Podcasts about chief executives

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Highest-ranking corporate officer or administrator

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  • Jan 12, 2022LATEST
chief executives

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Best podcasts about chief executives

Show all podcasts related to chief executives

Latest podcast episodes about chief executives

Leadership and Loyalty™
2/2 Tools and Tactics for Tomorrow's Leaders: Alain Hunkins

Leadership and Loyalty™

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 33:09


You may be someone who has, at some time or another, been led by a leader who leads like it's 1955. For that matter, you may be a leader who finds themselves living out the bad habits inherited from previous generations of leaders and wondering how to take ownership and transform. How can we Crack The Leadership Code, to build ourselves and those we serve into Strong Leaders?  Let's find out together. Our guest is Alain Hunkins. Alain believes that he has literally cracked the code on what it takes to lead, not just in 2021, but also far beyond. Alain Hunkins is a faculty member of Duke Corporate Education. Alain's writing has been featured in Fast Company, Forbes, Inc., Chief Executive, Chief Learning Officer, and Business Insider. He's a leadership speaker and coach who has worked with Walmart, Pfizer, Citigroup, General Electric, State Farm Insurance, IBM, General Motors, and Microsoft. Alain is the bestselling author of, Cracking the Leadership Code: Three Secrets to Building Strong Leaders. Website: https://www.alainhunkins.com Social Media https://www.facebook.com/hunkins. https://twitter.com/AlainHunkins. https://www.linkedin.com/in/alainhunkins Part 2) Tools and Tactics for Tomorrow's Leaders Why We Must Fire Ourselves as Psychic Leaders How Great Leader Always Ask for a Recipes The 4 Needs Every Leader Must Meet Specifically Designing an Environment That Energizes Your People. The Neuro-energetic Loss of Task Switching The Power of an Epic Failure . . . Curious about how to tap into what drives meaning in your life and create meaningful transformation in the lives you touch? Take a look at DovBaron.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Future of Work With Jacob Morgan
Why Language In Leadership Matters, Why We Misuse It, & How We Can Fix It To Become Better Leaders

The Future of Work With Jacob Morgan

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 49:54


Krister Ungerböck is a #1 Wall Street Journal Bestselling author of the book, 22 Talk SHIFTs: Tools to Transform Leadership in Business, in Partnership, and in Life.  Krister Ungerböck is a leadership communication expert, keynote speaker, and former CEO of a global tech company. His work has appeared in NPR, Forbes, Inc., HR.com, Chief Executive, Recruiter.com and Entrepreneur. Prior to exiting corporate life at age 42, Krister was CEO of one of the largest family-owned software companies in the world. In today's podcast we are talking about language.  More specifically Talk Shifts.  A powerful book reveals tools that people can use to communicate more authentically and improve listening skills. It explains how emotional intelligence can drive connection, growth and performance. Additionally, his lessons are equally applicable in the workplace and in the home. --------------------- Get the latest insights on the Future of Work, Leadership and employee experience through my daily newsletter at futureofworknewsletter.com  Let's connect on social! Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/in/jacobmorgan8 Instagram: https://instagram.com/jacobmorgan8 Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/jacobm Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FuturistJacob

Modrn Business
Justin Howe, Chief Executive Officer of HTeaO

Modrn Business

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 51:02


Ryan and Zack are in Texas to chat with the Chief Executive Officer of HTeaO, Justin Howe.

Leadership and Loyalty™
1/2 The Leadership Code: Alain Hunkins

Leadership and Loyalty™

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 26:42


You may be someone who has, at some time or another, been led by a leader who leads like it's 1955. For that matter, you may be a leader who finds themselves living out the bad habits inherited from previous generations of leaders and wondering how to take ownership and transform. How can we Crack The Leadership Code, to build ourselves and those we serve into Strong Leaders?  Let's find out together. Our guest is Alain Hunkins. Alain believes that he has literally cracked the code on what it takes to lead, not just in 2021, but also far beyond. Alain Hunkins is a faculty member of Duke Corporate Education. Alain's writing has been featured in Fast Company, Forbes, Inc., Chief Executive, Chief Learning Officer, and Business Insider. He's a leadership speaker and coach who has worked with Walmart, Pfizer, Citigroup, General Electric, State Farm Insurance, IBM, General Motors, and Microsoft. Alain is the bestselling author of, Cracking the Leadership Code: Three Secrets to Building Strong Leaders. Website: https://www.alainhunkins.com Social Media https://www.facebook.com/hunkins. https://twitter.com/AlainHunkins. https://www.linkedin.com/in/alainhunkins Part 1) 3 Secret to Building and Becoming a Strong Leader Why Giving Power Away, Makes You Powerful The Seduction of Power Recognizing the Difference Between Compliance and Commitment Becoming a Facilitator and Chief  Supporting Super Heroes, or Super Teams The Secret Leadership Formula of S.U.&L Why People over Numbers Gets Better Numbers . . . Curious about how to tap into what drives meaning in your life and create meaningful transformation in the lives you touch? Take a look at DovBaron.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Game Football Podcast
Shocks and Awkwardness

The Game Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 60:54


Hugh Woozencroft is joined by Tom Clarke, Tom Roddy, Martyn Ziegler and James Restall.Following their week of controversy, there was nothing controversial about Chelsea's 2-0 win over Spurs in the Carabao Cup semi-finals. How did Romelu Lukaku get on following his apology and how did Antonio Conte enjoy his return to West London? (00:00)Liverpool's semi-final with Arsenal has been postponed due to a Covid outbreak. How do the latest changes to the Covid testing protocol affect football going forward and are smaller teams likely to be more affected? (13:26)Martyn Ziegler joins us to discuss Britain and Ireland's chances of hosting a major tournament in the next 20 years - as the Euros look more likely than a World Cup (18:50)Manchester United have announced their new Chief Executive. Paul Hirst joins us straight from the announcement as we find out more about Richard Arnold (26:44)James Restall joins us as we look ahead to the third round weekend in this season's FA Cup (38:25)Get more of The Times and The Sunday Times for less than £1 a day. Start your free trial: thetimes.co.uk/thegame See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The DotCom Magazine Entrepreneur Spotlight
Sam Swicegood, Chief Executive Officer, Gib Games, A DotCom Magazine Exclusive Interview

The DotCom Magazine Entrepreneur Spotlight

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 35:47


About Sam Swicegood and Gib Games: My name is Sam and I solve problems. I have over 10 years experience in writing, technical consulting, media production, and more. Find out what I can do for you today. I am available for: Technical writing, copywriting, ghostwriting, editing, audio production, and graphic design. IT support and procedure management, article writing, program development, education, speaking, and process wrangling. Oh, and I can do magical things with Microsoft Excel. We're building the future. Virtual Reality isn't just gaming with a headset strapped to your face. It's a doorway to immersive experiences. It's an opportunity for accessibility. It's a window to imagination. GIB Games was founded on the principle that the Metaverse should be immersive, connected, and accessible to anyone. With years of level design and VR experience, GIB Games has created several amazing, awe-inspiring virtual environments like these for consumers and businesses alike. Come see what we're doing. It's sure to inspire you.

Best of Today
Government considering changes to rules on PCR tests

Best of Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 25:46


The government estimates that about a million people are now self-isolating. With staff off sick and hospitalisations increasing, a number of NHS trusts have declared critical incidents and some Greater Manchester hospitals are stopping non-urgent surgery. As a result, the government is now considering changes to coronavirus testing. People will no longer have to take PCR tests to confirm their coronavirus infection after a positive lateral flow test. Care Minister Gillian Keegan speaks to Today's Mishal Husain about the new thinking on lateral flow tests. GP Dr Zahid Chauhan, Director of Public Health Cumbria, Colin Cox and the President of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine, Katherine Henderson speak to Today's Nick Robinson about the pressures the NHS faces. Also on the programme discussing staff shortages were Nick Allen, Chief Executive of the British Meat Processors Association and Lucy Moreton, Professional Officer of the Immigration Services Union. (Image Credit: European Pressphoto Agency)

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast
Micheal Boblitz, Chief Executive Officer and Chief Strategy Officer at Tallahassee Orthopedic Clinic

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 9:59


This episode features Micheal Boblitz, Chief Executive Officer and Chief Strategy Officer at Tallahassee Orthopedic Clinic. Here, he discusses the benefits of consolidating orthopedic groups, transitioning the Tallahassee Orthopedic Clinic into more of a value based organization, the growth and expansion of his clinic, and more.

What Got You There with Sean DeLaney
The Distillation of Bob Iger

What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 38:40


Robert A. Iger is Executive Chairman of The Walt Disney Company and Chairman of the Board of Directors. He assumed the role of Executive Chairman in February 2020, having served as Chief Executive Officer since 2005. As Executive Chairman, Mr. Iger directs the Company's creative endeavors, while leading the Board and providing the full benefit of his experience, leadership and guidance. Over his 15 years leading the Company, Mr. Iger built Disney into one of the world's largest and most admired media and entertainment companies, while focusing on the three fundamental pillars of his strategic vision: generating the best creative content possible; fostering innovation and utilizing the latest technology; and expanding into new markets around the world. Mr. Iger has been named TIME's Businessperson of the Year (2019); one of the “World's Most Powerful People” by Forbes magazine (2018); one of the “Top Gun CEOs” by Forbes magazine (2009); one of Fortune magazine's “25 Most Powerful People in Business” (2006, 2007); one of the “Best CEOs” by Institutional Investor magazine (2008, 2009, 2010, 2011); MarketWatch CEO of the Year (2006); and “CEO of the Year” by Chief Executive (2014). His new autobiography is titled The Ride of a Lifetime: Lessons Learned from 15 Years as CEO of the Walt Disney Company, which offers stories and lessons about dealmaking, leadership, and much more. Read the full distillation: https://whatgotyouthere.com/the-distillation-of-bob-iger/ Subscribe to our YouTube: https://bit.ly/3Dxlw71 Watch on YouTube Get exclusive access to Masterworks by clicking HERE Subscribe to my Momentum Monday Newsletter Connect with us! Whatgotyouthere Sponsors Masterworks NuSkool Snacks Collagen Protein Bars https://nuskoolsnacks.com/ About What Got You There Podcast  What Got You There focuses on the journey behind some of the world's most successful people, uncovering the strategy, tactics, and routines that helped them get there. Sign Up to Momentum Monday is a weekly newsletter adding fuel to your inbox at the start of each week. Every

Multi-Hazards
Finding Certainty in the New Year (Remix with Margaret Heffernan)

Multi-Hazards

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 60:41


Another year rolls by and certainty seems just as hard to find. Dr. Margaret Heffernan's recent book Uncharted: How to Navigate the Future has a message: Tomorrow may be uncharted territory, but we can learn to handle uncertainty and move forward with confidence and agility. Join Dr. Heffernan and Multi-Hazards podcast host Vin Nelsen in this remix from early last year, all the more relevant now that we face new and challenging times going into a new year. Study Guide here, click where it says "PDF" on the middle left: https://multi-hazards.libsyn.com/finding-certainty-in-the-new-year-remix-with-margaret-heffernan Topics in this podcast include: * Why can we be optimists? * Why could asking experts for their opinions about the future be a waste of time? * Why and how our planning needs to change? * Uncertainty: necessarily bad or good? * How can uncertainty represent possibility? * What do transhumanists want? * How can aging bring out the best in us? * What is the "doctrine of inevitability"? * Why are driverless cars a problem? * How has technology taken away our willingness to explore? * Why are artists better with unpredictability? * Why do artists keep producing things that are ahead of their time? * How are scientists sometimes like these artists? * What generates breakthroughs in science? * How can we "reskill" for the future? * How can we have hope for the new year? Intro: "Ten Inch Spikes" by Jeremy Korpas on Youtube Audio Library Outro: "Floating Home" by Brian Bolger on YouTube Audio Library Photo by John Gibbons on Unsplash Margaret Heffernan's Bio Dr. Margaret Heffernan produced programmes for the BBC for 13 years. She then moved to the US where she spearheaded multimedia productions for Intuit, The Learning Company and Standard&Poors. She was Chief Executive of InfoMation Corporation, ZineZone Corporation and then iCast Corporation, was named one of the "Top 25" by Streaming Media magazine and one of the "Top 100 Media Executives" by The Hollywood Reporter. The author of six books, Margaret's third book, Willful Blindness : Why We Ignore the Obvious at our Peril was named one of the most important business books of the decade by the Financial Times. In 2015, she was awarded the Transmission Prize for A Bigger Prize: Why Competition isn't Everything and How We Do Better, described as "meticulously researched... engagingly written... universally relevant and hard to fault." Her TED talks have been seen by over twelve million people and in 2015 TED published Beyond Measure: The Big Impact of Small Changes. Her most recent book, Uncharted: How to map the future was published in 2020. She is a Professor of Practice at the University of Bath, Lead Faculty for the Forward Institute's Responsible Leadership Programme and, through Merryck & Co., mentors CEOs and senior executives of major global organizations. She holds an honorary doctorate from the University of Bath and continues to write for the Financial Times and the Huffington Post. Text and photo taken from her website: https://www.mheffernan.com/biography.php#modal-close

RTÉ - Morning Ireland
How can the tourism sector recover in 2022?

RTÉ - Morning Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 3:00


Eoghan O'Mara Walsh, Chief Executive of The Irish Tourism Industry Confederation, discusses the impact Covid-19 has had on tourism and how the sector can recover in 2022.

Mornings with Neil Mitchell
How much you should be paying for petrol this summer

Mornings with Neil Mitchell

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 3:49


RACV recommends not paying more than 145.9 cents per litre at the moment. Here's what Mark McKenzie, Chief Executive of the Australasian Convenience and Petroleum Marketers' Association, thinks of that. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast
Jeff Flaks, President and Chief Executive Officer at Hartford HealthCare & Duane Reynolds, Founder and CEO at Just Health Collective

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 12:02


This episode features Jeff Flaks, President and Chief Executive Officer at Hartford HealthCare & Duane Reynolds, Founder and CEO at Just Health Collective. Here, they discuss how they are working together to tackle health equity, diversity, and inclusion in the healthcare field.

The DotCom Magazine Entrepreneur Spotlight
Nikki Boyd, Chief Executive Officer, Mahaba Healthcare, A DotCom Magazine Exclusive Interview

The DotCom Magazine Entrepreneur Spotlight

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 27:02


About Nikki Boyd and Mahaba Healthcare: Experienced Chief Executive Officer with a demonstrated history of working in the hospital & health care industry. Skilled in Teamwork, Critical Thinking, Logistics Management, and Interpersonal Communication. Strong business development professional with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing from Ole Miss and a Bachelor of Arts focused in Criminal Justice and Corrections from Northwestern State University. We help nurses define their careers and ensure hospitals get reliable staffing. Our experience working and earning as per diem and travel nurses informed the dream to start Mahaba Healthcare Staffing Agency. However, having worked with enough healthcare facilities across the US, it was evident that many employer-nurse gaps still needed to be filled, and fast. Full-time nurses working as Telemetry nurses and PCU nurses are growing increasingly dissatisfied with the conditions and inflexibilities of their roles and workplaces. Professionals like yourself deserve a working environment where you are appreciated and treated the same way as their permanent staff without fearing burnout. Healthcare facilities face increased pressure due to surges in patient numbers, and they don't have enough capable nurses to handle the volatility. As a result, they risk losing their JHACO certifications. These hospitals, telemetry units, and progressive care facilities reach out to us because they fail to secure the top nursing staff for relevant roles independently. Mahaba Healthcare staffing builds bridges between honest and dedicated nurses looking for accommodating employers who fit their schedules. Our straightforward solutions for these candidates and employers create an easy-to-follow experience that you should take advantage of today. Our Mission To create exceptional staffing solutions that help bridge the gap between nurses and healthcare employers via sound professional support, extraordinary dedication, and safe and ethical practices to bring forth a reality of seamless healthcare delivery in contribution to helping to solve the future problems of the healthcare industry today. Our Vision To become the leader in delivering staffing solutions to progressive care nurses, telemetry nurses, and hospitals in the US while setting the bar higher for workplace excellence and safety standards.

The DotCom Magazine Entrepreneur Spotlight
Dieter Marlovics, Chief Executive Officer, RoboSig, A DotCom Magazine Exclusive Interview

The DotCom Magazine Entrepreneur Spotlight

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 31:12


About Dieter Marlovics and RoboSig: I am a seasoned technology entrepreneur who thrives on the successful execution of visionary ideas as well as funding, building, and leading the teams required to make it happen. I started my first business when I was 14 years old and truly enjoy working with other entrepreneurs to facilitate innovation, form a cohesive execution plan, make an investment, or provide positive energy to help take that first step and get through the inevitable difficult times. In 1997, I co-founded my first technology startup called HyperMeals.com, which enabled online food ordering from local restaurants for delivery. In 1999, I saw an opportunity in the electronic futures trading space when I noticed a small Chicago floor brokerage firm didn't so much as have email, let alone any meaningful technology whatsoever. I pitched the CEO of Gelber Group, LLC to fund the building of an electronic trading division inside the firm. Over the next decade as CIO, and my incessant entrepreneurial drive, Gelber Group evolved to become a highly profitable global algorithmic trading firm with over $100 Million in capital and more than nine data centers in three different countries. I sold my ownership stake in 2011. In 2015, I launched and provided seed funding for ReallyColor, LLC, where we built patented technology that lets you turn your photos into coloring pages and custom coloring books, and have sold gift cards in Toys "R" Us, BJ's Wholesale, Sam's Club, and others. In addition to other various business interests, I have published a number of book chapters and articles touching on my experiences and vision of technology management and leadership. I am also a singer-songwriter having released a handful of songs under my own name and under the name of my band, O.I.S. Digital copies of my music have been sold on iTunes and other digital retailers in over a dozen different countries. The RoboSig dream team has developed autonomous, systematic, and AI-supported market-neutral trading strategies coupled with automated risk management, to generate the most consistent risk adjusted returns ever seen. RoboSig is turning the problem of low, or even negative, interest rates around the world on its head. Our autonomous technology searches for and takes advantage of transient anomalies as it profitably mines global stability via the $6Trillion/day FX market and beyond.

Mornings with Neil Mitchell
Holidaying at home: Victorians flock to local waterways this summer

Mornings with Neil Mitchell

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 8:16


Shane McInnes gets the lowdown on holiday patterns from Felicia Mariani, Chief Executive of the Victoria Tourism Industry Council. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Urban Broadcast Collective
139. Steam works_PX

Urban Broadcast Collective

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 60:07


PlanningxChange Episode 87, features Steve Oates, the Chief Executive of the Heritage Railway Association (HRA). Formerly a property professional who then spent 20 years in commercial radio, Steve has had an active lifelong interest in heritage and steam railways. From his teenage years, and for more than 40 years, Steve has worked with the award-winning Isle of Wight Steam Railway in a non-executive and voluntary capacity, including ten years chairing its board of directors and trustees. He was appointed as the HRA's first chief executive 4 years ago, moving it from an entirely volunteer-run organisation to its' position as the UK-wide trade association and professional support body for the Heritage Rail sector. From the World's first preserved heritage railway – the Talyllyn in North Wales – to railways operating iconic mainline locomotives such as Flying Scotsman, between them the UK's heritage railways operate steam, diesel and electric traction and range from large standard gauge railways to smaller 12-inch and 15-inch gauge lines. As the sector's trade association, the HRA actively represents, and works to protect and promote, the interests of this wide range of heritage and tourist railways, tramways, cliff railways, related museums, railway preservation groups and associated organisations. The HRA has some 300 member railways, tramways and other organisations located throughout England and the UK. Coming in all shapes and sizes, more than 180 HRA member organisations regularly open to the public, 160 of them operating with passengers. The Associations website is https://www.hra.uk.com Professionally Steve is a chartered surveyor, but has wide commercial experience, having founded and managed three successful commercial radio stations, and headed-up an economic development service for a local authority. Heritage railways attract some 13 million visitors each year; they retain and nurture important skills, and employ some 4,000 people; they are important to local communities, providing interest and participation for 22,000 volunteers; and they are important to the wider economy, annually together contributing approaching £500million of economic impact. The HRA's 2021 annual awards can be viewed either on the HRA website or at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AkwvuCI6wnI Audio production by Jack Bavage. The episode was released on 27 December 2021. PlanningxChange is proud to be part of the Urban Broadcast Collective.

World Business Report
Ireland's economy surges despite Covid and Brexit

World Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 22:58


Russell Padmore travels across Ireland to find out how the Irish economy has shrugged off the impact of the pandemic and problems caused by Brexit. It seems foreign investors, especially Irish Americans, are confident that Ireland will enjoy significant growth in 2022, despite the prospect of corporation tax being increased, after the country signed up to a global deal orchestrated by the OECD. Russell's journey from the capital city, Dublin, to the rural north west also includes a trip across the border into Northern Ireland to hear how businesses there are worried about the UK government creating more uncertainty in its economic relationship with the European Union, which could undermine trade with the Irish Republic. We hear analysis from Austin Hughes, chief economist at KBC Ireland, Professor Luke O'Neill an immunologist at Trinity College Dublin, Mark Redmond, the Chief Executive of the American Chamber of Commerce in Ireland, Gillian Doyle, the founder of Cerebreon Technologies and Stephen Kelly, the Chief Executive of Manufacturing Northern Ireland.

Spectator Radio
Podcast special: Has technology helped the Northern Ireland border?

Spectator Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 31:37


Had Covid-19 not continued to dominate the headlines this year, there's little doubt that the outcomes of the Brexit deal would have been at the forefront of our policy discussions. Britain has left the EU with a bespoke trade agreement, but it's far from perfect, as the Northern Ireland Protocol continues to cause problems, especially for trade flow between Great Britain and Northern Ireland. What have digital solutions done so far to get closer to our goal of seamless trade? Has it been enough? What problems are still left to solve and do the realities of Brexit simply mean that we can now never fully escape these new regulatory burdens? To discuss, Kate Andrews is joined by Frank Dunsmuir, Head of Customs and International Trade Practice at Fujitsu; Stephen Kelly, Chief Executive of Manufacturing NI; and Shanker Singham, Chief Executive of Competere and an advisor to Fujitsu. This podcast is sponsored by Fujitsu.

Drive With Tom Elliott
Heidi Murphy finds out what's in store at Carols By Candlelight on Friday night!

Drive With Tom Elliott

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 8:01


Heidi Murphy, who is filling in as host of 3AW Drive, spoke with Ron Hooton at rehearsals on Thursday! He's the Chief Executive and Director of Vision Australia. Ambassador Donna Dyson, an award-winning songwriter, also popped by for the chat! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Kiwi with the World Bank, tackling our housing crisis

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 27:39


Jane Henley left a senior job at the World Bank in Washington DC to return home to Aotearoa, where she's turned her energies to our housing crisis and the part off-site construction can play. She was the founding Chief Executive of the Green Building Council, going on to lead the global Green Building Council, before joining the World Bank as Global Operations Manager of Green Building for the Bank's private sector arm. She also gained a Masters in Business from MIT. But like many kiwis abroad, the Covid pandemic awakened the urge to come home, which she did with her young daughter last year. Jane Henley now consults to Kainga Ora, the government housing agency, on its strategy, particularly in the area of off-site construction or pre-fab housing. She says it is undoubtedly the way forward for New Zealand to solve its housing crisis - in a sustainable, innovative way.

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Kiwi with the World Bank, tackling our housing crisis

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 27:39


Jane Henley left a senior job at the World Bank in Washington DC to return home to Aotearoa, where she's turned her energies to our housing crisis and the part off-site construction can play. She was the founding Chief Executive of the Green Building Council, going on to lead the global Green Building Council, before joining the World Bank as Global Operations Manager of Green Building for the Bank's private sector arm. She also gained a Masters in Business from MIT. But like many kiwis abroad, the Covid pandemic awakened the urge to come home, which she did with her young daughter last year. Jane Henley now consults to Kainga Ora, the government housing agency, on its strategy, particularly in the area of off-site construction or pre-fab housing. She says it is undoubtedly the way forward for New Zealand to solve its housing crisis - in a sustainable, innovative way.

American POTUS
POTUS 27 - Chief Executive & Chief Justice

American POTUS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 69:14


William Howard Taft was the hand-picked successor by Theodore Roosevelt himself.  But after just a couple years in The White House, their tight relationship fell apart, and Taft's run for a 2nd term became the target for TR's political attacks.  And what did all of this inner-party feuding do…it caused them both to lose!  Taft was out, but his story was far from over.  The man who loved the law, got his dream job when he became the first and only ex-POTUS to become Chief Justice of The SCOTUS!

Cleaning Up. Leadership in an age of climate change.
Ep69: Peter Sweatman 'Our Savings Will Save the Planet'

Cleaning Up. Leadership in an age of climate change.

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 66:04


Peter Sweatman is the founder and Chief Executive of Climate Strategy & Partners (@ClimateSt and www.climatestrategy.com), a strategic consulting group in Clean Energy, Clean Technology Innovation and Energy Efficiency working with leading companies and policymakers in the global energy transitionPeter is also Chairman and founder of Energy Efficiency Capital Advisors (www.eecapadvisors.com) an expert solution provider and finance structuring partner for over Euro 60 million of finance for energy savings and on-site power in Spanish cities.Peter Sweatman has spent 30 years in finance of which 18 are climate finance and energy efficiency. He has published fifteen white papers and chaired, moderated or spoken at 380 conferences and workshops on the global energy transition to a climate neutral economy. Peter is the rapporteur for EU Commission and UNEP FI's 500-strong Energy Efficiency Financial Institutions Group (#EEFIG) since 2013 and for five years was the G20's EEFTG technical lead. He is the co-chair of Breakthrough Energy's European Climate Innovation Hub, a founder advisor to the Climate Bond Initiative, a founder member of the Ashoka Support Network in Spain, advisor to the Climate Lab, advisor to Braemar Energy Ventures, on the steering committees of EY and CapGemini Invent's work on green recovery and climate innovation, a board member of Menorca Preservation Fund and visiting lecturer at IIT-Comillas university. Peter chaired and reported on a 250-expert process to help design the EU ETS Innovation fund and published a review of EU finance for competitive innovation for net-zero emissions by 2050.Peter holds an MA Cantab degree in Engineering and Management Studies from Cambridge University. In 1991, he joined JPMorgan in Corporate Finance where he spent 9 years responsible for client business, mainly in debt capital markets, for Spain, Portugal, Austria and Switzerland based in London and then for Mexico and other Latin American countries from New York. In the year 2000, Peter became a social entrepreneur to found three successful and high impact NGOs: Charity Digital (www.charitydigital.org.uk), New Philanthropy Capital (www.thinknpc.org) and Catalyst Climate Change Trust. From 2005, Peter was a Managing Director in Bunge-Climate Change Capital that was – from 2004-2010 - one of the world's leading specialist fund managers and advisors in the low carbon economy.

RNIB Connect
1064: National Federation Of the Blind USA Review Of 2021

RNIB Connect

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 6:19


Each year, at this time, RNIB Connect Radio's Allan Russell sits down with the Chief Executives of some of the UK's, and world's, leading sight loss charities. Today, we hear from Chris Danielsen who is the PR Director for the National Federation of the Blind in the USA. Chris looks back at the highlights and challenges of 2021 and ahead to 2022. If you' d like to learn more about the NFB, USA, go to www.nfb.org #RNIBConnect Image: Chris Danielsen, PR Director NBB USA

Skip the Queue
The fight for talent with Kate Nicholls, CEO of UKHospitality

Skip the Queue

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 40:03


Skip the Queue is brought to you by Rubber Cheese, a digital agency that builds remarkable systems and websites for attractions that helps them increase their visitor numbers. Your host is  Kelly Molson, MD of Rubber Cheese.Download our free ebook The Ultimate Guide to Doubling Your Visitor NumbersIf you like what you hear, you can subscribe on iTunes, Spotify, and all the usual channels by searching Skip the Queue or visit our website rubbercheese.com/podcastIf you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave us a five star review, it really helps others find us. And remember to follow us on Twitter for your chance to win the books that have been mentioned in this episode.Competition ends April 29th 2022. The winner will be contacted via Twitter. Show references: https://www.ukhospitality.org.uk/https://twitter.com/UKHospKatehttps://www.linkedin.com/in/kate-nicholls-093b0514/ Kate Nicholls is CEO of UKHospitality, the powerful voice representing the broad hospitality sector, having previously worked as CEO and Strategic Affairs Director of the ALMR.In July 2019, Kate was appointed Chair of the Tourism Alliance, the membership organisation for the tourism industry comprising of leading trade associations/trade bodies within the sector. Kate is also Chair of Mayor of London's Night Time Commission and is also a member of the Events Industry Board, London Food Board, Tourism Industry Council, Cultural Cities Enquiry, London & Partners Members Group and the Advisory Board for the Institute for Industrial Strategy.After gaining a degree in English and a post-graduate diploma in competition law, Kate worked as a researcher in the House of Commons and European Parliament before joining Whitbread as Government Relations Manager, starting her career in hospitality in 1993. Kate was Director at one of the largest independent public affairs companies, working with a number of hospitality, retail and leisure accounts before establishing her own strategic communications consultancy in 2000. She is a graduate of Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge and Kings College London.A highly motivated Board-level adviser with a proven track record in devising and delivering strategic public policy and communication campaigns. Over 25 years experience working in a variety of government, corporate, agency and freelance roles. Transcription:Kelly Molson: Welcome to Skip the Queue, a podcast for people working in or working with visitor attractions. I'm your host, Kelly Molson. Each episode, I speak with industry experts from the attractions world. In today's episode, I speak with Kate Nicholls, CEO of UKHospitality and the Co-chair of the London Tourism Recovery Board. Kate answers your burning questions on how to attract and maintain talent in the current challenging climate. If you like what you hear, subscribe on iTunes, Spotify, and all the usual channels by searching Skip the Queue.Kelly Molson: Kate, thank you so much for coming on the podcast today. I know how incredibly busy you are, so I'm very grateful.Kate Nicholls: Thank you. It's great to be with you. I don't think I've had any time in the last two years really where it hasn't been incredibly busy, so it's good to take some time out and have a chance to have a chat. So thank you for having me.Kelly Molson: You are very welcome. You are very welcome. I'm glad I could give you that time. Right, Kate, icebreaker questions, because this is where we start all of our podcast interviews. I want to know what is at the top of your bucket list?Kate Nicholls: Ooh, well, for the last two summers we'd been planning ... My eldest was just about to go to University when COVID hit, and for the last two summers we'd been planning to go to Costa Rica as a sort of last big family holiday. And of course that's been canceled for the last two years. So top of my bucket list at the moment is to go on holiday with my two daughters, ideally Costa Rica, but actually I'd settle for anywhere at the moment. I haven't really had a proper break. But yeah, Costa Rica.Kelly Molson: Costa Rica, definitely. Yeah. I hear you. I feel like anywhere with some sun right now would probably do you the world a good, Kate.Kate Nicholls: Exactly.Kelly Molson: Okay. If you could bring back any fashion trend, what would it be?Kate Nicholls: Well, to be fair, they've never gone away from my wardrobe, but I would really like to bring back the wrap dress. They were such a good staple for anybody who worked in the '80s and '90s and the early '00s. Quite like to bring them back as a major fashion trend.Kelly Molson: Yeah, good. Can't go wrong with a wrap dress, can you? Boots, wrap dress, cardie, done.Kate Nicholls: You can't. Very forgiving, pair with boots or heels or flats or trainers, and you can just adjust it according to how you're feeling during the week.Kelly Molson: It's the perfect work-to-evening outfit. They're perfect.Kate Nicholls: Exactly.Kelly Molson: Okay, Kate, and this might be a little bit like asking you what your favourite child is, but I want to know what your favourite restaurant is?Kate Nicholls: Oh, that's the difficult one because it changes so much depending on how I'm feeling and the time of day and what I'm doing. But during the lockdown, my local Korean cafe has been my go-to place for getting a quick fix, some comfort food, and they've kept me going throughout lockdown. I'm a big fan of street food.Kelly Molson: Oh yeah, love street food. We have a really big street food community in Cambridge, actually, and it's just amazing, isn't it? Like being able to try all those different cuisines in one place? Fantastic.Kate Nicholls: It is. It is. And I think I've got kind of a butterfly brain, so being able to go try lots of little things, lots of little samples and eat that kind of stuff is great. But the other thing we did do over the summer, my daughter and I, we went and celebrated the new three Michelin star female chefs that we had in London that were awarded. So again, I go from street food to high-end.Kelly Molson: Love it. Absolutely love it. Okay, Kate, it's unpopular opinion time. I ask everybody that comes on the podcast to share an unpopular opinion with us. It can be humorous, can be serious, whatever it needs to have to be your unpopular opinion.Kate Nicholls: Well, I did think long and hard about this one because there are so many unpopular opinions I think I could have. But if I'm sort of talking about the biggest one that would sort of divide a lot of people, cats are better than dogs. I'm really not a dog person.Kelly Molson: Oh, okay.Kate Nicholls: That's going to be controversial and split.Kelly Molson: It's very controversial. And I'm not going to lie, I've got two dogs, so I am a dog person. But Kate, my dogs are a nightmare at the moment. We've had a flea situation this year. I've got a very noisy little dachshund who is absolutely filthy. The weather is disgusting. You have to go out with them all the time. Cats are sounding more and more appealing to me by the day.Kate Nicholls: Cats are sort of neat, clean, undemanding. They're not as problematic as dogs. I always think dogs, you feel as though you've got another kid in the house. I mean, my unpopular opinion is based on the fact that I did have a nasty encounter with a dog when I was little, so I am quite scared of them. But yeah, dogs are not as good as cats.Kelly Molson: All right. Well, let's see what our listeners think. I'm not going to lie because it's the time of year I'm swaying towards a swaying cat, Kate. Yeah. You might have changed my opinion there. Nice. Listen, thank you again for coming on the podcast. I really do appreciate it. I mean, I'd be super gobsmacked if anybody that's listening to this podcast episode doesn't know who you are, but just give us a little brief overview of what your role is at the moment, just to explain how critical it has been over the past couple of years.Kate Nicholls: Yeah. So I'm currently Chief Executive at UKHospitality. That's the national trade body that represents hospitality operators and businesses and employers. And so we have 700 member companies. Between them, they operate just over 100,000 outlets across the UK, from a single-site pub, coffee shop, cafe, restaurant, park bar, hotel, holiday accommodation, right the way through to the national chains.Kate Nicholls: Our role as the trade body is to be the voice and face of the industry to promote the sector as a great place to grow, work, and invest, to engage with the government, to make sure we've got the most supportive regulatory and tax environment within which businesses can thrive and survive. And then to provide insight, advice, and guidance to our members on the way in which they can operate to be compliant and to help their businesses grow.Kate Nicholls: And so normally that's quite a broad-based role, but it was really front and centre as soon as COVID hit because clearly, we've got inbound tourism. We've got hotels that were hit first. City centre restaurants, pubs, and bars started to feel the effects of COVID back in February. And really since February ... I mean my first meeting on COVID with the government was the 28th of January last year.Kate Nicholls: And since then, it's been pretty full-on making sure that in real-time we can present the views, concerns, impact of COVID on our business sector and try and make sure that we get the support needed to sustain those businesses, to maintain the employment, to protect jobs within the industry when we've been so hard hit by COVID.Kate Nicholls: So really a big role with government, meeting government ministers and officials two, three, four times a week at the height of the crisis, and also being on the media to try and explain what the impact is of what appeared to be relatively small scale changes, what big impact that can have on business viability and really spelling it out to make sure that people understand what that means potentially longer term in terms of viable businesses, the economy, employment in the UK.Kelly Molson: And, as I said, you have been the spokesperson for the sector throughout the pandemic. And I have to say, Kate, you were in my top five Twitter accounts that I followed continuously throughout. So I had Kate's, I had Bernard Donoghue, I had ALVA, ASVA and Blooloop. And that was my top five to find out what the hell was going on in the sectors that we worked in. So thank you so much for sharing and for doing that role.Kelly Molson: So what I want to talk about today is about attracting and retaining talent within the attractions and hospitality sectors. But I guess, from a ... I don't run an attraction. I work with them. I'm an associate in that sector. So I guess I want to ask a couple of questions about the general public and what we can do right now.Kelly Molson: So we have a situation in our local town. I live in a town called Saffron Walden just outside Cambridge, a beautiful town, a market town, lots of lovely pubs. One of my favourite pubs, which is one of a chain, has had to close for a good couple of months now. And essentially, it closed because some of its other restaurants were so overwhelmed and so busy but so short-staffed that they had to redistribute staff from our pub to their pubs.Kelly Molson: And I guess that's happening in a lot of different places as well. So if we're unable to book a table because a venue is short-staffed, what can we, as the general public, do right now to support the sector?Kate Nicholls: Well, I think it does highlight a challenge that the industry has got. It's more acute in certain parts of the country, but up until Omicron hit and we were all going back eating and drinking out more regularly, the industry as a whole just did not have sufficient labour to be able to operate at full strength. So a quarter of our businesses in the same situation as the one you just describe saying that they were having to restrict hours, cut covers, not open for certain days of the week, turn away bookings simply because they didn't have the staff.Kate Nicholls: So I think as the general public, what we can do with those businesses is try and be a bit more creative in supporting them. Is there a different time that we can book? Because everybody tries to book dinner or lunch at the same time. Can we spread it out a little bit throughout the day? Can we look at going for early suppers or late suppers or brunches or afternoons? If we can't, then can we help them in other ways if they're still doing takeaway, if they're still doing delivery, we can support our businesses in that way. Or booking ahead in advance and making sure that we take out gift cards and those kinds of creative solutions some of our businesses have done where you can get cash through the tills and book two or three meals in advance.Kate Nicholls: So that's a main bit of support. The second thing is that if you do have a booking and your plans change and you can't make it, let them know, and let them know in sufficient time. Because we still are getting quite a lot of no-shows that people make these bookings, something changes. Plans always change, we do know that, but people aren't letting them know. And particularly at the moment when you've got larger scale bookings for Christmas, people will have bought that food in well in advance and will start cooking it well in advance, so you do need to let them know the day before or at least a good couple of hours before if you can't make your booking, and then they can pass it onto somebody on a waiting list.Kelly Molson: That actually leads to another question is how is the sector feeling right now? So with Omicron, with the Christmas rush, what's the general mood like in the hospitality sector at the moment? Are we seeing a lot of people booking, cancelling reservations that they have for large groups of people? Is it quieter than it should be?Kate Nicholls: Quieter than it would be at a normal Christmas. So even before we had Omicron, we knew that we weren't having the same level of bookings as we were seeing Christmas 2019 and previously, so trade is down. We have seen cancellations. They're running at about 10% at the moment, and we have seen a downturn in footfall over the last week. Not just for those bookings and corporate events, Christmas parties, Christmas socials, but just a more general decline in walk-in bookings and walk-in activity. So we are seeing revenues down over the course of the last week, 15, 20%, and that's as a result of the uncertainty.Kate Nicholls: There's a high degree of nervousness within the industry and a great degree of fear at the moment because we've all been in this situation before. Sadly, this time last year, people will have invested heavily to be able to open and operate at Christmas, and unless you get that Christmas trade-in, it can be very damaging to the businesses. They rely on having a good December in order to get them through the quieter months of January to March. And without that good December, there are many businesses that will undoubtedly go to the wall. What should be a very optimistic and hopeful time has, in the space of a week, turned to be very uncertain and very concerning.Kelly Molson: Okay. So look, some great advice there from Kate. If we can look at when you're booking, changing times, if you can look at supporting your local restaurants by booking gift vouchers, for example, or if they are doing takeaway, please do do that and let's try and get them through this really difficult period that we're seeing.Kelly Molson: Now Kate, as I said, I want to talk about attracting and retaining talent in the visitor attraction sector. I don't run an attraction. So what I did, and what I thought was a good idea, is to ask some of the past guests that have been on to ask me to ask you questions. And I've had some fantastic questions in from many of the different guests that we've had on. So let me just ask you a few of the things that have come in. Gordon Morrison, the CEO of ASVA, and Adam Goymour, park director at ROARR! Dinosaur Adventure, actually had really, really similar questions. So let me read out what Gordon wrote over because he puts it far more eloquently than I ever could.Kelly Molson: So Gordon said, "Staff are the beating heart of every tourism business and can undoubtedly make the visitor experience memorable both positively and negatively. As we face up to what is quite possibly the most difficult recruitment and retention environment in the tourism industry has ever seen, is it right that we should continue to rely on our people so heavily to deliver outstanding experiences? And if so, how do we ensure that our businesses are attractive, and how do we keep that top talent in the industry?"Kate Nicholls: I think this is the number one issue that all operators are grappling with at the moment as we come out and we've got a very tight labour market and we've got a real battle just to get staff in, nevermind the battle for talent that we had going into COVID. So we were already facing those challenges. I do think what we need to do is to use COVID as a reset moment and look again at our ways of working, style of working, what we're expecting of people. This gives us an opportunity to revise terms and conditions and to look again at hours of work in the sector to make sure that we are being as flexible as we possibly can and we are being as responsive as we possibly can to what new recruits are telling us.Kate Nicholls: Because we've got lots of new, younger people coming into the industry, many have had no experience before and are questioning, quite rightly, some of the ways that we do things. So particularly in food and beverages and things like that, less so in attractions, but you do get some antisocial hours. You do get double shifts. And people have different ways of paying people. And I think the labour scheduling and the flexibility that we can provide should be a positive rather than it being something that holds us back.Kate Nicholls: So I do think we can look again at making sure that we are as attractive as we possibly can be and that we've got our best foot forward. I think secondly, what we need to be doing as an industry is to look after the sector's employer brand. Individual business is very good at doing this, promoting themselves as a career of choice, but we want to get across the fact that we're a career and we have a great plethora of opportunities available to people if they come and work within our businesses.Kate Nicholls: Because we're an industry largely of small and independent businesses, we don't have the size and scale, but I think we can look again at the sector branding to be able to make sure we put the best foot forward, that we describe how important it is as a career, how meritocratic it is. Because there's no sector likes ours that provides young people with such opportunity where you can come in with limited experience, limited qualifications and skills. We will upskill you very rapidly and you can move into management within about two years. There's no other sector that will give you that level of responsibility and authority at such a young age and at such a low level within the business, and the pay and salary that goes alongside it.Kate Nicholls: So I think there's more we can do around that in terms of communicating career of choice. And also communicating that even if you only want to come with us for a short time, we will equip you with common transferrable skills that other employers will find valuable; business, finance, people management, leadership, conflict management. You get that by working in hospitality businesses and visitor economy businesses, again, at a very low entry-level, and these are soft skills, people skills that are valuable at all levels.Kate Nicholls: And then the final element is about making sure that we do invest in our people, that we do train them to provide continuing professional development and we invest in leadership and management as people go through. We're very good at taking people at entry-level and doing the immediate skills and training they need to be able to function. We need to look at how we can continue to invest in those people. That's what young people particularly are looking for from careers and employers now.Kelly Molson: Yeah, absolutely. It's really interesting what you said about the soft skills as well, because I think that one of the best starts that I ever had to my working career was working in hospitality and in retail because it gave me so much experience of understanding how to talk to people, how to communicate with people. And from that customer service perspective as well. I think it gave me such a good grounding in my career, and all of those skills I learnt then, I've taken through into what I do now in terms of sales and an account management role.Kate Nicholls: Absolutely. And if you think about some of the young people who've been most affected by COVID and had their schooling disrupted, their social lives disrupted for a couple of years, those are the skills that they are lacking. When teachers are talking about young people coming back into school, it's time management. It's personnel skills. It's social skills. It's communication. That's what they get from us.Kelly Molson: Yeah. Completely, completely agree. Mark Ellis, who's the interim lead at the National Memorial Arboretum, actually has asked a question that picks up on some of your earlier points there. He says that, "One of the outcomes of the industry-wide staffing shortage is that staff are able to negotiate a better work-life balance, which is a really good thing. Ultimately that is going to lead to better conditions throughout the industry, hopefully, more job satisfaction, higher standards and a better customer experience." Mark asks, "Do you think that we will see the appearance of some widely-accepted examples of best practice?" So things like how businesses will manage seasonal contracts or flexible hours or unsociable hours like you mentioned?Kate Nicholls: Yes. I think we will start to see that evolving as we go further forward and as we come out of this. I think that's what I mean by a COVID reset moment, that we can look again at the ways that we've done things to be able to offer that kind of attractive proposition to people. So moving away from some of the zero-hours contracts, moving away from some of the seasonal changes where people don't have that much certainty, and towards one that is focused on what the applicant is looking for and wanting and the flexibility that they're needing, and presenting it in a way which is appealing to them.Kate Nicholls: I think we will, if we work carefully at it, I think there's a great opportunity for us across the entire sector to pick up some of those really good case studies and examples and promote them and push them out around the sector so that we have a positive employability story to tell.Kelly Molson: That is great. Now, I'm going to pick up on that a little bit later on because we've had a really good question about that very topic. Let me ask you about the supply chain, though, and again, this is another question from Mark at the National Memorial Arboretum. So the supply chain at the moment is disrupted. Food costs are increasing. We all need to find a more sustainable way to feed humanity. What can we do as an industry, and this is the attractions industry, to help the public recognise that hospitality outlets that source locally, use seasonal ingredients, increase their plant-based options, that they are the best place to respond to these pressures? But at the same time, costs are going to rise through dual pressure of food and wage increases.Kate Nicholls: Well, I think this is going to be a collective challenge for all of us because it's inevitable that with the cost pressures that we've got that are building across the sector, and not just our sector but across the economy, prices are going to have to go up to consumers irrespective of what we're talking about in terms of local sourcing, et cetera, and the positive efforts we've got. So I think as an industry we're going to have to work to be able to communicate to consumers clearly why we are having to put prices up post-pandemic, and it is going to be a struggle and a challenge and there's going to be that juggling act which there always is around pricing decisions about how far you can push prices onto consumers before you turn off demand.Kate Nicholls: But with VAT alone going up, there is going to have to be a price increase that we are going to have to pass on. So I think that's one challenge that we need to look at separately. I think the advantage is it's going to be across the economy as a whole and we're not going to be doing it in isolation. So I think customers are going to get more used to hearing about prices and hearing about costs coming through.Kate Nicholls: And then I think, you're right, there is a real opportunity there for turning that conversation around and explaining about how local sourcing is more beneficial, meets the broader sustainability issues that consumers are increasingly concerned about. Not just consumers, potential employees. So sustainability and environmental and social governance issues are coming higher up the agenda when we're talking about recruitment and putting ourselves out as an attractive proposition.Kate Nicholls: People are looking for authentic stories about local sourcing, local supply chain, carbon net zero, limiting waste, all of those kind of positive issues that we can turn to our advantage. But I do think customers understand it doesn't come cost-free. So I think they are two sides of the same coin. I don't think we should be apologetic about the fact that we need to be able to invest in good quality produce in order to deliver a more sustainable food supply chain.Kelly Molson: Do you think those conversations are slightly easier to have now as well, since the pandemic? Because I think what we did see when attractions were able to open up and hospitality were able to open up is that we saw a huge increase in demand for things that were local. We wanted to understand more about our local environment. We wanted to be able to support our local independents. So do you think that's going to be an easier conversation to have now that we're in that mindset already?Kate Nicholls: I think so. I think COVID provides us with that opportunity. Certainly one of the strong trends, and it sees no sign of abating as we come out of COVID, localism and hyperlocalism was a trend we saw during lockdown when, inevitably if you can't travel, you explore in your neighborhood. But even as we reopened, people were exploring in their locality before they've got confident enough to go further across the country or into city centres. And clearly you're moving away from global travel for two years. Again, those are trends that become sticky with consumers and consumers are interested in hearing and exploring it more.Kate Nicholls: So I think neighbourhood is going to stick with us for a lot longer. Certainly as well in terms of the different ways in which we work, I don't think it's going to be as polarised as in the office or at home, but I do think you're going to be working remotely and people are going to be looking at neighbourhood and local options to be able to facilitate that. So I do think that that frees up the conversation to be had more generally about how we are making a more sustainable, more robust, more resilient supply chain by looking locally. But equally, that doesn't come cost-free.Kelly Molson: Absolutely. Let's talk about opening hours. So Mark had a really good question around that. So he says, "Over the last few months, as venues have reopened, we've seen many places change their opening hours, and that's to enable them to offer fair shifts for their staff in response to business needs." He actually says some are open fewer days each week, and some are closing earlier. The micropub and brewpub and taphouse that he tends to frequent, he does put in brackets here, "On an all too infrequent basis though. Nights out are a rare treat. But they're all offering a brilliant experience with great staff during their opening hours. Does Kate think that the public will learn to understand that not opening all hours is a new thing to be embraced, or do you think that pressure to increase the venues to go back to 11:00 to 11:00 will be the norm?"Kate Nicholls: I think it's probably too early to say yet with consumers and consumer habits and trends because I don't think people are going out in the same way that they were yet. What we have seen after this reopening, post the 19th of July, that there is an expectation from consumers to go back to normal and they're not very forgiving of those who aren't. So I think consumers during COVID have got used to having things when they want it, at the time that they want it, and rapidly, and they don't take kindly to things not being available for them.Kate Nicholls: So I suspect it will be more challenging to have that on a longer-term basis if that's a longer way of working. What we do know, however, is that what consumers really don't like is uncertainty. So if they can guarantee that you are always open for these particular days, these particular hours, they will understand that more readily than they turn up at your door and you're not open today because you can't get the staff. That's the bit that seems to create the disconnect.Kate Nicholls: And what we don't have yet is a loyal customer base back. So if they can't get it from you, they will go and find it somewhere else is what we're seeing very rapidly. So I don't think it means that everybody has to go back to 11:00 to 11:00, seven days a week and full service, but you do need to get back to some consistency and some standardisation for customers. And certainly what we're finding in the restaurant side, for example, are quite a lot of businesses in city centres are closing Monday and Tuesday, and that causes a degree of confusion for consumers when they're back out.Kate Nicholls: Now, having said that, our customer habits are going to change a little bit again over Christmas if we do have restrictions brought back in due to Omicron and therefore customers again will be adapting to changes and the ways that they're doing things and changes in the ways of working. But I do think that will depend on where you are located. If you are located in a city centre and people are not visiting the city centre as regularly, you need to have that certainty about when you are available and open that matches and meets with them. If you are in a local neighbourhood and a local area and you're part of the community, I think there will be increasing pressure back being available when the customers want you.Kelly Molson: Earlier in this question you mentioned that it's too early to tell because we're not seeing the demand, we're not seeing people going out as frequently as they were. It's a difficult question, but how long do you think that we need to leave it until we do start to see some data around that?Kate Nicholls: Again, I think that's difficult to be able to work out because of the uncertainties of new variants and changes in restrictions. We haven't had a clear consistent period where we've been able to trade normally. Had we not had Omicron coming along, I think we would have got a better feel for it. After Christmas, we would have been able to look back at five, six months where we could see what customers were doing, how confident they were, and could try and see trading was doing without the blips that were caused by supply chain shortages, delivery shortages, pingdemics, labour shortages across our industry. I suspect that it's going to be until the middle of next year before you can really start to plan with any certainty around what's stuck, what's a long-term trend and what's something that you're nudging consumer behaviour around.Kelly Molson: Thank you. You mentioned earlier about sharing best practices and we've had a great question from Hannah Monteverde who's the Park Manager at BeWILDerwood in Cheshire. So Hannah says, "It's not always feasible to be able to offer an increased salary or market-leading benefits." She'd be really interested to know of any examples of curveball ideas that have attracted staff recently. Do you have any case studies or examples of attractions that you feel have really bucked the trend for recruitment particularly well?Kate Nicholls: I think the ones that are doing interesting stuff around flexible hours, hours when you want it, more frequent pay. One of the things that we found across our sector was that people were getting paid after four weeks, six weeks in some cases when they were a new starter, compared to some of the newer startup companies and labour scheduling companies and temporary recruitment from Amazon where they were getting paid within the week. So as soon as they did a shift, they were getting paid.Kate Nicholls: And actually that was something that people found was really attractive, that as soon as they'd done their job, they were getting their pay almost immediately, so a return almost back to weekly pay packets was quite an interesting one. It's not necessarily creative or curveball, but it's just listening to what people were saying that was a frustration for them that they wanted to be able to have.Kate Nicholls: Food, uniforms, selling those kinds of benefits, the walking to work for anybody who's in a local attraction or provision of transport for those people who were off the beaten track and people relying upon cars, et cetera. Those are things that have been used quite creatively. And then flexible labour scheduling, giving people the ability to tell the employer when they were available to work and how many hours they had rather than getting that rota coming down on a fixed basis saying, "This is when we rota-ed you and you have to go away and work out somebody else to swap with if it coincides with your yoga class or your student lesson or a GP's appointment."Kate Nicholls: So I think putting more power in the hands of the employees and giving them the ability to be able to ask for what they want, when they want, hours and pay, those are the two creative ones I've seen most frequently.Kelly Molson: That's fascinating. I mean, the crux of it is flexibility, ultimate flexibility as the employee. That is such a simple change to be paid weekly, so that instant gratification, "I've done a really good job. I've been paid for it." What a simple change to be able to make that could make such a big difference.Kate Nicholls: Yeah. And there's technology that enables you to do it now. So on the labour scheduling front in terms of, "I'm available for these hours and I'd like some work." Stint provides the opportunity and there's labour scheduling that provides the opportunity to do that, to just log on and say, "I can do four hours," rather than, "I can do a full day." And that sometimes is better. And equally, there's technology that allows you to drawdown. So if the business still wants to keep a monthly salary payroll, you can draw down earlier ahead of your salary, so you just get it a bit more when you've been doing your work. Particularly relevant for young people coming into the sector.Kelly Molson: Yeah, absolutely. And hopefully retaining them for a little bit longer, because that is the challenge with the sector is that it has always been seen as a bit of a stopgap, hasn't it? And ideally, we want to-Kate Nicholls: It has, and in some respects, we shouldn't be apologetic for that because it is a good first job. It's a good first base. Transferrable skills that we talked about before. We obviously want to keep and capture those people who want to use it as a career. But equally, given the labour shortages we're facing, if we can keep those people with us for longer who are just looking at it as a stopgap, that's all to the good as well. And that's about making sure we invest in them and make sure that they're supported as they come into the company.Kate Nicholls: Because at the moment, churn is so high across the sector as a whole. People come in, find that the work's too busy, too demanding, not for them, and they go away again. So let's just support them, nurture them and try and help to make sure that they have as good an experience as they can while they're with us.Kelly Molson: Definitely. Final question for you from our attractions audience. And again, this is from Hannah. So Hannah asks, "Do we have any realistic idea of timescales in terms of the forecast for recovery?" And this is specifically around the recruitment challenges that we're having at the moment. She asks, "Is this something that we have to adapt and change to live within the long term, or is it something that we could potentially predict will slowly improve and recover back to a pre-Brexit and pre-COVID-19 scenario?"Kate Nicholls: Gosh. There are two factors to that, particularly if we're talking about labour markets. So the government-commissioned independent research to look at when domestic tourism for fallen revenues would recover to pre-pandemic levels, and I suppose that's the best indicator of when do you think demand is going to get up there? When do you think your money is going to come back? And the independent forecast suggested that domestic tourism revenues would recover by the end of 2023 and international, that's not until 2024.Kate Nicholls: Now the government has said it will work with the industry to try and bring that forward a year, but that still looks as though you're going to have most of 2022 where you are operating suboptimally, that you're not operating at full demand. And I think in terms of labour shortages and challenges, again, likely to be temporary but let's not forget that pre-COVID, we had a 5% vacancy rate. Post-COVID, it's 10%. So it was a tight labour market before we went into the COVID crisis.Kate Nicholls: How temporary is temporary? I think you're going to be living with cost price inflation and the disruption to the supply chain for at least six months of 2022 and I think the labour issues are going to be with us probably for a year or two. If nothing else changes, our biggest challenge for getting people back into work is twofold. One is we've got a hiatus in the talent pipeline where we haven't been able to train our own. Our apprentices haven't been able to go through people and vocational training, haven't been able to go through catering colleges, et cetera. Haven't been able to go through because people have been disrupted in education.Kate Nicholls: And the same goes at the higher levels for hospitality degrees, but also curator jobs and those kinds of occupational training skilled jobs in the sector. So you've got a two-year talent hiatus, talent pipeline hiatus, and you've got COVID travel restrictions that are preventing people from moving globally. And you can only see what's happened with Omicron to see that that's going to be with us probably for at least another year. So you are going to have a global disrupted labour market and you're going to have global disrupted supply chains for at least another year.Kelly Molson: Gosh. Another year of this.Kate Nicholls: Sorry.Kelly Molson: Weren't we saying this last year? We were nearly-Kate Nicholls: I don't mean that we're going to be having another year of COVID restrictions or the challenges that we've got, but I think the global supply chain, the global economy is still going to be in quite an uncertain state for the whole of 2022. And people certainly won't be moving around the globe as freely as they have been pre-pandemic. We're not going to get back to that sort of free movement. It's nothing to do with Brexit, but just that movement of people isn't going to be happening to the same degree, hence you've got a delay in domestic and international recovery. You've got a delay in international recovery.Kate Nicholls: The people who've moved abroad during COVID or people who would normally be coming into the UK to look for work or those with settled status who might be returning, they're not moving around because of COVID and they're not moving around because of the problems of international travel.Kelly Molson: Kate, thank you. Thank you so much for answering the questions today. It's been incredible to have you on. I'd like to end the podcast the way that I always end the podcast which is to ask you about a book that you could recommend to our listeners. It might be something that you love. It might be something that's helped your career in some way or helped shape your career in some way. What would you recommend for us today?Kate Nicholls: I am a voracious reader, so I usually have three or four books on the go at any one time. But I'm definitely a fiction reader. I've got two books. One that was really ... is a business book that I found really quite useful when I first was made chief executive about six, seven years ago. And that was Sheryl Sandberg's Lean In, which I would definitely recommend for any female leaders in the industry to look at. It talks about some of the different ways that people experience things at work and certainly helped me to think about how I wanted to support the next generation of women coming up and making sure that we had more female representation on boards.Kate Nicholls: And then my absolute favourite book, which is my go-to book at any time that I just want a little bit of escapism and a really good story is Wuthering Heights. However bad you're feeling, there's always something entertaining and enjoyable in getting lost in somebody else's story and that's my recommended read.Kelly Molson: Fantastic recommendations. I actually do remember on Twitter you tweeting photos of your book pile, your COVID book pile. They were huge.Kate Nicholls: Yeah. Because everybody knows I'm a reader and I read an awful lot, at Christmas I get big ... And that's what everybody buys me as a gift. So I always get quite a lot of books at Christmas, and last Christmas I got 20. And as we went into lockdown, of January, I thought, "Right, can I complete my reading pile before we come out of lockdown?" Actually, I had to go and buy another 30 books. By the time we came out of lockdown on the 19th of July, I had read 56 books.Kelly Molson: Oh my goodness, 56 ... Well, I guess books are a much better option than getting socks for Christmas, right?Kate Nicholls: Absolutely. Absolutely. So yes, I do have big piles. I still have piles of books all over the house that I'm still reading. But yeah, I usually have ... I finish three books a week.Kelly Molson: Oh, I love that. Well, listen, so if you want to win a copy of Kate's books, you know what to do. Go over to this podcast announcement on Twitter, retweet the announcement with the words I want Kate's books, and you might well be in with a chance of winning them. Kate, thank you once again for coming on the podcast today. Very, very grateful that you've been able to spare us some time to come on and chat, and I very much hope that you get that well-deserved rest and holiday to Costa Rica sometime very soon.Kate Nicholls: Thank you so much. It's been an absolute pleasure. Thank you for having me.Kelly Molson: Thanks for listening to Skip the Queue. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave us a five-star review. It really helps others find us. And remember to follow us on Twitter for your chance to win the books that have been mentioned. Skip the Queue is brought to you by Rubber Cheese, a digital agency that builds remarkable systems and websites for attractions that helps them increase their visitor numbers. You can find show notes and transcriptions from this episode and more over on our website rubbercheese.com/podcast.

Access to Inspiration
Bonus Episode from the Conscious Leader podcast

Access to Inspiration

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 24:14


Our guest today in this bonus series on Leadership and Learning is Paul Tennant OBE, who until recently was Chief Executive at The Law Society. Paul talks to our host Sue Stockdale about some of the key leadership characteristics that are important such as resilience, empathy, and always remaining curious. He also explains the importance of pausing and reflecting and how this helps him as a leader. From January 2022, Paul will be the new Chief Executive for care provider The Abbeyfield Society, which owns and manages around 20 UK care homes.This episode is part of the series featuring other podcasts that we recommend.Listen to more episodes from The Conscious Leader podcast series.https://www.tlcglobal.co/podcastsFind out more about the Learning Curvehttps://www.tlcglobal.coRead the transcription for this Access to Inspiration episode on www.accesstoinspiration.org and connect with us:Twitter www.twitter.com/accessinspirat1 Facebook www.facebook.com/accesstoinspiration Instagram www.instagram.com/accesstoinspiration LinkedIn www.linkedin.com/company/access-to-inspiration/ Sign up for our newsletter http://eepurl.com/hguX2b Sound Editor: Matias de Ezcurra (he/him)Producer: Sue Stockdale (she/her)

The Morning News
Dr. Rahul Koranne: President & Chief Executive Officer of the Minnesota Hospital Association

The Morning News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 7:40


Susie Jones talks with Dr. Rahul Koranne about how hospitals in Minnesota are dealing with the virus & patients.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Future Law Podcast
Ep. 57 - The SAL TechLaw.Fest 2021 Series: Rama Tiwari on Change Management in Action

Future Law Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 33:08


TechLaw.Fest is a signature production by the Singapore Academy of Law, and the Future Law Podcast is pleased to continue the conversations hosted there with this podcast series on the future of law and technology. Rama Tiwari, Chief Executive of the Singapore Academy of Law, joins host Michael Madison of the University of Pittsburgh for a wide-ranging conversation about change management, in legal organizations and elsewhere.  Links Rama Tiwari TechLaw.Fest Singapore Academy of Law See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Today with Claire Byrne
Policing Authority Review

Today with Claire Byrne

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 14:51


Helen Hall, Chief Executive of the Policing Authority

Fidelity Answers: The Investment Podcast
ESG at an industrial titan: BHP's chief executive on the hard decisions

Fidelity Answers: The Investment Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 24:28


How do you forge a sustainable future when you're the CEO of one of the world's biggest mining companies? BHP Chief Executive Mike Henry talks to Fidelity International's Global Head of Research Ned Salter about the balancing act he and other corporate leaders face and the importance of minimising ESG trade-offs. This is an edited version of the video interview which you can watch here along with more from Fidelity International's Sustainable World Summit. Read more at fidelityinternational.com or your local Fidelity website. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Fidelity Answers: The Investment Podcast
2021: A sustainability odyssey

Fidelity Answers: The Investment Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 23:20


The pandemic and COP26 made 2021 a big year for sustainability. In this final podcast of the year we round up the main themes and ask where next for investors and ESG. We look back at Fidelity International's inaugural Sustainable World Summit and some of the highlights from speakers including the UN's Special Envoy for Climate and Finance Mark Carney; Former President of the European Commission José Manuel Barroso; and Chief Executive of mining giant BHP, Mike Henry. Carsten Roemheld is joined by Fidelity's Head of Corporate Sustainability and Enterprise Relationships, Victoria Kelly.  Watch interviews and highlights from Fidelity's Sustainable World Summit here.  Read more at fidelityinternational.com or your local Fidelity website. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

RNIB Connect
1026: British Blind Sport's Chief Exec's Review Of 2021

RNIB Connect

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 7:40


Each year, at this time, RNIB Connect Radio's Allan Russell sits down with the Chief Executives of some of the UK's, and world's, leading sight loss charities. Today, we hear from Alaina MacGregor who is the CEO of British Blind Sport. Alaina looks back at the highlights and challenges of 2021 and ahead to 2022. If you'd like to learn more about BBS, go to www.britishblindsport.org.uk #RNIBConnect Image: Alaina MacGregor, CEO of British Blind Sport

RNZ: Nine To Noon
In praise of the pohutukawa (and rata)

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 16:21


The pohutukawa, Aotearoa's Christmas tree, is in full bloom now in many parts of the country, signalling it's time to head to the beach. But just two decades ago the future of the iconic tree was in doubt. Robyn Haugh, Chief Executive of Project Crimson, a charitable trust dedicated to protect and restore the pohutukawa and rata, says New Zealanders are embracing the idea of donating trees around the country.

RNZ: Nine To Noon
In praise of the pohutukawa (and rata)

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 16:21


The pohutukawa, Aotearoa's Christmas tree, is in full bloom now in many parts of the country, signalling it's time to head to the beach. But just two decades ago the future of the iconic tree was in doubt. Robyn Haugh, Chief Executive of Project Crimson, a charitable trust dedicated to protect and restore the pohutukawa and rata, says New Zealanders are embracing the idea of donating trees around the country.

The Mentor with Mark Bouris
Mr Yum: Identifying a good idea and how to pursue it

The Mentor with Mark Bouris

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 51:48


When you discover a win-win solution for both the customer and the merchant, you're sitting on a goldmine.  Mr Yum is a QR code food ordering platform, a dine-in order & pay, pick up or delivery platform for your restaurant. Kim Teo is one of four founders who came up with the idea of Mr Yum and operates as the Chief Executive and is one of the main reasons why the platform exists. Mark and Kim chat about how to quantify a business idea, how to create a win-win situation for both the merchant and customer and what turns a “nice-to-have” product into a “need to have”.  Join the Facebook Group. Follow Mark Bouris on Instagram, LinkedIn & YouTube. Want to grow your business and stay ahead of the pack? Access Mark Bouris' Masterclasses.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Rich Pickings: Fidelity's Asset Allocation Podcast
ESG at an industrial titan: BHP's chief executive on the hard decisions

Rich Pickings: Fidelity's Asset Allocation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 24:28


How do you forge a sustainable future when you're the CEO of one of the world's biggest mining companies? BHP Chief Executive Mike Henry talks to Fidelity International's Global Head of Research Ned Salter about the balancing act he and other corporate leaders face and the importance of minimising ESG trade-offs. This is an edited version of the video interview which you can watch here along with more from Fidelity International's Sustainable World Summit. Read more at fidelityinternational.com or your local Fidelity website. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Rich Pickings: Fidelity's Asset Allocation Podcast
2021: A sustainability odyssey

Rich Pickings: Fidelity's Asset Allocation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 23:20


The pandemic and COP26 made 2021 a big year for sustainability. In this final podcast of the year we round up the main themes and ask where next for investors and ESG. We look back at Fidelity International's inaugural Sustainable World Summit and some of the highlights from speakers including the UN's Special Envoy for Climate and Finance Mark Carney; Former President of the European Commission José Manuel Barroso; and Chief Executive of mining giant BHP, Mike Henry. Carsten Roemheld is joined by Fidelity's Head of Corporate Sustainability and Enterprise Relationships, Victoria Kelly.  Watch interviews and highlights from Fidelity's Sustainable World Summit here.  Read more at fidelityinternational.com or your local Fidelity website. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

RNIB Connect
1057: Canadian Chief Exec of Sight Loss Charity, CNIB, Reviews 2021

RNIB Connect

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 9:10


Each year, at this time, RNIB Connect Radio's Allan Russell sits down with the Chief Executives of some of the UK's, and world's, leading sight loss charities. Today, we hear from John Rafferty who is the CEO of Canada's largest sight loss charity, CNIB. He looks back at the highlights and challenges of 2021 and ahead to 2022. If you'd like to learn more about the organisation, or join in on some of their virtual offerings, go to www.cnib.ca #RNIBConnect Image: John Rafferty CEO of Canada's loss charity, CNIB.

Breakfast Leadership
Interview with Daniel Major

Breakfast Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 23:40


Daniel Major is CEO of GoviEX Uranium - a mineral resources company focused on the exploration and development of various Uranium deposits located throughout Africa. With over 30 years of experience in the mining industry, Daniel has established an impressive portfolio and was recently the Chief Executive of the Basic Element Mining and Resource Division in Russia. Numbers-wise, GoviEx has one of the largest NI 43-101 uranium resources compared to its peers, and across its assets holds 36.2 million pounds of contained uranium (U3O8)! Currently, at its biggest mine called Madaouela, Uranium is estimated at US$18.30 per pound and is expected to produce an annual average of US$525 million earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) over its lifespan. Social Media Links: https://goviex.com/

The Microscopists
Sir Paul Nurse (The Francis Crick Institute)

The Microscopists

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 53:47


#36 – Today's guest on The Microscopists is Nobel Laureate Sir Paul Nurse, Chief Executive and Director of The Francis Crick Institute in London. Paul's early career used microscopic screening to identify temperature-sensitive cell-cycle mutants in fission yeast. This work led to the identification of the cell division cycle 2 gene (cdc2), which encodes a kinase critical for cell cycle progression. It was for this work that he was awarded the 2001 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine alongside Tim Hunt and Leland Hartwell. Watch or Listen to all episodes of The Microscopists here: http://bit.ly/the-microscopists-pds

20 Minute Leaders
Ep680: Kevin Hancock | Chief Executive Officer at Hancock Lumber Company

20 Minute Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 22:09


Kevin Hancock is an award-winning author and speaker. The CEO of Hancock Lumber Company, one of the oldest and best known family businesses in America, he is a recipient of the Ed Muskie Access to Justice award, the Habitat for Humanity Spirit of Humanity award, the Boy Scouts of America Distinguished Citizen award, and the Timber Processing Magazine Person of the Year award. Kevin is also a member of the Maine Indian Tribal State Commission. A frequent visitor to the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota, Kevin is an advocate of strengthening the voices of all individuals—within a company or a community —through listening, empowering, and shared leadership. Kevin is also the founder of The Seventh Power, a non-profit organization dedicated to advancing economic sovereignty for native communities across America.

Global Tech Leaders' Podcast
Corey White, Chief Executive and Experience Officer at Cyvatar.ai, tells us how he is always moving towards what scares him.

Global Tech Leaders' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 33:59


In today's episode we have Corey White, Chief Executive and Experience Officer at Cyvatar.ai, prior to that he had an illustrious career at Cylance no less, he was at CompTIA and McAfee. He is a servant leader so very excited to talk about what that means. He has proven himself in organisations such as Cylance, where he was the first employee consultant in the organization to build a team to a 150+ globally which is not an easy task. Culminating in the acquisition of Cylance by Blackberry for 1.5 Billion. To say he is experienced in AI is an understatement. We kick off by asking Corey about his career journey and what has led him to where he is today? It was not perfectly planned out Knew he liked computers First job was Microsoft Introduction of the internet What is a cookie Could not sit still on a support call Figure things out We ask Corey how does the fact that his mind is so fast, how has that helped him in his career? Mindset Let go of ego Then we ask Corey, what is a big red flag for you when interviewing new team members and how does he build culture? No one can be successful without knowing who they are Spark Type Test “I'm a maker” - love building things Be a better person Roles that match your innate skills Align skill and happiness We ask Corey, you know what to look for when hiring, how do you manage those people with servant leadership and what does it mean to him? You're doing everything Trust those people to do the job When hired, I now work for you Hire the right people Support them to be successful Servant leader mindset Next we ask Corey how has AI affected the cybersecurity game and how it's used to win the war on threats that exist today? AI is a very good tool People, process and technology Without the right people using it, it's almost useless We ask Corey, how are things going at Cyvatar.ai? Solution and secure Fully understand what the challenges are Subscription businesses Platform businesses Then we ask Corey, how does he stay organized, any life hacks? Goes back to knowing yourself Assistant ingrained in my life Find a very very smart assistant Executive hack She's the organised version of Corey Last but not least, we ask Corey what he feels are his super powers? Listening I'm constantly moving towards what scares me Stuck afraid --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/gloabl-tech-leaders/message

Talking Infrastructure
How do we deliver infrastructure that truly benefits society?

Talking Infrastructure

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 41:09


In the latest episode of AECOM's Talking Infrastructure podcast, AECOM's Chief Executive for India and Europe, Colin Wood, talks to Nick Smallwood, Chief Executive of the UK Infrastructure and Projects Authority. They discuss how to create ambition across the sector, drive collaboration and find smarter ways to deliver infrastructure that truly benefit society.

Dad.Work
#32. Mindfully Disrupting Old Patterns And Growing As A Parent - Chris Plourde

Dad.Work

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 62:37


- Exploring your own judgements and defensiveness,- The importance of men's groups in Chris' life,- The shift that happens when you start to accept that things happen FOR you, not TO you,- Therapy as mental fitness for the brain,- Letting go of shame and guilt,- Digging beneath the anger to get to the buried emotions,- Breathwork as a healing tool,- Developing forgiveness and gratitude for your own parents,- The difference between raising boys and girls,- Chris' experience as a conscious father leading a teenage son, including big talks around things like consent,- Why action is the necessary ingredient to change your life.Chris Plourde is a Los Angeles based Conscious Performance Coach, Consultant, Speaker, Mind Body, Breathwork, Meditation Instructor with over 23 years of experience. Chris has traveled both nationally and internationally speaking and educating on the physical, mental and emotional aspects of wellness & life. He has created, presented and coached hundreds of retreats and workshops for a variety of well known companies and organizations, such as Walt Disney, Equinox, YPO (Young Presents Organization) Chapters, Tender Greens, Enterprise Car Rental,  Xerox, World Wide Produce, Lululemon, Twitter, Explore.org, and many more. Chris has mentored and consulted with celebrities, business executives, top fitness professionals and military special ops personal. As a former Chief Executive with Men's Teams and Organizations, he has mentored many men to find their authentic self and create leadership qualities which they could bring to their families, communities and businesses.  Chris has 2 amazing kids(9&15yrs old) and a solid loving relationship with his wife of 16 yrs.  His owes it his happy marriage to open clear communication and the balance between masculine and feminine.  He loves working with couples on clarify and strengthening their own relationships. Chris' goal is to help individuals and organizations gain clarity, and work towards what they want in life, create new habits and get into massive action by unleashing the greatness that is already there and owning their unique stories.   He believes freedom is “an inside job” and it's our relationship with circumstances and people in our lives that sometimes need a perspective shift.By disrupting old patterns using a variety of mindfulness tools, Chris is able to identifying limiting beliefs, help create new habits and guide his clients to achieving their goals. The process of falling in love with the Journey of becoming the greatest version of themselves is what it all comes down too, Not only for success but for fulfillment and Happiness. WEB: chrisplourde.comIG: @coachchrisplourde

Unleashing Brilliance
Ep 124 - Worthy, Stop Mauling Your Mojo With Maree Mcpherson

Unleashing Brilliance

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 59:23


What would compassion and love allow you to do if they were sat beside you right now? This is one of the key questions Maree McPherson asks on this podcast. With a strong belief that impact follows insight, Maree's gifts bring organisations to life through what she sees, hears and feels. Maree helps develop organisations into legacies by assisting people in thinking and making sense of what they discover. She believes we are all capable of more and shares so much personal reflection and insight in this conversation about how she made big decisions during her career. Maree's leadership experience spans over 35 years, including a Chief Executive in a peak body and a regional development organisation. Initially trained in social welfare, Maree started her career in case management with children's services and assisted people with intellectual disabilities. Now, her clients include ambitious individuals and leading organisations. Maree has worked with individual leaders and leadership teams within organisations to embrace lifelong learning and create a legacy. Maree is the author, of 2 books - Cutting Through the Grass Ceiling – Women Creating Possibility in Regional Australia and her latest book Worthy, Stop Mauling Your Mojo. Straighten Your Self-Talk and Create an Intentional Life was released in September 2021 (available at Amazon, Booktopia and directly from Maree at mareemcpherson.com.au). Maree is also one of the 4.1% of coaches in Australia and New Zealand, serving as a member of the International Coach Federation

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Backlog of 45,000 breast screens since lockdown

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 24:44


The Breast Cancer Foundation fears lives are being put at risk, as tens of thousands of mammograms are delayed due to Covid. Associate Health Minister Ayesha Verrall has confirmed a back-log of 45,000 breast cancer since lock-downs started, to this September. The Breast Cancer Foundation says this backlog is "unacceptable, alarming and needs urgent action". There are concerns other cancer screening services, including prostate, are also being affected by Covid-related delays in the health system. Kathryn speaks to the Chief Executive of The Breast Cancer Foundation Ah-Leen Rayner and Chris Jackson, an academic oncologist and former medical director of the Cancer Society.

Fish Out of Water: The SwimSwam Podcast
Brent Nowicki Details His Journey So Far As FINA's Chief Executive

Fish Out of Water: The SwimSwam Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 50:37


 Brent Nowicki's been the new FINA Executive Director about six months. He's young, only 42 years old, with an impressive resume.  As expected he's bringing a lot of energy and changes to FINA.  Brent's managing an extremely jam-packed calendar, and it appears he's striving to package tentpole aquatic events as spectacles.  The upcoming World Championships in Abu Dhabi will provided much needed data to determine if spectacle events can work—be a cost-benefit and be bigger driver of TV rights.  Brent's transparent on this topic.  SwimSwam will touchback with him to learn more about these results. SWIMSWAM PODCAST LINKS Click here to listen and subscribe on Spotify Click here to listen and subscribe on Apple Podcasts Click here to listen and subscribe on Podbean Click here to listen and subscribe on Google Click here to listen and subscribe on YouTube Click here to listen and subscribe on Listen Notes Click here to listen and subscribe on Stitcher Click here to listen and subscribe on iHeartRadio Click here to listen and subscribe on Amazon Click here to listen and subscribe on Pandora Music: Otis McDonald www.otismacmusic.com

20 Minute Leaders
Ep672: Mati Gill | Chief Executive Officer, AION Labs

20 Minute Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 21:57


Mati is the CEO of AION Labs, an Israel-based innovation lab using AI for drug discovery and development, a coalition between Pfizer, Amazon Web Services (AWS), AstraZeneca, Teva, Merck and the Israel Biotech Fund (IBF). Mati has held leadership roles within the biopharma industry for over a decade, formerly serving as a senior executive at Teva Pharmaceuticals. Prior to his term in industry, Mati was Chief of Staff for Israel's Minister of Public Security.

Seriously…
Under the Influence

Seriously…

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 29:14


Philosopher and author James Garvey examines the rise of behavioural science at the heart of our politics and its key role during the pandemic. There was a large amount of attention paid to the government's slogan during the Covid crisis that politics would 'follow the science'. But not just branches of the natural sciences, like epidemiology, medicine and virology. Our national politics is also being informed to an unprecedented degree by behavioural science – taking advice from experts with a remarkable understanding of human motivation, decision-making and action; how to steer whole populations from one mode of behaviour to another in a crisis, not only for medical purposes but also as a tool for government and social order. The Behavioural Insights Team was called to action and the Independent Scientific Pandemic Insights Group on Behaviours (SPI-B) convened, reporting directly to SAGE who reported to No.10. James Garvey, who has written on the history of persuasion, explores the deep and ever-more powerful relationship between politics, government and behavioural science. What are the key ideas here and where did this alliance come from - what have been its strengths and weaknesses? James asks whether behavioural science techniques are being used to circumvent more traditional routes of democracy, such as manifestos, public debate and even our political consent. But also how behavioural insight is illuminating problems governments have found difficult or even intractable in the past, upturning older models of the public, benefiting the whole. He explores how online and digital technology might be used to amplify these techniques. Is this a pivotal moment for our politics? Contributors include Brooke Rogers, chair of the Cabinet Office Behavioural Science Expert Group and co-chair of the Independent Scientific Pandemic Insights Group on Behaviours (SPI-B), behavioural economist Cass Sunstein (who co-authored the bestseller ‘Nudge'), public health psychologist and member of SPI-B Chris Bonell, lawyer Susie Alegre, who specialises on freedom of thought and digital rights, author Peter Pomerantsev, who writes about propaganda and political influence, economist Shaun Hargreaves-Heap, social psychologist and SPI-B advisor Stephen Reicher and David Halpern, Chief Executive of the Behavioural Insights Team. Presenter: James Garvey Producer: Simon Hollis A Brook Lapping production for BBC Radio 4