Podcasts about chief executives

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Highest-ranking corporate officer or administrator

  • 2,730PODCASTS
  • 6,149EPISODES
  • 32mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jun 28, 2022LATEST
chief executives

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Best podcasts about chief executives

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Latest podcast episodes about chief executives

Happiness Happens
174: How to harness your inner power with Chris Plourde

Happiness Happens

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 36:04


In this episode, we're talking about how to harness your inner power.    Whether it's through the stories we tell ourselves, the conditioning we've experienced due to past trauma, or leveraging meditation, reiki and our breath, there are so many ways to own our inner power.   Joining me for this conversation is Chris Plourde. Chris is a coach, a businessman, a father and husband.    He works with top athletes and well-known companies, organizations, celebrities, moms/dads and even military special ops. As a Former Master Trainer and Presenter, he created and presented content both nationally and internationally, on the mental and physical aspects of training for peak performance in all areas of life. As a former Chief Executive with Men's Teams and Organizations, he has mentored many men to find their authentic self and create leadership qualities which they could bring to their families, communities and businesses.   He wants to help you gain clarity, establish personal performance habits, create balance and unleash your true potential in all areas of your life. He believes while the needs of every type of person may vary, the core concept is the same. The way you approach one thing in life is the way you approach everything in life.   We get into: [2:00] What happiness means to Chris [3:20] Why we put conditions on our freedom [8:20] Where to begin with finding awareness in the imperfections [12:20] Defining happiness and success now vs. before starting the healing journey [19:05] The power of breathwork and harnessing our breath  [30:10] How to create a bit more happiness in your day, every day, starting today   Resources: Podcast Resources: https://www.simonacostantini.com/resources  Apply to be a podcast guest: https://forms.gle/WtXHsqZmiEhCwTAk6  Connect with Chris Instagram Twitter www.chrisplourde.com    Connect with Simona www.instagram.com/simona__costantini  www.instagram.com/costantiniproductions  www.instagram.com/happinesshappenspodcast  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXtOxOAuXxW7c5cYKdAEfWg  https://twitter.com/simona_cos  https://www.facebook.com/costantiniproductions  https://www.facebook.com/happinesshappenspodcast/  www.simonacostantini.com    Free discovery call: https://hello.dubsado.com:443/public/appointment-scheduler/612f984ed55be0651882e2b7/schedule

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive
Sarah Helm: Drug Foundation chief executive on advising people to use strips to test for fentanyl in their drugs

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 3:16


The arrival of a dangerous opioid in New Zealand's ignited calls for people to test their drugs.A dozen people in Wairarapa were taken to hospital after consuming fentanyl - likely sold as cocaine or meth.Preliminary tests confirm its fentanyl, although some samples are still being tested.The Drug Foundation's ordered 7000 extra fentanyl test strips, so people can check drugs at home.Chief executive Sarah Helm told Heather du Plessis-Allan they're advising anyone who's bought white powder to use them.She says they strips are available from the Hemp Store online or Needle exchange, in store and online.LISTEN ABOVE

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive
Bob McCoskrie: Family First chief executive says those celebrating Supreme Court decision could be in for rude shock

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 4:12


Family First says it's been deregistered as a charity, but not defeated.The Government and the Charities Board has removed charity status away after a Supreme Court case.It's because Family First's advocacy has been ruled unfair, unbalanced and disrespectful.Chief Executive Bob McCoskrie says other groups have opinions and have been able to keep their status.He told Heather du Plessis Allan those celebrating the decision could be in for a rude shock.“My warning to them is just: what happens when the state decides that their favourite charity's opinion is unpalatable, they're going to be the ones whining.”LISTEN ABOVE

Sinocism
Shanghai declares victory; Xi going to Hong Kong, New Minister of Public Security; PGII and GDI; Praise for Xi

Sinocism

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022


Today’s Essential Eight: Victory declared in Shanghai - Shanghai Party Secretary declared victory over COVID, Beijing is sending kids back to school, but Shenzhen and Dandong have some localized lockdowns. Xi going to Hong Kong for July 1 - From various reports, Xi will be in Hong Kong on July 1 for the events marking 25th anniversary of the handover and the installation of John Lee as the new Chief Executive.

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast
Caitlin Zulla, Chief Executive Officer at SCA Health, & Jason Strauss, President at SCA Health

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 23:33


This episode features Caitlin Zulla, Chief Executive Officer at SCA Health, & Jason Strauss, President at SCA Health. Here, they discuss their focus on improving the health of their patients, providers, & community, SCA Health acquiring PE GI Solutions, the evolving space around value-based care, and more.

Overnight with Michael McLaren
Over 65s could return to the nation's workforce

Overnight with Michael McLaren

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 13:04


Michael is joined by Innes Willox, Chief Executive of national employer association Australian Industry Group (Ai Group), who says policymakers needed to think outside the box to solve “huge labour and skills shortages”. Treasurer Jim Chalmers has confirmed he is open to the idea of easing the rules around pension eligibility to make it easier for older Australians to work more without losing benefits, which could see than 400,000 people over the age of 65 returning to the nation's workforce. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Beyond High Street
Neal Restivo, Chief Executive Officer at Oatey Company

Beyond High Street

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 29:45


On this episode of Beyond High Street, Farmer School dean Jenny Darroch and 1982 Farmer School of Business accounting graduate Neal Restivo discuss the importance of diverse teams, giving back, and the family tradition he started at Miami University.

RTÉ - Drivetime
What is Day-to-Day Life Like in Russia?

RTÉ - Drivetime

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 8:20


Chris Weafer, Chief Executive at Macro-Advisory (Eurasia business consultancy in Eurasia) in Moscow

RTÉ - News at One Podcast
HSE chief executive Paul Reid stepping down

RTÉ - News at One Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 8:28


We get the latest from our political correspondent Micheál Lehane, and speak to Health Editor with the Irish Times, Paul Cullen.

Woman's Hour
Being lesbian in the military, Roe v Wade overturned, Shireen Abu Aqla

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 57:03


Dame Kelly Holmes came out as a lesbian last week. The Olympic champion served in the army in the late 1980's, when you could face prison for being gay as a member of the military. Dame Kelly spoke of her worry that she would still face consequences if she were to let her sexuality be known. It wasn't until 2000 that a ban on being gay and serving in the Army, Navy or RAF was lifted. Emma Riley was discharged from the Royal Navy in 1993 for being a lesbian, she joins Emma in the studio alongside Caroline Paige, joint Chief Executive of Fighting with Pride. American women are starting this week with a newly re-drawn map of the United States, in light of the Supreme Court's landmark overturning of Roe vs Wade last Friday, which gave women constitutional right to get an abortion nationwide. Today, abortion is legally banned in at least nine US states - with more to follow as so called trigger laws clear the necessary hurdles. For some this is a time of huge shame, sorrow, bafflement and fear - the clock turned back on women's rights. For others - the supreme court's decision represents a victory - the success of a long fought battle against abortion being a nationwide right in America. But for women who are pregnant now and don't want to be - especially in states where even abortion providers are unclear if they will be prosecuted should they go ahead - what should they do? Emma hears from BBC correspondent in Washington DC Holly Honderich, journalist Hadley Freeman and Dr Jan Halper-Hayes, former Global Vice President for Republican Overseas. A memorial service will be held in London tomorrow for the Palestinian-American journalist Shireen Abu Aqla who was killed while reporting in the occupied West Bank last month. On Friday, the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, said the bullet had been fired by Israeli security forces - something the Israel Defence Force disputes. Emma is joined by the BBC's Middle East Correspondent Yolande Knell to talk about Shireen. It's the first day of Wimbledon, and current world number 11 Emma Raducanu makes her centre court debut this morning, playing against Alison Van Uytvanck. This is her second Wimbledon, but her first since winning the US open last year. Molly McElwee is the women's sport reporter for The Telegraph and gives the lowdown on Emma's form.

Highlights from Newstalk Breakfast
Plans for Navan hospital ED 'will proceed' despite Ministers objections

Highlights from Newstalk Breakfast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 8:27


The Chief Executive of the HSE has said plans to reconfigure the Emergency Department at Our Lady's Hospital Navan will proceed, despite a request from Minister for Health Stephen Donnelly to put them on hold. For more on this Shane spoke to the Clinical Director of Our Lady's Hospital in Navan, Dr. Gerry McEntee and Aontu leader and TD for Meath West, Peadar Toibin.

Mornings with John Mackenzie
John MacKenzie chats with Lara Wilde, Chief Executive of Food Manufacturing Hub & FNQ Incubator, about the rising cost of fresh produce and grocery items.

Mornings with John Mackenzie

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 10:18


John MacKenzie chats with Lara Wilde, Chief Executive of Food Manufacturing Hub & FNQ Incubator, about the rising cost of fresh produce and grocery items. Rising fuel costs and interest rate rises are already putting the financial strain on Aussies struggling to survive from week to week. Now to compound the strain, basic vegetable prices are going through the roof, with the simple capsicum and iceberg lettuce making the recent headlines. Lara shares some tips and tricks which may help you save money on your weekly shopping bill.

The EdUp Experience
456: The Lincoln Edge - with Scott Shaw, Chief Executive Officer & President of Lincoln Tech

The EdUp Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 53:45


We welcome YOU back to America's leading higher education podcast, The EdUp Experience! It's YOUR time to #EdUp In this episode, President Series #159, YOUR guest is Scott Shaw, Chief Executive Officer & President of Lincoln Tech, YOUR guest cohost is Dr. Bill Pepicello, YOUR host is Dr. Joe Sallustio, & YOUR sponsor is LeadSquared! What is the Lincoln Edge & how does it prepare students to be successful in life & the workforce? Listen in to #EdUp! Prior to taking the position of President & Chief Executive Officer, Mr. Shaw served in the positions of President & Chief Operating Officer, Executive Vice President & Chief Administrative Officer & Senior Vice President of Strategic Planning & Business Development of the Company. Prior to joining Lincoln, Mr. Shaw was a partner at Stonington Partners, Inc., where he had been since 1994. As a partner at Stonington, Mr. Shaw was responsible for identifying, evaluating & acquiring companies & then assisting in the oversight of these companies through participation on the board of directors of acquired companies. In addition, Mr. Shaw worked closely with senior management to develop long-term strategic plans, to evaluate acquisitions & new investment opportunities, to assist with refinancing, & to execute on the final sale of the company either to the public or to another company. Mr. Shaw also served as a consultant to Merrill Lynch Capital Partners Inc., a private investment firm associated with Merrill Lynch & Co., Inc., from 1994 through 2000. Mr. Shaw holds an M.B.A. from the Wharton School of Business & a B.A. from Duke University. His extensive financial & business management experience provides the board a unique perspective on the issues facing companies in our industry. Thank YOU so much for tuning in. Join us on the next episode for YOUR time to EdUp! Connect with YOUR EdUp Team - Elvin Freytes & Dr. Joe Sallustio ● Join YOUR EdUp community at The EdUp Experience! We make education YOUR business! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/edup/message

95bFM: The Wire
A Health-Based Approach to New Zealand's Drug Laws w/ Sarah Helm: June 27, 2022

95bFM: The Wire

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022


New polling shows most New Zealanders support changing the country's drug laws to remove criminal penalties and instead offer education, treatment, and other health-based approaches. To hear more about the research and what it could mean for New Zealand's drug laws in the future, Emilia Sullivan spoke to Sarah Helm, Chief Executive of the New Zealand Drug Foundation

95bFM: The Wire
The Wire w/ Emilia: June 27, 2022

95bFM: The Wire

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022


This week on The Wire for Rāhina, Monday the 27th of June. Emilia is hosting for the first time! She reports on the overturning of Roe v Wade, and speaks to Ella Shepherd from ALRANZ Abortion Rights Aotearoa about what this means for Americans, and what it could mean in New Zealand. She also talks to Sarah Helm, Chief Executive of the NZ Drug Foundation about new research showing that New Zealanders support a health-based approach to drug laws, and we also chat about the alert sent out last night that fentanyl has been detected in drugs circulating in the Wairarapa. Trishil speaks to Jo Spratt from Oxfam about the failure of G7 nations to adequately distribute vaccines to lower-income countries. And in this week's installment of Tomorrow's World, Stella Huggins talks with entomologist Neil Birrel who created the startup Hexacycle, which aims to convert organic waste into a source of sustainable protein and oil to help feed an increasingly hungry world. That's us for the Monday Wire! See you next week.

Scottish Football
SFA Chief Executive Ian Maxwell on the progress of Scotland's national sides & VAR's imminent arrival into Scottish football.

Scottish Football

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 69:59


Jonathan Sutherland & guests in conversation with SFA Chief Executive Ian Maxwell - discussing both the women & men's national sides plus VAR on the horizon of Scottish football.

BusinessNet Explorer
Electrical - Building Services | BNE Product News - FUTURE Designs - 'Brand Leader' Interview

BusinessNet Explorer

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 13:49


In this BNE 'Brand Leader' Interview podcast, David Clements, Chief Executive of FUTURE Designs, discusses the journey that his company has taken, supporting the circular economy for over 12 years, that has now led to the launch of the carbon careful TM initiative, promoting the refurbishment and upgrading of existing luminaires and carcasses to increase the sustainability of commercial premises. Link to the carbon careful TM book mentioned in this podcast: https://www.futuredesigns.co.uk/carbon-careful/ | The interviewer for BusinessNet Explorer is Mick de Leiburne. | Podcasts, Bite Sized Learning, Building, Industry, Sector, Architects, Building Designers, Consultants, Engineers, Integrated Building Design, Lighting Design. Construction, Building Services, Electrical, Specifiers, Buyers, Sustainability, Energy Saving, Lighting, Luminaires, LED. | For full product information please refer to the brand manufacturer. Link to the FUTURE Designs profile page within the BNE Construction & Building Services | Audio Visual virtual exhibition at BusinessNet Explorer: https://businessnetexplorer.com/clients/future-designs/

Modern Mindset with Adam Cox
342 - Donna Kunyo and Miles Baron for National Bingo Day.

Modern Mindset with Adam Cox

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 12:17


Adam Cox is joined by Donna Kunyo, National Bingo Caller of the Year, and Miles Baron, Chief Executive of The Bingo Association, for National Bingo Day to discuss why Bingo is still so popular in the UK. Donna explains what made her fall in love with Bingo and how she became a Bingo caller, and Miles explains what's going on across the UK for the day and the future of the game.  www.bingo-association.co.uk

The Ian King Business Podcast
Retail sales fall, investing in Rwanda, and carbon capture plant opens

The Ian King Business Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 25:54


Ian King talks to: Erin Brookes from Alvarez and Marsal about the fall in retail sales as shoppers cut their spending on food; the Chief Executive of Rwanda Finance Limited about investing in the country; Tata Chemicals as it opens the country's biggest carbon capture plant; and Saudi Arabia's Industry Minister - as international relations with the country begin to thaw

Thriving Geelong - People With Purpose
In conversation with Steve Hocking, Chief Executive, Geelong Football Club

Thriving Geelong - People With Purpose

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 41:42


Thriving Geelong - People With Purpose Podcast is brought to you by the Geelong Chamber of Commerce. Geelong Chamber CEO Ben Flynn chats with thriving Geelong business leaders. In this episode, recorded on 23rd of June 2022, we hear from Steve Hocking, CEO of the Geelong Football Club

Power Women with Victoria Schneps
Emma DeVito, President and Chief Executive Officer of VillageCare and VillageCareMAX Managed Long-Term Care Plans

Power Women with Victoria Schneps

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 13:53


Emma DeVito, President and Chief Executive Officer of VillageCare and VillageCareMAX Managed Care Plans, speaks of the people who impacted her early life, her … Read More

The Media Show
Another Warning for the BBC

The Media Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 28:16


The media regulator Ofcom has released a review of how the BBC operates. It's considered how the BBC deals with complaints, how it approaches impartiality, and how it decides which services to provide. Across all three, Ofcom wants an improvement. Guests: Kevin Bakhurst, Group Director, Ofcom; Owen Meredith, Chief Executive, News Media Association; Roger Mosey, former Head of TV News, BBC; and Alice Enders, Head of Research, Enders Analysis Producer: Steven Williams Presenter: Ros Atkins

Best of Today
25 years since the first Harry Potter novel

Best of Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 5:03


This week Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone turns 25. It has sold 120 million copies and is the first of 7 books in the bestselling series which also came to life on screen with a string of hit movies. Today's Nick Robinson speaks to Lindsey Fraser, former critic and literary agent at Fraser Ross Associates, and Nigel Newton, Chief Executive of Bloomsbury Publishing who published the book. (Image, Harry Potter first edition, Credit, Reuters Henry Nicholls)

Dear Cancer, I'm Beautiful
A Bone Health Refresher And Updates! With Claire Gill, Chief Executive Officer of the Bone Health & Osteoporosis Foundation

Dear Cancer, I'm Beautiful

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 36:10


Claire Gill, Chief Executive Officer at the Bone Health & Osteoporosis Foundation, returns to the show to give us a refresher about bone health, but also brings us all up to speed on the current legislation surrounding the medical reimbursement rate for the DXA scan. From bone health tips to prevent fracture to ways that you can help get this bill passed,  Claire shares everything that you need to know about bone health AND how to advocate for it!    PLUS - Enter To Win A Cancer Fashionista VIP Gift Bag filled with all of my favorite things! Simply complete this survey  and a winner will be drawn at random on Wednesday, August 31 2022. Winner to be notified via email on September 1, 2022.    If the prize is not redeemed within 5 business days, another contestant will be selected.  Thanks so much for completing this survey and good luck! It's so helpful for me to know what will help you with YOUR bone health, so this is totally a win-win!

Skip the Queue
Attraction partnerships and rivalries, with Dominic Jones

Skip the Queue

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 47:55


Skip the Queue is brought to you by Rubber Cheese, a digital agency that builds remarkable systems and websites for attractions that helps them increase their visitor numbers. Your host is  Kelly Molson, MD of Rubber Cheese.Download our free ebook The Ultimate Guide to Doubling Your Visitor NumbersIf you like what you hear, you can subscribe on iTunes, Spotify, and all the usual channels by searching Skip the Queue or visit our website rubbercheese.com/podcast.If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave us a five star review, it really helps others find us. And remember to follow us on Twitter for your chance to win the books that have been mentioned in this episode.Competition ends October 1st 2022. The winner will be contacted via Twitter. Show references: https://maryrose.org/https://www.historicdockyard.co.uk/https://twitter.com/DominicJonesUKhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/dominicejones/ https://www.nmrn.org.uk/https://www.historicdockyard.co.uk/news/item/1152-buoyant-bounce-back-bodes-well-for-portsmouth-historic-dockyard Dominic Jones was recruited to the Mary Rose in 2019 ago as Chief Operating Officer, and became CEO in 2021.  He brings an excellent background in commercial visitor attractions (Disney, Merlin) and creative visitor experience development.During his time at the Mary Rose, he has already driven an excellent commercial and operational performance and worked closely with previous Chief Executive to create the new Portsmouth Historic Dockyard joint venture with the National Museum of the Royal Navy, which launched successfully in August 2020.  Transcriptions: Kelly Molson: Welcome to Skip the Queue, a podcast for people working in or working with visitor attractions. I'm your host, Kelly Molson. In today's episode, I speak with Dominic Jones, CEO of the Mary Rose Museum and Director of Portsmouth Historic Dockyard. Dominic shares the amazing impact of the joint venture between the Mary Rose Museum and the National Museum of the Royal Navy and his advice for any attractions looking to start and improve their partnership arrangements. If you like what you hear, subscribe on all the usual channels by searching Skip the Queue.Kelly Molson: Dominic. Welcome to Skip the Queue. Thanks for coming on.Dominic Jones: Thanks for having me. I'm looking forward to it, I think.Kelly Molson: You are looking forward to it. You don't need to think about it. Can we just point out, I know, listeners, you can't see this, but if you're watching this on YouTube, can we just see, you've got a lovely little, "I love Skip the Queue" graphic in the background there. Look at that.Dominic Jones: Yeah, I think it's important to get across that I do love Skip the Queue and it's important to get that across before the icebreaker questions, I think, just in case you had a couple and you were thinking, "Oh, I'm going to be a bit tough." And then, so I did that and I tweeted this morning how excited I am about your forthcoming website attraction questionnaire, so that's a double. That's a double positive, right?Kelly Molson: Thank you. Thank you. Don't worry, listeners. I've got a special little recording so you understand what we're talking about that will be coming out in the next week or so, so you'll find out more about that soon.Dominic Jones: And I bought you a rubber for your rubber collection. Can you see that? Mary Rose rubber?Kelly Molson: Wow. Look at that.Dominic Jones: You may or may not get that depending on how the icebreakers go, so that's my third attempt.Kelly Molson: Gosh, I've never been bribed for a good icebreaker question.Dominic Jones: It's not bribery. It's a nice gift. It's a nice gift.Kelly Molson: Right, well, let's get cracking on the icebreaker questions, shall we? I think I've been quite kind to you. Tell us something that you are really great at cooking.Dominic Jones: I really like cooking. I actually find cooking really relaxing, so on a Friday or Saturday, I often cook at home, so it depends, really. I quite like making my own recipes, so just using what we've got in the house. So for example, scallops with chorizo, or if you're doing a steak, might do it with some sort of watercress and various cheese, or just sort of experimenting. I really like sort of seeing what we've got, putting it together and making it work. I think it's important, when you're cooking, to drink some wine as well.Kelly Molson: Oh, I agree.Dominic Jones: So cooking with wine is something I enjoy doing.Kelly Molson: We can be friends, Dominic.Dominic Jones: There we go.Kelly Molson: Absolutely, we can be friends. Also, really great choices of food there. I would definitely eat both of those. You'd be really good on Ready Steady Cook, then. That would've been your show.Dominic Jones: Yeah. Do you know what? I used to... So I once applied for a game show, which I didn't get on, I was very disappointed, but Ready Steady Cook was one I think I could have done. Because it's not hard, is it? Most things go with things, and it's also about having the confidence to carry it off and knowing... The only time it went wrong was I wanted to cook for my girlfriend, who's now my wife, a lemon pasta dish and it tasted awful and it had lemon rind in it and stuff, so... But apart from that, it's always worked out.Kelly Molson: Well, I mean, you must have done all right. She married you.Dominic Jones: Yeah.Kelly Molson: She married you in the end.Dominic Jones: True.Kelly Molson: All right. Well, our next one, I've gone topical for this. If you were the captain of a pirate ship...Dominic Jones: Yeah?Kelly Molson: What would be the name of your ship?Dominic Jones: That's a good one. Oh. I do like pirates. I think, because I'm Welsh and because I'd want to be a pirate who... A bit like sort of the Warrior in the Dockyard, which isn't a pirate ship, by the way, but when it came in, people normally surrendered, I want to be a scary pirate that people would think, "Oh, don't..." Maybe, like, Smoking Dragon or something like that. And then we'd light smoke as we came in so people are like, "Oh, here's the Smoking Dragon."Kelly Molson: Yeah, I like that. And there'd be a big dragon's head on the front with flame and smoke coming out of it.Dominic Jones: And people... Because a lot of pirates were Welsh. I don't know whether you know this, but a lot of pirates were Welsh.Kelly Molson: I didn't know that.Dominic Jones: Yeah, it's massive.Kelly Molson: Wow.Dominic Jones: Massive.Kelly Molson: Okay. All right. This is great. That's an excellent answer.Dominic Jones: I have to say, these are slightly biased questions because I was listening to a few of your podcasts recently and, like, you had someone from the zoo, "Oh, what's your favourite animal?" Or you had someone from IAAPA, "What's your favourite ride?" And I'm getting a "name a pirate ship"? Know what I mean?Kelly Molson: All right, what's your favourite boat?Dominic Jones: No, only joking. I'm not going to answer that. I'm not going to answer that.Kelly Molson: All right, but what is your favourite smell? That's my last question.Dominic Jones: Genuinely, we're looking at smell now for the museum, because smell is so important, it's something that can make a difference. When I was at Madame Tussauds Amsterdam, we used smell, as well, as part of the experience, because it just creates that emotive moment. I do like cookie dough and cookies and the smell of that sort of baking which you get pumped in in Disney parks. I quite like the smell of red wine.Kelly Molson: Yeah. Yep.Dominic Jones: Yeah, so I think it's food or drink smells I like, but yeah. Good question.Kelly Molson: Good answer. We are at Unpopular Opinion Point. What have you got to share with us?Dominic Jones: This is a hard one because I've decided to go work on this and I did have some really cool ones about lager and N-Dubz and stuff, but I decided to go with work because one of the things that through my whole career, anyone who knows me will know is I get really frustrated when people blame the weather, so I think you shouldn't blame the weather for anything because what happens is when someone blames the weather, when the weather's... So I've worked in theme parks and in museums and aquariums, indoor and outdoor attractions, and you probably know that when it's bad weather, it's great for indoor attractions, when it's good weather, it's good for the theme parks, right?Dominic Jones: So you get people that, when it's good weather in theme parks or bad weather in museums, they say, "Oh, our marketing and our everything we're doing is brilliant because the visitors are coming." And as soon as it's the bad weather or the good weather, depending on what you are, then it's all about the weather. So, "Our visitors are down because the weather was good." If you're in an indoor attraction and it really, really irritates me, and it's one of those things, they're mutually exclusive, you can only blame the weather if you give the weather credit when it's good, and it's one of those things, if things are good, I always think you should look outside the window and think, "Right, what's the reason for that?" And then if things are bad, you should look inside your organisation. It's one of my pet hates, but probably doesn't work for the podcast, so I should probably go with the lager or N-Dubz one, but anyway, there we go. But it is important, right? I think it's a good one.Kelly Molson: It is important. No, I think, yeah, that is important. It's really interesting. I've never really thought about that before. We need to give the weather more credit.Dominic Jones: Well, you need to give the weather credit if you're going to use it to blame. For me, it's a constant. It's something... And these days, weather forecasts are 10, 14 days out, so you should be able to plan.Kelly Molson: Yeah. Okay. Good. All right.Dominic Jones: I'll get off my high horse now. Yeah.Kelly Molson: Listeners, let us know how you feel, so let us know if you want to know about that N-Dubz one as well. I'm intrigued. Right, Dominic, I want you to tell us about your background because we met up recently, didn't we, at the M+H exhibition? And you were very humble about coming on the podcast and you said, "Oh, I'm not going to have anything... You've had really interesting people on and I'm not that interesting." You are really interesting and you've had such an incredible background. Tell us a little bit about it and how you got to where you are now.Dominic Jones: Well, I'm not sure about that. I do like listening to your podcast and you have some amazing guests and 9 times out of 10, I normally think, after listening to them, "Right, I'm going to either do something that they've suggested." Or I follow them on LinkedIn or Twitter and think, "Right, let's learn from them." Because I think you should always learn from other people, but so my career is a lot of luck, a lot of opportunity and a lot of chats.Dominic Jones: When I was growing up, I wanted to be a leisure centre manager. You know? Like you probably won't remember The Brittas Empire, but that was my dream. That was my dream, much to my mum's disappointment. And so that was all I ever wanted, so I went to college and did a leisure studies course, a HND, and there was a placement in PGL Adventure, which is like an adventure park, and I was a Multi Activity Instructor. Absolutely loved it.Dominic Jones: But then I sort of realised, actually, there's a whole world out there and decided I wanted to work in theme parks, so I applied to work at Disney and didn't get it the first time. I was very cocky, I was the wrong sort of person for Disney, but I went back three times and eventually got it and I did a placement in Disney and it was the best thing I ever did and it changed my life. It's one of the few jobs that I've left and thought, "My life will never be the same again." So good. So I did that and I got my master's degree. I didn't get the doctorate because I went on spring break, but hey, I was young...Kelly Molson: Well, spring break, though.Dominic Jones: Exactly. I was young. And then sort of went to Thorpe Park and was a Ride Operator. I remember my friends and some of their family were saying, "That's a real waste of..." Because I went to, in between Disney, went to university in Swansea, and they said, "It's a real waste of university, operating a teacup for £3.50 an hour." Or whatever it was at the time. But I loved it and for me, it was... I thought, "If you want to become a manager or you want to become, eventually, a General Manager or a Director of a theme park, it's really important to know how these things work."Dominic Jones: So I loved it, and just in case you ever get to operate the teacups, it's not too complicated, there's a red and green button, the red is to stop and the green is to start. I mean, it was five hours of training, but I finally mastered it and you can't actually make it go faster, so when you're there on the microphone and say, "Do you want to go faster?" You can't, it goes faster anyway, but I loved it and then very quickly rose through the ranks, so I became a Ride Supervisor, Team Leader, Area Team Leader, Coordinator, went to Chessington, worked there just at the time when Tussauds had bought Thorpe Park, so it was a real great time for career opportunities.Dominic Jones: Then I went to Madame Tussauds, was the Customer Service Manager there and helped create the first contact centre, if you like, call centre, where we sold tickets for things like Rock Circus, which is no longer in existence, but Rock Circus, the London Eye, Madam Tussauds, the Planetarium and that became the Merlin Contact Centre in the future, and then I started applying for loads of jobs, more General Manager jobs, and didn't get them and realised that I needed to get some marketing and sales experience.Dominic Jones: So I left and went to work for Virgin and then I was there for nearly 10 years and absolutely loved it and instead of getting the sales and marketing, well, I got the sales experience, I ended up becoming Vice President of Europe, the Middle East and Africa for the logistics side of the business, and then also, so we opened up Kenya, had some amazing life experiences, we saw the whole world and then was Regional Vice President Sales in Hong Kong for Asia Pacific, so great time.Dominic Jones: And then my wife became pregnant, obviously, I was involved in that, and it made me realise that I probably couldn't do a job where I was traveling 24/7. I mean, for a while, I did literally consider, which makes me sound like a bad person, "I could call in from Skype and things like that." And my wife was like, "Come on." So we went back to Wales and it was really hard to find a job that would allow me to be at home and be around so I actually thought, "Well, originally, when I went to Virgin, I wanted to have marketing experience."Dominic Jones: So I actually went to Thorpe Park and the marketing team and looked after the partnerships and promotions, did some really cool things, the Ministry of Sound nightclub deal was there, did some stuff with Lionsgate. A really good time doing the "buy one, get one free" things, the partnerships and events, got some good bands together on the stage that hadn't been on stage with the Wideboys and the [inaudible 00:11:55] boys if you know your dance music, it was massive.Dominic Jones: Anyway, so I did that for a bit and then got an opportunity to go back to Wales, which is where my wife's family is from. I'm from North Wales, she's from South Wales, so I got a chance to run Oakwood Theme Park, which I absolutely loved and probably would've been there forever if an opportunity hadn't come up with Merlin and Merlin, it was to look after the rest of Europe and the rest of Europe was basically anything in their midway, so Madam Tussauds, Dungeons, Lego Discovery Centre, Sea Life, that wasn't in the UK or Germany, so it was like Istanbul, Helsinki, Paris Blankenberge in Belgium, Spain. I mean, it was brilliant and I did that for a few years.Dominic Jones: Then I went and ran Thorpe Park for a few years, which absolutely loved because that was where I started as a teacup operator and I remember, there was a guy there, good friend of mine, he said, "I remember, when you were on the teacups, you said, 'One day, I'm going to come back and run the place.'" And I did, so amazing. And then, in that time, I had three kids and really was commuting from Christchurch, so decided to change careers again and come into the heritage world and came as the COO of the Mary Rose, which I did for two years, and then, during the pandemic, became the CEO, so quick sort of... Yeah. But lots of luck and right place, right time, all those sort of things, but that's good, right? That's most people's career.Kelly Molson: Whoa. That is amazing. I mean, you've been to so many different places. I love that you went full-circle at Thorpe Park as well. What an incredible story, to have gone in there as an operator and then end up running the place. That is amazing.Dominic Jones: Yeah, I loved that. And actually, all the jobs I've had have really become part of our story. I was talking to someone yesterday about the Mary Rose and they were talking about what they were going to do next but how the Mary Rose had been a massive part of their story and I said, "That's the beautiful thing about work and careers and life. Whatever you do, it becomes part of your story and you're part of their story." So whether it's Thorpe Park, whether it's when I opened up, for Virgin Atlantic, the Nairobi route for logistics and the Hamlin, it was amazing and I've been to Kenya probably more times than I've been to Birmingham, you know? So that's part of my story, and when I leave the Mary Rose, I hope isn't any time soon, this will always be... It'll be my favourite Tudor warship. I mean, it's probably the only Tudor warship, but also my favourite one, so yeah.Kelly Molson: That was the answer to my question, as well. "What's your favourite ship?"Dominic Jones: Yeah.Kelly Molson: Wow. I'm blown away by your career. I just think you've had such a phenomenal journey to get to where you are now. There's something that I want to talk to you about today and that's about your joint venture that you have with the Mary Rose and the National Museum of the Royal Navy. I just want to read out a tweet that I saw because this is what sparked this conversation, so this is a tweet that went out on the Mary Rose Twitter account.Kelly Molson: It says, "We are very pleased to share that Portsmouth Historic Dockyard saw a 150% rise in visitor numbers in 2021, reported by ALVA today. The significant rise in visitors demonstrates the effectiveness of the joint venture between Mary Rose and the National Museum of the Royal Navy in our first year."Kelly Molson: I am very intrigued by this because this has been kind of a constant throughout most of the podcast conversations that we have is about how collaborative the sector is, but this is really specific about two attractions collaborating together to bring more visitors in. I would love you to tell us about this.Dominic Jones: Well, yeah, the end result's fantastic. 150% increase in visitors. It really feels joined up. My son's school is coming in today so I was in the visitor centre and I was waiting to see what time he was coming in because he obviously wouldn't tell me the time he's actually in, so I was looking around the visitor centre and I couldn't be prouder, when you see the mixture of Victory and Warrior and Mary Rose, and how far we've come since we started, but if you go back in history, the Mary Rose used to be part of Portsmouth Historic Dockyard and there was one ticket and there was a separate company called Portsmouth Historic Dockyard that ran it, and lots of trusts, at that time, there were lots of trusts that fed into it, and then, for whatever reason, some of these trusts went independent.Dominic Jones: And so when I joined the Mary Rose, we were separate. We had a separate ticket, visitor centre, if you like, so imagine, I guess, like a... You know when you're on holiday and there's people trying to get you to go on boat rides or they're trying to get you to come into their restaurant? And literally, we were competing, so when a visitor was outside, there'd be the Mary Rose saying, "Hey, come and see Henry VIII's warship, the biggest Tudor collection in the world." I mean, it's amazing. And then the people next door, "Hey, come and see the Victory and the Warrior." And it just was really difficult for the customers, and for whatever reason, we weren't together and we had these two separate companies, so for quite a while, when I started, along with Helen, who was the CEO and Dominic and a gentleman called John in NMRN, we had meetings to see if we could get closer and to get a deal, and then I think Matthew joined, as well, from NMRN, and eventually we kind of got to an agreement.Dominic Jones: It was about, "What can we do together? What, collaboratively, can we do?" We came up with three things. We can sell tickets together, we could run a visitor centre together, so that's #1, the visitor side. We could market the destination together, and we could do strategic operations like events. So we then looked away and came across a deal, and for us, it was important that the two parties, so Mary Rose and the National Museum of the Royal Navy had a 50/50 parity of decision so it wasn't a one-sided joint venture and it was really... There's lots of talent in both organisations, so I've always admired what the National Museum of the Royal Navy have done over the years and how they've told history and how they bring it to life, and obviously, I love the Mary Rose.Dominic Jones: And so when we put us together, it was just a real opportunity, that synergy. You know when people say "one and one and you get three", but it was exactly like that and it worked really well, so we share marketing, so marketing costs, we share, we share marketing resource, so Mary Rose marketing people work along with NMRN marketing people. We do some things independently so our trusts are independent, our conservation, our research and all that sort of stuff, that's just Mary Rose and NMRN is just that, although we are working on some projects together, but in terms of the visitor, we have one visitor centre, we have one ticket you can buy, lots of options, we could talk about that, some amazing pricing we did which allowed us to do that.Dominic Jones: Because when you're competing against each other, you almost are encouraged to discount more, so we had, at times, the National Museum of the Royal Navy who were saying Portsmouth Historic Dockyard then might have a deal on Groupon, we might have a deal on Wowcher and you'd just be discounting, discounting, discounting, and you wouldn't be really getting across the real value for the customer, so yeah, it was really hard, and I remember, we would really fight for every single visitor because, for us, 84% of our money comes from tickets, so I remember, we'd get Henry VIII down the front, out the front, we'd have him talking to the visitors, saying, "Oh", you know, and with people talking in French and he'd go up in French and say, "Well, I was the king of France. Why are you going to Victory? Come to Mary Rose." But he wouldn't be taking them away from Victory, because that would be bad, but he would be saying, "Go to both." And we'd always be positive about NMRN, but we'd also want people to come to Mary Rose because that was how we were going to survive.Kelly Molson: Just going back to those times, then, was it more like a rivalry than anything?Dominic Jones: Yeah, it was really hard.Kelly Molson: So it was really difficult?Dominic Jones: It was really hard. I mean, we all respected each other, but it was really hard. It was like one of those ferry terminals or restaurants on holiday. I mean, I remember, we would flyer, like circus marketing, bumping into the brand, resort domination, we called it. We would be literally, when it was sunny because you can't blame the weather, when it was sunny, we'd be on the beach with Mary Rose leaflets saying, "Hey, get out the cool, we're air-conditioned, come to the Mary Rose." We were literally in all the restaurants, we had colour-in sheets, "Come to...", it was all about getting everyone to come and actually, we quickly realized that the NMRN was spending so much money on getting people to Portsmouth that we needed to make sure when they're in Portsmouth, they came to the Mary Rose and we did.Dominic Jones: I mean, I look back on it now, we had adverts that had, because we'd been very lucky with Tripadvisor, five stars, I mean I would've dreamed of that at Thorpe Park, but five stars constantly so we'd have posters that say, "You've just missed the best thing to do in Portsmouth." And then another one. "Turn around." You know, like when you go to Camden Town and there's a McDonald's, a Burger King and then outside the Burger King, there's a sign. "Why are you going to Burger King? Go to McDonald's." It was like that, so it wasn't great.Kelly Molson: It's quite intense, as well, isn't it, for the visitor?Dominic Jones: Yeah.Kelly Molson: That's a lot of pressure.Dominic Jones: Well, it is and I would do it and I would literally go down and leave, because you've got to leave from the front, and I would put my Mary Rose coat, which I've still got here, and I'd be down the scenic and we'd be... And I remember coaches would turn up and one of the ladies who was fantastic with us, Sandra, she's now one of our Visitor Experience Managers, but she'd jump on the couch and say, "Have you booked your tickets? Where are you going? Can I tell you about the Mary Rose?" And she'd bring whole coaches in. It was hard and it was really... I went to sleep every night easy, because it was so tiring and it wasn't sustainable and we did need to get a deal, and actually, the National Museum of the Royal Navy and the Mary Rose always treated each other with respect, but it was like the Battle of Victory Gate and that's not the way to behave and that's not the long-term way to run a business.Dominic Jones: So what was really great was we've got a deal, we got the ability to sell tickets together and we got the ability to work together and there's some really super talented people in the National Museum of the Royal Navy and in Mary Rose and we did some great things, so when we reopened after COVID, we did this really cool video where we had Henry VIII and we had some of their characters from Warrior and some of their actors all visiting each other's attractions in the lift, wearing face masks, getting hand sanitiser, and it just feels joined up.Dominic Jones: I mean, I've done lots of partnerships in my career. At Merlin, we had a Sea Life in Helsinki, which was a joint venture with a theme park called Linnanmaki. If you ever get to interview this lady who ran Linnanmaki, or she might the CEO there, she was amazing, but we had this joint venture. See, it's really hard in a joint venture because, especially if it's a 50/50 parity decision one, you've got to get agreement and that means that you work really hard on doing the right thing, so what's quite nice is if we were on our own, we probably would've done marketing campaigns and other things which were okay, but because we end up working together and we've got to make sure we get that joint agreement, the results is always way better. It's brilliant. And the customers benefit, because it's one entrance, it's one ticket, there's a lot more value in it, so yeah, it's been really successful.Kelly Molson: I hadn't realised quite how intertwined the organisations were in terms of decision-making and marketing, like you say, and sharing all of those resources. You talked a little bit about the visitor centre. Did you have to change the infrastructure and stuff? Did you have to build new buildings and all of that and agree on that?Dominic Jones: Well, no, they had a big visitor centre because, I mean, they've got a lot more footprint, more attractions, they've got the Warrior, they've got M.33, they've got a Submarine Museum over in Victory and we've got the Mary Rose, which is amazing. And so we had a building called Porter's Lodge, which was here and then there's the gate, and then they had their visitor center and their visitor center was perfect, so we moved in there, but we agreed to make it look and feel like it was Mary Rose and National Museum of the Royal Navy, so we spent a bit of money on the look and feel of it, so that was good and same with the brand and the marketing and making it feel like it was something new, but yeah, so there was a bit of that.Dominic Jones: I mean, in terms of infrastructure, we went with their ticketing system because it made more sense because it would be a bigger cost for them to change. We went with some of the Mary Rose's media buying because, at the time, we were buying media cheaper and better. And actually, now, we're in the process of going to tenders together, so the digital agency, we've done together, the PR agency, we've done together and it's great because it's a bigger portfolio and you get different views, and I always think the best way to run any business, so, for example, the Mary Rose or Thorpe Park or wherever it is, to talk to your customers, to talk to your staff and then, obviously, to talk to the manage experts. And we get that in spades, because we've also got our staff and our customers and our volunteers, but we've got NMRN staff and customers and volunteers and together, we are getting some really cool ideas and things we can do, so it's working well. As you can see, 150% increase in the first year.Kelly Molson: I mean, I've read it with my own eyes.Dominic Jones: And I hope you saw, NMRN, they did a little nice fist bump reply, and it just is in the spirit of it. We are working together and I think that's so important.Kelly Molson: It is massively important. You mentioned something about pricing earlier, and we've spoken about this before, but you said that you did something interesting that you'd implemented that allowed you to grow the yield and the revenue as well. Was this something that you did jointly too?Dominic Jones: Yeah, it was. So we had to come up with a new pricing structure because we were doing something new, so they had, what was it called? Full Navy Ticket, which was for all of their attractions and we had an annual ticket, so when we merged, we had to come up with a new pricing structure and it's a good opportunity to change, and 84% of our business, our revenue comes from tickets, theirs is about, I think, 80% or so, I can't remember, so it's still important to them as well. So we had to get the pricing right and it allowed us to really think about what's the best value for the customer and what's the best thing to do that stops us having to discount heavily?Dominic Jones: So we created a... It's like a decoy pricing model, like supermarkets have been doing it for years, so if you buy one attraction, it's a really bad ticket. I mean, still, a few people buy them, it's a really bad ticket, so it was... I mean, it used to be £18. We put the price up to £24. It used to be, if you bought one ticket, you could visit that attraction all year. You can only visit it once. So we made it a really unattractive ticket, so that's your lower decoy, so the idea of that is you only buy that if all you really want to do is go to the Mary Rose or all you want to go is go to the Victory and if you've just come to see one of those things, that's the sort of money you would pay, it's very competitively priced with other things on the South Coast, so that's what we did.Dominic Jones: And then we created a Three-Attraction Ticket or Three-Ship Ticket, which was slightly more money, so that went up to £39, which was the biggest sort of sting, about a £15 increase, big, big jump. And that was an annual ticket. That was, you could pick your three attractions and visit them all year. And then we did, "But for £5 more, you could have an Ultimate Explorer and have everything including the..." And that sort of, so you've got the lower decoy, which is the single attraction, then you've got the medium decoy, which is three ships, but then you go, "Well, for £5 more, you could do everything."Dominic Jones: And 80% of people do the Ultimate Explorer and they do everything, and it's so good value. I mean, it's less than the price of a football game and football game, 50% of the time, you're disappointed, and you don't get long, do you? It is incredible value and you get to go to all the attractions, you get out on the water, it's brilliant. So we've got that. And then we were going to put in an upper decoy, now, an upper decoy is a premium, really expensive ticket, so for example, we might, "We have, at Mary Rose, you can go into the ship for £300 and have a private experience." And we were going to put that in, but actually, because the decoy system worked so well, we didn't need that so we've just kept it as Single Attraction Ticket, Three-Attraction Ticket and Ultimate Explorer and it's working really, really well.Dominic Jones: So yeah, that's our pricing. And because of that, we don't have to discount because we put all the value and loaded the value in, actually, we don't have to discount. And then, when we do discount, we want to reach the right people, so, for example, we do, between the months of November and February, we do a Loyal and Local campaign where we go out to Portsmouth and Southampton regions and we say, "Bring a bill in and you can get a considerable discount." All year round, we do a discount for people who've got a Portsmouth leisure card, so anyone who's on Universal Credit, so they get 50% off.Dominic Jones: And we do some other really cool community engagement stuff between us with schools and stuff like that, and then if we do do a discount, so discounts are still important, so there's some amazing partners out there, GetYourGuide, Picnic, lots of the providers that really support businesses, Virgin, Ticketdays, all that sort of stuff. But we do it at the right level, so we've got like a playground, so whereas before, we might have been competing against each other, thinking, "Oh, we need to discount by 40% or 50% and then give them extra commission so they push it." We now do it at a really fair level, so there is a bit of a discount, but it's not much.Dominic Jones: And then for the consumer, we want the cheapest, best-value ticket to always be on our website. And we used a couple companies, so we used a company called, they were called Brand Incrementum, they're now called Magic Little Giants, we use them, we use some insight into what previous businesses have done before, but we copied the American Six Flags website model. If you ever want a quick lesson in pricing, just go to Six Flags. Their website is that... I mean, you're into websites, right?Kelly Molson: I am.Dominic Jones: It's the best website for pricing. I love it and I check it nearly every month. It makes me laugh, how focused they are on decoy pricing and how in-your-face they are, but how you don't know it as a consumer unless you know. It's amazing. It drives my family mad. I love it. Anyway. Yeah.Kelly Molson: This decoy pricing, I've never heard that phrase, I've never heard that used in pricing before. This is all new to me.Dominic Jones: It's like supermarkets when you get... And I remember, we've got a local supermarket near us and the guy did, "buy one bottle of wine, get one wine free". And then he had, "or buy one wine for £7 or buy two for £7". We were always going to buy two for £7 or two for £8. It's all that sort of trying to encourage behaviour, but he didn't quite get it because recently, I went in, it was like, "buy one, pay for one" and I was like, "Isn't that... That's the same as normal, yeah?" "Yeah." But he's a nice guy so I bought one. Well, that's my problem.Dominic Jones: But no, it's the same way supermarkets have been doing, where they try with the club card to get you to purchase things, or they're trying to do that, and all we're trying to do is encourage everyone to go for that Ultimate Explorer, which is the best value. It's almost like you can imagine it on the website, it's got a sign saying, "Pick me." So even to the extent we still don't, this day, discount our Single Attraction Ticket on our website. We don't give any discount for it and then we give a £5 discount on the three attractions and £5 on Ultimate Explorer. But yeah, loving the pricing.Kelly Molson: Love this. This is such great insight. Thank you for sharing. This partnership is really intriguing to me because I think it seems like the perfect setup, right? Because you're literally neighbors in the same area, you could make this work really well. What advice would you give to other attractions that are thinking about partnering with other attractions? Like what would be your top tips for people to make this work well?Dominic Jones: I mean, it's really hard. You've got to think about, because often people see it as competitors, but you've got to think in terms of getting the customers or the guests or the consumers, whatever you call them, giving them the best value, and during lockdown, when we were being interviewed and stuff, we'd always say, "Come visit the Mary Rose or come visit..." Once we did the joint venture, "Come visit the Historic Dockyard. But also, if you can't come visit, go visit your local museum, go visit anyone." It's important to share that, and I think there are always benefits of working together, you're always stronger together.Dominic Jones: When I was at Oakwood Theme Park in Wales, amazing theme park, you're in West Wales and we were thinking, "Well, how do we reach further and advertise more?" And actually, we ended up working with a farm, which was a stunning farm that had rides and animals called Folly Farm down the road and we worked, then, with Manor House Wildlife Park and Heatherton, and you actually work together and you can work together and I'd always say, "Try it on something." So try it whether it's an event or try it whether it's a destination marketing campaign. I mean, we're working with the people of Portsmouth, so with... "The people of Portsmouth", that sounds a bit grand. We're working with attractions in Portsmouth on trying to get people into Portsmouth, so we do something with Portsmouth Council where the Spinnaker Tower and D-Day Museum and Mary Rose and National Museum of the Royal Navy and now Portsmouth Historical Dockyard, together, we advertise in London because actually, advertising in London individually is really expensive, but if you do it collaboratively.Dominic Jones: There's lots of ways to do stuff collaboratively and find another angle. So we've got other people on our site that we're not partners with at the moment, so the Portsmouth Naval Base Property Trust, amazing people who run some of the small boats that we did the Gunboat Race with the D-Day veterans on the weekend. Fantastic. So yesterday, we had a really great Volunteers' Tea Party to celebrate the end of volunteer and we had the volunteers from the Property Trust, we had the volunteers from the NMRN, the volunteers from the Mary Rose, there's always some synergy and I would say, in any way, find it.Dominic Jones: Everywhere I've worked, I've tried to get partnerships with local businesses, with other theme parks, with other attractions, because, actually, it's your stronger together, and if you're going, especially, after a local market, because you've always got to love your locals, that's the most important thing. If they see that you actually are the sort of people that work with each other, it makes them almost more proud of you. You remember the Game Makers in the London Olympics in 2012 and how amazing they were and how they did that sort of course where everyone was recommending all this stuff to you, that's kind of what you want, but I would find some common ground, whatever it is.Dominic Jones: Whether it's lobbying, we found common ground at Thorpe Park with other attractions to lobby the government for things, for VAT to level... Or whether it's in Oakwood, trying to get some advertising to get people from Bristol to cross the bridge to come into Wales or whether it's, I'm trying to think, in Amsterdam, we worked, so Madame Tussauds Amsterdam and Dungeons, which I was responsible for, we worked with Heineken because they had this amazing experience and with Tours & Tickets, so we'd make sure that if anyone came to Amsterdam, they came to our attractions. It's those sort of partnerships, finding the common ground and making it work.Dominic Jones: And don't be scared of it, because you are always bigger and better together and customers have so much choice, so working together delivers amazing results. I would never want to go back to not being part of a partnership with the National Museum of the Royal Navy and I would love it if we could do more. We are keen to do more with other attractions in the South to get people to come to the South Coast, to come to Hampshire. But yeah, I would definitely do...Dominic Jones: And also, you get bigger buying power, so say, for example, Merlin are really strong, so they don't necessarily need those with other partners because they can do a campaign in the press, Sun, Days Go Out and you've got all the Merlin attractions, but if you're individual attractions, you can't, so if you do a partnership with your competitors, you can then suddenly say, "Right, well, we want to do a Days Out campaign in the press between all these independent attractions."Dominic Jones: I mean, it's brilliant. I love it and I love, also, this industry, how collaborative especially the heritage side is. You can say, "Oh, I was thinking about doing this. What do you think?" Or, "What do you think about that?" And everyone will share and everyone is almost willing you to be successful. It's crazy, right? It's one of the best industries in the world. If you were in, I don't know, the restaurant business, you wouldn't be doing that, would you? Or another... It's so good. Anyway, hopefully, that answers your question.Kelly Molson: Oh, absolutely.Dominic Jones: I get very passionate about it. I'm so sorry. I love it.Kelly Molson: I'm so glad that you do because it answered my question perfectly and I think you've given so much value to listeners today in terms of all of the things that you've done, I couldn't have asked for a better response. Thank you. It's a big year for the Mary Rose, isn't it? And I think it would be very right that we talk about that. So it's your 40th year celebration this year, isn't it?Dominic Jones: Yeah, 40 years since the raising, so 1982, October. I am obviously older than you so I remember watching it on Blue Peter as a child and it was the world's first underwater live broadcast. It was watched by over 60 million people worldwide. I mean, it was amazing of its time and so yeah, 40 years, and because of that, we've now got the world's biggest Tudor collection of everyday life, there's nowhere else in the world you can get closer to Tudor and we've got the biggest maritime salvation, so we've got a lot of plans to celebrate. Unfortunately, the pandemic got in the way. During the pandemic, I'm not going to lie, it was horrific. There were times when we were drawing a list of who we were going to give the keys to, got really, really bad and it got dark for everyone and every museum, every attraction, every business, I'm not trying to say, "Oh, poor us." Everyone had that tough time.Dominic Jones: But it meant that actually investing, we were going to do another building, we were going to do a whole museum dedicated to the raising and actually, probably one of the best things that came out of it is we didn't because we got the joint venture, which is brilliant, our trading improved, we had a fantastic summer and then we were like, "Right, we should really do something for the 40th anniversary, but we can't afford taking another lease of another building or building another building, so what can we do?" And we managed to come up with a few plans, so the first thing we're doing is we're doing a TV documentary, which is going to be brilliant, coming out in October. Honestly, I've seen, they started some of the filming and the pre [inaudible 00:37:39], it's going to be brilliant.Kelly Molson: Oh, that's so exciting.Dominic Jones: I can't give too much away because we've had to sign something, but it's going to be great. And actually, we even had, because we're responsible for the wreck site, so we had Chris and Alex who helped raise the Mary Rose, our Head of Interpretation, Head of Research, amazing people, they were out diving the other day because we're still responsible for the wreck site and it just gives you goosebumps. I saw the footage and oh, it's amazing. So we got that. We're also building a 4D experience.Dominic Jones: So when we reopened last summer, we opened with this thing called 1545, which was an immersive experience and we wanted to get across the Mary Rose didn't sink on its maiden voyage, it was Henry VIII's ship that he, when he came to the throne, he commissioned two ships, the Mary Rose was one of them, it fought in lots of battles, it had a long life and then sank defending Britain in a battle, by the way, the French who were invading was twice the size of the Spanish Armada, but because history's written by the winners, we don't hear that.Dominic Jones: But amazing, so we did this amazing, immersive experience. We got Dame Judi Dench to do the voice and you feel like you're going to get sunk. Well, the ship does sink and you go under and then you go into the museum and it's so good and we were like, "We want to do something for the end. We want to have a finale that says..." Because the thing about our museum, it's authentic. There's 19,700 artifacts. You can't get that anywhere else. I mean, it's just brilliant. Anyway, so we thought, "How are we going to end this?" And the thing we don't do justice to is the finding, the raising, the excavation, all the divers, there was 500 volunteer divers. From the 1960s, people were looking for it.Dominic Jones: I mean, Alexander McKee, who found it, was on the news and people would say... It was like an Indiana Jones movie, they were saying, "Oh, he's never going to find it." And other people were looking, the Navy were looking and there was a bit in Indiana Jones where they got the map the wrong way around and all of that. Brilliant. So they found the Mary Rose and then they got Margaret Rule who was this amazing lady who had, when she went to university, I think she didn't get a place at university at first because she was a woman and this is amazing, today's day story, and she didn't dive, she was an archeologist. And then she said, "I'm going to dive." Taught herself to dive and without her, this museum, the Mary Rose wouldn't be here, so Alexander McKee, Margaret Rule, two amazing people, both of them...Kelly Molson: What a woman.Dominic Jones: Yeah, what a woman, but both of them, both of them, without them, we wouldn't be here. So we want to tell their story, but also, we want to put the guests and the visitors to what it's like to dive, so with a mixture of real-life filming, footage from these 500 volunteer divers, outtakes from the Chronicle programs that are on the BBC, including, if we can get it to look right, even His Royal Highness, Prince Charles diving. It is stunning.Dominic Jones: So we're going to take the guests on a bit of a pre-show with the history, then they're going to get into the 4D theater and it'd be like you were boarding a red, going out to the wreck site, there'll be a dive briefing, you'll have the wind in your hair, the seats will be buzzing, but I'm hoping it's this good. I better ring the people after this [inaudible 00:40:38].Kelly Molson: You're really building it up, Dominic.Dominic Jones: Yeah. Well, it better deliver. No, they're brilliant. Figment are amazing. They're so good. So you get in there and then you dive and then you go down and you see what it's like to be under the water. The Royal Engineers were involved, the divers were involved and then you'll be there when the Mary Rose is raised, we're even going to recreate the moment where it... Oh, it'll be brilliant.Dominic Jones: So in answer to your question, we're doing a documentary and a 4D experience, and we've got anniversary lectures so if you're around in October, come and get involved. We've got a lot of people, from historians to divers to... Just talking about the relevance of the Mary Rose and the history of it, and also the diving, and we've got a new coffee table book coming out, so we've got lots and lots and lots going on.Kelly Molson: Oh, my goodness. It's all going on.Dominic Jones: And if we'd have done it the old way, if we'd have done it with a new museum and a new building, I don't think it would've been as good. I mean, I joined the Divers' Legacy group, so about 150 of the divers, on a Zoom call a few weeks ago and it's just, it takes you... These people, who, some of them are retired now or bear in mind this was 40, 50 years ago and hearing their stories and it's living history and it's so important that we tell these stories and capture them now, because in 50 years, they won't be here, and part of our responsibility, our charity objectives, if you like, is to tell the story and forever, and I think that bit of the story's missing, so if that's one thing that we do while I'm at the Mary Rose, I'll be really proud.Kelly Molson: Ah, that is wonderful. And it is [inaudible 00:42:12].Dominic Jones: You have to come, right? You're going to have to come.Kelly Molson: Well, this is the question. When do I need to come to experience everything that you've just sold to me? Because I am sold.Dominic Jones: Yeah. You probably want to come after our anniversary, because we're hoping to launch all this around that time, which is in October, which is, now, this is an interesting one because this was a good conversation with our trustees and our board. "Do you want to launch something in the off-peak period? Don't you want to launch it at Easter or the summer or..." And my view is we should launch it because it's the right thing to do and we're launching this in October because it's a legacy, we want the divers there, we want as many of them there as possible and it's going to be at the Mary Rose forever. This is the ending to the Mary Rose Museum. So it's not like we're launching something for Easter or summer, so we are going to launch it in October, so I'll let you know the details, come and get involved.Kelly Molson: All right, absolutely. I am there. If it's as good as what you've just described, then it's going to be one amazing day out.Dominic Jones: It'd be better. And then, and final thing, sorry, which we're not doing, but I wanted to do is we've still got some of the Mary Rose down in the ocean, so one day, I'd like to bring that back up. I don't think I'll be here to do that because it's probably be in 15 years' time or something because we need to raise a lot of money and do that, but we want to bring the rest of her back up or whatever's left down there back up, and that's quite exciting because our story continues. We still do research.Dominic Jones: We did this fantastic piece of research on skeletons, on human remains. It's a really cool diversity story. Out of the eight skeletons, one was Spanish, one was Venetian, two were North African, second generation, not slaves, a real diversity story in Tudor England. Amazing. Maybe the Victorians whitewashed history. Who knows? But what a great story. And we keep learning and we've got this amazing team of curatorial staff and all of our staff, from the maintenance to the visitor staff to the volunteers and every day, we learn something new, so [inaudible 00:44:03] we want to do. And then, at some point... Have you seen The Dig on Netflix?Kelly Molson: Yes. Yes.Dominic Jones: Great film.Kelly Molson: So good.Dominic Jones: Great film, but I want to write to Netflix to do The Dive. Can you imagine? This story about human endeavor with the Mary Rose? It'd be amazing, so we'd like to do that as well at some point, but we just don't have enough hours in the day, right?Kelly Molson: No. Just add it onto that long list of stuff.Dominic Jones: Yeah.Kelly Molson: Wow. Thank you.Dominic Jones: So if you know anyone in Netflix, let us know, or if anyone from Netflix is listening, get in touch, we want to do that. It'd be cool.Kelly Molson: I would love it.Dominic Jones: I've already casted.Kelly Molson: If someone from Netflix was listening, that would be incredible. Who have you casted?Dominic Jones: Well, so local, because you've got to get local, so for Margaret Rule, I reckon Kate Winslet, she'd do a good job. Great actress. I mean, we've already got Dame Judi Dench, so the same sort of caliber in our 1545 experience, and then also another local who could bring the Alexander McKee, Kenneth Branagh, but to be honest with you, Netflix can do all of that, because let's be honest, I'm not going to make movies, am I? I'm running a museum. But I just think it'd be really cool. It'd be really cool.Kelly Molson: I don't think there's anything that you couldn't do, Dominic, to be honest, after this podcast, so who knows?Dominic Jones: It'd be really cool. Yeah, who knows?Kelly Molson: All right, last question for you, a book that you love that you'd recommend to our listeners?Dominic Jones: I love this question and I really struggled, so I went back and thought about a work example, because I think that's probably more useful, so in all of my career, I've come across lots of people who talk about strategy and I have my own view on what strategy is, but there are lots of books you can read about strategy and there's only one book, in my opinion, that is worth reading and it's this, Good Strategy/Bad Strategy. Hopefully, it's still in print. It is the only book to read on strategy. It's the best book I've... And without this book, I don't think I would've been able to do half the stuff that I've done, because it's all about how you formulate your decisions, how you make your decisions, what the outcome is, it's about execution, it's about everything that, for me, you need to be successful, so I recommend this book. Really good book.Kelly Molson: Good Strategy/Bad Strategy. I have not read that book, but I feel like that's going to go...Dominic Jones: You should read it.Kelly Molson: Yeah, that's going to go top of my pile. All right, listeners, if you want to win a copy of this book, as ever, if you just go over to our Twitter account and you retweet this podcast announcement with the words, "I want Dominic's book." And then you will be in with a chance of winning it. Oh, my goodness. I have had such a good time listening to you today. Thank you so much for coming on and sharing. It's been so valuable. Yeah, that's blown me away today. I'm very excited about coming to visit and thank you for sharing the insight into your partnerships.Dominic Jones: Yeah. Absolute pleasure. And thanks for being kind with the icebreakers, you're going to get the rubber, that's going to your collection.Kelly Molson: Oh, yay. A rubber rubber.Dominic Jones: Because I was really upset that you've got a rubber collection without the Mary Rose. That actually hurt my feelings. It hurt my feelings.Kelly Molson: Well, I'm sorry, I've never actually visited the Mary Rose.Dominic Jones: Well, we're going to put that right.Kelly Molson: We are going to change this, aren't we? So yeah, I'm sorry. I will come and get my rubber in-person, then. Don't post it to me. I'll come and get it in-person when I come and visit.Dominic Jones: Yeah, let's do that. Thank you. Keep it up.Kelly Molson: Thanks for listening to Skip the Queue. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave us a five-star review. It really helps others find us. And remember to follow us on Twitter for your chance to win the books that have been mentioned. Skip the Queue is brought to you by Rubber Cheese, a digital agency that builds remarkable systems and websites for attractions that helps them increase their visitor numbers. You can find show notes and transcriptions from this episode and more over on our website, rubbercheese.com/podcast.

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive
Greg Harford: Retail NZ chief executive after speaking at select committee on Fair Pay Agreements

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 2:13


The debate on Fair Pay Agreements is rife again, with it currently in select committee stage.It's expected to become law by the end of the year, but the likes of Business NZ and Retail NZ remain extremely opposed to it.Retail NZ's Greg Harford who spoke today at select committee joined Heather du Plessis-Allan.LISTEN ABOVE  

Woman's Hour
Celebrating midwinter in sub-Antarctic. Olivia Harrison on celebrating her husband though poetry.

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 57:33


As we celebrate the summer solstice on the other side of the world it's the shortest day or mid-winter. For the first time the British Antarctic Survey have an all-female team wintering on Bird Island in the sub-Antarctic. Midwinter is a moment of celebration for the teams on sites. The Bird Island Research Station Leader, Imogen Lloyd, joins Emma to tell her about the work they're doing. Olivia Harrison has penned a book of poetry called "Came the Lightening" to celebrate her husband, George Harrison's life, more than twenty years after his death.. As lead guitarist of The Beatles, his most famous songs included While My Guitar Gently Weeps, and Here Comes the Sun. What prompted her to share her memories in poetry? A court support service that helps thousands of people who cannot afford a lawyer could be under threat after having its government funding changed. The Chief Executive of Support Through Court Eileen Pereira explains what any loss of core-funding could have on the women they support. A new story suggests that Boris Johnson may have spoken to Downing Street aides about getting his wife, Mrs Carrie Johnson, two roles while she was living in Number 10 with the Prime Minister as his fiancee. Sources told the Daily Mirror that the Prime Minister raised possible new environmental roles for her in autumn 2020, either on the COP 26 summit or with the Royal Family. His closest advisors are said to have vetoed both suggestions - but what questions does this raise about her being the victim of sexism and the idea of her as a private citizen? We hear from Daily Mirror Political Editor Pippa Crerar Plus a new coming-of-age TV series was released on Amazon Prime – The Summer I Turned Pretty, The characters are supposed to be 15 and 16 year olds, but the majority of the cast are in their early 20's. Why are films and television shows that focus on the teenage experience so often played by older actors? We hear from Alex Hart an English and History Student at Durham University and Tianna Haffenden a young actor. Presenter Emma Barnett Producer Beverley Purcell

Backchat
Chief Executive-elect John Lee's cabinet; obesity and pandemic

Backchat

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 61:59


The DotCom Magazine Entrepreneur Spotlight
Gordon G. Summers, Chief Executive Officer, ECMRMIG, A DotCom Magazine Interview

The DotCom Magazine Entrepreneur Spotlight

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 25:09


About Gordon G. Summers and ECMRMIG: Privacy solutions and Technology strategies. Product Owner and product development strategies. Workgroup director for enterprise architecture governance strategies. Company cyber security architectural strategies. Lead and direct the preparation of governing principles to guide decision-making pertinent to infrastructure architecture. Produce all architectural strategies, BPM processes for the organization including the following: Zachman Framework for Enterprise Architectures framework for the development. Open Group Architectural Framework (TOGAF) for accurately defining processes for Government Clients. Federal Enterprise Architecture for all federal client work. Gartner Methodology as part of the ECMRMIG enterprise architectural practice. Earned Value Management system (EVMS) for management of all resources, cost, budgets of the company. Services, products marketing strategies. Privacy using technology company. ECMRMIG is an advocate for achieving Total General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) and future author ownership policies. Engaging New Audiences Through Smart Approach Headquartered in Laurel MD, ECMRMIG is a Privacy Information Governance organization with technology packages including Privacy best practice standards, Security best practice standards, EVM (EARN Value Management), (Safe-agile) Scaled Agile development methodology. At ECMRMIG, our focus is to provide data privacy governance. ECMRMIG is an advocate for achieving Total General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) and future author ownership policies.

Morning Mix with Alan Corcoran
Chief Executive of Wexford County Council Tom Enright says he is confident a site will be delivered for the SETU

Morning Mix with Alan Corcoran

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 10:45


On todays edition of The Morning Mix we brought a special feature as we asked our elected members of the Oireachtas and Tom Enright CEO of Wexford County Coucil.... what is the delay in getting our campus for the South East Technological University?

Talk Chineasy - Learn Chinese every day with ShaoLan
171 - Mobile in Chinese with ShaoLan and Chief Executive & Founder Ralph Simon from Mobilium Global

Talk Chineasy - Learn Chinese every day with ShaoLan

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 9:13


The ”Father of the ringtone” Ralph Simon joins ShaoLan in London to learn how to say ”mobile” in Chinese. Listen to find out why Ralph believes smartphone technology will continue to be one of the most important technologies driving change in the world and why we need to have trust in our apps and devices.

In the Suite
EP 66 Championing Women's Empowerment and the Entrepreneurial Spirit of Independent Investment Advisers with Brian Hamburger, President and Chief Executive Officer of MarketCounsel

In the Suite

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 48:01


To kick start this year's season, Tina Powell has a one-on-one conversation with Brian Hamburger. As the architect behind many of the best independent investment firms, Brian is the Founder, President, and CEO of MarketCounsel, a regulatory compliance consulting firm. He is also the Founder and Managing Member of the Hamburger Law Firm; a practice focused on the investment and securities industry.In addition to being an entrepreneur, Brian wears many hats. In addition to being a father to three children, he's an attorney, columnist, and an outspoken industry advocate for independent investment advisers. Most recently, Brian was featured on Barron's Podcast The Way Forward speaking about Mergers and Acquisitions in the Wealth Management Industry. Brian explains that his entrepreneurial spirit was instilled in him ever since he was a child, watching his parents and grandparents grow from working in textile factories to owning ice cream shops, auto body shops, and advisory practices. His role model, his grandmother, pushed him into the field of law. She told him, 'If you understand the rules and laws, you can take that creativity to do great things.Besides speaking at regional and national conferences, he has his annual gathering of the industry's top advisors and thought leaders. He emphasizes the value that these kinds of conferences offer the industry and feels extremely grateful for the recognition it's receiving. As a result of his years of hard work and dedication, he has been named an Innovator in "Investment News' 2020 class of Icons & Innovators" and included in "The IA25: Investment Advisor Magazine's Annual List of the Top Influential People in the Industry" in 2020.Welcome to Season 3: Find the agenda of our conversation with Brian below(03:50) Why Did he Start His Two Entities Together (08:30) How Did Brian Get into the Finance Industry(16:15) Everyone Needs That Champion(22:23) Brian Hamburger's Ah-Ha Moment and Bone to Pick with Tina (28:00) About The Market Counsel Summits(33:30) Gratitude and Reflection(39:99) Safety and Security Are Key Leadership Obligations(47:10) Proactive vs. Reactive(50:10) Best Way to Contact Brian (53:07) A cause close to Brian's Heart(55:56) Thank you, Brian!ResourcesBrian Hamburger LinkedIn Brian Hamburger Twitter MarketCounsel Summit WebsiteHamburger Law FirmRyan Marcus | Head of Engagement MarketCounsel & Hamburger Law Firm T3 Technology Tools of TodayGreyshirt Team Rubicon Invest in Others Charitable Foundation

Irish Tech News Audio Articles
Affric Highlands recommended for re-wilding UN flagship status

Irish Tech News Audio Articles

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 4:48


Britain's largest rewilding initiative has been earmarked by the UK and Scottish Governments as a globally-prestigious showcase project to help nature, people and climate, as the United Nations (UN) Decade of Ecosystem Restoration steps up action to halt climate breakdown before 2030. Led by Trees for Life, Affric Highlands is a community-focused 30-year plan to create a vast nature recovery area of over half a million acres stretching from Loch Ness to Scotland's west coast. Affric Highlands recommended for re-wilding UN flagship status It will restore woodland, peatland and riverside habitats to help save native species from extinction, boost biodiversity, sustain new nature-based jobs and support re-peopling. The UK Government and Scottish Governments have recommended Affric Highlands for UN World Restoration Flagship status – joining a prestigious roster of global projects, whose final shortlist of 10 will be announced later this month. Steve Micklewright, Chief Executive of Trees for Life, said: “The huge environmental challenges of the coming decade need to be met with huge ambition. Affric Highlands is about scaling up ecological restoration, working collaboratively, and seeing nature as a key ally in tackling climate breakdown. We want to show how nature, local communities and livelihoods can help each other thrive. “We're delighted that both the Scottish and UK Governments have given Affric Highlands their endorsement for flagship status. It's increasingly clear that rewilding offers hope for nature, climate and people.” Affric Highlands brings together a huge range of local partners to create a bold new vision for the area. Its ambition is to demonstrate how the return of nature and recovery of landscapes can strengthen existing livelihoods and create new opportunities. Stephanie Kiel, Affric Highlands Team Leader, said: “We are working closely with a range of different landowners and land managers to develop and link-up nature restoration projects across the Affric Highlands area, which encompasses Glens Affric, Cannich, Moriston and Shiel. People are a central part of this vision, and more resilient ecosystems will support a greater diversity of job opportunities that can help sustain rural communities. “We are providing the expertise to help restore native woodlands, including through natural regeneration while returning much-needed trees to the banks of upland streams and rivers to provide vital shade, nutrients and shelter for Scotland's struggling Atlantic salmon.” Golden eagles, red squirrels, red grouse, short-eared owls, mountain hares, trout, ospreys and otters will benefit from the improved and better-connected wild habitats. The Affric Highlands emblem is the Scottish wildcat, and there will be efforts to help save this species from extinction. Trees for Life is working with local schools, community groups, and health and youth services so that young people can develop their voices to help shape the direction of Affric Highlands. The introduction of a Green Leadership Award for young people and a wellbeing-focused nature photography project are currently underway. Such broad community engagement is one of the UN's key principles for natural recovery. Competition for UN World Restoration Flagship status is extremely strong, with over 400 nominations expected from around the world. The successful 10 projects will make ecosystem restoration tangible for a broad audience and inspire a global movement to scale-up efforts to prevent, halt and reverse the collapse of biodiversity worldwide. Affric Highlands is a Trees for Life initiative being delivered in partnership with Rewilding Europe. It is part of Rewilding Europe's acclaimed European network of nine awe-inspiring rewilding landscapes, which also include Romania's Southern Carpathians, Croatia's Velebit Mountains, and the Oder Delta in Germany and Poland. Trees for Life has been rewilding parts of the Affric Highlands landscape for the past three decad...

This Week
Neil McDonnell, Chief Executive of small and medium business representative group ISME

This Week

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 7:28


Neil McDonnell from ISME spoke to Aengus Cox about the Public Sector Pay talks and what affect an increase in public sector pay could have on the private sector.

Sunday Supplement
Political ethics, Welsh law, and Scottish devolution

Sunday Supplement

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 55:18


Guests include: Welsh Conservative MP David Jones, who is a member of the Commons Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee, Plaid Cymru MP Hywel Williams, Mark Barry who is a Professor of Practice in Connectivity at Cardiff University, Lesley Riddoch is a journalist, broadcaster and columnist, Adam Morris, is a former head of media for the Scottish Conservatives and director of Shorthand PR, Catherine Nicholson is the European Affairs Editor for France 24 TV, Andrea Cleaver is the Chief Executive of the Welsh Refugee Council and Joel James is the Conservative MS for South Wales Central and the shadow minister for social partnership.

The Bunker
Sound of Silence: The End of Music in Schools?

The Bunker

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 27:56


Music education in the UK is in a perilous place, with the largest cuts in spending per pupil for 40 years, falling teacher recruitment numbers, and huge drops in GCSE and A-Level uptake. With a new National Plan for Music Education imminent, will it be enough to ensure music matters? Jude Rogers talks to Chrissy Kinsella, Chief Executive of the London Music Fund, about transforming under-served communities, if learning tunes are really less important than science and tech for career prospects, and why some people still think music is more a luxury than a necessity. “Classical music will always be full of elite, old, white people unless we change it.”  “The problem always is and always will be funding.” “Wouldn't it be amazing if every primary school had a music teacher?” “We often focus on academic attainment, but we should also be celebrating music for the joy of music.” “There's such a lack of joined up thinking from central government.” https://www.patreon.com/bunkercast Written and presented by Jude Rogers. Group Editor: Andrew Harrison. Lead Producer: Jacob Jarvis Producers: Jacob Archbold and Jelena Sofronijevic. Audio production by Jade Bailey THE BUNKER is a Podmasters Production Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Down To Business
Businesses & Wicklow: What The Garden of Ireland Has to Offer

Down To Business

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 17:40


Wicklow is known as the garden of Ireland but of course, there are innumerable opportunities for entrepreneurs and business people alike and so Bobby wanted to take a look at what Wicklow as a town and a county has going for it. To find out more Bobby is joined by: - Matt Forkin who is the Wicklow Chamber of Commerce President - Brian Gleeson, Chief Executive, Wicklow County Council - Pamela Walsh, Founder Wicklow Way Wines and Chairperson of Wicklow Naturally

RTÉ - The Business
Business and the Protocol

RTÉ - The Business

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 5:52


Chief Executive of Manufacturing NI Stephen Kelly has spoken out on behalf of a number of businesses in the North who are concerned about what the overturning of the Northern Ireland Protocol would mean for them. He joins us now.

Irish Tech News Audio Articles
Thousands of Drone Flights Predicted in Dublin by 2030

Irish Tech News Audio Articles

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 5:07


Civil defence, emergency response, public safety and environmental monitoring applications are already realising the benefits of drone technology. This is just the start of what is possible according to a report launched Tuesday on international best practice and future trends in drones which was delivered as part of an initiative to accelerate the potential of drones across local government in Ireland. The project was co-funded by the Department of Public Expenditure and Reform's Public Service Innovation Fund and led by Dublin City Council's Smart Dublin team. Minister of State for Public Procurement and eGovernment, Ossian Smyth TD, who launched the report Tuesday at the offices of Dublin City Council said: “I am delighted to see organisations such as Dublin City Council, the Local Government Management Association (LGMA), the Irish Aviation Authority (IAA), Maynooth University and others come together to think about current and future applications of drone technology and to map out how we can all collaborate to maximise the benefits of these technologies. The DPER Public Service Innovation Fund (PSIF) was designed to support projects like this that are driving innovation across the sector.” Drone technology: Possibilities and concerns Also released were the results of a national omnibus survey of 900 respondents which found that 84% of respondents felt positive about drone technologies and there is a confidence that drones could be delivering mail (67%) and takeaways (55%) across Ireland by 2025. Concerns that were identified by respondents include the importance of trust (75%), privacy (54%) and safety (50%), key issues that will need to be addressed before the technology realises its full potential. Leading international expert Philip Butterworth Hayes and joint author of the best practice report stated: “Drones are being deployed globally by local governments, fire services and emergency responders to deliver significant benefits to communities. We are just at the start of this revolution happening in our skies. Increased technology advances will make it possible to automate and scale these services globally, while it's only a matter of time before we see passenger services being rolled out. Paris is likely to be the first city in Europe to operate electric air taxi services, as early as 2024, in time for the Olympic Games.” “Ireland and Dublin are at the forefront in the use of drones across Europe thanks to progressive policies by the IAA, and programmes such as Smart Dublin and Dublin City Council showing leadership in thinking ahead and future-proofing the city.” Owen Keegan, Chief Executive of Dublin City Council stated that: “The City Council through its fire services, building control and survey and mapping teams are using drone technologies to allow us to work more safely and efficiently. As we start to consider how we scale these operations it is critical that we continue to do so in a way that builds trust with our communities. I'm delighted to see the Smart Dublin team drive this project with the support of such a wide range of collaborators across industry and academia.” Tim McCarthy is one of Ireland's top drones' researchers leading multi-million Euro projects with Science Foundation Ireland and Airbus. He highlighted the importance of collaboration, if Ireland is to realise the potential of drones: “To move to the next stage there needs to be a significant collaboration with local authorities, industry, the IAA, communities and other government agencies to collectively roll out these new technologies and to shape a future where drones are helping to support communities in automated environmental monitoring and specialist support services” “We are already witnessing an increasing array of developments in the drone industry including; robotic platforms, multimodal sensor technologies coupled with machine learning processors which are helping us to monitor and manage our urban spaces, delivering more effi...

From Lab to Launch by Qualio
Navigating FDA Clearance and Launching a Medical Device with Dr. Heather Underwood of EvoEndo

From Lab to Launch by Qualio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 15:42


Today we're catching up with Dr. Heather Underwood, CEO of EvoEndo. EvoEndo recently completed an $8.4 million Series A financing round on the heels of 510(k) FDA clearance in early 2022. We first spoke with Dr. Underwood in June of 2021. In this episode, we chart a course through her accomplishments, lessons learned through the FDA clearance process, working with CROs, and hear firsthand about the challenges she's tackled as Chief Executive of a medical device startup ready to revolutionize clinical endoscopy practice with a safer, faster, cost-effective alternative. About EvoEndoEvoEndo, founded in 2017 by Dr. Joel Friedlander (Chief Medical Officer), is making unsedated transnasal endoscopy a reality. General anesthesia has been the standard of care for pediatric patients undergoing endoscopies. This can be a traumatic experience, especially for patients with chronic health conditions who may require the procedure several times a year. But EvoEndo's single-use small-diameter device for unsedated transnasal endoscopy is ready to transform this medical necessity. The company received 510(K) clearance from the FDA in February of 2022 and is poised for a commercial launch of its innovative product. About Dr. Heather UnderwoodDr. Heather Underwood joined EvoEndo as CEO in 2019 after completing the Stanford Biodesign Innovation Fellowship for medical devices. Dr. Underwood completed her Ph.D. at the University of Colorado Boulder's ATLAS program where she developed and implemented clinical decision support systems for midwives and nurses in Kenya, receiving the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship grant and a Gates Grand Challenges grant to support her research. She has spent the last 10 years founding and leading medical device startups, non-profit life science organizations, and innovative academic initiatives. LinksHeather Underwood | LinkedIn:https://www.linkedin.com/in/hmunderwood/ EvoEndo:https://evoendo.com/Titan100:https://www.titan100.biz/2022coloradotitan100Proxima CRO:https://www.proximacro.com/Qualio website:https://www.qualio.com/Previous episodes:https://www.qualio.com/from-lab-to-launch-podcastApply to be on the show:https://forms.gle/uUH2YtCFxJHrVGeL8Music by keldez 

The Bunker
Painting By Numbers: How Do We Put a Price on Art? 

The Bunker

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 38:47


Who decides the value of a piece of art? And how do they come to their conclusions? In May, Andy Warhol's 'Shot Sage Blue Marilyn' sold at Christie's for a record £158 million, making it the most expensive painting of the 20th century – but it is merely the biggest wave in an international tsunami of art sales. Jelena Sofronijevic speaks to Mary-Alice Stack, Chief Executive at Creative United, and Erling Kagge, polar explorer, former politician, and author of A Poor Collector's Guide to Buying Great Art, to discuss placing a value on creativity.  “The price is reflective of the market, not the value of the artwork.” – Mary-Alice Stack “Now, we don't talk about art, we talk about the art market,” – Erling Kagge “Art fairs are the least best place to buy an artwork.” – Mary-Alice Stack “There was a time when galleries felt like the preserve of the moneyed classes.” – Mary-Alice Stack “There's a sense that if you need to ask the price, you can't afford it.” - Mary-Alice Stack  “Fantastic art is being made every day.” – Erling Kagge “The auction houses are competing against themselves.” – Mary-Alice Stack  “What matters to artists is the creation of the work in the first place.” – Mary-Alice Stack  https://www.patreon.com/bunkercast Written and presented by Jelena Sofronijevic. Group Editor: Andrew Harrison. Lead Producer: Jacob Jarvis Producers: Jacob Archbold and Jelena Sofronijevic. Audio production by Jade Bailey. THE BUNKER is a Podmasters Production https://uk.gestalten.com/products/erling-kagge-buying-great-art  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Fix with Michelle King
All Talk and No Action: Why DEI efforts are falling short - Ann Francke

The Fix with Michelle King

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 18:59


One thing is clear to me. The progress of DEI efforts in organizations has stalled. New research findings released by the Charted Management Institute or CMI, in the United Kingdom last month reveals a growing sentiment towards DEI efforts. People are growing weary of DEI. In the Managers Pulse Point Survey, CMI found that despite ongoing efforts and activity towards gender equality, workplace gender equity remains elusive. The research has also revealed that employees, particularly men are either passive and or actively resisting DEI efforts. These findings highlight for me the current state of DEI, which is fatigue. While there has been huge amount of inequality, awareness raising with things like the 'me too' movement and the 'anti-racism' movement, when this is not met with tangible action it can lead to feelings of exhaustion, isolation, frustration and sometimes skepticism about DEI efforts.  People from typically underrepresented groups experience this as all DEI talk and no action, which leads to disengagement. But the reverse is true for people in dominant positions in workplaces, typically white men. They perceive all the DEI talk as action and believe activity is underway to address the issues, even though very little changes actually take place. So consequently, they feel left out, disengaged and disillusioned with DEI efforts, believing too much focus is being given to these topics. Joining us on today's episode is Ann Francke, Chief Executive of CMI, to discuss these findings and share why we need to fight DEI fatigue if we want to meaningfully advance diversity, equity and inclusion at work.   Ann Francke Chartered Management Institute (CMI)  

RTÉ - Morning Ireland
Tourism Industry Representatives To Appear Before Oireachtas Committee

RTÉ - Morning Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 3:50


Eoghan O'Mara Walsh, Chief Executive of the Irish Tourism Industry Confederation (ITIC), speaks about the appearance of tourism industry representatives before an Oireachtas Committee today on the rising cost of tourist accommodation.

RNZ: Nine To Noon
House prices drop, properties on the market for longer - REINZ

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 4:51


House sales are taking longer to complete, properties are staying on the market for longer and the upward pressure on prices are easing. The Real Estate Institute has just released its residential sales data for May. Median house prices have decreased 4 percent since April, but are up 2.4 percent since this time last year. Meanwhile across New Zealand, the number of houses sold have decreased 28.4 percent annually, from 7,758 houses sold last year, to 5,556 this year. Kathryn speaks to Jen Baird, Chief Executive of REINZ.

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast
Caitlin Stella, Chief Executive Officer at Joe DiMaggio Children's Hospital

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 23:10


This episode features Caitlin Stella, Chief Executive Officer at Joe DiMaggio Children's Hospital. Here, she discusses how the population growth in Ft. Lauderdale is affecting staffing, record-high ER visits, mental health issues in children & adolescents exacerbated by the pandemic, and more.

RTÉ - Morning Ireland
33,000 domestic violence reports to Women's Aid last year

RTÉ - Morning Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 6:58


Sarah Benson, Chief Executive of Women's Aid, discusses their 2021 impact report that shows they had over 33,800 domestic abuse disclosures.

A Little Bit Of Everything With Me!
Chris Plourde - Conscious Performance Coach

A Little Bit Of Everything With Me!

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 30:25


Ep. 735 - Chris Plourde - Conscious Performance Coach Chris's Bio: Chris is a coach, a businessman, a father and husband. he works with top athletes and well-known companies, organizations celebrities, moms/dads and even military special ops. As a Former Master Trainer and Presenter, he created and presented content both nationally and internationally, on the mental and physical aspects of training for peak performance in all areas of life. As a former Chief Executive with Men's Teams and Organizations, he has mentored many men to find their authentic self and create leadership qualities which they could bring to their families, communities and businesses. He want to help you gain clarity, establish personal performance habits, create balance and unleash your true potential in all areas of your life. He believe while the needs of every type of person may vary, the core concept is the same. The way you approach one thing in life is the way you approach everything in life. Chris's Links: chrisplourde.com IG - @coachchrisplourde FB - Chris Plourde Conscious Performance Coaching Search: A Little Bit Of Everything With Me! on 20 podcast platforms Link in Bio! Website: anchor.fm/everythingwithange Latin Podcast Winner 2021 & 2020 Platinum Award Winner Community Votes Etobicoke Clubhouse: @angeliavg Facebook: @alittlebitofeverythingwithme Instagram: @alittlebitofeverythingwithme Merch Line IG: @avgest2020 Website: www.everythingwithange.com Buy me a Coffee: Ko-fi.com/everythingwithange #applepodcast #buildinganempire #newgoals #newviews #iheartradiopodcast #spotifypodcast #googlepodcasts #coach #coaching #energies #goalsetting #goals #perfromancecoach #podcasting #torontopodcast #torontotalkshow #podcaster #thecoop #coop #podcast #podcastjourney #pandoramusic --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/everythingwithange/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/everythingwithange/support

Fintech Insider Podcast by 11:FS
636. News: Have Apple pressed the Buy Now Pay Later nuke button?

Fintech Insider Podcast by 11:FS

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 56:29


Our expert hosts, Gwera Kiwana and Nicole Perry, are joined by some great guests to talk about the most notable fintech, financial services and banking news from the past week. This week's guests include: Lena Hackelöer, CEO & Founder, Brite Payments Tim Waterman, Chief Commercial Officer, Zopa  With soundclips from: Dare Okoudjou, Founder & CEO, MFS Africa Daniel Kjellén, CEO and Co-Founder, Tink Peter Lord, CEO, Codat Myles Stephenson, Founder & Chief Executive, Modulr We cover the following stories from the fintech and financial services space: Apple Pay Later is the company's take on a buy now, pay later service - 4:42 Challenger bank Zopa enters BNPL market - 16:21 African payments company makes rare purchase of US fintech - 29:00 Open banking platform Tink strikes payments deal with Revolut - 37:35 JPMorgan Backs Software Startup Codat at $825 Million Valuation - 46:40 Modulr Unveils SEPA Instant Service for Real-Time European Business Payments - 49:50 Rapyd launches out of this world competition for software developers to win a trip to the edge of space - 51:40 This episode is sponsored by TrueLayer Let's face it, cards were not designed for online. Payments can take days to settle, hurting customer loyalty. While high fraud, clunky checkouts and expensive fees mean millions in missed revenue. At TrueLayer, we've made instant payments available for businesses across Europe and the UK. So you can cut costs, fight fraud and get money moving fast. To learn more visit: www.TrueLayer.com/payments Fintech Insider by 11:FS is a podcast dedicated to all things fintech, banking, technology and financial services. It's hosted by a rotation of 11:FS experts including David M. Brear, Simon Taylor, Jason Bates and Gwera Kiwana, as well as a range of brilliant guests. We cover the latest global news, bring you interviews from industry experts or take a deep dive into subject matters such as APIs, AI or digital banking. If you enjoyed this episode, don't forget to subscribe and please leave a review Follow us on Twitter: @fintechinsiders where you can ask the hosts questions, or email podcasts@11fs.com! Special Guests: Daniel Kjellén, Dare Okoudjou, Lena Hackelöer, Myles Stephenson , Peter Lord, and Tim Waterman.

Rise Up For You
#418 With Margaret Heffernan on The Big Impact Of Small Change

Rise Up For You

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 19:47


Dr. Margaret Heffernan produced programs for the BBC for 13 years. She then moved to the US where she spearheaded multimedia productions for Intuit, The Learning Company, and Standard&Poors. She was Chief Executive of InfoMation Corporation, ZineZone Corporation, and then iCast Corporation, was named one of the “Top 25” by Streaming Media magazine and one of the “Top 100 Media Executives” by The Hollywood Reporter. The author of six books, Margaret's third book, Willful Blindness: Why We Ignore the Obvious at our Peril was named one of the most important business books of the decade by the Financial Times. In 2015, she was awarded the Transmission Prize for A Bigger Prize: Why Competition isn't Everything and How We Do Better, described as “meticulously researched…engagingly written…universally relevant, and hard to fault.” Her TED talks have been seen by over 13 million people and in 2015 TED published Beyond Measure: The Big Impact of Small Changes. Her most recent book, Uncharted: How to map the future was published in 2020. It quickly became a bestseller and was nominated for the Financial Times Best Business Book award, was one of Bloomberg's Best Books of 2021, and was chosen as the “Medium Best of the Best” business book. She is a Professor of Practice at the University of Bath, Lead Faculty for the Forward Institute's Responsible Leadership Programme, and, through Merryck & Co., mentors CEOs and senior executives of major global organizations. She chairs the boards of DACS and FilmBath and is a Trustee of the Centre for Effective Dispute Resolution. SOCIAL MEDIA: Website: mheffernan.com ______________________________________________ Thank you again for joining us today! If you know anybody that would benefit from this episode please share it with them and help spread the knowledge and motivation. -- Subscribe and rise up for you to be your best: www.youtube.com/c/riseupforyou -- Enroll in one of our Coaching Programs today to improve your life, deepen your success and increase your potential in work and life: www.riseupforyou.com/coaching -- Check Out our Book, Rise Up For You: Closing the Gap Between You and Your Potential www.nadalena.com/book -- Follow us on Social Media: LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/nadalena/ Facebook: www.facebook.com/RiseUpForYou/ Instagram: www.instagram.com/riseupforyou Sign up for our FREE Master Success Kit: www.riseupforyou.com/successkit Looking for more support? Grab your free coaching call with our team completely FREE! Bring your questions about Confidence, Leadership or Business and we will assign you the best coach to provide customizable support. SCHEDULE YOUR FREE CALL HERE calendly.com/riseupforyou/coaching

In The Money Players' Podcast
Nick Luck Daily Ep 502 - Why didn't BHA back its own proposal?

In The Money Players' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 39:39


Tom in for Nick and joined by senior writer at the Racing Post Lee Mottershead to discuss the news that the BHA's proposal to remove 300 races from the British programme is to be shelved. Lee gives his views and we hear from the Chief Executive of the National Trainers Federation Paul Johnson - the NTF who were very much in favour of the proposal. We also have an updated statement from the BHA on the matter. It's Royal Ascot International Challengers Media Morning in Newmarket and we have an update from the camp of US challenger Spendarella who is set for the Coronation Stakes. We also hear from John Gosden on his filly Inspiral and his Gold Cup challenger and former winner Stradivarius.