as part of the University of Bath Institute for Policy Research (IPR) and Bristol Ideas conference, 'Is it time for Universal Basic Income?': https://www.bristolideas.co.uk/attend/is-it-time-for-universal-basic-income/ This event took place on 6 October 2021.

Public lecture podcasts
Will technological change make UBI inevitable?

Public lecture podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 31:29


Many economists argue that technology is reducing wages and income from work. Others believe that automation and the Fourth Industrial Revolution will inexorably reduce the demand for the labour. If we can't get an adequate income from employment, do we need UBI to maintain incomes in technologically advanced societies? With Kate Bell and Anna Dent. Chaired by Gavin Kelly. Part of the University of Bath Institute for Policy Research (IPR) and Bristol Ideas conference, 'Is it time for Universal Basic Income?': https://www.bristolideas.co.uk/attend/is-it-time-for-universal-basic-income/ This event took place on 6 October 2021.

Yang Daily - Andrew Yang News
Episode 447 – 10/24 – Democracy bustered, Employers won‘t hire, Worldcoin, NY ballot, Shane puts screws to Chuck, and More!

Yang Daily - Andrew Yang News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 7:04


In today's episode: The GOP filibusters the democracy reform and, presumably, puppies, Employers complain there are no workers while refusing to hire applicants, OpenAI's head of research is working on a new UBI crypto token, New Yorkers get a number of democracy issues to vote on, Shane and Paige put the screws to Chuck, and More! Links and transcript found here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1S4uP8_UNaDjTczWgnbJ9kyg8Lnp-UB6GXY4Gh5-scCs/edit?usp=sharing Help make this podcast possible at: https://www.patreon.com/YangDaily Message me @YangDailyCast or YangDailyPodcast@gmail.com! YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcx_EbiZhhRhvvjFdZryPCQ/videos

The Reason Interview With Nick Gillespie
Andrew Yang: 'Political Violence Is Becoming More and More of an Inevitability'

The Reason Interview With Nick Gillespie

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 40:41


The former presidential candidate talks about UBI, race relations, ranked-choice voting, his new political party Forward, and how "the duopoly is killing us."

Hidden Forces
Andrew Yang on His Forward Party and the Rise of a New Political Consensus

Hidden Forces

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 46:12


In Episode 215 of Hidden Forces, Demetri Kofinas speaks with 2020 Presidential candidate and Founder of the Forward Party, Andrew Yang. Yang is perhaps best known for popularizing the idea of universal basic income, what he called “the freedom dividend” during his run for president in 2020. He recently launched “the Forward Party,” a political party focused on breaking what Andrew sees as a two-party duopoly that is no longer working and whose members and policies have fallen increasingly out of favor with the majority of Americans. He details many of his policy proposals in his new book “Forward,” including ranked-choice voting, open primaries, term limits, campaign reform, and of course universal basic income: one-thousand dollars for every man and woman in America. Demetri spent most of the first half of their conversation asking Andrew Yang about his experience on the campaign trail, what it was like to run for president, and what it taught him about the American political system and how to go viral in today's attention economy. The overtime is where Kofinas really had the opportunity to dig into Yang's policy platform. They discussed Andrew's UBI proposal, its potential impact on inflation, and how to implement such a policy without making politics even more transactional than it is today. They also discuss how to crack the gerontocracy that currently exists in Washington, the misaligned incentives in our news media, as well as how Andrew Yang thinks blockchain and distributed ledger technology can be leveraged for the public good and why crypto is a potential path to universal basic income. If you enjoy the free content we produce every week, we encourage you to take the leap and become a premium subscriber, if you haven't already. There's no commitment. You can cancel at any time and the entire library of subscriber content going all the way back to Episode 1 becomes instantly available to you, including the overtimes, afterthoughts, transcripts, and rundowns, depending on your tier. You can access the second part of this episode, as well as the transcript and rundown to this week's conversation through the Hidden Forces Patreon Page. All subscribers gain access to our premium feed, which can be easily added to your favorite podcast application. If you enjoyed listening to today's episode of Hidden Forces you can help support the show by doing the following: Subscribe on Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | SoundCloud | YouTube | CastBox | RSS Feed Write us a review on Apple Podcasts Subscribe to our mailing list through the Hidden Forces Website Producer & Host: Demetri Kofinas Editor & Engineer: Stylianos Nicolaou Subscribe & Support the Podcast at https://patreon.com/hiddenforces Join the conversation on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter at @hiddenforcespod Follow Demetri on Twitter at @Kofinas Episode Recorded on 10/11/2021

百靈果NEWS
油價暴漲、韓國總統候選人希望人人有錢拿、理查吉爾不受全中共歡迎、 讀書會: 吃佛 Eat The Buddha 03

百靈果NEWS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 42:47


國際原油價格暴漲、韓國執政黨推出的總統候選人推出 UBI 大餅 根本從楊安澤偷過來的 「百貨年度購物盛會-新光三越週年慶10/7開跑囉!」 首波六店,化妝品單筆滿2000送200,全館累計滿5000送500,使用五倍券還有機會送10倍 將5萬元禮券帶回家! 到店買不夠,回家上網繼續買! skm online同步線上週年慶,消費輸入專屬折扣碼[KKSHOW100],滿2,000再折100!快來新光三越一次掌握所有優惠!

The Munk Debates Podcast
Be it resolved: The pandemic has proven UBI's time has come

The Munk Debates Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 47:46


While the conversation around a universal basic income - a government program which provides every adult with regular cash payments - has gained traction in recent years, the COVID-19 pandemic turned the fringe experimental program into a reality for millions of people around the globe. Facing skyrocketing unemployment and an impending economic crisis, some governments decided to act swiftly and without conditions: they transferred cash directly into the hands of all their citizens - regardless of age, income, or geography. Proponents of UBI see the pandemic era handouts as proof that the program works. COVID-19 exacerbated income inequality and sped up technological innovation which disproportionately hurt lower wage earners and marginalized communities. Direct cash payments offered financial security to society's most vulnerable and helped transform the broken relationship between individuals and the labour market. It bought precious time and resources for those seeking new economic opportunities in a rapidly-changing workforce. Critics worry that UBI disincentivizes work and rewards indolence. They point to pandemic recovery rehiring difficulties as proof that getting cash handouts without strings attached encourages people to stay out of the workforce all together. Re-positioning government into the role of economic provider threatens individual aspiration for self-reliance and betterment. Furthermore, the already well-off do not need to benefit from cash handouts. If the government wants to address racial and economic injustices it would have much more success by enriching already existing social welfare programs that target those most in need. Arguing for the motion is Scott Santens, Senior Advisor to Humanity Forward and Editor of Basic Income Today. Arguing against the motion is Oren Cass, executive director of American Compass and author of The Once and Future Worker: A Vision for the Renewal of Work in America. QUOTES: SCOTT SANTENS “Basic income is an acknowledgement that everyone has basic needs, and we should make sure that those absolute most basic needs are being met at all times.” OREN CASS “It has always been an American tradition to value reciprocity, and a universal basic income runs directly against that.” Sources: ABC News, Global, Yang Speaks, CNBC, Newzroom Afrika The host of the Munk Debates is Rudyard Griffiths - @rudyardg.   Tweet your comments about this episode to @munkdebate or comment on our Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/munkdebates/ To sign up for a weekly email reminder for this podcast, send an email to podcast@munkdebates.com. To support civil and substantive debate on the big questions of the day, consider becoming a Munk Member at https://munkdebates.com/membership Members receive access to our 10+ year library of great debates in HD video, a free Munk Debates book, newsletter and ticketing privileges at our live events. This podcast is a project of the Munk Debates, a Canadian charitable organization dedicated to fostering civil and substantive public dialogue - https://munkdebates.com/ The Munk Debates podcast is produced by Antica, Canada's largest private audio production company - https://www.anticaproductions.com/   Executive Producer: Stuart Coxe, CEO Antica Productions Senior Producer: Ricki Gurwitz Editor: Kieran Lynch Associate Producer: Abhi Raheja

Yang Daily - Andrew Yang News
Episode 442 – 10/9 – Global, national, local, and celebrity UBI! Oh my! And RCV in MI, Philly, and Twitter!

Yang Daily - Andrew Yang News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 6:02


In today's episode: Think 20 proposes global UBI, funded by transaction, wealth, and carbon taxes, Japan's new Prime Minister considers cash relief, Civil Rights leader writes book proposing simple UBI, Grimes supports UBI, RCV efforts ongoing in Michigan and Philly, and Forward Party asks Twitter to implement RCV polling! Links and transcript found here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1qCAQJRzUw4wkiJs48p3_AkB5lC19UKK8uV1fSdpedkQ/edit?usp=sharing Help make this podcast possible at: https://www.patreon.com/YangDaily Message me @YangDailyCast or YangDailyPodcast@gmail.com! YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcx_EbiZhhRhvvjFdZryPCQ/videos

Nintendo Switch UK Podcast
A Cloudy Kingdom - Episode 134

Nintendo Switch UK Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 67:57


We are finally getting Kingdom Hearts in all its glory, with one huge caveat...it's cloud based! Mike and Al discuss this, GTA, Smash and much more.Grand Theft Auto The Trilogy The Definitive EditionBonito DaysKathy Rain, The Director's CutCosmicAAA ClockFinal Smash Fighter announced as Sora from Kingdom HeartsKingdom Hearts HD 1.5 & 2.5 ReMixKingdom Hearts HD 2.8 Final chapter PrologueKingdom Hearts IIIKingdom Hearts Integrum Masterpiece collectionPokémon Legends: ArceusCozy GrovePathwaysAsdivine CollectionXexexSupport the show (http://www.patreon.com/nsukp)

Ditch The Quick Fix
The Invisible Cure: The Resurgence Of Ultraviolet Light Irradiation With Tom Lowe

Ditch The Quick Fix

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 32:04


Our mission here at Ditch the Quick Fix is to shed light on viable options that will help you make better decisions on your health.One such option is Ultraviolet Light Irradiation Therapy, commonly known as UBI Therapy.And to better understand it, I am joined by the leading UBI expert, Tom Lowe, to discuss what this therapy is all about and how it can be used by practitioners at their clinics and also ordinary people.Tom has spent the last decade researching and revamping the UBI therapy to make it easier and quicker to use.In fact, he has recently published a book, The Invisible Cure: The Resurgence of Ultraviolet Light Irradiation, to help people understand this cheap but incredibly powerful therapy.UBI therapy has been around for close to 100 years. Individuals with autoimmune diseases and chronic infections have positive responses to this therapy.So, how does this therapy work?Tune in, and let's learn how we can integrate this valuable therapy into our health options!Key Takeaways- Tom's journey (02:03)- The history behind UBI (04:25)- The healing power of UBI therapy (11:23)- How UBI therapy works (14:51)- The invisible cure book (16:56)- UV light germicidal properties (18:36)- UBI therapy on mental disorders (25:11)Additional ResourcesGet Tom's book and learn more about UBI Therapy here-----ditchthequickfix.com/Do you want to improve your physical health? Learn More Here---------You can find the podcast on Apple, Google, Spotify, Stitcher, or wherever you listen to podcasts.If you haven't already, please rate and review the podcast on Apple Podcasts!

Karen Hunter Show
Andrew Yang - Former Presidential Candidate; Author of Forward

Karen Hunter Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 27:03


Iin Forward, Yang reveals that UBI and the threat of job automation are only the beginning, diagnosing how a series of cascading problems within our antiquated systems keeps us stuck in the past—imperiling our democracy at every level. With America's stagnant institutions failing to keep pace with technological change, we grow more polarized as tech platforms supplant our will while feasting on our data. Yang introduces us to the various “priests of the decline” of America, including politicians whose incentives have become divorced from the people they supposedly serve. The machinery of American democracy is failing, Yang argues, and we need bold new ideas to rewire it for twenty-first-century problems. Inspired by his experience running for office and as an entrepreneur, and by ideas drawn from leading thinkers, Yang offers a series of solutions, including data rights, ranked-choice voting, and fact-based governance empowered by modern technology, writing that “there is no cavalry”—it's up to us. This is a powerful and urgent warning that we must step back from the brink and plot a new way forward for our democracy.

Making Sense with Sam Harris
#262 — The Future of American Democracy

Making Sense with Sam Harris

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 33:04


In this episode of the podcast, Sam Harris speaks with Andrew Yang about the state of American democracy. They discuss Andrew's run for the Presidency, the humiliations of campaigning, the manipulation of politics by the media, Andrew's run for the mayor's office in NYC, the power of bad incentives, open primaries, rank-choice voting, the Forward Party, the weakness of a two-party system, inequality, the child tax credit, enhanced unemployment, UBI, worries about inflation, and other topics. SUBSCRIBE to listen to the rest of this episode and gain access to all full-length episodes of the podcast at samharris.org/subscribe.   Learning how to train your mind is the single greatest investment you can make in life. That's why Sam Harris created the Waking Up app. From rational mindfulness practice to lessons on some of life's most important topics, join Sam as he demystifies the practice of meditation and explores the theory behind it.

Nintendo Switch UK Podcast
Stick A 4K In It - Episode 133

Nintendo Switch UK Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 46:37


Rumours are abound that a 4K dev kit is out there, but are we getting 4K? We've got all the latest news, reviews, rumours and chat in this week's episode with Anton, Mike and Al.GAMES WE TALK ABOUT INCLUDE:Victory Heat RallyFiregirl: Hack ‘n Splash RescueA Boy and His BlobDungeon EncountersAtelier Sophie 2: The Alchemist of the Mysterious DreamHorizon Chase TurboBayonetta 3Mario Party SuperstarsSuper Monkey BallFall GuysDisney Classic Games CollectionLEGO Super Mario 64Sin ChronicleGrand Theft Auto: The Trilogy – The Definitive EditionKonamiSupport the show (http://www.patreon.com/nsukp)

Jim Nog Pod
#025 - Stephanie Gaitán

Jim Nog Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 122:50


Stephanie Gaitán is a writer, editor, and mother from the Bronx whose work has been featured in 433. Her past-times include laughing, sharing photos of cute everything with her friends, and binge-watching childhood TV shows with her daughter. Her work has also been featured in Stone of Madness Press, Voyage YA, and Palabritas, and she has work forthcoming in LaLibreta. You can find her on Twitter @GaitanWrites and on Instagram @JupiterGaitan. On this episode, we discuss the value of writing workshops and MFA programs, Stephanie's academic background, her passions, depression, effects of social media on society, our personal politics, socialism vs capitalism, UBI, SF movies and series that have influenced us, mixed identity, post-colonialism, the writing process, and much more. She also reads from an upcoming work titled “Hood Phantom.”  Episodes are also posted on Youtube on a new channel, Jim Nog Pod.  Currently, I am a one-man show. JNP takes a lot of effort and time. Please show your support via Patreon.com/jimnog. Timestamps: 0:00 - Intro song 0:44 - Introduction 2:20 - Start of convo; about Stephanie 3:44 - 433 (magazine) 6:15 - Stephanie's creative writing background 12:02 - MFA programs and independent writing workshops 18:12 - About Stephanie's story “Neutron Star" 20:10 - Stephanie's academic background 25:00 - Stephanie's biggest passions 27:00 - Depression 31:12 - Therapy and mental health 35:55 - Effects of social media on society 41:59 - How to social media better 46:12 - Stephanie's politics 49:11 - Jim's politics 50:33 - How to define hard work 52:43 - Tax the rich 56:34 - UBI 1:02:22 - Star Trek: TNG 1:03:03 - Dr. Who 1:04:30 - HHGG 1:07:28 - Major Cow scene and philosophy 1:12:58 - Other influences (writers) 1:16:45 - Other influences (movies and series) 1:22:52 - Language learning 1:24:14 - Transracial Jimin 1:30:34 - Mixed racial identity 1:32:13 - Defensiveness & post-colonialism 1:36:12 - Stephanie reads her poem "Hood Phantom" 1:38:16 - Discussion of poem 1:42:52 - A story from Jim about artifice 1:45:34 - Stereotypes of hiphop heads 1:46:49 - Good writing in hiphop 1:48:24 - Stephanie's writing process 1:50:55 - Jim's writing process (w/ examples from others) 1:53:38 - Writers and cats 1:54:30 - Vegetarianism and pets 1:55:20 - NaNoWriMo 1:56:32 - Stephanie's parting message; being a "good writer" 2:01:04 - Outro song & some words about next time 2:02:11 - Credits Jim's Socials: - Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jimnog/ - Twitter: https://twitter.com/jimnog - Website: http://www.jamesnoguera.com References: - 433: https://www.fourthreethree.org - When We Make It by Elizabeth Velasquez: https://amzn.to/3uTML84 - "Forbidden Words (#TTR)" by Marcos de la Guagua: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5iNIiLOUhM8 

Wealth Power & Influence with Jason Stapleton
Troubles, Troubles Everywhere: Inflation, Censorship, and Default

Wealth Power & Influence with Jason Stapleton

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 86:01


Inflation is here.The $4 trillion bailout in 2020 basically went straight into the economy, and now prices are soaring. Meanwhile, Janet Yellen is talking about taxing *unrealized* capital gains, and medical offices around the country are firing unvaccinated medical professionals after spending months freaking out about locking down to prevent the medical industry from being overwhelmed.The "experts" who "run" this country are a bunch of incoherent morons. They're doing everything they can to run the country into the ground and squeeze every last little bit of personal gain they can get out of it.We're headed toward a tiered society where the have-nots are completely dependent upon the system and everything that entails. You won't want to be a have-not. Everyone who listens this show will be better equipped to navigate the future, no matter how bad the crisis gets.******If you're ready to take control of your life, income, and future, go to http://controlthesource.com and join the Nomad Network to get started. Brand new app in app stores now!Give your business an unfair advantage in less than 3 minutes a day. Get the daily newsletter that delivers the most actionable and tactical growth strategies available today, straight from the mind of a marketing genius: http://dailyalchemy.me.Learn the blueprint for generating predictable and sustainable income from anywhere on earth: http://www.nomadicwealthoffer.com.Jason on Twitter: https://twitter.com/jason_stapletonJason on IG: https://www.instagram.com/thejasonstapletonJason's website: https://jasonstapleton.comMatt on Twitter: https://twitter.com/realkingpilledDon't forget to like and subscribe, and please share the show!

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
Could Using the Right Multi-Factor Authentication Save You?

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 83:13


Could Using the Right Multi-Factor Authentication Save You? I had a good friend who, this week, had his life's work stolen from him. Yeah. And you know what caused it? It was his password. Now, you know what you're supposed to be doing? I'm going to tell you exactly what to do right now. Let's get right down to the whole problem with passwords. I'm going to tell you a little bit about my friend this week. He has been building a business for. Maybe going on 10 years now, and this business relies on advertising. Most companies do so in some way; we need to have new customers. There's always some attrition. Some customers go away. So how do we keep them? We do what we can. How do we get new customers? For him, it was. Advertising, primarily on Facebook. He did some Google ads as well, but Facebook is really where he was focused. So how did he do all of that? Here's the bottom line you have to, if you are going to be advertising on Facebook, you have to have an advertising account. The same thing's true. Google. And then, on that account, you tie in either your bank account or your credit card. I recommend a credit card so that those transactions can be backed up. And on top of all of that now, of course, you have to use a pixel. So the way the tracking works is there are pixels on websites, about those already. And the bottom line with the pixels. Those are also. Cookies are about the pixels are used to set a cookie so that Facebook knows what sites you've gone to. So he uses those. I use those. In fact, if you go to my website, I have a Facebook pixel that gets set. And the reason for all of that is so that we know with. I'd be interested in something on the site. So I know that there are many people interested in this page or that page. And so I could, I have not ever, but I could now do some advertising. I could send ads to you so that if you were looking at something particular, you'd see ads related to that, which I've always said. It is the right way to go. If I'm looking to buy a pickup truck, I love to see ads for different pickup trucks, but if I don't want a car or truck, I don't want to see the ads. It isn't like TV where it sometimes seems every other ad is about. Car or a pickup truck. It drives me crazy because it's a waste of their money in advertising to me. After all, I don't want those things. And it's also not only just annoying in money-wasting. There are better ways to do targeting. And that's what the whole online thing is. Anyways, I told you about that because he had set up this pixel years ago. Basically, the Facebook pixel gets to know you. All of the people who like you that might've bought from you. Cause you can have that pixel track people through your site, your purchase site, they know what you purchase on the shopping cart, et cetera. And you can identify these people over on Facebook and their ads because they abandoned the cart or whatever it is you want to do there. So there's just a whole ton of stuff that you can do for these people. And it's so bad. It is so valuable. It takes years to build up that account. Years to put that pixel in place. And our friend here, he had done precisely that. Then he found that his account had been compromised. And that is a terrible thing in this case because the bad guy used his account to place ads. So now there are really two or three problems here. We'll talk about one of them. Why was the bad guy going after him? He has been running ads on Facebook for a long time. So as far as Facebook is concerned, his account is credible. All of the ads he runs don't have to be reviewed by a human being. They can go up almost immediately. He doesn't have to wait days for some of these things to go up. So our bad guy can get an account like his that has years' worth of advertising credibility and now start advertising things that are not correct. So there again is part of the value of having one of these older accounts for advertising. And so the bad guy did that use his credibility. And then secondly, he used 25 grand worth of my friend's money to run ads. Also, of course, very bad, very bad. So I sat down with him. In fact, it was this last week, and I was out on a trip with just a vacation trip. It was absolutely fantastic. I never just do vacation. It's always business plus work whenever I do anything like this, but I was on a trip last week. And so my eldest son who works closely with me, and he's also part of the FBI InfraGard program. So I had him reach out to my friend, and he helped them out, and they talked back and forth. So here's the problem that he has. And I'm trying to figure out a perfect way to solve this. And I haven't figured that out yet. And if you guys have an idea because you are the best and brightest, you really are. So go ahead and drop me an email at me@craigpeterson.com if a good way around this particular problem, which is he has. This Facebook could count and many other accounts, including his website, hosting account, email account, et cetera. And. He has people who manage his ads for him. Who operates his website for him, who put up some promotions, advertising, and everything else. So these are third-party. This is what we generically call a supply chain, risk people who are not him have access to his stuff, his private property. And how does he do it, or how did he do it? Is he went ahead and gave them. Access by giving them accounts or passwords. How well were they guarding their passwords and their accounts? So the first thing I had my friend do was going to haveIbeenpwned.com. I had him put in his email address, the one he uses the most, and it showed up in five different. Hacks data dumps. So these are five various sites where he had used that same email address in this case. And he found out that in those five cases, the bad guy's got his passwords and personal information. All bad. And he went ahead and cleaned it up. So I said put in the password because have I been, pwned also let you check your password, just see if it has been used by someone else and then stolen. So there are billions of passwords in this database. It's incredible of all of these known passwords. So he put in his password, and no, it had not been stolen, but the problem is how about the people that were managing his ads on Facebook and managing his Facebook ad. We're the usernames, which are typically the email addresses and the passwords kept securely. That's a supply chain thing I'm talking about, and that's where I'd love to get him. But from you guys, me@craigpeterson.com. If you think you have a good answer, What we've been doing. And our advice to him was use one password. That's the only one to use. I don't trust last pass anymore. After their last big hack where they got hacked one password, the digit one password. And go ahead. And set it up. And in a business scenario, you can have multiple vaults. So have a vault. That's just for people that are dealing with your Facebook ad account, maybe have another vault for people who are posting for you on Facebook. Or better yet when it comes to Facebook, go ahead and have an intermediary that is trusted the, if this, then that, or there's a few of them out there that can see that you put the post up on the website and automatically posted on Facebook. So you don't have to get. All of these people, your passwords, but again, it's up to you. You got to figure out if that makes sense to you that those are the types of things that I think you can do. And that is what we do as well. Now, one of the beauties of using one password like that, where you're not sharing all of your passwords to everything you're sharing, the minimum amount of login information that you possibly can share is that if they leave your employees, All you have to do is remove their access to the appropriate vault or vaults, or maybe all of your vaults. And this is what I've done with people that worked for me in the US and people would work for me overseas, and there have been a lot of them and it has worked quite well for me. So with one pass, We can enforce password integrity. We can make sure the passwords on stolen. One password ties automatically into have I been postponed. If a password has been exposed, if it's been stolen online, it's a great way to go. Now I've got an offer for you guys who are listening. I have a special report that I've sold before on passwords, and it goes through talks about one password. He talks about the last pass, which I'm no longer really recommending, but give some comparisons and how you can use these things. Make sure you go and email me right now. Me, Me@craigpeterson.com. That's ME at Craig Peterson dot com and just ask me for the password special report, and I'll be glad to get that on-off to you. There is a lot of good detail in there and helps you, whether you're a home user or a business. So the next step in your security is multi-factor authentication. Interesting study out saying that about 75% of people say that they've used it for work or for business, but the hard numbers, I don't think they agree One of the things that you have to do is use good passwords. And the best way to do that is to use a password manager. I was talking about a friend of mine who had been hacked this last week and his account was hacked. His Facebook ad account was hacked. We asked him if we could reach out to. BI and he said, sure. So we checked with the FBI and they're looking to turn this into a case, a real case, because they've never seen this type of thing, the hijacking of an advertising account who hijacked it. And why did they hide jacket? Was this in preparation maybe for. Playing around with manipulating our next election cycle coming up. There could be a lot of things that they're planning on doing and taking over my friend's account would be a great way to have done it. So maybe they're going to do other things here. And our friends at the FBI are looking into it. How now do you also keep your data safe? Easily simply. When we're talking about these types of accounts, the thing to look at is known as two factor authentication or multifactor authentication. You see my friend, if he had been using multi-factor authentication. I would not have been vulnerable. Even if the bad guys had his username, email address and his password, they still would not be able to log in without having that little six-digit code. That's the best way to do multi-factor authentication. When we're talking about this code, whether it's four or 5, 6, 8 digits long, we should not be using our cell phones to receive those. At least not as text messages, those have a problem because our phone numbers can be stolen from us and they are stolen from us. So if we're a real target, in other words, they're going after you. Joe Smith and they know you have some, $2 million in your account. So they're going after you while they can, in most cases, take control of your phone. Now you might not know it and it doesn't have to be hacked. All they have to do is have the phone company move your phone number to a new phone. Once. So that means one of the things you need to do is contact your telephone vendor, whoever it is, who's providing new that service. That's a company like Verizon sprint T-Mobile a T and Tone of those companies that are giving you cell service, you have to contact them and set up a pass. So that if they have a phone call coming in and that phone call can be faked. So it looks like it's coming from your phone, even if there was a phone call coming in, whether it's coming from your phone or not, they have to get that password or passcode that you gave them. And once they have that passcode now, and that's great, but if you don't have that in there targeting you specifically, then you're in trouble. So for many of us really it may not make a huge difference. But I would do it anyways. I have done it with every one of my cell phone carriers now. A couple of decades set up a password. So the next step is this multifactor authentication. If I'm not supposed to get it via text message to my phone, how do I get it? There are a couple of apps out there. There's a free one called Google authentic. And Google authenticator runs on your phone. And once it's there on your phone and you are setting it up on a website, so Facebook, for instance, your bank, most websites out there, the bigger ones, all you have to do is say, I want to set up multi-factor authentication, and then it'll ask you a case. So how do you want to do it? And you can say, I want an app and they will display. A Q R code. That's one of those square codes with a bunch of little lines inside of it. You're seeing QR codes before they become very common. And you take your phone with the Google authenticator app. Take a picture. Of that little QR code on the screen, and now it will start sinking up so that every 30 seconds Google authenticator on your phone will change that number. So when you need to log back into that website, it's going to ask you for the code. You just pull up Google authenticator and there's the code. So that's the freeway to do it. And not necessarily the easiest way to. Again, going back to one password. I use this thing exclusively. It is phenomenal for keeping my passwords, keeping them all straight and then encrypted vault, actually in multiple encrypted vault it's so that I can share some of them. Some of them are just strictly private, but it also has that same authenticator functionality built right into it. Microsoft has its own authenticator, but you can tell Microsoft that you want to use the standard authenticator. Of course, Microsoft has to do everything differently. But you can tell it. And I do tell it, I want to use a regular authenticator app, not Microsoft authenticator. By the way. That's why I advise you to don't use the Microsoft authenticator, just use one authenticator for all of the sites, and then Microsoft will give you that same QR code. And then you can take that picture and you're off and running. Next time you log in, it asks you for the code and instead of texting it to you to your phone smarter, otherwise it will not. That require you to open up your authenticator. So for me, for instance, when I'm logging into a website, it comes up and asks for the username, asked for the password. Both of those are filled out automatically by one password for me. And then it asks for that code identification code and. One password automatically puts it into my pace to buffer copy-paste, buffer, and I just paste it in and they've got the code. So I don't have to remember the codes. I don't remember passwords. I don't have to remember usernames or email addresses. One password remembers them all for me. Plus it'll remember notes and other things. So you can tell, I really one password. We use it with all of our clients. That's what we have for them. And it does meet even a lot of these DOD requirement on top of. Depending again, how much security you need. We will use duo D U O and it also has this authenticator functionality and we will also use UBI keys. These are those hardware key. They do oh, can provide you with hardware tokens. Those are those little tokens that can go onto your key ring. That show a changing six-digit number every 30 seconds. And that's the same number that would be there in your smartphone app. Your one password or Google authenticator smartphone. Hopefully, I didn't confuse you too much. I think most of the reason we're not using the security we should is because we're not sure how to, and we don't know what we're going to be. And I can see that being a big problem. So if you have questions about any of this, if you would like a copy of my password security, special report, just send an email to me. M e@craigpeterson.com. That's me M e@craigpeterson.com. That's S O N.com. I'll be glad to send it to you. Also, if you sign up for my newsletter there on my website@craigpeterson.com, you are going to get. I was hold little series of the special reports to help you out, get you going. And then every week I send out a little bit of training and all of my articles for the week. It's usually six to 10 articles that I consider to be important so that, what's going on in the cybersecurity world. So you can. With it for yourself, for your family, for your business. Craig peterson.com. According to researchers. 32% of teen girls said that when they felt bad about their bodies, Instagram made them feel worse. And you know what Facebook knew and knows Instagram is toxic for teen girls. There's a great article that came out in the Wall Street Journal. And I'm going to read just a little bit here from some of the quotes first. When I went on Instagram, all I saw were images of chiseled bodies, perfect. Abs and women doing 100 burpees in 10 minutes, said, Ms.  Now 18, who lives in Western Virginia. Amazing. Isn't it. The one that I opened now with 32% of teen girls said that when they felt bad about their bodies, Instagram, I made them feel worse. So that is studies again, that looks like yeah, these were researchers inside Instagram and they said this in a March, 2020 slide presentation that was posted to Facebook's internal message board that was reviewed by the wall street journal quote comparisons on Instagram can change how young women view and describe themselves. Apparently, for the past three years, Facebook has been conducting studies into how Instagram is affecting its millions of young users. Now, for those of you who don't know what Instagram is, it allows these users to create little stories, to have. Pictures videos of things that they're doing, and it's a lifestyle type thing you might've heard, of course, of how this I don't know what it is. Kidnapping murder plot. These, this young couple and the body I think was found up in Wyoming. I'm trying to remember, but of her and it's yeah, there it is. It wasn't my OMI. And I'm looking up right now, Gabby potato. That's who it is. She was what they called a micro influence. And I know a lot of people who can loom, that's what they want to be. There's a young lady that stayed with us for a few months. She had no other place to live. And so we invited her in here and we got some interesting stories to tell about that experience. And it's, a little sad, but anyhow, she got back up on her feet and then she decided she was going to become an influence. And what an influencer is someone that has a lot of followers. And of course, a lot means different numbers. You get these massive influencers that have tens of millions of people that quote, follow unquote them. And of course, just think of the Kardashians they're famous for. Being famous, nothing else. They have subsequently done some pretty amazing things. At least a few of them have. We've got one of those daughters who now was the first earliest billionaire. I think it was ever youngest. So they have accomplished some amazing things after the fact, but they got started. By just becoming famous by posting on these social media sites. So you get a micro-influencer, like Gabby Petito, who is out there posting things and pictures. And you look at all of these pictures and, oh my gosh, they're up at this national park. Oh, isn't she so cute. I'll look at her boyfriend. They'll look so good together and people. Fall for that image, right? It's just like Photoshopping these pictures of models, changing them. There've been some real complaints about those over the years. So Instagram sets these kids up with these pictures of people that are just totally unrealistic. One of the slides from a 2019 presentation says, quote, we make body. Excuse me. We make body image issues worse for one in three teenage girls teams, blame Instagram for increases in the rate of anxiety. And depression said another slide. This reaction was unprompted and consistent across. Groups among teens is this according to the wall street journal who reported suicidal thoughts, 13% of British users, and 6% of American users trace the desire to kill themselves to Instagram. Again, according to one of these presentations, isn't this just absolutely amazing. And you might've heard it discussed a little bit. I saw some articles about it, obviously in the news wall street journal had it, but this is a $100 billion company, Instagram. That's what their annual revenues. More than 40% of Instagram users are 22 years old and younger. And about 22 million teens log into Instagram in the US each day, compared with 5 million that log into Facebook, the younger users have been declining. Facebook it's getting the population there is getting older and older on Facebook. In average teens in the us spend 50% more time on Instagram than they do on Facebook. And also tick-tock, by the way I took talk has now surpassed YouTube in some of these metrics. Quote, Instagram is well-positioned to resonate and win with young people said a researcher's slide posted internally. Inside Facebook. Another post said there is a path to growth. If Instagram can continue their trajectory. Amazing. So Facebook's public phase has really tried to downplay all of these negative effects that the Instagram app has on teens, particularly girls, and hasn't made its research public or available to academics or lawmakers who have asked for it. Quote, the research that we've seen is that using social apps to connect with other people. Positive mental health benefits said Mark Zuckerberg. He's the CEO of course of Facebook. Now this was 2020. In March one at a congressional hearing, he was asked about children and mental health. So you see how he really lawyered the words that they can have positive mental health benefits, but Facebook's own internal research seems to show that they know it has a profound negative effect on a large percentage of their users. Instagram had Adam Moseri told reporters in may of this year, that research he had seen suggest the app's effect on team's wellbeing is likely quote quite small. So what the wall street journal seems to be pointing out here is that Facebook is not giving us the truth on any of this stuff. It's really sad. We've got to be careful. No, apparently Mr. Moseri also said that he's been pushing very hard for Facebook to really take their responsibilities more broadly. He says they're proud of this research. I'm just summarizing this before we run out of time here, but it shows the document. Internal documents on Facebook show that they are having a major impact on teen, mental health, political discourse, and even human trafficking. These, this internal research offers an unparalleled picture. Courtney told the wall street journal of how Facebook is acutely aware that the products and systems central to its business success routine. Fail great article. I've got it in this week's newsletter. You can just open it up and click through on the link to the wall street journal. They have a paywall and I hate to use payroll articles, but this one's well worth it. And they do give you some free articles every month. So if you're not on that newsletter, you can sign up right now. Craig peterson.com. You'll get the next one. If you miss a link today, if you want some, the special report on passwords, et cetera, just email me directly. Give me a few days to respond. But me M e@craigpeterson.com. That's me M e@craigpeterson.com. We've all worked from home from time to time. At least if we're somehow in the information it industry, I want to talk right now about why you need a personal laptop. Even if the business is providing you with a laptop. Laptops are something that was designed to be personal, but many of us are using them as our main computer. I know I often am using my laptop, a couple of my kids and my wife. It's really their main computer, even though they all have other computers that they could potentially be using, laptops are just handy and you have them with, you can take them with you. We've got workstation set up that are kind of. Workstations, if you will, where there are three screens set up and they're all hooked up into one central screen controller that then has a USBC connection that goes right into the, your laptop. So you can be sitting there with four screens on your Mac laptop on your mac pro if you need four screens, it's really handy. No question. Many of us have a laptop for home and a laptop for business. And many of us also look at it and say, oh wow, this is a great laptop I got from work. It's much better than my home laptop. And you start to use the business laptop for work. At home. Okay. That's what it's for. Right. But then we start to use that business laptop for personal stuff. That's where the problems start. We've seen surveys out there that are shown. Then half of workers are using work issue devices for personal tasks that might be doing it at home. They might be doing it at the office. Things like personal messages, shopping, online, social media, reading the news. So the prospect of using your work laptop as your only laptop, not just for work, but also for maybe watching some movies, group chat and messaging, reading, fan fiction, paying bills, emailing to family or friend. It just seems not. It's so tempting. It's just natural. I'm on it. I'm on it all day long. Why wouldn't I just use it? And this is particularly true for people who are working from home, but we have to be careful with that. It's really something that you shouldn't be doing for a couple of reasons. One that. Top that's a business. Laptop is the property of the business. It's just like walking home with boxes, full of pencils and paperback in the old days, it is not yours to use for personal use. We also have to assume, assume since it is the company's laptop that hopefully it's been secure. Hopefully they haven't set up. So it's going through a special VPN at the office and it's going through special filters, maybe snort filters or something else. That's doing some deeper inspection on what's coming through your laptop. Well, there are also likely on that laptop. Tools that are monitoring your device. Things like key loggers, biometric tracking, Jill location, software that tracks your web browser and social media behavior, screenshot, snapshot software, maybe even your cam. Is being used to keep track of you. I know a number of the websites that I've used in the past to hire temporary workers. Those workers have to agree to have you monitor what they're doing. These hourly workers, subtle take screenshots of their screen, unbeknownst to them. Pictures from the cameras at random intervals. Again, unbeknownst to them, it'll track what they're doing. And so I can now go in and say, okay, well he billed me five hours for doing this. And I look at his screen and guess what? He wasn't doing that for all of those five hours that he just billed me. Well, the same thing could be true for your company, even if you're not paid by the hour. Right now, we're looking at stats that show over half of the businesses that are providing laptops for the employees to use more than half of them are using monitoring software. And through this whole lockdown, the usage of these different types of monitoring systems has grown. Now there's some of the programs you're using. You might be VPN in, you might be using slack or G suite enterprise, all good little pieces of software. They can monitor that obviously, but it goes all the way through to the business. And using your slack access as paid for, by the businesses also idiotic to do things like send messages to your buddies, set up drinks after work, complain to other people about someone else in the business, your boss, or otherwise your it, people at the business can see all of that. They can see what you're doing with slack. Even if you have a separate personal account. It's still more likely that you'll end up mixing them up if you're logged into both on the same computer. So the bottom line is if you are on a work computer, whether it's a laptop or something else, you can reasonably assume that I T can see everything. That's not. They own it. Okay. And they have to do some of this stuff to protect themselves. We put software on laptops for companies not to spy on employees. That's none of our business, but we put software on computers for employees. To make sure they stay safe. Think of what happens when your computer, your laptop, whatever it might be, connects to the company's network. Now that can be through a VPN. It can be because you take your laptop home or on the road when you're traveling and you bring it back into the office. If that computer is infected, somehow now you've brought that infection into the office. And that's how a lot of the malware works. It goes from computer to computer. So once they get in that front door where there's through a website and email that you clicked on or in a computer that you're bringing into the office, they can start to move around. Now it's not just your activity. And this is an interesting article from the verge by Monica chin. It's not just your activity that they can see on your laptop, but in many cases, they're also able to look at anything you're downloading any of your photographs or videos that you might've sinked up from your smart. Laura loading these types of things, your text messages on your work device for safekeeping, or just because it's your primary device might seem harmless, right? Cause you're just going to remove them before you hand it in. But some companies such as Apple won't allow you to wipe your device before handing it in regardless of how personal the contents are. And that makes sense too, because many times an employee leaves. And they don't give the company all of the information that they have, that they're obliged to give back to their employer. Things that they've been working on, customer information, et cetera. So Manalive, there are plenty of other devices out there. Hopefully if you leave your company with plenty of notice, moving a bunch of things off your work device in the last few days, uh, might raise some eyebrows at the. And I'm saying hopefully, because they should notice that sort of thing, because it could be malicious activity. It could be an insider risk that maybe they're not even aware of. There's so much you could go wrong here. So bottom line don't use the work laptop for home. So what should you use? You know, my personal recommendation. Almost always is get a Mac. They are safer to use the patches that they get are usually not destructive. You know, sometimes you can install a patch for windows and now your machine just won't work anymore. Right. You've had that happen. I know every last one of us out there that are tried to install Microsoft patches for a while have had that happen to them. All of a sudden the patch has completely messed up your computer and you are so out of luck, it's ridiculous. Right? So don't, you know, hopefully don't do that, but I like the max because they are basically safer than windows. And also because the patches just work on them, apple tends to get them out in plenty of time to try and protect us the next level. If he can't afford an apple and. Apple laptops really are not expensive when you consider how long they last and the quality that components, they are not expensive at all. But if you can't afford that, the next thing I would look at is getting a Chromebook. There are a lot of companies that make Chromebooks Chrome is an operating system from Google. It's similar to Android. Google keeps the Chromebooks up-to-date. They patch them quite regularly and make sure that there aren't nastiness is going on. You just have some of the same issues and Android has patches might take a while to get to you because it has to go through the vendor that made the Chromebook. You might have a Chromebook for Sam from Samsung, for instance, it's not Google's even though it's called a Google Chromebook. Now Chromebooks rely heavily on the cloud services that Google provides, but they can also run just locally. So with a Chromebook and you can get them for as little as 150 bucks, but remember you get what you pay for. Or as much as I've seen them in the $2,000 price range with fancy GPU's, local storage and other things, but at 150 bucks, it could be well worth it for you. It lets you do the regular word processing. Just think of what you can do with Google docs, spreadsheets against Google docs, spreadsheets, all of those types of things are built into it. You can. Cruz the web, obviously using Google Chrome on your Chromebook. And send and receive email, which is what most people do. That's really kind of all, most people do at home. So consider that as well. I also like iPad. They are quite safe again, but they tend to be more expensive and they can do pretty much everything. And now with Android support built right into Google Chromebooks, you can even run Android apps. So there you go. Keep safe and be safe out there. Right. Have a hack free life. Make sure you get my newsletter. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. The national cyber director, Chris Inglis said that we need cyber bullets, that cyber bullets are part of the war on hacks. And it makes sense on one level. But when you get into the reality, it's a much different story..  I had an interesting email this week from a listener. Actually he sent it about two weeks ago when I finally was able to get to it this week and responded, and he was pointing out how there are some things that I talk about on the show that I put into my newsletter that are really good. And. I'm paraphrasing here but theoretical to so many people, there's some things that you can figure out pretty easily yourself. Some things you can do yourselves and other things that are just different. To do still. And a lot of that has to do with the websites you go to in order to maintain your passwords. And he was complaining specifically about bank of America and how you can, according to what he has found here in the real world, you can come up with a. Password a 20 character long password that is going to keep everything nice and safe at trend to be generated. You're using one password and great. So you set your password up in bank of America's account, and then you try and log in later, and it doesn't work because it lets you put 20 character passwords and when you're creating it, yeah. But the login screen only takes the first 16. So of course they'd home match. You see it's things like that really are pushing us back, holding us back. But I'd say pushing us back from being secure as a country, there, there just aren't enough people paying enough attention to make sure this cyber security, even the basic stuff like passwords and two factor authentication are being done properly. So one of the things I wanted to make sure you guys were aware of is I need to know when you're having these problems, because what I want to do is put together some trainings to show you exactly how to do it. Because on some websites you were saying, it's pretty hard to use one password he's paying for it, but it's kinda difficult for him. And I think in some ways, a lack of understanding. Then, it can be difficult to spend a bunch of time trying to watch some training videos for some of the software. And so I want to hear when you're having problems so I can do what I did for him this week and spend a little time, write some stuff up, and I even am reaching out to some of this website. People like bank of America who are really messing up cyber security for people who are trying to do the right thing and writing them and saying, Hey, listen, I'm part of the FBI InfraGard program. I'm a member of it. I paid a lot of attention to cybersecurity. Heck I ran the training for the FBI InfraGard program for a couple of years, and there are some real things lacking. In the login anyways, and this one particular case of the cybersecurity, but I don't know all of this stuff. I'm not using all of these things and I have a disadvantage over you guys, and that is that I've been doing this for so long. I've forgotten what it's like to not know it. Does that make sense? So if you have something that I've talked about on the show, that's appeared in my newsletter and you're having some confusion over, let me know. Just email me M e@craigpeterson.com. What he did is he just hit reply to my newsletter. And of course, that goes to me and me@gregpeterson.com and it tracks it. So I know I need to reply, so I can sit down and go through and answer people's questions. I sent out a lot of the copies of my password, special report to people you guys had requested specifically some of the. People out there had requested a little bit of help. And I had sent out an email to most of the people that I could identify as being business people. I sent out a little thing saying, Hey, listen, if you could use half-hour my help, let me know myself or my team. And then, again, you can just send me an E Craig. So I answered a lot of those questions this week. And in fact, that's how I come up with much of what I cover here on the show. You guys ask the questions and that's how I know that it's a real problem. If I understand it, that's one thing. But for the people who don't do cybersecurity as their primary job or a strategy, I get it. I can get why you guys are confused. So make sure you get my weekly newsletter. So you can find out about all of the trainings, the free stuff, the paid courses, and. It's easy. Just go to Craig peterson.com/subscribe. That's Craig Peterson, P E T E R S O N. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. And I'm more than glad. Add you to that list. And there are now thousands of people on that list to get my email pretty much every week. If you miss it one week, it's probably, cause I just got too busy, but I put out all my show notes. I put it all a little bit of training notes, all. The us government is supposedly getting ready to fire what they're calling cyber bullets in response to these significant hacking attacks. This is what they're calling a comprehensive strategy to dissuade. Adversaries. And this is all from the national cyber security director, Chris Inglis. This is from an article in American military news.com by Chris Strome. That was out this week. And of course I included that in my newsletter this week as well, coming out. Today or tomorrow, depends on how this all goes right with the weekend. I got to help a buddy out today, but president Joe Biden has been really talking about how do we use cyber weapons to retaliate. For instance, he gave a list of industries that Russia should not be. As though Putin himself is running all of these hacks or come out of Russia. Yeah, certainly there are some that are part of their military, but there many of them that are just bad guys that are trying to make some money, we should feel sorry for them. So Biden gives him this list and says, Hey, listen, if you attack any of these various industries or actually portions of our economy, We are going to retaliate. We have seen the us retaliate under President Trump and the retaliation. Of course he did all kinds of economic stuff to stop it. And much of which has been reversed by president Biden's administration, but also he attacked them directly in. Down some power systems there in the Moscow area, which I thought was really kinda cool. So kudos to President Trump for doing that and for president and Biden now to say, Hey, we are going to attack back. Of course. The biggest question is. What would we be attacking? How would we be attacking it? And for what reason, for instance, the red Chinese have gone after our office of personnel management, OPM records and got them all back in 2015. So they now know everything about everybody that had a secret security clearance or the took a paycheck from the federal government. All of those records, they would get their hands on them and get them on all of the records a lot. So Inglis was in front of the let's see here, the, yeah, he was a former director of the national security agency. He's the first to hold his Senate-confirmed position at the white house, this national cyber director position. And he says there is a sense that we can perhaps fire some cyber bullets and shoot our way out of this English set at the conference. It was hosted by the way, by the national security agency and a nonprofit group, he said that will be useful in certain circumstances. If you had a clear shot at a cyber aggressor and I can take them offline, I would advise that we do so as long as the collateral effects are acceptable. Yeah. What we have done here under president Biden administration is we have shut down some people who were operating illegally, we have shut down some cyber actors that were attacking us. So we've been doing that, but it isn't exactly. Wow. We just saw a muzzle flash over there. And so we are returning fire to the area of that muzzle flash, because as I've said many times before, we just don't know. Where in fact that bullet is coming from, it makes it a lot more difficult. English went on to say there's a larger set of initiatives that have to be undertaken. Not one of those elements is going to be sufficient to take this. Out let's see here, the us should make clear to Russia now their adversaries, what kinds of attacks would prompt a response, which is what president Biden did when he was talking with, of course, President Putin over there, red lines of both good and bad red lines are clear and crisp. Although I got to say many of our administrations have. Really done anything about it. It's the red line in the sand and Syria president Obama didn't do anything when they stepped over that red line. So yeah. And then with what we just finished doing in Afghanistan, where we drew a red line and said, we're going to protect all of you who helped us. And then we not only abandoned them, but we abandoned Americans behind there. I don't think a lot of people aren't going to believe us. So here's the last statement here. And again, this is an article in American military news from our cyber chief is the government actions. Aren't always going to be broadcast. In some cases, it's not helpful to broadcast those for all of mankind to see another one. We are doing some things behind the scenes. And I have certainly seen some of the results of those over the last few years. Stick around.  You're listening to Craig Peterson online@craigpeterson.com. You've got a smartphone and there are some new versions out, right? New hardware, new software, Android iOS. How long should you keep that device? How long can you stay safe with that older device? Apple has now done something. Different something they've never done before. One of the reasons that apple equipment tends to be safer than almost anything else out there is that they have, what's known as a closed ecosystem. There's arguments both directions here on whether that's safer or not. But the real advantage when it comes to cybersecurity is there are only. So many versions of the iPhone out there. What are we now in a couple of dozen versions of the hardware platform that makes it easier for apple to be able to support older versions of the software and multiple pieces of hardware, much easier than for, let's say Microsoft windows. It doesn't even have a single. Platform or Android, where there are hundreds of hardware platforms out there and tens of thousands of versions of the hardware, because one model phone can contain many. Changes different types of hardware to talk to the cell towers or the screen you name it. So it's very hard to keep up. Android has for quite a while now supported three versions of their operating system. Of course, we're talking about Google, but Android operating system. So they support the current release. Of Android and the Breviary release is two previous releases in fact of Android. Now that is frankly a pretty good thing to know, but there's over a billion Android devices out there that are no longer supported by security updates. We've got Android 10, nine, and eight that are fairly supported right now. We're actually up to Android 12. So here's how it works. If you've got Android version 10 out, if that's the main one, then you can continue to do. Eight and nine and get updates, security updates. But then here's the problem, everybody, those security updates are coming out of Google, but that does not mean that they are making it all the way to you. So there you go. It's one thing for Google to provide updates, but if you can't get them because your phone manufacturer is not supporting them, you've got trouble Samsung. Is probably the best company other than maybe Google and the Google Pixel phone. Samsung's the best company to go to. If you want some longer-term support. Many of these other companies just don't provide support past the current version. So keep that in mind as well. Android 12 was the 12th major version of Android announced by Google, February, 2021. And it is starting to roll out a Android. The 11th, 11 is the one that was out in February of last year. At least it was announced then. And we're, they're coming out, they're getting pushed out. So basically Google is saying the current version plus two prior versions. And that usually gives you about a four or maybe even a five year window. So if you're. An Android device from a major manufacturer, particularly Samsung on the Android side, your device is going to be good for at least four years, maybe five years now on the, and by the way, you don't necessarily have to upgrade the. You could be continuing to run an older release saw, as I mentioned earlier, if it version 11 is the current one that's out there being supported, which it is right. 12 is early still, but version 11, that means two prior versions still get security updates. You don't get featured. Dates, you don't get the new stuff, but you get security updates. So Android 11, the current one that means 10 and nine get security updates. So you don't, you're not being forced to do an upgrade. Most people don't upgrade their phones from an older major release to a newer major release. In other words, they don't try and go from Android eight to Android 11. Because in fact, most of the time, the hardware manufacturer doesn't support it. That's why there's over a billion Android devices out there right now that cannot get security updates. So have a look at your phone and your vendors. See what you're running. You probably want to do an update because most phones cannot get any support on the, in the apple side. Things are a lot different with Apple iOS, which is the operating system used on the iPhone and the I pad apple has always forced you to move to the next major version. No, they only force you to do that. If they support the hardware. And I've got to say kudos to them, they're still supporting the iPhone six S which came out quite a while. The iPhone success is something that my wife has been using and that I had as well. In fact, she got my old iPhone success, but that's a six-year-old. Phone came out in September of 2015. So it is still getting security updates, and we'll probably continue to get them. Not only is it getting security update this six-year-old iPhone success is getting the latest and our iOS operating system. It's getting iOS 15. Isn't that just amazing? Yeah, exactly. And so not just security updates, like you might get from some of the other vendors out there, Android vendors. So the apple keeps their arms around you for quite a while. Here's, what's changed now with Apple and iOS, the, for the first time ever in the iOS world, Apple is not forcing you to upgrade. So you're not being forced to upgrade to iOS 15. You can continue to run iOS 14. And that's how apples got around the security patches in the past, because what happens is you get the updates and installs them. Basically. There's no reason for you not to upgrade your phone. And so you do so apple never had to worry about releasing some of these fixes for really old versions of iOS. Although they have done that from time to time. In the Mac iOS side, Apple has done a couple of good things. The, where they always have supported basically three releases, what Google's doing with Android. So you now have a new feature. If you will, with iOS, here's a PSA for everyone. Public service announcement. You don't have to take the iOS 15 upgrade. Now I did. I put it on my iPhone and I seem to have some sort of a problem with messages where it's telling people that my phone has notifications turned off, which it does not. So I haven't figured that one out yet. I'll have to look into that a little bit more, but. This is nice because that means you're not going to have to upgrade your iPhone to iOS 15. You'll still get security updates for iOS 14, something Apple's never done before. We'll see if they continue this. We will see if they match Google going back. Three releases in Android. It just never been done before over on the iOS. So good news for them. Also course in the windows world and the Mac world, you really should upgrade the operating system as much as you can. Windows 11 though, man, windows 11. And I said this to my newsletter. I warned you guys is going to be a nightmare. For many people. You are not going to be able to do an automatic upgrade unless you have the newest of hardware, with the highest end of features, Craig peterson.com. One of the very big ransomware operations is back online. And now we have some inside information from one of the contractors working for this ransomware organization and oh yeah, there's an FBI tie, too.. This organization, ransomware gang, almost business, whatever you might want to describe them as is known as revolt. They have a few other names, but that's the really big one. And they are basically the 800 pound gorilla in the ransom. Business, you might be using cloud services right now. Maybe you use Microsoft's email service. Their Microsoft 360, I think, is what they call it now and use it for email and various other things pretty handy. It's mostly in the cloud. Computers you own or operate or have to maintain. I think that makes some sense too, but here's the bottom line it's software as a service right now, salesforce.com software as a service, Oracle has their accounting stuff. QuickBooks online, all software as a service. It isn't just those legitimate businesses that I just mentioned. That are using the cloud that are providing software as a service where you're paying monthly or however frequently. And you're getting this software as a service. That's what that means. Typically it means it's in the cloud and you don't have any real control over it. That's what this ransomware gang has been doing. This gang known as rebill. They all appear to be in. And there's some interesting stuff. That's come out. A transcript was released of an interview with one of their contractors. Now the original interview was in Russian. So I read through a translation of the Russian. I have no idea how good it is, but it is being quoted by a bank. Insider magazine that you might be familiar with bank info, security. That's one of the places that I follow. And there's a few interesting things that he talked about that I want to get into, but these are the people who have been behind things like the colonial pipeline attack and some of the other very large attacks, the way they work, their business model is. You can license their software, their ransomware software, and you go after a business or a government agency, whatever it might be, you get that ransomware software inside. And the reveal gang will take a percentage of the money that you have in rent. Now, how is that for a, an interesting business model, right? Taking something that the rest of the world has been using, and then take that model and put it into the legal side of the world. For three weeks, during this whole reveal ransomware attack, this summer turns out that the FBI secretly withheld the key that could have been used to decrypt. And computers that reveal had infected with ransomware and looks like kids up to maybe 1500 networks. Now those are networks, not just computers. That includes networks run by hospitals, schools, and businesses, including critical infrastructure businesses. The way the FBI got their hands on this decryption game. Is by penetrating reveal gangs servers. So they got into it. They were able to grab the keys and then the FBI waited before. Did anything with it. See, what they were trying to do is catch the people behind reveal. And so they didn't want to release information, get information out there to the press that might tip off those bad guys over there in Russia. And then shut down their operations. But as you might know, because I mentioned it here before the reveal gang went offline on July 13th, before the FBI could really track them down. And then the FBI didn't release the key until July 21st. And then I think it was Malwarebytes released a decryption tool. So if you had been hacked by the gang, you could. Now, remember it isn't reveal itself. That's doing most of them. Ransomware hacking if you will or a placement it's small guys. And that's why some people, including this contractor that apparently worked for the reveal gang itself says, people think that it's the Russian government, that it's Putin, that's doing this. He said, in fact, it's not it's small guys. And people like me are getting four or five hours a night. Because we're working so hard trying to make a whole of this work, come up with the new software approaches. We have to provide code tech support unquote to our affiliates, as well as tech support to the people who have had their computers and their data ransomed. So it a real interesting mix. Absolutely. Interesting mix. Now Christopher Ray here a couple of weeks ago, he's the FBI director told Congress that cool. We make these decisions as a group, not unilaterally. To the FBI and working with other government agencies, these are complex decisions designed to create maximum impact. And that takes time and going against adversaries, where we have to marshal resources, not just around the. But all over the world. So this Russian based gang first appeared in 2019, they've been around, they've been exporting large amounts of money from businesses for a very long time. One of the interest he'd things I think about all of this is that this reveal gang has their software as a service, and they provide it to quote affiliates, quote that, go ahead and then install the software, get you to install it on your computers in order to ransom you a double whammy ransom you, but there's now reports out there that there's a secret back door in the ransomwares code that allow. Rebill to go around their affiliates and steal the proceeds. How's that for hilarious, you've got a bad guy who goes in and gets the software from revolt, pays them a commission, and then reveal apparently has been jumping in on these customer support chats. In other words, you just got nailed and because you got nailed with ransomware, you have to go to. Chat room. And so you go in there and you're getting customer support on how to buy Bitcoin and how to transfer to their wallet. And apparently revival is getting right in the middle and is extorting money from these people directly instead of having the affiliates do it pretty amazing. So here's this part of this interview? It was aired on the Russian news outlet, London. And was trans translated by yeah. Flashpoint. Here are the guys that got the full transcript of the interview. He says in the normal world, I was called a contractor, doing some tasks for many ransomware collectives that journalists considered to be famous. Money is stolen or extorted with my hands, but I'm not ashamed of it. I do. And again, this goes into the thinking of many of these bad guys of Americans are all rich and they don't deserve what they have. He said, let's put it this way. This is a very time consuming job. And if you've earned enough, then you can quit the game. But chronic fatigue, burnout, deadline. All of these words from the life of ordinary office workers are also relevant for malware developers. So there you go. You should feel sorry for these malware developers who are developing software to steal millions from you and. Down our critical infrastructure. Hey, join me online. Craig peterson.com. And if you subscribe to my weekly newsletter right there on the site, I'll send you a few of my special reports. The most popular ones will come to you right there in your email box. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. We all pretty much have some form of insurance. And we're going to talk right now about the types of cyber insurance you may have. Now this might be through your homeowners policy or perhaps a rider on a business policy.  Many of our homeowners policies have started coming with cyber insurance. So we're going to talk about that. What is it? Businesses as well are also using cyber insurance and I'm sure you've heard of insurance basically called LifeLock and what that's all about. So let's kind of start. When we have a breach in a business, usually what happens is information about our customers is stolen. Look at some of the biggest breaches in history where we. Hundreds of millions of our personal records stolen Equifax breach is an example of a huge breach where we had all kinds of personal information that was stolen by the bad guys. Now, some of this information gets stale pretty quickly, but of course, other parts of it like our address, our social security number, they are probably not going to change for years. If for. No, of course our social security number will never change the social security administration. Just doesn't reissue them for very many reasons at all. And they do not reissue a social security number was stolen online because. Just about everybody's has, so what does a company like LifeLock do? They keep an eye on your credit report for you. And they're looking at what's going on new accounts that are open. They look at various other things, just related to that. And they, at that point say, wait a minute, something weird is happening. Now my credit cards, for instance, I have a credit card that if let's say I buy two of the same thing, one after the other and the, both the same price that credit card company pops a message right up on my phone saying, Hey, did you just buy two? Of these $15 things from and I can say yes or no, if I'm out on the road and I am purchasing gas, the credit card can pop up on my phone and it does and say, Hey, will you just trying to buy gas at this gas station? Because what'll happen as you use the credit card at the pump. And the pump says it was denied and then up at pops and yeah. Okay. No, that was me. And they said, okay, we'll try the transaction. Okay. And we'll approve it next time. And that's all automated. And that has nothing to do with LifeLock. LifeLock is there to more or less detect that something happened and if something happened and it was a bad guy and basically your identity was stolen. So they might be trying to buy a Ferrari in your name or maybe a 10 year old, four Ford focus, whatever it might be. And. They will help you try and clean it. That's what they do. So that's why it's cheap. And I don't know that it's terribly useful to you if you're really concerned. Go ahead and do that, but do keep an eye on your credit report. I do as well. My bank has free credit reporting for me, my credit card. Same thing. Free credit reporting that lets me know everything that's going on. So that's an easy way to tell WhatsApp. And there are different types of cyber insurance beyond this sort of thing, beyond the LifeLocks of the world. And many of us just get our cyber insurance through our homeowner's policy. It's a little rider. And businesses can buy cyber insurance as well. We have cyber insurance, that's underwritten by Lloyd's of London and we provide a $500,000 or million-dollar policy to our clients. As well, because that's what we do is cyber security, right? So the idea is if one of our clients gets hit, we have some insurance to back us up, but of course we go a lot further. It's almost like the LifeLock where if you do get hit by ransomware or something else, we will help you get back in business. We'll help restore your data. We'll help you with providing you. The information you need in order to do press releases, which agencies you need to contact, which of your customers you need to contact. And we've got scripts for all of that. So you can send it all out and just take care of it. So the idea is you don't want ransomware. So you hire us. We are extremely likely to keep ransomware out of your systems. And on top of that, if you are hit with ransomware, we restore everything. LifeLock does not do that. Obviously they all, I'll only do stuff after the fact and the cyber insurance you buy from an insurance agency is much the same, and there's a huge caveat with these policies that we're buying for our businesses and for our homes. And that is. They have a checklist at the insurance companies. Did you do this and this? And if you did, then they might payout if you did not, they may not payout. In fact, pay outs on cyber insurance policies are not known because. Bottom line. They really don't payout. Okay. I'm looking at some numbers right now and about paying ransoms and everything else. You may or may not. You got to have a look at it. Many of these policies are never paid out by the cyber insurance covers. They usually just regular insurance companies, but it's a special rider. And what they do is they say, Hey, listen, you did not follow the rules, so we're not going to payout. And there are many cases. If you go online and do a search, just use duck, go and say cyber insurance, payout. Lawsuits I'm doing that right now is. And it'll come up and show. Oh, okay. Does it cover lawsuits? Why are liability claims so costly? Yeah, exactly. A 2% payouts is talking about here. I'm invoicing, the most common cyber insurance claim denial. Yeah, it goes on and on. There are a lot is an act of war clause could nix cyber insurance payouts. That's another big one that they've tried to use. So the cyber insurance company will say, Hey, that was China attacking you. Therefore it was an act of. And you can bet if there is a big hack, they will use that. Think of what happens with the hurricanes coming onshore. How much do they push back on payouts? Especially with the real big one, it would bankrupt them. So we gotta be very careful. There are some different types of  cyber insurance. Policies do which have different types of coverages. You've got the first party lost loss, I should say. So that's you to covering you and your loss, your first-party expenses, third party liability. Each one of those has specific parameters. So sub-limit retention and others. First-party losses are usually including the loss of revenue due to business interruption. First party expenses would include all of the services and resources that you needed to use to recover from attack like forensic or system rebuilding services. These third-party liabilities. May cover expenses and legal fees related to potential damage caused by the incident to third parties like partners, customers, or employees whose sensitive information may have been compromised. So read them carefully. Be very careful. There are next-generation, cyber insurance policies are going even further and make these types of services. Prior to any incident to reduce exposures and prevent incidents in the first place. Now we don't provide insurance. We are not an insurance company, but that's basically what we're trying to do here. Not become an insurance company, but to make sure. The businesses have the right services so that the likelihood of anything happening or is extremely low. And then following up after the fact it's different obviously than insurers in and insurance, the guardians, Jessica Crispin had a great article about a couple of weeks ago that I've been hanging on. And it's talking about this tattle where that's been incorporated into the computers we're using at home. Now we're specifically talking about employers that are putting this. The software on computers, they belong to the companies. A lot of businesses are worried. If workers are at home or where we can't see them, how do we know that they're actually working, not watching Netflix or something else on. They have, of course, come up with software that can reassure your boss. It does things like take snapshots of what you're doing. Record your keystrokes grabs photos from. Picture from your camera. There's a new program called sneak, which makes your webcam take a photo of you about once a minute and makes available to the supervisor to prove you're not away from your desk. There's no warning in advance. It just takes that photograph catches your doom. Pretty much anything can be absolutely anything. Then, it's the type of thing you'd expect the national security agency to do. So there are some good reasons for this lack of trust because sometimes employees have not been doi

The Global Politico
Union leader Sharan Burrow: How to convince governments to actually change

The Global Politico

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 21:09


Health workers who don't get paid if they contract Covid-19. Over 6,000 migrant workers dead after helping with World Cup construction in the Middle East. As the head of the world's largest union confederation, it's Sharan Burrow's priority to protect workers against abuses like these and hold offending governments accountable. But as she tells host Ryan Heath, she's walking a tightrope between convincing governments to change and keeping her seat at the table. Sharan Burrow is the General Secretary of the International Trade Union Confederation.  Ryan Heath is the host of the "Global Insider" podcast and newsletter.  Olivia Reingold produces “Global Insider.”  Irene Noguchi edits “Global Insider” and is the executive producer of POLITICO Audio.

Nintendo Switch UK Podcast
The N64 Director's Cut - Episode 132

Nintendo Switch UK Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 96:18


Yes, everyone is talking about the latest Nintendo Direct and Anton, Mike and Al give us their thoughts and ratings on September's event.  This, plus lots more news, rumours and releases in an extra long episode.Games we talk about include:Doom & Destiny WorldsDisney Classic Games CollectionRover Mechanic SimulatorAntonball DeluxePokemon UniteDragon Quest XIIMario Kart TourAtelierNintendo Switch OLED unboxingAnimal Crossing Series 5 amiibo cardsZelda: Breath Of The Wild and Splatoon 2 physical releasesSunbreak “Massive” DLC for Monster Hunter RiseMario Party SuperstarVoice of Cards: The Isle Dragon RoarsDisco Elysium The Final CutHyrule Warriors: Age of Calamity - Expansion Pass Wave 2: Guardian of RemembranceChocobo GPKirby and the Forgotten LandMario Golf: Super RushDisney Magical World 2: Enchanted EditionStar Wars: Knights of the old RepublicDying Light 2: Stay Human - Cloud VersionDying Light: Platinum EditionTriangle StrategyMetroid DreadNintendo Switch Online Expansions PackSuper Mario 64Mario Kart 64StarFox 64Yoshi StoryThe Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of TimeWinbackMario TennisDr Mario 64Sin & PunishmentThe Legend of Zelda: Majora's MaskF-Zero XMario GolfPokemon SnapKirby 64 The Crystal ShardsPaper MarioBanjo-KazooieCastlevania BloodlinesContra HardCorpsDr Robotniks Mean Bean MachineEcco the DolphinGolden AxeGunstar HeroesMushaPhantasy Star IVRistarShinning ForceShinobi IIISonic the Hedgehog 2Streets of Rage 2Strider.Bluetooth Nintendo 64 and Sega Mega Drive controllersShadowrun TrilogyCastlevania Advance CollectionActraiser RenaissanceDeltarune Chapter 1&2Montage: Hot Wheels UnleashedSurviving the AftermathShin Megami Tensei VWreakfestRune Factory 5Super Mario Movie castingSplatoon 3Bayonetta 3Klonoa EncoreAlan Wake RemasteredSupport the show (http://www.patreon.com/nsukp)

The Brian Nichols Show
332: THROWBACK: Economics and Liberty (feat. Steve Horwitz)

The Brian Nichols Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 47:55


The late and great Steve Horwitz on the economics of liberty. Original Show Notes: Listen as Steve and I discuss a number of economic topics, starting with an in-depth discussion on minimum wage, universal basic income (UBI), automation, and artificial intelligence. Next, we discuss trade in the era of Trump, focusing specifically on the differences between “free-trade” vs “fair-trade” and the dangers of economic nationalism. We conclude today's episode with a critique of democratic socialism while presenting a realistic libertarian alternative. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

AI and the Future of Work
Gary Bolles, best-selling author of The Next Rules of Work, shares how to manage through disruption and find your passion

AI and the Future of Work

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 42:06


Gary Bolles, entrepreneur, venture advisor, and best-selling author, is a deep thinker who established roots in Silicon Valley in the 80s to pursue his joint passions for technology and exploring what he calls the three boxes of life - learning, work, and leisure. He's the author of The Next Rules of Work which was published August 31. He's also the chair for the Future of Work at Singularity University and the founder of eParachute among other companies. Oh, and his LinkedIn courses have helped train more than 800,000 students. Listen and learn...How the son of a laid off minister became one of the foremost authorities on the future of workWhat opportunities are being created by "The Great Reset"How technology is redefining work... and redefining our identity as humansWhat it means that we're moving from a "workforce" to a "worknet"About the $10 million exercise... and why it's the best way to find your passionWhy living the acronym "PACE" is the best way to ensure future career successReferences in today's episode...Gary's siteSingularity UniversityAI and the Future of Work with Charlene Li

Good Morning Liberty
Joe Rogan, Amanda Knox, Minimum Wage, & UBI || EP 548

Good Morning Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 39:46


Amanda Knox & Joe Rogan discussed UBI & Minimum Wage on Rogan's most recent episode. Here's what they got wrong, and here's the actual solution to the perceived problem. Fourth Stimulus Check Update: Petition for Monthly $2,000 Nears 2.9 Million Supporters https://www.newsweek.com/fourth-stimulus-check-update-petition-monthly-2000-nears-29-million-supporters-1630493?utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Twitter#Echobox=1631990344 Open an IRA w/ iTrustCapital to Invest in Physical Gold & Crypto TAX-FREE! Get 1-Month FREE with Discount Code ($29.95 Savings)   Link: https://rebrand.ly/libertypod   Need someone to talk to? Betterhelp.com/gml   Interested in learning how to Day Trade? Mastermytrades.com   Chat LIVE during the show! https://goodmorningliberty.locals.com/   Like our intro song? https://www.3pillmorning.com   Advertise on our podcast! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Confoes Podcast
Capital Confoes 2 – Universal Basic Income

Confoes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 27:29


In this podcast we take you with us on a journey about economics and investing. By being equipped with different perspective we strive to make better and more informed financial decisions. Welcome to Capital Confoes! In episode 2 we touch a bit on Universal Basic Income (UBI) Episode Overview 0:00 - Intro and defining UBI3:22 - Where does UBI money come from?9:37 - The rich and the poor have equal rights to UBI14:35 - Eliminating unskilled labor19:49 - Can UBI work in developed and developing nations? The Hosts Diego AmeeraliGregory Bainathsah Feel free to join our Discord Server. Financial Disclaimer ** The information in this podcast is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional financial advice. All content, including text, graphics and images contained in this podcast is for general information purposes only and does not replace a consultation with your financial or tax professional **

Political Misfits
Labor and Climate Change; Reproductive Rights Under Attack; Tackling the Opioid Epidemic

Political Misfits

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 114:05


Dan Kovalik, author and human rights and labor lawyer, talks to us about the intersection of labor and climate change, and how extreme weather is affecting the U.S. where workers are forced to work in dangerous and unhealthy conditions. We also talk about how empowering federal oversight agencies and worker unionization could alleviate working conditions and work in tandem with other policies to mitigate the effects of climate change.China Dickerson, political strategist and National Political Director for Forward Majority, talks to us about news that U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in a major abortion case that could ultimately cut off abortion access in dozens of states, what this means for reproductive rights, the intersection between culture, religion and white supremacy in these decisions, and how these restrictions will particularly harm black and brown communities.Dr. Sheila Vakharia, deputy director of research and academic engagement for the Drug Policy Alliance, joins us to talk about how the Biden administration is trying to reach a middle ground on how to confront the opioid epidemic and drawing fire in the process from across the ideological spectrum, and how harm reduction approaches to the epidemic will yield better results than another drug war.Kristine Hendrix, member of the board for Second Chances, which deals with incarcerated individuals and those recently released, contributor to the Truth-Telling Project and "We Stay Woke" podcast, and treasurer for Carla Coffee Wright for U.S. Senate, talks to us about cities implementing universal basic income programs and whether they are enough to keep people out of poverty, vaccine mandates, and the impact of COVID-19 on child care workers and the children they look over.Pam McKinnon, theater director, artistic director for the American Conservatory Theater, and executive board member of Stage Directors and Choreographers, talks to us about the play “Toni Stone”, about first woman to play baseball in the Negro Leagues, the first woman to play professionally in a men's league, and the importance of telling these often neglected stories.

Independent Thought
COVID-19 Booster Shots

Independent Thought

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 59:37


In this episode, I discuss my thoughts around the Biden administrations COVID-19 booster shot proposal. I discuss who it's intended for, pushbacks it's receiving, criticisms I have & how it relates to the rest of the world's access to the vaccine. In my guest segment, I am joined by the Plaid Jacket Philosopher. We discuss the motivations behind his podcast, thoughts on blue collar jobs, cancel culture, UBI, American influence on Canadian politics & more. Special thanks to BETTY'S DIVINE for sponsoring today's show! You can find Betty's Divine online at https://www.bettysdivine.com/ Special thanks to BATHING BEAUTIES BEADS for sponsoring today's show! Get 15% Off with the code INDEPENDENTTHOUGHT at https://www.bathingbeautiesbeads.com/ Follow Plaid Jacket Philosopher: INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/plaidjacketphilosopher/ APPLE PODCASTS: https://podcasts.apple.com/ca/podcast/the-plaid-jacket-philosophers-podcast/id1530680364 TWITTER: https://twitter.com/JacketPlaid Follow - Independent Thought: INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/independentthought/?hl=en PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/Independentthought YOUTUBE: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC7ccPtminOAZ-z0Anpq2M_w Sources for 1st segment: https://finance.yahoo.com/news/3-reasons-why-fda-rejected-booster-shots-195236606.html https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vUBssQ9NyRk https://time.com/6096172/covax-vaccines-what-went-wrong/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mOF4iIYneXk https://www.nytimes.com/2021/09/13/health/fda-coronavirus-booster-shots.html https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RSdscAMK66Y https://www.bbc.com/news/business-57016260

Let's THINK about it
Sacred Economics (pt 2)

Let's THINK about it

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 26:56


IntroCheck Step 46 for a history of how money developed from sacred origins into “a force for evil.”Part 1: Separation and OnenessThis illusion is a prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for only the few people nearest us. Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living beings and all of nature.” ~ Charles Eisenstein He goes as far as to say to bring forth generosity and love and all dimensions of life, “we must dismantle the systems of domination that perpetuate the illusion of separation. Most notably the neoliberal system of Economics but also religion and politics.”The difficulty is, we are perpetually bombarded and distracted by the reinforced narrative of individual sovereignty and freedom (liberty) with no discourse on social morality or what we owe each other.  Eisenstein says we must disengage from this system, not oppose it. To do this, we need a new story. Not the age of separation, but the story of Ascent. Part 2Systemically we need policy in place that align wealth with the sacred.  Eisenstein brings up negative interest. This is when money circulates and investment continues, but the original capital loses value. These would lead us to “value” the capital less than the products or services. With positive interest, there is an incentive to hoard money (pull it out of circulation) and be rewarded through stockpiling, which encourages stagnation, otherwise known as a recession. In 1906 Silvio Gesell proposed “ the natural economic order” where a stamp of a small percentage was periodically pasted onto paper currency, this maintenance was a fee on the currency.  If wealth is instead measured through happiness and well-being, it will be linked with intimate connections and communities, mutual benefit and attentiveness, which also provides emotional stability, and can generate it's own economies.Part 3But what about land use, property, and ownership? The consumer citizen has increasingly been distanced from the means of production, and nature, to remain focused on the separated individual self. We become “rational actors” or “rational optimizers.”The tragedy of the Commons is an economic parable about how “rational actors” optimize individual wellbeing at the cost of the entire community, destroying the equilibrium to thrive for self-interest. Our current model exacerbates or encourages extraction, or commodifying the commons into private wealth, which leads to increase wealth consolidation and extractive damage. As the myth of perpetual growth become obvious, we need a support system, which is why Eisenstein recommends a social dividend: call it UBI or welfare. You may ask: where will the money come from, because with negative interest the money supply would continue to shrink?We will develop a “Commons backed currency” to generate new money and align it with preserving nature. If the land was in a public trust, a social shared resource that could be lent (leased) to corporations for a limited amount of time, the lease would be our social dividend, capital, and currency. This is a three-pronged attack torealign money with natural decay,alter the way land is used, letting it become the currency backing or capital as a communally shared resource, andletting pre-pollution taxing redirect innovation (and community) towards enriching a sustainable commons. 

All-In with Chamath, Jason, Sacks & Friedberg
E47: Facebook's week from hell, Ellen Pao on sexism in Elizabeth Holmes coverage, Newsom's win, frauds & more

All-In with Chamath, Jason, Sacks & Friedberg

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 95:30


Show Notes: 0:00 Besties intro, TPB Symposium recap, rapid generations in tech 7:00 UBI, incentives for success, social safety nets 19:45 Newsom's recall victory in California, where the GOP went wrong 33:59 Facebook's week from hell, Instagram's harmful impact on teen girls 42:42 How to properly regulate social media's impact on certain groups 1:04:46 Pentagon admits to killing 10 Afghan civilians (including seven children) in drone strike 1:07:17 Ellen Pao on sexism around the Elizabeth Holmes trial; Juicero, JUUL, and other male-led failures/frauds 1:25:54 Mailchimp sells for $12B, employees got no equity 1:29:43 AOC at the Met Gala Follow the besties: https://twitter.com/chamath https://linktr.ee/calacanis https://twitter.com/DavidSacks https://twitter.com/friedberg Follow the pod: https://twitter.com/theallinpod https://linktr.ee/allinpodcast Intro Music Credit: https://rb.gy/tppkzl https://twitter.com/yung_spielburg Intro Video Credit: https://twitter.com/TheZachEffect Links: https://www.usnews.com/news/health-news/articles/2021-02-16/as-social-media-time-rises-so-does-teen-girls-suicide-risk https://www.politico.com/news/magazine/2021/09/15/stolen-election-myth-gop-511988 https://www.wsj.com/articles/facebook-knows-instagram-is-toxic-for-teen-girls-company-documents-show-11631620739 https://www.publichealthlawcenter.org/topics/commercial-tobacco-control/commercial-tobacco-control-litigation/master-settlement-agreement https://twitter.com/DavidSacks/status/1438597853320908811 https://www.kff.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/Slide1.png https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2017-04-19/silicon-valley-s-400-juicer-may-be-feeling-the-squeeze https://scorpioncapital.s3.us-east-2.amazonaws.com/reports/BLI.pdf https://www.sec.gov/news/press-release/2021-176 https://www.sec.gov/news/press-release/2021-164 https://ag.ny.gov/press-release/2021/attorney-general-james-ends-virtual-currency-trading-platform-bitfinexs-illegal https://coingeek.com/tether-banned-on-canada-first-2-licensed-digital-currency-exchanges/ https://investors.intuit.com/news/news-details/2021/Intuit-to-Acquire-Mailchimp/default.aspx https://twitter.com/stoolpresidente/status/1437585404010582016 https://shop.ocasiocortez.com/collections/all/collections_-tax-the-rich?sort_by=manual https://www.bestiesapparel.com/

Yang Daily - Andrew Yang News
Episode 433 – 9/15 – Inspiration4 launch, UN wars with AI, California recall recall, Hospital overload, and UBI on phones and streets!

Yang Daily - Andrew Yang News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 9:43


In today's episode: World's first all-civilian crew makes it to orbit, The UN declares war on AI, Newsome survives his recall but the recall may not survive Newsom, Hospitals across the southwest buckle undle load of COVID patients, Aarika needs you on the phones, and UBI needs you on the streets! Links and transcript found here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1-JUGRLSimNq6FaLlbriH2GomXVcRrA7kG7N8lKjLSc8/edit?usp=sharing Help make this podcast possible at: https://www.patreon.com/YangDaily Message me @YangDailyCast or YangDailyPodcast@gmail.com! YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcx_EbiZhhRhvvjFdZryPCQ/videos

Pod of Gold
UBI: The Webinar: The Episode: The Sequel

Pod of Gold

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 55:03


So nice, we had to do it twice! Dive deeper into the topic of Unconditional Basic Income in our second webinar, co-hosted with FEASTA and Vermonters for a New Economy. We discuss the finer points of UBI as a key element in the transition to a society centered around universal well-being. Featuring Scott Santens, Marjukka Turunen, Herbert Jauch, Enno Schmidt, and Michel Bauwens.  The post UBI: The Webinar: The Episode: The Sequel appeared first on Pod of Gold.

Yang Daily - Andrew Yang News
Episode 430 – 9/8 – Voter suppression, Topless tag, Idaho hospital triage, and the time is ripe for carbon dividend!

Yang Daily - Andrew Yang News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 8:31


In today's episode: Texas finally passes SB1 voter suppression bill, Idaho hospitals enter triage mode from COVID overflow, Jim Jordan runs douchiest bag, Moving Forward 's awesome UBI summaries, and the time is ripe for a carbon dividend to pass! Links and transcript found here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1dq3iqM3jJzz5Bhjb9brHrSgcHY82uEkcMh16FMAVC9c/edit?usp=sharing Help make this podcast possible at: https://www.patreon.com/YangDaily Message me @YangDailyCast or YangDailyPodcast@gmail.com! YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcx_EbiZhhRhvvjFdZryPCQ/videos

Beneath the Dirt
#152 - Shaggy's Mom's House

Beneath the Dirt

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 49:27


This week we got new music from Alla Xul Elu, G-Mo Skee, Krizz Kaliko, King Iso, Ubi, Stevie Stone, and Jehry Robinson. Shaggy 2 Dope and Kegan the Creep made an appearance on Your Mom's House Podcast. Twiztid dropped the video for "Neon Vamp", and much more. Support the channel by donating: streamlabs.com/beneathdirt Cash App - $beneathdirt Everything else Beneath the Dirt: beneathdirt.com

Yang Daily - Andrew Yang News
Episode 429 – 9/4 – The thick and skinny on Texas‘ unprecedented abortion law, UBI in TX, and a new political debate app!

Yang Daily - Andrew Yang News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 11:50


In today's episode: We dig into the unprecedented aspects of the Texas abortion law and their implications, Support for UBI grows in Texas, and high-schoolers release a new political debate app! Links and transcript found here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1fP7lFgkPGVK5hwpdf1UEFZBAA07AXDsAAkpqr5FRa8U/edit?usp=sharing Help make this podcast possible at: https://www.patreon.com/YangDaily Message me @YangDailyCast or YangDailyPodcast@gmail.com! YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcx_EbiZhhRhvvjFdZryPCQ/videos

Wealth Power & Influence with Jason Stapleton
Enslaving a Nation: Jason Talks Afghanistan & US Policy

Wealth Power & Influence with Jason Stapleton

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 75:49


If anyone is qualified to weigh in on the situation in Afghanistan, it's Jason. He spent a number of years there as a private military contractor, so he has unique insight into the situation on the ground.But while everyone is worried about what's going to happen under the Taliban in Afghanistan, the powers that be are laying the groundwork for the enslavement of the American underclass.And they're using a tool that will ensure the slaves sign themselves up for their own subjugation.******If you're ready to take control of your life, income, and future, go to http://controlthesource.com and join the Nomad Network to get started. Brand new app hitting app stores soon!Give your business an unfair advantage in less than 3 minutes a day. Get the daily newsletter that delivers the most actionable and tactical growth strategies available today, straight from the mind of a marketing genius: http://dailyalchemy.me.Learn the blueprint for generating predictable and sustainable income from anywhere on earth: http://www.nomadicwealthoffer.com.Jason on Twitter: https://twitter.com/jason_stapletonJason on IG: https://www.instagram.com/thejasonstapletonJason's website: https://jasonstapleton.comMatt on Twitter: https://twitter.com/realkingpilledDon't forget to like and subscribe, and please share the show!

Yang Daily - Andrew Yang News
Episode 423 – 8/23 – Update on Afghanistan withdrawal and wrap-up on the decision. Everything else tomorrow!

Yang Daily - Andrew Yang News

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 5:59


In today's episode: We go over some updates on the status of the Afghanistan withdrawal and wrap up my thoughts on the decision and reactions to it. Tomorrow we'll catch up on everything else. Lots of UBI news to look forward to! Links and transcript found here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1czhvfLdhFdhFsWRZ4eIahpLgh5GEOnL9I-ul1mmxGjQ/edit?usp=sharing Help make this podcast possible at: https://www.patreon.com/YangDaily Message me @YangDailyCast or YangDailyPodcast@gmail.com! YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcx_EbiZhhRhvvjFdZryPCQ/videos

Yang Speaks
How we get to a Star Trek economy

Yang Speaks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 59:17


Floyd Marinescu is the founder of UBI Works, an organization that advocates for UBI in Canada. In this thought-provoking episode, Marinescu explores the idea of commonwealth funds, why it's important that the money for UBI comes from the right place, and how we can get to a Star Trek economy in the future. Watch this episode on YouTube: https://youtu.be/GSWKI87P0j8 Follow Floyd Marinescu: https://twitter.com/floydmarinescu Follow UBI Works: https://www.ubiworks.ca Follow Andrew Yang: https://twitter.com/andrewyang Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2651 - The Comprehensively Transformative Nature of Medicare-For-All w/ Dr. Abdul El-Sayed

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 68:49


Emma hosts Dr. Abdul El-Sayed, writer of The Incision newsletter on Substack, to discuss his recent book Medicare For All: A Citizen's Guide, that he co-authored with Dr. Micah Johnson, which explores the story of M4A through three parts: a diagnosis and history of the problem, the policy behind M4A, and the politics around it. Emma and Dr. El-Sayed first cover the general structure of our healthcare industry, with a particular focus on the roles of copays and deductibles in garnering profits for insurance companies, while also being the cause of around two-thirds of US bankruptcies, before they walk us through the history of the discourse on national health insurance. Starting with the 1900s progressive era, Abdul and Emma discuss the partnership between Baylor hospital and a local teachers union that was the blueprint for our current structure, eventually becoming Blue Cross Blue Shield, the WW2 wage freeze that initiated employer benefits, as well as the political fights for nationalized health insurance, including Truman in the 40s, Ted Kennedy's push under Nixon, and LBJ's success establishing medicare. After digging into the big adversaries for a single-payer system, looking at the lobbying groups led by doctors in the earlier 20th Century, and the coalescence around insurance agencies and big pharma as small business practices have become less and less common, Emma and Dr. El-Sayed look into the destructive capacity of the localized monopoly model under health insurance, and the drastic growth in efficiency, affordability, and prevention that we would see under a monopsony model. They round out the interview by looking at M4A's recent step into mainstream politics, and unpack the shortcomings of the contemporary arguments against it. Emma wraps up the first half by covering the devastating developments of the delta variant, the continued pushback against mask mandates, and Dan Crenshaw's frustration with election truthers. And in the Fun Half: Matt and Brandon join Emma as they chat about Mike Lindell's symposium, both the Zoom crashes and MyPillow coupon booms, and the thought process that might be behind his mass bounty to disprove his election fraud data. They also look into Tucker's victim-blaming, standing by known retaliator Andrew Cuomo as he faces controversy Fox news hosts are all too familiar with (sexual assault and hiding covid deaths), as well as Andrew Yang's attempted union between UBI's stability, and cryptocurrencies complete instability. Weston from Sacramento explores our employers' desires to get us back to work, plus, your calls and IMs! Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com Subscribe to the AMQuickie newsletter here. Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ (Merch issues and concerns can be addressed here: majorityreportstore@mirrorimage.com) You can now watch the livestream on Twitch Check out today's sponsor: BetterHelp gives you access to your own fully licensed and accredited therapist via phone, chat, or video. A lot of therapists elsewhere have long waitlists and it can take weeks or months before they can see you… But when you sign up with BetterHelp, they match you with a therapist based on your specific needs, and you'll be communicating with them in less than 24 hours. BetterHelp is giving our audience 10% off their first month when you go to https://betterhelp.com/majorityreport Support the St. Vincent Nurses today as they continue to strike for a fair contract! https://action.massnurses.org/we-stand-with-st-vincents-nurses/ Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Subscribe to AM Quickie writer Corey Pein's podcast News from Nowhere, at https://www.patreon.com/newsfromnowhere Check out The Letterhack's upcoming Kickstarter project for his new graphic novel! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/milagrocomic/milagro-heroe-de-las-calles Check out Matt Binder's YouTube channel! Check out The Nomiki Show live at 3 pm ET on YouTube at patreon.com/thenomikishow Check out Matt's podcast, Literary Hangover, at Patreon.com/LiteraryHangover, or on iTunes. Check out Jamie's podcast, The Antifada, at patreon.com/theantifada, on iTunes, or at twitch.tv/theantifada (streaming every Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday at 7pm ET!) Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn @BradKAlsop Help Aamon Hawk Buy A Super Computer!

Yang Speaks
A conversation with Scott Santens, the original UBI advocate

Yang Speaks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 51:23


Andrew reunites with Scott Santens, one of our foremost experts on Universal Basic Income. Tune in as they discuss how Scott got into UBI, where the UBI movement is going, and more. Watch this conversation on YouTube: https://youtu.be/MsIfrty2xN0 Follow Scott Santens: https://twitter.com/scottsantens | https://www.instagram.com/scottsantens Follow Andrew Yang: https://twitter.com/AndrewYang | https://instagram.com/andrewyang Follow Zach Graumann: https://twitter.com/Zach_Graumann | https://instagram.com/zachgraumann Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices