Podcasts about Heracles

Divine hero in Greek mythology

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Let's Talk About Myths, Baby! A Greek & Roman Mythology Podcast
Mythology vs. Myth Making, From the Heracleidae to Thermopylae, Ancient Sparta & The Spartan Mirage (Part Three)

Let's Talk About Myths, Baby! A Greek & Roman Mythology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 48:16


That's right it's time for actually, run of the mill mythology! Okay, it's Spartan so actually it's still pretty weird, and confusing... Because you know, Greek mythology. We're talking Children of Heracles and all the famous Spartans of the Homeric world. Plus, the myth-making that gave us 300. Help keep LTAMB going by subscribing to Liv's Patreon for bonus content!CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real thing.Sources: Early Greek Myths by Timothy Gantz; Herakles by Emma Stafford; Oxford Dictionary of Classical Myth and Religion; Theoi.com; Herodotus' Histories, Godley translation found on Perseus; Bad Ancient entry on the 300 at Thermopylae; A Companion to Sparta, edited by Anton Howell.Attributions and licensing information for music used in the podcast can be found here: mythsbaby.com/sources-attributions. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Matt Christiansen Bible Study
Session 28: January 21, 2023

Matt Christiansen Bible Study

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2023


Scripture Reading: John 19:16b-30 So they took Jesus, 17 and carrying his own cross he went out to the place called “The Place of the Skull” (called in Aramaic Golgotha). 18 There they crucified him along with two others, one on each side, with Jesus in the middle. 19 Pilate also had a notice written and fastened to the cross, which read: “Jesus the Nazarene, the king of the Jews.” 20 Thus many of the Jewish residents of Jerusalem read this notice because the place where Jesus was crucified was near the city, and the notice was written in Aramaic, Latin, and Greek. 21 Then the chief priests of the Jews said to Pilate, “Do not write, ‘The king of the Jews,' but rather, ‘This man said, I am king of the Jews.'” 22 Pilate answered, “What I have written, I have written.”23 Now when the soldiers crucified Jesus, they took his clothes and made four shares, one for each soldier, and the tunic remained. (Now the tunic was seamless, woven from top to bottom as a single piece.) 24 So the soldiers said to one another, “Let's not tear it, but throw dice to see who will get it.” This took place to fulfill the scripture that says, “They divided my garments among them, and for my clothing they threw dice.” So the soldiers did these things.25 Now standing beside Jesus' cross were his mother, his mother's sister, Mary the wife of Clopas, and Mary Magdalene. 26 So when Jesus saw his mother and the disciple whom he loved standing there, he said to his mother, “Woman, look, here is your son!” 27 He then said to his disciple, “Look, here is your mother!” From that very time the disciple took her into his own home.28 After this Jesus, realizing that by this time everything was completed, said (in order to fulfill the scripture), “I am thirsty!” 29 A jar full of sour wine was there, so they put a sponge soaked in sour wine on a branch of hyssop and lifted it to his mouth. 30 When he had received the sour wine, Jesus said, “It is completed!” Then he bowed his head and gave up his spirit.Main Themes[I am still working on the blog post.]Historical Context: Roman CrucifixionThe latter half of chapter 19 describes the crucifixion of Christ, one of the most significant events in human history even without taking into account its religious implications. If its theology is true, then its significance is certainly without rival. Yet, I fear the story—gory and mystical as it is—barely fazes us. It is part of our cultural DNA. It's too familiar, while yet remaining unexamined. In an attempt to bring some “newness” to the story, I will begin this session by reading an extended quotation from Tom Holland's (the historian, not Spider-Man) Dominion. Tom Holland is not a Christian, yet he realized, to quote the books byline, “how the Christian revolution remade the world.” He has the best description of crucifixion and its first century cultural significance I have encountered. Without further ado, here is Tom Holland in the preface to Dominion: No death was more excruciating, more contemptible, than crucifixion. To be hung naked, ‘long in agony, swelling with ugly weals on shoulders and chest', helpless to beat away the clamorous birds: such a fate, Roman intellectuals agreed, was the worst imaginable. This in turn was what rendered it so suitable a punishment for slaves. Lacking such a sanction, the entire order of the city might fall apart. Luxury and splendour such as Rome could boast were dependent, in the final reckoning, on keeping those who sustained it in their place. ‘After all, we have slaves drawn from every corner of the world in our households, practicing strange customs, and foreign cults, or none—and it is only by means of terror that we can hope to coerce such scum.'Nevertheless, while the salutary effect of crucifixion on those who might otherwise threaten the order of the state was taken for granted, Roman attitudes to the punishment were shot through with ambivalence. Naturally, if it were to serve as a deterrent it needed to be public. Nothing spoke more eloquently of a failed revolt than the sight of hundreds upon hundreds of corpse-hung crosses, whether lining a highway or else massed before a rebellious city, the hills all around it stripped bare of their trees. Even in peacetime, executioners would make a spectacle of their victims by suspending them in a variety of inventive ways: ‘one, perhaps, upside down, with his head towards the ground, another with a stake driven through his genitals, another attached by his arms to a yoke'. Yet in the exposure of the crucified to the public gaze there lurked a paradox. So foul was the carrion-reek of their disgrace that many felt tainted even by viewing a crucifixion. The Romans, for all that they had adopted the punishment as the ‘supreme penalty', refused to countenance the possibility that it might have originated with them. Only a people famed for their barbarousness and cruelty could ever have devised such a torture: the Persians, perhaps, or the Assyrians, or the Gauls. Everything about the practice of nailing a man to a cross—a ‘crux'—was repellent. ‘Why, the very word is harsh on our ears.' It was this disgust that crucifixion uniquely inspired which explained why, when slaves were condemned to death, they were executed in the meanest, wretchedest stretch of land beyond the city walls; and why, when Rome burst its ancient limits, only the planting of the world's most exotic and aromatic plants could serve to mask the taint. It was also why, despite the ubiquity of crucifixion across the Roman world, few cared to think much about it. Order, the order loved by the gods and upheld by magistrates vested with the full authority of the greatest power on earth, was what counted—not the elimination of such vermin as presumed to challenge it. Criminals broken on implements of torture: who were such filth to concern men of breeding and civility? Some deaths were so vile, so squalid, that it was best to draw a veil across them entirely.The surprise, then, is less that we should have so few detailed descriptions in ancient literature of what a crucifixion might actually involve, than that we should have any at all. The corpses of the crucified, once they had first provided pickings for hungry birds, tended to be flung into a common grave. In Italy, undertakers dressed in red, ringing bells as they went, would drag them there on hooks. Oblivion, like the loose earth scattered over their tortured bodies, would then entomb them. This was a part of their fate. Nevertheless, amid the general silence, there is one major exception which proves the rule. Four detailed accounts of the process by which a man might be sentenced to the cross, and then suffer his punishment, have survived from antiquity. Remarkably, they all describe the same execution: a crucifixion that took place some sixty or seventy years after the building of the first heated swimming pool in Rome. The location, though, was not the Esquiline, but another hill, outside the walls of Jerusalem: Golgotha, ‘which means the place of a skull'. The victim, a Jew by the name of Jesus, a wandering preacher from an obscure town named Nazareth, in a region north of Jerusalem named Galilee, had been convicted of a capital offence against Roman order. The four earliest accounts of his execution, written some decades after his death, specify what this meant in practice. The condemned man, after his sentencing, was handed over to soldiers to be flogged. Next, because he had claimed to be ‘the king of the Jews', his guards mocked him, and spat on him, and set a crown of thorns on his head. Only then, bruised and bloodied, was he led out on his final journey. Hauling his cross as he went, he stumbled his way through Jerusalem, a spectacle and an admonition to all who saw him, and onwards, along the road to Golgotha. There, nails were driven into his hands and feet, and he was crucified. After his death, a spear was jabbed into his side. There is no reason to doubt the essentials of this narrative. Even the most sceptical historians have tended to accept them. ‘The death of Jesus of Nazareth on the cross is an established fact, arguably the only established fact about him.' Certainly, his sufferings were nothing exceptional. Pain and humiliation, and the protracted horror of ‘the most wretched of deaths': these, over the course of Roman history, were the common lot of multitudes.Decidedly not the common lot of multitudes, however, was the fate of Jesus' corpse. Lowered from the cross, it was spared a common grave. Claimed by a wealthy admirer, it was prepared reverently for burial, laid in a tomb and left behind a heavy boulder. Such, at any rate, is the report of all four of the earliest narratives of Jesus' death—narratives that in Greek were called euangelia, ‘good news', and would come to be known in English as gospels. The accounts are not implausible. Certainly, we know from archaeological evidence that the corpse of a crucified man might indeed, on occasion, be granted dignified burial in the ossuaries beyond the walls of Jerusalem. Altogether more startling, though—not to say unprecedented—were the stories of what happened next. That women, going to the tomb, had found the entrance stone rolled away. That Jesus, over the course of the next forty days, had appeared to his followers, not as a ghost or a reanimated corpse, but resurrected into a new and glorious form. That he had ascended into heaven and was destined to come again. Time would see him hailed, not just as a man, but as a god. By enduring the most agonising fate imaginable, he had conquered death itself. ‘Therefore God has highly exalted him and bestowed on him the name which is above every name, that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, in heaven and on earth and under the earth…'The utter strangeness of all this, for the vast majority of people in the Roman world, did not lie in the notion that a mortal might become divine. The border between the heavenly and the earthly was widely held to be permeable. In Egypt, the oldest of monarchies, kings had been objects of worship for unfathomable aeons. In Greece, stories were told of a ‘hero god' by the name of Heracles, a muscle-bound monster-slayer who, after a lifetime of spectacular feats, had been swept up from the flames of his own pyre to join the immortals. Among the Romans, a similar tale was told of Romulus, the founder of their city. In the decades before the crucifixion of Jesus, the pace of such promotions into the ranks of the gods had begun to quicken. So vast had the scope of Roman power become that any man who succeeded in making himself its master was liable to seem less human than divine. The ascent into heaven of one of those, a warlord by the name of Julius Caesar, had been heralded by the blaze across the skies of a fiery-tailed star; that of a second, Caesar's adopted son, who had won for himself the name of Augustus, by a spirit seen rising—just as Heracles had done—from a funeral pyre. Even sceptics who scorned the possibility that a fellow mortal might truly become a god were happy to concede its civic value. ‘For the human spirit that believes itself to be of divine origin will thereby be emboldened in the undertaking of mighty deeds, more energetic in accomplishing them, and by its freedom from care rendered more successful in carrying them out.'Divinity, then, was for the very greatest of the great: for victors, and heroes, and kings. Its measure was the power to torture one's enemies, not to suffer it oneself: to nail them to the rocks of a mountain, or to turn them into spiders, or to blind and crucify them after conquering the world. That a man who had himself been crucified might be hailed as a god could not help but be seen by people everywhere across the Roman world as scandalous, obscene, grotesque. The ultimate offensiveness, though, was to one particular people: Jesus' own. The Jews, unlike their rulers, did not believe that a man might become a god; they believed that there was only the one almighty, eternal deity. Creator of the heavens and the earth, he was worshipped by them as the Most High God, the Lord of Hosts, the Master of all the Earth. Empires were his to order; mountains to melt like wax. That such a god, of all gods, might have had a son, and that this son, suffering the fate of a slave, might have been tortured to death on a cross, were claims as stupefying as they were, to most Jews, repellent. No more shocking a reversal of their most devoutly held assumptions could possibly have been imagined. Not merely blasphemy, it was madness.Even those who did come to acknowledge Jesus as ‘Christos', the Anointed One of the Lord God, might flinch at staring the manner of his death full in the face. ‘Christians', as they were called, were as wise to the connotations of crucifixion as anyone. ‘The mystery of the cross, which summons us to God, is something despised and dishonourable.' So wrote Justin, the foremost Christian apologist of his generation, a century and a half after the birth of Jesus. The torture of the Son of the Most High God was a horror simply too shocking to be portrayed in visual form. Scribes copying the gospels might on occasion draw above the Greek word for ‘cross' delicate pictograms that hinted at the crucified Christ, but otherwise it was left to sorcerers or satirists to illustrate his execution. Yet this, to many across the Roman world, was not as deep a paradox as perhaps it might have seemed. So profound were some mysteries that mortals had no choice but to keep them veiled. The naked radiance of the gods was far too dazzling for the human eye. No one, by contrast, had been blinded by the spectacle of the Son of the Most High God being tortured to death; but Christians, although accustomed to make the sign of the cross as a gesture of piety, and to contemplate with wide-eyed reverence the gospel accounts of their Saviour's sufferings, seem to have shrunk from seeing them represented in physical form.Only centuries after the death of Jesus—by which time, astonishingly, even the Caesars had been brought to acknowledge him as Christ—did his execution at last start to emerge as an acceptable theme for artists. By AD 400 the cross was ceasing to be viewed as something shameful. Banned as a punishment decades earlier by Constantine, the first Christian emperor, crucifixion had come to serve the Roman people as an emblem of triumph over sin and death. An artist, carving the scene out of ivory, might represent Jesus in the skimpy loincloth of an athlete, no less muscled than any of the ancient gods. Even as the western half of the empire began to slip away from the rule of the Caesars and fall to barbarian invaders, so in the eastern half, where Roman power endured, the Cross provided assurance to an embattled people that victory would ultimately be theirs. In Christ's agonies had been the index of his defeat of evil. This was why, triumphant even on the implement of his torture, he was never shown as suffering pain. His expression was one of serenity. It proclaimed him Lord of the Universe.Carrying His Cross to GolgothaJesus carries his cross out of Jerusalem to a place called Golgotha. Jews and Romans alike performed executions outside of a town. The Romans made a spectacle of it, in which soldiers would march the prisoner while crowds of spectators gathered to watch.John tells us that Jesus “carr[ied] his own cross.” The Roman custom was to have the prisoners carry their own patibulum—the transverse beam of the cross. This beam was later affixed over the upright stake (the palus, stipes, or staticulum). So, Jesus probably did not carry the entire cross as we normally see it depicted in paintings or movies. The Romans would often continue to scourge the prisoner. Given that Jesus had already been severely scourged, this may not have happened. If the lashings had continued, Jesus could have died before ever reaching the cross.The Synoptics tell us that someone else carried the cross:As they led him away, they seized Simon of Cyrene, who was coming in from the country. They placed the cross on his back and made him carry it behind Jesus. (Luke 23:26)The texts can be easily harmonized. After the severe scourging Jesus received, he was probably unable to carry the cross the whole way to Golgotha. The Romans quickly conscripted Simon of Cyrene to finish the job. No point in ruining a perfectly sadistic execution. The inference that Jesus was extremely weak is not mere speculation. Crucifixions lasted days with the criminal hanging on the cross. All four Gospels attest to Jesus dying quickly after being lifted. This shows he was mortally wounded well before the actual crucifixion.Golgotha is probably at or near where the Church of the Holy Sepulchre is today. As Britannica explains:Church of the Holy Sepulchre, also called Holy Sepulchre, church built on the traditional site of Jesus' Crucifixion and burial. According to the Bible (John 19:41–42), his tomb was close to the place of the Crucifixion, and so the church was planned to enclose the site of both the cross and the tomb.The Church of the Holy Sepulchre lies in the northwest quarter of the Old City of Jerusalem.This is not mere reliance on the tradition that accompanies that church, but on historical evidence. The same evidence weighs against the famous “Garden Tomb”—which some Protestants believe to be Jesus' burial site—from being the correct location.Golgotha was also called “The Place of the Skull.” This could be from the shape of the terrain or, more likely, from the executions carried out there. Why do we, in the English-speaking Christian tradition, call this place “calvary”? As study note 56 in the NET tells us,The Latin word for the Greek κρανίον (kranion) is calvaria. Thus the English word “Calvary” is a transliteration of the Latin rather than a NT place name (cf. Luke 23:33 in the KJV).They Crucified Him Along Two OthersWhat is central to the Christian faith? The crucifixion of Jesus. Christians put crosses on their churches, wear crosses on their necks, and sing hymns like “The Old Rugged Cross.” Yet, in how much detail does the Gospel of John describe the crucifixion? In one. short. sentence.There they crucified him along with two others, one on each side, with Jesus in the middle. (John 19:18)The other Gospels hardly add much detail. Why? Because crucifixion was an unspeakably well-known horror at the time. It was the kind of event with which everyone in John's audience would have been familiar, and the kind of event no one wanted to think about—particularly in relation to someone beloved, much less their Lord!As explained by Tom Holland, crucifixions were intentionally horrific. They sent a public message. Executioners were given free reign to improvise and improve upon them. Sometimes the victim might be tied to the cross, other times they might be nailed to it. When nails were used, they were 5 to 7 inches long. They penetrated the wrist and sunk deep into the wood. The criminal would hang for hours or days. He (or sometimes she) would be unable to swat the flies off his wounds. He could not contain his bodily wastes. All while hanging from a cross anywhere from 6 to 10 feet in height.Jesus was crucified with two others. At first, this may seem surprising. They appear nowhere else in the story. However, this is not an unlikely situation. Crucifixions were a form of government propaganda. What better time to broadcast the message than during a popular festival drawing thousands of people from all over the empire.Jesus, King of the JewsPilate had a tablet made that displayed the charge against Jesus—“king of the Jews.” This would have been somewhat customary. During an execution, one of the soldiers might carry a tabula (tablet) declaring the charge and cause of execution. There is dark humor embedded in this scene. Pilate included the charge provided to him by the Jews themselves. He writes it in Aramaic, Latin, and Greek. Remember that during this festival Jews from all over the empire and some Gentiles would travel to Jerusalem. Many of them may have been more fluent in Latin or Greek. So, Pilate advertises to all there: this is the king of the Jews being crucified.Think of how the situation would have been perceived by those not “in the know.” The king of the Jews is being crucified by the Romans during the most important Jewish festival of the year, while a crowd of Jews—particularly the Jewish religious elite—cheer on. This would be confusing at best and treacherous at worst. It would have looked like the Jewish religious elite were siding with the Romans against the Jewish claim of sovereignty.The chief priests protest. The tablet must be rewritten, they request. “Do not write, ‘The king of the Jews,' but rather, ‘This man said, I am king of the Jews.'” Pilate gets the last laugh. The Jewish leaders may have involved him in a situation with which he wanted no connection; they may have twisted his arm by threatening to accuse him of treason to Caesar; but they certainly cannot direct Pilate's execution of Jesus. “What I have written, I have written” he responds, taking his small revenge on them.There is a subtle theological point made by the message on the tablet. Remember Jesus' words in chapter 12:And I, when I am lifted up from the earth, will draw all people to myself. (John 12:32)The message, at least on its face, seems serious: “king of the Jews.” And it is written not only in Aramaic (the language of the Jews) but in the “universal” languages. Greek was still the lingua franca and Latin was a close second. They were the languages spoken all over the world, or that's what anyone in John's audience would have thought.The point is that the message of Jesus' kingship is displayed for all the world to see, not just the Jews. Of course, there are many more languages and the Gospel message is still making its way to the whole world today, but the symbolism is powerful. Jesus died so that “everyone who believes in him will not perish but have eternal life.” (John 3:16, emphasis added)They Took His Clothes—Psalm 22The soldiers proceed to take whatever few possessions Jesus had upon his arrest. Confiscating the goods of an executed prisoner was standard practice. The removal of clothing upon execution was also standard. The Romans executed prisoners naked. In the ancient world just as today, nakedness in the wrong settings can be cause of shame. For the Jews particularly, public nakedness would have especially shameful. Given that Jesus was crucified in a Jewish setting and during a Jewish festival, the Romans could have agreed to keep loincloths on the criminals.The Roman army's basic unit was a contubernium, eight men who shared a tent. Dispatching half a unit, i.e., four men, would have been common for a task such as crucifixion. (This was called a quaternion, a squad of four soldiers.) Hence the need to divide the garments among several soldiers. The NET translation says they “threw dice.” This is possible (that they used actual dice), but as translator's note 74 to the NET explains:Grk “but choose by lot” (probably by using marked pebbles or broken pieces of pottery). A modern equivalent, “throw dice,” was chosen here because of its association with gambling.What the text calls a tunic would be an unfamiliar garment to us. Translator's note 71 in the NET explains:Or “shirt” (a long garment worn under the cloak next to the skin). The name for this garment (χιτών, chitōn) presents some difficulty in translation. Most modern readers would not understand what a ‘tunic' was any more than they would be familiar with a ‘chiton.' On the other hand, attempts to find a modern equivalent are also a problem: “Shirt” conveys the idea of a much shorter garment that covers only the upper body, and “undergarment” (given the styles of modern underwear) is more misleading still. “Tunic” was therefore employed, but with a note to explain its nature.The main point John is making by describing how soldiers divided Jesus' clothes among them is a prophetic one. He reminds us how Psalm 22 is being fulfilled. I quote the entire psalm below (for the sake of legibility, I format it as if it were prose).For the music director, according to the tune “Morning Doe”; a psalm of David.My God, my God, why have you abandoned me? I groan in prayer, but help seems far away. 2 My God, I cry out during the day, but you do not answer, and during the night my prayers do not let up.3 You are holy; you sit as king receiving the praises of Israel. 4 In you our ancestors trusted; they trusted in you and you rescued them. 5 To you they cried out, and they were saved; in you they trusted and they were not disappointed.6 But I am a worm, not a man; people insult me and despise me. 7 All who see me taunt me; they mock me and shake their heads. 8 They say, “Commit yourself to the Lord! Let the Lord rescue him! Let the Lord deliver him, for he delights in him.”9 Yes, you are the one who brought me out from the womb and made me feel secure on my mother's breasts. 10 I have been dependent on you since birth; from the time I came out of my mother's womb you have been my God.11 Do not remain far away from me, for trouble is near and I have no one to help me. 12 Many bulls surround me; powerful bulls of Bashan hem me in. 13 They open their mouths to devour me like a roaring lion that rips its prey.14 My strength drains away like water; all my bones are dislocated. My heart is like wax; it melts away inside me. 15 The roof of my mouth is as dry as a piece of pottery; my tongue sticks to my gums.You set me in the dust of death. 16 Yes, wild dogs surround me—a gang of evil men crowd around me; like a lion they pin my hands and feet.17 I can count all my bones; my enemies are gloating over me in triumph. 18 They are dividing up my clothes among themselves; they are rolling dice [literally, “casting lots”] for my garments.19 But you, O Lord, do not remain far away. You are my source of strength. Hurry and help me! 20 Deliver me from the sword. Save my life from the claws of the wild dogs. 21 Rescue me from the mouth of the lion and from the horns of the wild oxen.You have answered me. 22 I will declare your name to my countrymen. In the middle of the assembly I will praise you. 23 You loyal followers of the Lord, praise him.All you descendants of Jacob, honor him. All you descendants of Israel, stand in awe of him. 24 For he did not despise or detest the suffering of the oppressed. He did not ignore him; when he cried out to him, he responded. 25 You are the reason I offer praise in the great assembly; I will fulfill my promises before the Lord's loyal followers. 26 Let the oppressed eat and be filled. Let those who seek his help praise the Lord. May you live forever!27 Let all the people of the earth acknowledge the Lord and turn to him. Let all the nations worship you. 28 For the Lord is king and rules over the nations.29 All the thriving people of the earth will join the celebration and worship; all those who are descending into the grave will bow before him, including those who cannot preserve their lives.30 A whole generation will serve him; they will tell the next generation about the Lord. 31 They will come and tell about his saving deeds; they will tell a future generation what he has accomplished.Look, Here is Your MotherWho is standing near Jesus as he is crucified? All the disciples except the “beloved disciple” have deserted him. The women are the ones who remain with him. This is not entirely surprising from a historical standpoint. Roman soldiers would probably have permitted women followers to remain with the convicted criminal. There would have been many bystanders anyways, and women—even if followers of the criminal—may not have been viewed as active revolutionaries. In the Ancient world, women were allowed more latitude in mourning, and women were executed far less often. (Less often—but not never. The female followers of Jesus were still putting themselves at risk by openly supporting a crucified revolutionary.)Only the Gospel of John mentions the presence of a male disciple at the cross. We have discussed the identity of the “beloved disciple” before. Christian tradition is that the beloved disciple is John himself (the author of this gospel). The fact that only John mentions his presence at the cross makes sense. The other gospel authors focus on the crucifixion itself. John adds a short description of a touching moment he had with Jesus and Jesus' mother.Caution, a short rant is incoming: Nowadays, there are different proposals as to the identity of the beloved disciple. But, frankly, nowadays we can't even agree on what is a woman, so scholarly disagreement on any given point is not as weighty as it once was. Moreover, biblical scholarship is staunchly opposed to tradition. Scholars seem to go out of their way to suggest non-traditional hypotheses, even if they are quite weak or nonsensical. At any rate, I will proceed as if the beloved disciple is John. I don't think the other proposals are even worth discussing, but may this short rant serve as a disclaimer that you should look into those if you are interest. Ok, rant over. Back to the text.Remember that Jesus began his ministry at the behest of his mother, although she did not understand what she was requesting.When the wine ran out, Jesus' mother said to him, “They have no wine left.” Jesus replied, “Woman, why are you saying this to me? My time has not yet come.” (John 2:3-4)In chapter 19, Jesus' mother is present at the end of his earthly ministry.Recall that Jesus is Mary's oldest son, or only son if you take the Catholic approach. Joseph is absent from the narrative, which means he is probably deceased. This further means that the responsibility of caring for Mary fell on Jesus' shoulders. We may have a difficult time understanding the legal position of women in ancient Jewish society, but I will attempt to provide a short explanation. They were “connected” to society through the men in their lives: as the daughter of a man, as the wife of a man, or as the mother of a man. A woman left with no man in her life, either as a father, husband, or son, was a woman that belonged to no household. And a woman without a household had no support group. She was most often destitute. (A younger woman might be expected to remarry or return to her father's household if he was still living. With Mary, those choices were clearly not available.)Consequently, the duty of a son, particularly the eldest, was to care for her aging parents, especially his mother. Moreover, from what we understand of Jewish custom, a dying man was allowed and encouraged to settle the legal status of the women for which he was responsible. A crucified man could make his testament even from the cross.In the ancient world, both Jew and Roman, friendship could create a bond almost as meaningful as kinship. There are several ancient stories in which a dying man asks his friend to become like a son to the decedent's mother. Consequently, the exchange between Jesus, Mary, and John would not have seem odd to an ancient audience.Lastly, we need to understand that adoptive ties would have been taken seriously. A man adopting a woman as his mother is not mere poetry, but an honorable and serious commitment to care for her for the rest of her life.It is with all that in mind that we need to read the conversation in verses 26 and 27. “'Woman, look, here is your son!' He then said to his disciple, ‘Look, here is your mother!'” This was a serious command in which Jesus discharged his last duty—caring for his mother. There is a poetic beauty in that fact that as Jesus was crucified, he went to the grave with no earthly possessions. He had nothing to write a will about, except to settle the legal status of his mother. His mother is all he had and he gave her away as well.One notable detail in this exchange is that Jesus entrusted his mother to his disciple, not to a sibling (whether full or half-sibling, if the Catholic approach is taken). At this point in the narrative, Jesus' ministry has cost him his family. He is now closer to his faith family than he is to his “real family.” This would become a model for many Christians to this very day, when families would disown their own fathers, mothers, brothers, sisters, and children because they placed their faith in Jesus Christ.I Am ThirstyEven on the cross, Jesus is working. He is careful with his words in order to “fulfill the scripture.” He exclaims, “I am thirsty.” On its face, this statement is a visible symbol of Jesus' mortality. The more biblically literate in John's audience, however, would recognize a reference to either Psalm 69 or Psalm 22. Psalm 22 was quoted above. Here I quote Psalm 69 in its entirety, again in the form of prose for easier legibility:For the music director, according to the tune of “Lilies”; by David.Deliver me, O God, for the water has reached my neck. 2 I sink into the deep mire where there is no solid ground; I am in deep water, and the current overpowers me.3 I am exhausted from shouting for help. My throat is sore; my eyes grow tired from looking for my God.4 Those who hate me without cause are more numerous than the hairs of my head. Those who want to destroy me, my enemies for no reason, outnumber me.They make me repay what I did not steal. 5 O God, you are aware of my foolish sins; my guilt is not hidden from you. 6 Let none who rely on you be disgraced because of me, O Sovereign Lord of Heaven's Armies. Let none who seek you be ashamed because of me, O God of Israel.7 For I suffer humiliation for your sake and am thoroughly disgraced. 8 My own brothers treat me like a stranger; they act as if I were a foreigner. 9 Certainly zeal for your house consumes me; I endure the insults of those who insult you.10 I weep and refrain from eating food, which causes others to insult me. 11 I wear sackcloth and they ridicule me. 12 Those who sit at the city gate gossip about me; drunkards mock me in their songs.13 O Lord, may you hear my prayer and be favorably disposed to me. O God, because of your great loyal love, answer me with your faithful deliverance. 14 Rescue me from the mud. Don't let me sink.Deliver me from those who hate me, from the deep water. 15 Don't let the current overpower me. Don't let the deep swallow me up. Don't let the Pit devour me.16 Answer me, O Lord, for your loyal love is good. Because of your great compassion, turn toward me. 17 Do not ignore your servant, for I am in trouble. Answer me right away.18 Come near me and redeem me. Because of my enemies, rescue me. 19 You know how I am insulted, humiliated, and disgraced; you can see all my enemies. 20 Their insults are painful and make me lose heart; I look for sympathy, but receive none, for comforters, but find none.21 They put bitter poison into my food, and to quench my thirst they give me vinegar to drink. 22 May their dining table become a trap before them. May it be a snare for that group of friends.23 May their eyes be blinded. Make them shake violently. 24 Pour out your judgment on them. May your raging anger overtake them. 25 May their camp become desolate, their tents uninhabited. 26 For they harass the one whom you discipline; they spread the news about the suffering of those whom you punish.27 Hold them accountable for all their sins. Do not vindicate them. 28 May their names be deleted from the scroll of the living. Do not let their names be listed with the godly.29 I am oppressed and suffering. O God, deliver and protect me. 30 I will sing praises to God's name. I will magnify him as I give him thanks. 31 That will please the Lord more than an ox or a bull with horns and hooves.32 The oppressed look on—let them rejoice. You who seek God, may you be encouraged. 33 For the Lord listens to the needy; he does not despise his captive people.34 Let the heavens and the earth praise him, along with the seas and everything that swims in them. 35 For God will deliver Zion and rebuild the cities of Judah, and his people will again live in them and possess Zion. 36 The descendants of his servants will inherit it, and those who are loyal to him will live in it.So is Jesus' thirst and vinegar drink a reference to Psalm 22 or Psalm 69? The Gospel of Matthew seems to connect Jesus' statement with Psalm 69. In the Greek, Matthew describes the drink as being mixed with cholēn, translated as gall or bile in English. This is the same Greek word used in the Septuagint translation of Psalm 69:21. Notice that Matthew probably based his gospel on the Gospel of Mark, which uses the word esmyrnismenon (myrrh), so using the word cholēn seems like a deliberate interpretation by Matthew. On the other hand, the Gospel of John (and the Gospel of Mark in verse 15:34) makes a reference to Psalm 22 just a few verses before. Interpreting the reference as connected to Psalm 22 shows more literary consistency with the rest of chapter 19. Of course, as your resident fence-sitter, I must also suggest that the reference could be to both psalms. Jewish understanding of prophecy fulfillment was much more fluid than our modern sensibilities would like.Most importantly, both Psalms place us in the context of the suffering servant, persecuted for his service to God. One psalm ends in hope for the oppressed. The other in judgment for the oppressors.Gave Up His SpiritAfter fulfilling scripture, Jesus exclaims “It is completed!” and gives up his spirit. Allow me to begin the discussion of verse 30 with its latter half.John has emphasized time and time again that Jesus is in control, not the Jews, not Pilate, not anyone else but himself. He goes to the cross willingly and deliberately. The second half of verse 30 is the culmination of that theme. Jesus does not simply die. He gives up his spirit. Even at the moment of death, he is in control. Jesus, being God himself, sacrifices himself willingly.The verb used by John to refer to Jesus' giving up of his spirit is paredōken. This is the same verb (although different voice) as the verb used twice in Isaiah 53:12 (paredothē). In Isaiah, the verb is used passively (he is “given up”), while in John the suffering servant is active (he “gives up” his spirit). Nonetheless, the reference is fairly clear, particularly when we consider than John has referenced Isaiah 53 before (John 12:38).Isaiah 53 is a key passage to understanding the death of Jesus. As I did before with Psalm 22 and Psalm 69, I quote Isaiah 53 here as if it were prose:Who would have believed what we just heard? When was the Lord's power revealed through him?2 He sprouted up like a twig before God, like a root out of parched soil; he had no stately form or majesty that might catch our attention, no special appearance that we should want to follow him. 3 He was despised and rejected by people, one who experienced pain and was acquainted with illness; people hid their faces from him; he was despised, and we considered him insignificant.4 But he lifted up our illnesses, he carried our pain; even though we thought he was being punished, attacked by God, and afflicted for something he had done. 5 He was wounded because of our rebellious deeds, crushed because of our sins; he endured punishment that made us well; because of his wounds we have been healed.6 All of us had wandered off like sheep; each of us had strayed off on his own path, but the Lord caused the sin of all of us to attack him.7 He was treated harshly and afflicted, but he did not even open his mouth. Like a lamb led to the slaughtering block, like a sheep silent before her shearers, he did not even open his mouth.8 He was led away after an unjust trial—but who even cared?Indeed, he was cut off from the land of the living; because of the rebellion of his own people he was wounded. 9 They intended to bury him with criminals, but he ended up in a rich man's tomb because he had committed no violent deeds, nor had he spoken deceitfully.10 Though the Lord desired to crush him and make him ill, once restitution is made, he will see descendants and enjoy long life, and the Lord's purpose will be accomplished through him.11 Having suffered, he will reflect on his work, he will be satisfied when he understands what he has done. “My servant will acquit many, for he carried their sins. 12 So I will assign him a portion with the multitudes, he will divide the spoils of victory with the powerful, because he willingly submitted to death and was numbered with the rebels, when he lifted up the sin of many and intervened on behalf of the rebels.”

1Twente Vandaag
1Twente Vandaag van maandag 9 januari 2023

1Twente Vandaag

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 59:41


Met vandaag o.a. 1Twente-verslaggever over Enschedese politiek in 2023; Het slotstuk van het kerstcircus Enschede was afgelopen weekend en wij namen een kijkje bij die show voor blinden en slechtzienden; De voorbeschouwing op FC Twente - Telstar en een nieuwe editie van In Depot met vandaag aandacht voor: De Tukker.

Ballen verstand
S4E32: FC Twente kan dé verrassing van de Eredivisie worden en het lijntje tussen Roma en Heracles is gelegd

Ballen verstand

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 34:53


Het voetbalseizoen wordt vanavond weer hervat. FC Twente speelt thuis tegen FC Emmen en Heracles Almelo gaat op bezoek bij Jong AZ. In de eerste De Ballen Verstand van 2023 blikken voetbalwatchers Ralph Blijlevens en Leon ten Voorde vooruit op de tweede seizoenshelft. „FC Twente kan dé verrassing van de Eredivisie worden.” De winterse transferperiode is nog niet voorbij en dus kan er nog genoeg vuurwerk worden verwacht. In Almelo werd donderdag met trotst de Italiaanse spits Antonio Satriano gepresenteerd. „Dat hij getekend heeft voor 4,5 jaar geeft wel aan dat ze vertrouwen in hem hebben", vertelt Ralph.  In Enschede zullen ze niet zijn geschrokken van de interesse van Feyenoord in Ramiz Zerrouki. „Maar Feyenoord zal wel met een goed bod moeten komen", vertelt Leon. Hij verwacht dat de Algerijnse middenvelder sowieso vertrekt bij Twente, maar het is waarschijnlijker dat het in de zomer gebeurt. Hervatting competitieIn de Keuken Kampioen Divisie lijkt Heracles samen met PEC Zwolle op weg naar promotie. De enige vraag die nog gesteld kan worden: wie van beide ploegen wordt kampioen? In de Eredivisie zijn de verschillen in de top een stuk kleiner. En daar kan FC Twente van profiteren, denkt Leon. „Ik zeg niet dat het gebeurt, maar als het allemaal goed valt, kan je maar zo in de top drie eindigen. FC Twente kan dé verrassing van de Eredivisie worden.”Support the show: https://krant.nlSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

AstrologicamenteLore
Leo "El león de Nemea los doce trabajos de heracles"

AstrologicamenteLore

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 3:29


Podcast Red Inka + Audio Libros
04.11.52 Los Miserables de Victor Hugo (4ra Parte: El idilio de la calle de Plumet y La epopeya de la calle de Saint-Denis - Libro undécimo: El átomo confraterniza con el huracán - Cap 04 El anciano e

Podcast Red Inka + Audio Libros

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 3:08


Los Miserables Autor: Víctor Hugo Cuarta Parte: El idilio de la calle de Plumet y La epopeya de la calle de Saint-Denis Libro undécimo El átomo confraterniza con el huracán Cap IV : El anciano extraña al niño. Entre tanto, Gavroche, acababa de establecer contacto en el mercado de Saint-Jean, puesto que estaba desarmado, con un grupo a cuyo frente estaban Enjolras, Courfeyrac, Combeferre y Feuilly. Iban más o menos armados. Bahorel y Jean Prouvaire se habían encontrado con ellos y habían engrosado el grupo. Enjolras llevaba una escopeta de caza de dos tiros; Combeferre, un fusil de guardia nacional con el número de una legión y, metidas en el cinturón, dos pistolas que le asomaban por la levita desabrochada; Jean Prouvaire, un mosquetón viejo de caballería; Bahorel, una carabina; Courfeyrac blandía un estoque desenvainado; Feuilly, con un sable sin vaina en la mano, iba delante gritando: «¡Viva Polonia!». Llegaban del muelle de Morland, sin corbata, sin sombrero, sin resuello, calados de lluvia y con relámpagos en los ojos. Gavroche se les acercó calmosamente. —¿Dónde vamos? —Ven —dijo Courfeyrac. Detrás de Feuilly andaba, o más bien brincaba, Bahorel, como un pez en el agua de los disturbios. Llevaba un chaleco carmesí e iba diciendo frases de esas que lo desbaratan todo. El chaleco alteró a un transeúnte, que gritó, despavorido: —¡Que llegan los rojos! —¡Lo rojo y los rojos! —replicó Bahorel—. Qué espantos tan raros, burgués. Yo no tiemblo cuando veo una amapola, y Caperucita Roja no me da ningún miedo. Burgués, hazme caso, dejemos el temor al rojo a los animales con cuernos. Se fijó en un trozo de pared en que había un cartel, la hoja de papel más pacífica del mundo, un permiso para tomar huevos, una disposición cuaresmal que el arzobispo de París dirigía a sus feligreses. Bahorel exclamó: —¡Feligreses! Una manera educada de llamarlos reses. Y arrancó la disposición de la pared, con lo cual se metió en el bolsillo a Gavroche. A partir de ese momento, Gavroche empezó a estudiar de cerca a Bahorel. —Bahorel —comentó Enjolras—, haces mal. Habrías debido dejar en paz esa disposición, ni nos va ni nos viene; despilfarras la indignación tontamente. Conserva tu provisión. No hay que disparar fuera de la formación, ni con el alma ni con el fusil, —Cada cual tiene su estilo propio, Enjolras —repuso Bahorel—. Esa prosa obispal me molesta; quiero comer huevos sin que nadie me dé permiso. Tú eres del estilo hielo ardiente; yo soy de pasármelo bien. Además, no me despilfarro, cojo carrerilla; y si he roto esa disposición, ¡por Heracles!, ha sido de aperitivo. Esa exclamación, por Heracles, le llamó la atención a Gavroche. Estaba siempre al acecho de ocasiones para instruirse y le tenía consideración a aquel arrancador de carteles. Le preguntó: —¿Qué quiere decir por Heracles? Bahorel le contestó: —Quiere decir mecachis en la mar en latín. En éstas, Bahorel reconoció, asomado a una ventana, a un joven pálido de barba negra que los miraba pasar, probablemente un amigo del A B C. Le gritó: —¡Pronto, cartuchos! Para bellum. —¡Bello, sí, de verdad que es un chico guapo! —dijo Gavroche, que ya entendía latín.

Ballen verstand
S4E31: FC Twente moet zich zorgen maken en onder een andere trainer was Heracles niet gedegradeerd

Ballen verstand

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 38:42


Ze zijn voor één keer herenigd: Leon ten Voorde en Fardau Wagenaar blikken in een nieuwe aflevering van de podcast De Ballen Verstand terug op 2022. Terug op een jaar voetbal in Enschede en Almelo. Maar er wordt ook alvast vooruitgekeken. „Vier kapitale plekken in de organisatie bij FC Twente moeten nog worden ingevuld..” Dat Heracles het nu zo ongelooflijk goed doet in de Keuken Kampioen Divisie is opmerkelijk, vindt Fardau. „Hoe kan het zo zijn veranderd in een paar maanden tijd? Zou dat echt te maken hebben met de trainer?” Leon denkt van wel. „Ik denk zelfs dat Heracles in de Eredivisie was gebleven als Frank Wormuth geen trainer was geweest", vertelt Leon. „Maar bewijzen kan ik dat niet, natuurlijk.” Dan FC Twente. Dat een memorabel jaar beleefde met onder andere een Europees avontuur en heel recentelijk een trip naar Costa Rica. Leon vindt dat FC Twente heeft laten zien dat het terug is op een niveau dat van de club mag worden verwacht. „Dat zegt Streuer ook. Twente mag nooit meer terug naar een plek in het rechterrijtje. Incidenteel kan je een keer zevende worden, maar het doel moet hoger liggen.” Op bestuurlijk niveau moet er nog wel wat gebeuren, ziet Leon. „Vier kapitale plekken in de organisatie bij FC Twente moeten nog worden ingevuld.”Support the show: https://krant.nlSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

AstrologicamenteLore
Cáncer "Carcinos y los doce trabajos de heracles"

AstrologicamenteLore

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 3:33


Mito sobre la constelación de Cáncer.

Ballen verstand
S4E30: FC Twente moet nu écht aan de bak in Costa Rica en nare blessure Scheperman domper op feestvreugde

Ballen verstand

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 35:15


Er gebeurde weer genoeg bij en rondom de twee Twentse betaaldvoetbalorganisaties. Waar FC Twente in Costa Rica met de afscheidswedstrijd van Bryan Ruiz een bijzonder moment beleefde, scoorde dichter bij huis Heracles achtmaal in het laatste duel van 2022. Tot en met donderdag verblijft FC Twente nog in Costa Rica, waar deze maandag twee trainingen op de agenda stonden. „Na alle romantiek rondom het afscheid van Ruiz moet FC Twente nu echt aan de bak. De ploeg is hier op trainingskamp om zich voor te bereiden voor de herstart van de competitie”, laat FC Twente-watcher Leon ten Voorde vanuit het land in Centraal-Amerika weten.  De ploeg speelt de komende dagen ook nog een oefenduel tegen - opnieuw - Alafuelense, al hoopt Ten Voorde dat de Enschedeërs dan wel beter voor de dag zullen komen en de ontmoeting als een serieuze test oppakken.  Keuken Kampioen DivisieOndanks het WK voetbal ging de competitie in de Keuken Kampioen Divisie wel gewoon door. Heracles sloot de achttiende speelronde tegen FC Dordrecht af met een 8-1 thuiszege. Dat spits Samuel Armenteros een hattrick scoorde, net als overigens buitenspeler Emil Hansson, is voor de Almelose koploper van de eerste divisie geen reden om zich niet te versterken in de punt van de aanval.  Clubwatcher Ralph Blijlevens wist te melden dat de club in de afrondende fase is met de komst van een extra spits. „Hij gaat dit seizoen al meedoen, maar is ook gehaald met het oog op de terugkeer in de eredivisie.” Hierover en nog veel meer komt aan de orde in de nieuwste aflevering van podcast De Ballen Verstand, voorgezeten door host Frank Bussink. Support the show: https://krant.nlSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

1Twente Vandaag
1Twente Vandaag van vrijdag 16 december 2022

1Twente Vandaag

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 60:01


Met vandaag o.a. Enschedese wethouder Jurgen van Houdt beoogd burgemeester van Rijssen-Holten; Directeur OBS Roombeek was bij opnames Kerst Muziekgala NPO1; Eigenaar Boensma in Enschede over de verkoop van vuurwerk en podcasthost Roos-Sanne over de komende aflevering van Struggles.

1Twente Vandaag
1Twente Vandaag van donderdag 15 december 2022

1Twente Vandaag

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 64:26


Met vandaag o.a. Directeur Enschede Promotie over Enschedese lights up; Drummer Ten Times a Million over de doorbraak van zijn band; Advocaat over stopzetten persalarm bij incidenten; IJsbaan Hengelose IJsclub opent vandaag en in een nieuwe editie van het Twents Kwartearken aandacht voor internationale studenten die gaan zwemmen voor het goede doel.

The Silly History Boys Show
Episode 61 -  'Deer Hard' the Hind of Artemis; Heracles part 4

The Silly History Boys Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 45:04


  The Silly History Boys are back again to continue the laborious labours of everyone's fave Demi God…Heracles! Weary of our hero's popularity the wicked King and naughty goddess Queen Hera plan to set our hero up for a fall… He must hunt the fastest thing alive…no not Sonic! The Golden Hind of Artemis! Can he catch it? What happens if he does? Will the goddess of the hunt turn him into a dart board? Find out on a simply epic chase across Ancient Greece, through mountains, deserts and top notch gastro pubs! Did we mention its silly…cos it is very silly indeed! Blessing of Zeus for ZapSplat for all their zaps and splats and music Scott Buckley is assured a place on the Parthenon for all his epic tracks! Rate and review on your chosen platform platform ‘deer friends' of history! Also…do you erm…want to buy us a coffee? Help support the show with a donation on Kofi below! We'd be ever so grateful and we won't spend it all on sweets (we will spend ‘some of it' on sweets) https://ko-fi.com/sillyhistoryboys

1Twente Vandaag
1Twente Vandaag van woensdag 14 december 2022

1Twente Vandaag

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 60:46


Met vandaag o.a. Stadscarillon speelt kersliedjes vanuit de Grote Kerk op de Oude Markt; Brahim Tiberkanine over de halve finale van Marokko op het WK voetbal; ervaringsdeskundige over eetstoornissen en livemuziek van Enschedese singer-songwriter Sem Noa.

Anchored by Truth from Crystal Sea Books - a 30 minute show exploring the grand Biblical saga of creation, fall, and redempti

Episode 190 – Jesus’ Attributes Were Not “Borrowed” Welcome to Anchored by Truth brought to you by Crystal Sea Books. In John 14:6, Jesus said, “I am the way, the truth, and the life.” The goal of Anchored by Truth is to encourage everyone to grow in the Christian faith by anchoring themselves to the secure truth found in the inspired, inerrant, and infallible word of God. Script Notes: “Jesus told her, “I am the resurrection and the life. Anyone who believes in me will live, even after dying.” The Gospel of John, Chapter 11, verse 25, New Living Translation “Jesus told him, “I am the way, the truth, and the life. No one can come to the Father except through me.” The Gospel of John, Chapter 14, verse 6, New Living Translation ******** VK: Hi! I’m Victoria K. Welcome to Anchored by Truth brought to you by Crystal Sea Books. I’m here today with RD Fierro, author and founder of Crystal Sea Books, and part-time event planning consultant. He rearranges the chairs in the conference room when we have meetings. Today on Anchored by Truth, as we approach Thanksgiving and Christmas, we want to continue our series where we focus on the life and ministry of Jesus. And we want to continue listening to Crystal Sea’s epic Christmas poem The Golden Tree: The Frost Lion. Frost Lion is the third part of the Golden Tree trilogy. The first installment of the Golden Tree saga was The Golden Tree: Komari’s Quest and copies of it are available from our website which is crystalseabooks.com. Even though we’re playing Frost Lion on our broadcasts and podcasts it has not yet been released for people to get their own copy but that will happen in the near future. Today we’re coming to part five out of seven of the poem. So, we’re getting close to bringing it home, right RD? RD: We are indeed. For any listeners who weren’t able to be with us for our last couple of episodes we should tell them that The Golden Tree: The Frost Lion is a poem that is written in the style of some classic Christmas stories. It was written in seven parts and each part ends in a sort of cliffhanger. So, now that we’re at part five we’re pretty deep into the story. But just as a quick refresher The Golden Tree: The Frost Lion is about a group of small koala bears who live in the Artic in valley that’s green and warm because in the middle of the valley is a Golden Tree that keeps the valley warm and fertile. They’ve been there for several generations but just as Christmas season is approaching two teenage bears, Koest and Kopaul, were on a high hill near their town when the spotted a dark shape crossing the snow and ice. The strange shape turned out to be a bear named Roleb. Roleb came from the village their ancestors had left many generations ago and had travelled with a friend who got lost. Roleb and his friend were travelling to the arctic to search for help for their village which had lost its faith. Thanks to the wisdom of the village elders, Kodan and Kojon, the bears have been able to summon an ice eagle. But what can this ice eagle do? What will this ice eagle do … if anything? VK: Sounds like we’re getting to the good part. So, let’s continue with the story. Here’s part five of Crystal Seas’ Christmas epic poem: The Golden Tree, The Frost Lion. ---- The Golden Tree: The Frost Lion – Part 5 VK: Ok. So, the bears from the village have now found Roleb’s lost friend. But it’s too late. Roleb’s friend has died from the cold. So, it seems as if Roleb’s whole journey to the north has been for nothing. That seems very sad – if that was how the story ended. But, of course, it hasn’t ended yet. So, maybe all hope isn’t lost. And, knowing you, the answer to finding out whether anything can be done for Roleb and his friend is …to tune in next time. RD: That sounds like a brilliant suggestion. And maybe listeners could gather some family members to join them ... VK: Sounds even better. Listening to Golden Tree as a family could be a great way for parents or grandparents to connect with their kids and help them develop their faith. It would also make a great centerpiece for a home school study group or church youth group discussion about the role that courage and commitment play in the Christian faith – something that’s particularly relevant as we get closer and closer to Christmas. RD: Right. Somebody once said that the Christian faith is so simple that even children can comprehend enough about it to understand the plan of salvation. But even though we can begin with the faith of a child we should pursue the goal of developing a truly mature faith. God will meet us and help us wherever we are in our faith journey but He isn’t satisfied with leaving us at the starting line. Hebrews 12:2 says that Jesus doesn’t just initiate our faith. He also wants to perfect it. And part of perfecting our faith is ensuring that we understand what the Bible tells us about Jesus. VK: Well, so far we’ve seen that there are extra-Biblical sources that confirm that Jesus was a real historical figure who lived and died in Judea during the time period described by the Bible. But we’ve also seen that as helpful as it is to know that there are secular sources that confirm Jesus’ life that those sources aren’t enough to tell us everything that we need to know about Jesus. We can only get a complete revelation about Jesus from God’s special revelation to people, the Bible. And as we saw in our last episode, and again in today’s scriptures, Jesus’ statements about himself tell us something pretty important: that Jesus is not only fully human but also fully divine. RD: Yes. And so that takes us to the next subject that we need to talk about as we are focusing on the life of Jesus in preparation for celebrating his birth at Christmas. VK: And that is... RD: And that is - that because Jesus is the central figure not just of Christianity, but also the entire Bible, one of the criticisms that’s sometimes directed toward Jesus is that the attributes that the Bible assigns to Jesus were borrowed from other cultures or religious sources. So, Christians need to be familiar with some of the assertions that Jesus’ deeds, especially his miracles, were simply drawn from other religious myths or pagan characters. VK: Can you give us an example of what you’re thinking about? RD: Sure. It is has been alleged that Jesus’ miraculous conception isn’t a unique belief. For instance, critics will say that the mythological figure, Hercules, was also supposed to be the son of a divine father – in this case Zeus - and a mortal mother. VK: But, of course, there are significant differences between Hercules purported conception and Jesus. In the Greek legend Hercules mother was named Alcmene (ALK-MEN-EE). Zeus was supposed to have taken on the human form of Alcmene’s husband and deceived Alcmene and slept with her. And that’s how Hercules was conceived. That’s not nearly the same thing as Jesus being born of Mary while Mary was literally still a virgin. RD: The differences are even more pronounced. Hercules was actually the Roman name of a hero the Romans adapted from the Greek Heracles. According to the Greek legend, Heracles’ mother Alcmene was simultaneously pregnant with Heracles by Zeus and his half-brother Iphicles by her husband. And that’s only the beginning of the legendary aspects in Alcmene’s pregnancy with Heracles. So, as soon as you get beyond the superficial similarity and look at the details, the notion that Jesus’ conception was somehow an adaptation of the Heracles/Hercules myth falls apart. But this is a good example of one kind of obviously fallacious attack that’s directed against the historicity of Jesus. VK: So, what you’re saying is that one form of attack that’s leveled at Jesus has to do with a particular attribute of Jesus and then trying to find a parallel somewhere else in a different religion that is obviously false. The critics then try to discredit the life of Jesus by saying that if story A is false, then story B must be false also. RD: Right. But that makes as much sense as saying that if there are two $5 bills on the table and one is counterfeit, the other one must be also which is just silly. So, sometimes the supposed pagan origin of the details of Jesus earthly life and ministry are concerned with specific attributes of Jesus, such as his virgin birth. But sometimes the copycat thesis is less concerned with the specifics of Jesus life and more concerned with generalities that might be associated just about any supernatural figure. VK: Again, do you have any specific examples in mind? RD: For instance, since sickness and disease are obviously a plague on human existence... VK: No pun intended… RD: No pun intended… anyway, the ability to bring miraculous healing would be expected to be a staple of myths or legends. And it is. For example, Asclepius or Asklepios was a Greek demi-god who was the god of medicine. He was supposed to have raised Hippolytus from the dead, though he was killed by Zeus for doing so. Asclepius was supposed to be the son of the god Apollo and a human mother. Buddha was also supposed to have been able to cure the sick. VK: But again, these kinds of general miracle workings of mythological characters vary considerably from the information we have about the miracles that Jesus performed. For instance, in the case of Jesus curing Peter’s mother we have precise details of the location where the miracle was done, the people involved, and even a pretty close approximation to the timing. And many of Jesus’ healings involved specific details that conform to the religious and cultural conventions known to exist. Such as when he healed the lepers and then told them to go show themselves to a priest which was required by Jewish law. And Jesus’ healing miracles weren’t always the cause for celebration the way you would expect of a miracle like when Jesus restored the eyesight of the man born blind. The blind man was rejected by the religious leaders and cast out by them. RD: Exactly. The descriptions of Jesus’ miracles read like historical accounts because they are. Again, the key to drawing distinctions between Jesus’ miracles and those general sorts of miraculous powers that are associated with the pagan sources is in the details. The Bible accounts provide the details and in the majority of cases there are multiple eyewitness accounts. But the case of Buddha provides another way of refuting the claims that the Bible’s descriptions of Jesus are drawn from other sources. The earliest known account of Buddha’s life was written in the 2nd century AD so it came after Jesus and not before it. That’s also true for another supposed religious figure who supposedly served as the source for many of the details of Christ’s life, Mithra. In Mithra’s manifestation during the Roman period he was supposed to have been born on December 25th, had 12 disciples, performed miracles, had a final meal before he died, and rose from the grave after 3 days. VK: And since Mithra was a religious figure that was known to come from the Persian culture, modern day Iran, supposedly he was the inspiration for much of what the disciples taught about Jesus. Right? RD: Right. The earliest mention of Mithra is around 1400 BC so as a religious figure Mithra would pre-date Christ by a considerable time period. But the problem is that the attributes of the Iranian version of Mithra do not correspond to the Roman version. The Roman version of Mithra is best known for slaying a bull whereas there is no known connection to bull slaying in the Iranian version. And a lot of the supposed correspondences between Christ and Mithra appear in the Roman version and the dating of the correspondences is after Christ. VK: So, many scholars believe there might have been some cross pollination between Christ and the Roman version of Mithra but given the timing of the appearance of the similarities it’s far more likely that the legends of Mithra borrowed from Christianity and not vice versa. RD: And that would have been fair because there was one way that Christianity did borrow from Mithraism, in art. In the early part of the 3rd century AD (313), the Roman emperor Constantine issued the edict of Milan which accepted Christianity. Before then the Roman emperors had generally been very hostile to Christians. Within 10 years Christianity had become the official religion of the empire. But by then Mithraism seems to have also gained a strong foothold within the empire as well. In the third and fourth centuries, the Roman church officials seemed to have embarked on an effort to prove that their faith was the superior one, embarked on an advertising campaign. One commentator said their efforts were “reminiscent of our soft drink wars. Mithra was depicted slaying the bull while riding its back; the church did a lookalike scene with Samson killing a lion. Mithra sent arrows into a rock to bring forth water; the church changed that into Moses getting water from the rock at Horeb.” VK: That sounds suspiciously like the law of unintended consequences. The church officials in the 3rd and 4th century went on a campaign to prove that Christianity was superior to Mithraism and 1,600 years later the church now has to defend itself against the claim that Jesus’ life and ministry were the copycat version. RD: I think that’s an excellent observation. And let’s close out with one more, quick example. In Hinduism Krishna was also supposed to have had a miraculous conception so some critics point to that legend as a possible inspiration for the Christian tenant. VK: But in that case, Krishna’s ‘miraculous conception’ is his mom being impregnated by ‘mental transmission’ from his completely human father. Again, not remotely similar to the Bible’s description of how Mary became pregnant. RD: And to add to that – how credible is it that the first Christians, who were largely Jews from Palestine, would have borrowed a legend from a thousand miles away. At a minimum the Jews were fiercely monotheistic whereas Hinduism is distinctly polytheistic. So, this again points to the need to not only examine the varying details of alleged instances of borrowing but also consider the cultural factors that would have been in play. Often either chronological or cultural factors alone will be enough to refute the alleged possibilities. To go back to our earlier example with the money, when new bank tellers are being taught to spot counterfeit dollars they aren’t given lots of counterfeits to study. They’re given lots of real bills to feel and handle. The idea is that if the tellers get so used to touching and handling the real thing, the fakes will become instantly recognizable. That same approach will work when it comes to being able to answer many of the criticisms that are addressed at Christianity and Jesus. VK: And that’s a good lesson for all of us. The more time we spend studying scripture – and developing familiarity with the details of the people, the nations, the geography, the culture – not only will we be able to be confident in our own faith. But we will also be able to point other people to the truth. RD: Precisely. Myths and legends read like myths and legends. They have fantastic details that have little or no correspondence to things in the real world. Good common sense enables us to quickly see elements that don’t make sense in our experience. By contrast, the history contained in the Bible reads like good histories that we see elsewhere. There are specifics about people, places, times, and events and quite often either archeological finds or extra-Biblical records will provide information that helps confirm the Biblical record. VK: Sounds like a great time for a prayer. Today since we’re so close to Christmas let’s listen to a prayer about that special day. ---- Prayer for Christmas VK: We’d like to remind our audience that a lot of our radio episodes are linked together in series of topics so if they missed any episodes or if they just want to hear one again, all of these episodes are available on your favorite podcast app. To find them just search on “Anchored by Truth by Crystal Sea Books.” We hope you’ll be with us next time as we continue our discussion of the reality of Jesus’ life. We hope you’ll take some time to encourage some friends to tune in too, or listen to the podcast version of this show. Also, we’d to remind listeners that copies of The Golden Tree: Komari’s Quest are available from our website. If you’d like to hear more, try out crystalseabooks.com where “We’re not famous but our Boss is!” (Bible Quotes from the New Living Translation) The Gospel of John, Chapter 11, verse 25, New Living Translation The Gospel of John, Chapter 14, verse 6, New Living Translation The Gospel of John, Chapter 15, verse 5, New Living Translation (Sources used for this episode or other in this series) https://creation.com/pagan-copycat-thesis-refuted http://www.tektonics.org/copycat/pagint.php http://www.tektonics.org/copycat/mithra.php

1Twente Vandaag
1Twente Vandaag van dinsdag 13 december 2022

1Twente Vandaag

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 62:46


Met vandaag o.a. Medeoprichter Energie van Hengelo rond afstudeerstage af bij eigen bedrijf; We gingen binnenkijken bij Bioscoop Vue Enschede; 1Twente-verslaggever met een terugblik op de raadsvergadering van gisteren en de column van Ton Ouwehand.

Ballen verstand
S4E29: Bij een megabod op Zerrouki ziet de wereld er anders uit en Heracles blijft zoeken naar een extra spits

Ballen verstand

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 24:32


Het contrast kan bijna niet groter. Terwijl Heracles Almelo zondagmiddag de Keuken Kampioen Divisie met een 1-3 overwinning op bezoek bij Roda JC hervatte, pakten de spelers van FC Twente hun koffers voor een trainingskamp naar het zomerse Costa Rica, inclusief het afscheidsduel van Bryan Ruiz.  Leon ten Voorde belt vanaf Schiphol in voor deze aflevering van De Ballen Verstand. Hij vliegt namelijk naar Costa Rica om het trainingskamp van FC Twente daar op de voet te volgen. „Ron Jans heeft gezegd dat het nuttige met het aangename wordt gecombineerd deze week", vertelt Leon. „Hij wil dat de jongens die mee zijn over dertig jaar kunnen zeggen: ‘weet je nog toen in Costa Rica'.” Waar Leon dus naar Costa Rica afreist, zat Ralph Blijlevens zondagmiddag in Kerkrade voor het duel tussen Roda JC en Heracles Almelo. De Almeloërs wonnen met 1-3 en deden we ze moesten doen. Het gat met de derde plaats is gegroeid naar zeven punten en dat is goed nieuws voor de #missiepromotie van Heracles. „Het begin was wat slap, maar dit was gewoon een heel knappe overwinning.” Hoewel de ziekenboeg in Almelo langzaam leegloopt, blijft de club wel op zoek naar een extra spits. Op transfergebied kan er dus nog wel wat gebeuren in Almelo. Die kans is in Enschede wat kleiner, al mag Thijs van Leeuwen wel vertrekken. En Ramiz Zerrouki? „Als er op 20 januari een megabod op Zerrouki komt dan ziet de wereld er plots heel anders uit.” Support the show: https://krant.nlSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

1Twente Vandaag
1Twente Vandaag van maandag 12 december 2022

1Twente Vandaag

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 55:11


Met vandaag o.a. Buurthuis Beien over ‘gratis kerstmarkt' en stille armoede in Enschede-Noord; Bestuur Bernhards Ontmoeting slaapt buiten; SP Hengelo opent meldpunt voor mensen in financiële nood; Mantelzorger wil meer begrip voor mantelzorgers en in een nieuwe editie van In Depot aandacht voor stempels.

1Twente Vandaag
1Twente Vandaag van vrijdag 9 december 2022

1Twente Vandaag

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 55:11


Met vandaag o.a. Enschedese student over Paarse Vrijdag; Cafétaria Hengelose Es stopt vanwege hoge energiekosten; Communicatiemedewerker over speciale voorstelling kerstcircus Enschede; Het Stedelijk Zwering in Enschede is een inzamelactie gestart; Een nieuwe Stelling van de Week, met deze week: De supermarktprijzen zijn onbetaalbaar en de column van Bart Peeters Weem.

1Twente Vandaag
1Twente Vandaag van donderdag 8 december 2022

1Twente Vandaag

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 57:56


Met vandaag o.a. Privacy-advocaat met uitleg over bescherming medische gegevens; Twentse Jonge Ambtenaar van het jaar 2022; 1Twente-presentator over zijn podcast Struggles en een nieuwe editie van het Twents Kwartearken met daarin aandacht voor de dag van de vrachtwagenchauffeur.

1Twente Vandaag
1Twente Vandaag van woensdag 7 december 2022

1Twente Vandaag

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 62:21


Met vandaag o.a. Twickel College Hengelo opent omgekeerde supermarkt; SP-raadslid over huishoudelijke hulp in Enschede; Marieke Nijhof over huisartsenproblematiek en vier grote woningbranden vlot achter elkaar in Enschede, zet de brandweer aan het denken.

1Twente Vandaag
1Twente Vandaag van dinsdag 6 december 2022

1Twente Vandaag

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 55:26


Met vandaag o.a. Voorzitter COC Twente-Achterhoek over homovriendelijkheid Twentse steden; 1Twente-verslaggever met tussenstand energie-enquête Verwarm Twente; het Smakenrad start vanaf 13 december t/m 8 januari en de column van Robert van der Meulen.

Ballen verstand
S4E28: FC Twente heeft met ‘broertje' Zerrouki al de opvolger van Algerijn in huis

Ballen verstand

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 31:21


Met oefenwedstrijden in Almere en Leeuwarden hebben FC Twente en Heracles de draad weer opgepakt. Uitslagen doen er niet toe, wedstrijdritme en balgevoel is belangrijker richting de herstart van de competitie. Die begint voor de Almelose koploper van de KKD zondag bij Roda JC in Kerkrade, terwijl FC Twente zich opmaakt voor het bijzondere trainingskamp in Costa Rica. In een nieuwe aflevering van De Ballen Verstand keek host Frank Bussink samen met de voetbalwatchers Leon ten Voorde en Ralph Blijlevens terug op wat opviel tijdens de oefenduels, kwamen natuurlijk de prestaties van het Nederlands elftal op het WK in Qatar aan de orde en werd er voorzichtig vooruit geblikt naar de komende wintertransferperiode.  Terwijl in Almelo druk gezocht wordt naar de komst van een geschikte aanvaller, wordt iets verderop in Enschede niet echt gerekend op ingrijpende veranderingen in de selectie. Volgens Ten Voorde is er wel onduidelijkheid over wat de plannen van eigenaar Manchester City zijn met huurling Manfred Ugalde.  En wat als toch onverhoopt Ramiz Zerrouki voor veel geld vertrekt? Dan heeft FC Twente zijn opvolger al in huis: jeugdspeler Irakli Yegoian, een 18-jarige speler uit Georgië en speler van de FC Twente/Heracles Academie. Het jongere ‘broertje' van Zerrouki, want samen wonen ze in hetzelfde gastgezin in Haaksbergen.Support the show: https://krant.nlSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Voice Of Kaalhei
The Voice Matchday S2E19

The Voice Of Kaalhei

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 76:51


In aflevering 19 van The Voice Matchday bespreken Bart, Jasper en Rob Nederland - USA, is er KKD en Roda nieuws, de analyse van Argentinie en Heracles, het spoorboekje voor de resterende achtste- en kwartfinales en speelronde 17 van de KKD, bespreken ze de 3e ronde van de groepsfase en de reeds gespeelde achtste finales op het WK, wordt er vooruit gekeken op Nederland - Argentinie, bespreken ze de teams die ze volgen op het WK, is er ee nieuwe editie van "De zolder van Oranje" en is er natuurlijk de column van Jasper "The Missing Link".

1Twente Vandaag
1Twente Vandaag van maandag 5 december 2022

1Twente Vandaag

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 64:31


Met vandaag: Gebiedscoördinator Yvon Weustink over nieuw voedselbos in het Wageler; We kijken bij het winterse plein vol kerstsferen mét overdekte schaatsbaan in Hengelo; Marian Rupert en Marnix Morsink over 'GOOD ETT'N in en um Hengel'; Een reportage over een kerstbomentekort door de droogte; Marina Eenschoten over de drie finalisten van de stadsgrachtenwedstrijd in Enschede; Henk Ketting en Gwen Lemmens over de dertigste 1Twente Top 1000; En In Depot over de echtheidskenmerken van Twents textiel.

Of The Eldest Gods
S3E16 We Meet the Dragon of Eternal Bad Breath

Of The Eldest Gods

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 97:07


This week we talk for a LONG time about Annabeth's parental situation and of course we are FINALLY able to talk about Heracles and a bit of Atlas. Send us an Iris message at oftheeldestgodspod@gmail.com with your thoughts and theories going forward! We would love to hear from you. Make sure to subscribe so you know when our next episode drops and rate and review if you like what we are doing. IG: www.instagram.com/oftheeldestgodspod/ Twitter: twitter.com/oftheeldestgods SUPPORT US ON PATREON: www.patreon.com/oftheeldestgods BUY OUR MERCH, PLZ: tee.pub/lic/iqnn8laIbzg Follow Charlie: IG: www.instagram.com/greenpixie12/ and www.instagram.com/greenpixiedraws/ Twitter: twitter.com/greenpixie123 Plug: The Owl House Follow Raye: https://twitter.com/heyheyraye Barbie Movies Slap: https://twitter.com/barbieslaps Plug: Malevolent

Jon Solo's Messed Up Origins Podcast
The Messed Up Origins™ of Megara | Mythology Explained

Jon Solo's Messed Up Origins Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 15:28


In today's episode we're looking at the character behind Disney's Megara in Hercules. ► Support the series on Patreon! » https://www.patreon.com/JonSolo ► SOLOFAM MERCH: » https://www.bonfire.com/store/solo-ma... ► Want more? » Mythology Explained: https://bit.ly/MythologyExplained » Messed Up Origins: https://bit.ly/MessedUpOrgins » Disney Explained: https://bit.ly/DisneyExplained » Fables Explained: https://bit.ly/FablesExplained » Messed Up Murders: https://bit.ly/MurderPlaylist ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ ► Social Media: » Twitter: https://twitter.com/JonSolo » Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/JonSolo » Facebook Fan Page: https://facebook.com/TheRealJonSolo » Official Subreddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/jonsolo ► Join the Official Channel Discord: » https://www.patreon.com/JonSolo ► Send Fan Mail to: » SoloFamMail@gmail.com ► Business: » biz@messeduporigins.com (Business Inquiries ONLY) ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ ▼ Resources ▼ » my favorites: https://messeduporigins.com/books » Heracles' Wives: https://www.theoi.com/articles/who-wa... » "Megara & Dead Adonis" Poems: https://www.theoi.com/Text/Megara.html » The New Heracles Poems of Pindar (Account Required): https://www.jstor.org/stable/311075?r... » Euripedes Passage: http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/t... » The Mad Hercules (Full Play): https://archive.org/details/cu3192410... » Diodorus Siculus on Heracles: https://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/...

Stuff You Missed in History Class
Unearthed! Autumn 2022, Part 2

Stuff You Missed in History Class

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 41:18 Very Popular


The second part of our autumn list of things that were unearthed in the recent past includes potpourri, repatriations, shipwrecks, medical finds, Viking items, and books and letters. Research:  Abbott, Dennis. “Archaeologists unearth skeleton dating from Battle of Waterloo” Brussels Times. 7/13/2022. https://www.brusselstimes.com/belgium/254695/archaeologists-unearth-skeleton-dating-from-battle-of-waterloo Amaral, Brian. “A R.I. wreck that may be Captain Cook's Endeavour is being eaten by ‘shipworms'.” Boston Globe. 8/11/2022. https://www.bostonglobe.com/2022/08/11/metro/ri-wreck-that-may-be-captain-cooks-endeavour-is-being-eaten-by-shipworms/ Andalou Agency. “164-square-meter Heracles mosaic found in Turkey's Alanya.” 7/26/2022. https://www.dailysabah.com/life/history/164-square-meter-heracles-mosaic-found-in-turkeys-alanya “Van Gogh self-portrait found hidden behind another painting.” 7/14/2022. https://apnews.com/article/hidden-van-gogh-self-portrait-b703b4391c4ec0ba5bcf381ae44a6c3b Banfield-Nwachi, Mabel. “Rare original copy of Shakespeare's First Folio sells for £2m.” The Guardian. 7/22/2022. https://www.theguardian.com/culture/2022/jul/22/shakespeare-first-folio-sells-for-2m-at-auction Behrendt, Marcin. “Keep demons in the grave.” Nicolaus Copernicus University in Torun. 9/19/2022. https://portal.umk.pl/en/article/keep-demons-in-the-grave Benke, Kristopher. “Medieval mass burial shows centuries-earlier origin of Ashkenazi genetic bottleneck.” 8/30/2022. https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/963008 Bennett-Begaye, Jourdan and Kolby KickingWoman. “Jim Thorpe's Olympic record reinstated.” Indian Country Today. https://indiancountrytoday.com/news/jim-thorpes-olympic-record-reinstated Bergstrøm, Ida Irene. “The last person who touched this three-bladed arrowhead was a Viking.” 8/26/2022. https://sciencenorway.no/archaeology-viking-age-vikings/the-last-person-who-touched-this-three-bladed-arrowhead-was-a-viking/2069302 Bergstrøm, Ida Irene. “This gold ring once belonged to a powerful Viking Chief. It was found in a pile of cheap jewellery auctioned off online.” Science Norway. 7/8/2022. https://sciencenorway.no/archaeology-viking-age-vikings/this-gold-ring-once-belonged-to-a-powerful-viking-chief-it-was-found-in-a-pile-of-cheap-jewellery-auctioned-off-online/2052329 Bir, Burak. “Historical artifact from AD 250 returns to Türkiye after 140 years.” AA. 7/1/2022. https://www.aa.com.tr/en/culture/historical-artifact-from-ad-250-returns-to-turkiye-after-140-years/2628092 Brewer, Graham Lee. “Search for missing Native artifacts led to the discovery of bodies stored in ‘the most inhumane way possible'.” NBC News. 9/4/2022. https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/search-missing-native-artifacts-led-discovery-bodies-stored-inhumane-w-rcna46151 Brownlee, Emma. “Bed Burials in Early Medieval Europe.” Medieval Archaeology. Vol. 66, 2002. https://doi.org/10.1080/00766097.2022.2065060 Buschschlüter, Vanessa. “Pedro I: Emperor's embalmed heart arrives in Brazil.” BBC. 8/22/2022. https://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-62561928 Cardiff University. ‘Bronze Age enclosure could offer earliest clues on the origins of Cardiff.” 7/14/2022. https://phys.org/news/2022-07-bronze-age-enclosure-earliest-clues.html Cheng, Lucia. “After More Than 150 Years, Sculptor Edmonia Lewis Finally Gets Her Degree.” Smithsonian. 7/20/2022. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/sculptor-edmonia-lewis-receives-her-degree-180980429/ Davis, Nicola. “DIY fertiliser may be behind monks' parasite torment, say archaeologists.” The Guardian. 8/19/2022. https://www.theguardian.com/science/2022/aug/19/diy-fertiliser-may-be-behind-monk-parasite-torment-say-archaeologists-cambridge Dennehy, John. “UAE-led project makes groundbreaking discovery in Zanzibar's famed Stone Town.” The National News. 9/30/2022. https://www.thenationalnews.com/uae/heritage/2022/09/01/uae-led-project-makes-groundbreaking-discovery-in-zanzibars-famed-stone-town/ Donn, Natasha. “Portuguese scientists discover 100,000 year old case of deafness.” 7/18/2022. https://www.portugalresident.com/portuguese-scientists-discover-100000-year-old-case-of-deafness/ Eerkens, J.W., de Voogt, A. Why are Roman-period dice asymmetrical? An experimental and quantitative approach. Archaeol Anthropol Sci 14, 134 (2022). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12520-022-01599-y Elis-Williams, Elinor. “Finding the ship that sent out a warning to The Titanic.” 9/26/2022. https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/965748 Enking, Molly. “Kentucky Floods Damage Irreplaceable Appalachian Archives.” Smithsonian. 8/3/2022. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/kentucky-floods-damage-irreplaceable-appalachian-archives-180980517/ Fels, Tony. “What Elizabeth Johnson's Exoneration Teaches about the Salem Witch Hunt.” History News Network. 8/22/2022. https://historynewsnetwork.org/article/183740 Golder, Joseph. “New Technique Used to Free 1,300-Year-Old 'Ice Prince'.” Newsweek. 6/30/2022. https://www.newsweek.com/new-technique-used-free-1300-year-old-ice-prince-1720801 Grescoe, Taras. “This miracle plant was eaten into extinction 2,000 years ago—or was it?” National Geographic. 9/23/2022. https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history/article/miracle-plant-eaten-extinction-2000-years-ago-silphion?loggedout=true Griffith University. “Massive Outback rock art site reveals ancient narrative.” Phys.org. 9/21/2022. https://phys.org/news/2022-09-massive-outback-art-site-reveals.html Hauck, Grace. “How a missing foot in Borneo is upending what we've known about human history.” Phys.org. 9/7/2022. https://phys.org/news/2022-09-foot-borneo-upending-weve-human.html Hussain, Abid. “Record rains in Pakistan damage Mohenjo Daro archaeological site.” MSN. 9/8/2022. https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/record-rains-in-pakistan-damage-mohenjo-daro-archaeological-site/ar-AA11B0zH IOC News. “IOC to display the name of Jim Thorpe as sole Stockholm 1912 pentathlon and decathlon gold medallist.” 7/15/2022. https://olympics.com/ioc/news/ioc-to-display-the-name-of-jim-thorpe-as-sole-stockholm-1912-pentathlon-and-decathlon-gold-medallist Johnston, Chuck. “Grand jury declines to indict Carolyn Bryant Donham, the woman whose accusations led to the murder of Emmett Till.” CNN. 8/10/2022. https://amp.cnn.com/cnn/2022/08/09/us/emmett-till-carolyn-bryant-no-indictment-reaj/index.html Katz, Brigit. “Albuquerque Museum Returns Long-Forgotten Cache of Sculptures to Mexico.” Smithsonian. 7/29/2022. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/albuquerque-museum-returns-long-forgotten-cache-of-sculptures-to-mexico-180980501/ Katz, Brigit. “London's Horniman Museum Will Return Stolen Benin Bronzes to Nigeria.” Smithsonian Magazine. 8/9/2022. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/london-horniman-museum-return-stolen-benin-bronzes-nigeria-180980541/ Katz, Brigit. “Museum of the Bible Returns Centuries-Old Gospel Manuscript to Greece.” Smithsonian. 8/30/2022. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/museum-of-the-bible-returns-centuries-old-gospel-manuscript-to-greece-180980670/ Kiel University. “Examination of recently discovered wreck from the 17th century.” PhysOrg. 7/28/2022. https://phys.org/news/2022-07-17th-century.html Kuta, Sarah. “Can Tree Rings Solve the Mystery of a 19th-Century American Shipwreck?” Smithsonian. 9/1/2022. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/tree-rings-american-shipwreck-Dolphin-1859-180980676/ Kuta, Sarah. “Man Pays $75 for Medieval Text That Could Be Worth $10,000.” Smithsonian. 9/29/2022. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/man-pays-75-for-700-year-old-medieval-text-that-could-be-worth-10000-180980858/ Lewsey, Fred. “Prehistoric roots of ‘cold sore' virus traced through ancient herpes DNA.” 7/27/2022. https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/959525 Macmillan, Jade. “Indigenous leaders bring their ancestors home after 90 years at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History.” ABC. 8/3/2022. https://www.abc.net.au/news/2022-08-04/indigenous-remains-repatriated-from-smithsonian/101272318 McEnchroe, Thomas. “Uniquely preserved medieval kitchen unearthed north of Moravia.” Radio Prague International. 8/8/2022. https://english.radio.cz/uniquely-preserved-medieval-kitchen-unearthed-north-moravia-8758128 net. “Research from Viking latrines helps reveal the long history of a parasite.” https://www.medievalists.net/2022/09/research-from-viking-latrines-helps-reveal-the-long-history-of-a-parasite/ net. “Site of 13th-century shipwreck to be protected.” https://www.medievalists.net/2022/07/site-of-13th-century-shipwreck-to-be-protected/ Metcalfe, Tom. “1,000 years ago, a woman was buried in a canoe on her way to the 'destination of souls'.” LiveScience. 8/24/2022. https://www.livescience.com/indigenous-canoe-burial-argentina Nick J. Overton et al, Not All That Glitters is Gold? Rock Crystal in the Early British Neolithic at Dorstone Hill, Herefordshire, and the Wider British and Irish Context, Cambridge Archaeological Journal (2022). DOI: 10.1017/S0959774322000142 Nyberg, Elin. “Jewellery from grave of high status Viking woman delivered at museum's door.” University of Stavanger. 7/9/2022. https://www.uis.no/en/research/jewellery-from-grave-of-high-status-viking-woman-delivered-at-museums-door Nyberg, Elin. “Unique sword casts new light on Viking voyages across the North Sea.” Phys.org. 7/18/2022. https://phys.org/news/2022-07-unique-sword-viking-voyages-north.html Oltermann, Philip. “Germany hands over two Benin bronzes to Nigeria.” 7/1/2022. https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/jul/01/germany-hands-over-two-benin-bronzes-to-nigeria Orie, Amarachi and Christian Edwards. “This ship tried to warn the Titanic about the iceberg. Now scientists have found its wreckage.” CNN. 9/30/2022. https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/titanic-warning-ss-mesaba-irish-sea-intl-scli-scn/index.html Pannett, Rachel. “Scientists find evidence of oldest known surgery, from 31,000 years ago.” Washington Post. 9/7/2022. https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/2022/09/07/oldest-amputation-surgery-borneo-hunter/ Patel, Vimal. “Last Conviction in Salem Witch Trials Is Cleared 329 Years Later.” New York Times. 7/31/2022. https://www.nytimes.com/2022/07/31/us/elizabeth-johnson-witchcraft-exoneration.html Peek, Madison. “A voice for their ancestors: Exhumations begin at Williamsburg's First Baptist Church site.” Daily Press. 7/18/2022. https://www.dailypress.com/virginiagazette/va-vg-archaeology-discovery-burial-20220718-jequutuz2rbkvbrjposwovxot4-story.html Public Library of Science. “High-status Danish Vikings wore exotic beaver furs.” Phys.org. 7/27/2022. https://phys.org/news/2022-07-high-status-danish-vikings-wore-exotic.html Rebosio, Cameron. “SLAC researchers scan 600-year-old documents for clues about first printing presses.” 8/13/2022. https://www.paloaltoonline.com/news/2022/08/13/slac-researchers-scan-600-year-old-documents-for-clues-about-first-printing-presses Recker, Jane. “Five Stolen Paintings Go on Display in Virtual Reality.” Smithsonian. 7/13/2022. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/virtual-reality-stolen-artwork-180980389/ Recker, Jane. “Harvard Returns Chief Standing Bear's Pipe Tomahawk to the Ponca Tribe.” Smithsonian. 7/7/2022. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/civil-rights-leader-standing-bears-tomahawk-returned-to-his-tribe-180980369/ Rose, Andy. “3,000-year-old canoe found in Wisconsin's Lake Mendota is the oldest ever found in Great Lakes region.” CNN. 9/23/2022. https://www.cnn.com/2022/09/23/us/canoe-native-wisconsin-lake-mendota/index.html Scislowska, Monika. “Is Danish king who gave name to Bluetooth buried in Poland?” Phys.org. 7/31/2022. https://phys.org/news/2022-07-danish-king-gave-bluetooth-poland.html Solly, Meilan. “Bones Found in Medieval Well Likely Belong to Victims of Anti-Semitic Massacre.” Smithsonian. 9/1/2022. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/bones-found-in-medieval-well-likely-belong-to-victims-of-anti-semitic-massacre-180980692/ Solly, Meilan. “England's Oldest Surviving Shipwreck Is a 13th-Century Merchant Vessel.” Smithsonian. 7/26/2022. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/englands-oldest-surviving-shipwreck-is-a-13th-century-merchant-vessel-180980474/ Stafford, Joe. “Archaeologists carry out first dig at tomb linked to King Arthur.” 7/1/2022. https://www.manchester.ac.uk/discover/news/tomb-linked-to-king-arthur/ Tabikha, Kamal. “Archaeologists uncover 2,600-year-old blocks of white cheese in Egypt.” Mena/The National News. 11/12/2022. https://www.thenationalnews.com/mena/2022/09/12/archaeologists-uncover-2600-year-old-blocks-of-white-cheese-in-egypt/ Tamisiea, Jack. “Beloved Chincoteague ponies' mythical origins may be real.” National Geographic. 7/27/2022. https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/article/famous-chincoteague-ponies-may-actually-descend-from-a-spanish-shipwreck Taylor & Francis Group. “More digging needed to see whether bones of fallen Waterloo soldiers were sold as fertilizer, as few human remains have ever been found.” Science Daily. 6/18/2022. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/06/220617210054.htm Taylor, Luke. “Evolution of lactose tolerance probably driven by famine and disease.” New Scientist. 7/272022. https://www.newscientist.com/article/2331213-evolution-of-lactose-tolerance-probably-driven-by-famine-and-disease/ The History Blog. “1,400-year-old iron folding chair found in Bavaria.” http://www.thehistoryblog.com/archives/65004 The History Blog. “Conserving an 18th c. portrait and the waistcoat in it.” http://www.thehistoryblog.com/archives/64758 The History Blog. “Flash-frozen 7th c. boy warrior grave thawed.” http://www.thehistoryblog.com/archives/64490 The History Blog. “Getty returns unique Greek terracotta sculptural group.” http://www.thehistoryblog.com/archives/64992 The History Blog. “Hiker Finds Viking Brooch From Woman's Burial.” http://www.thehistoryblog.com/archives/64949 The History Blog. “Roman “refrigerator” found in Bulgaria.” http://www.thehistoryblog.com/archives/65258 The History Blog. “Roman anchor retrieved from North Sea.” http://www.thehistoryblog.com/archives/65211 The History Blog. “Secrets of Vermeer's Milkmaid revealed.” http://www.thehistoryblog.com/archives/65195 The History Blog. “Shrimp fishermen haul in wooden figurehead.” http://www.thehistoryblog.com/archives/64893 UNC University Communications. “Excavations by UNC-Chapel Hill archaeologist reveal first known depictions of two biblical heroines, episode in ancient Jewish art.” 7/5/2022. https://uncnews.unc.edu/2022/07/05/excavations-by-unc-chapel-hill-archaeologist-reveal-first-known-depictions-of-two-biblical-heroines-episode-in-ancient-jewish-art/ University of Cincinatti. “Using science to solve a 1,300-year-old art mystery.” 9/6/2022. https://phys.org/news/2022-09-science-year-old-art-mystery.html University of Helsinkin. “Human bones used for making pendants in the Stone Age.” EurekAlert. 7/4/2022. https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/957821 Vindolanda Charitable Trust. “Instruments of War: Roman cornu mouthpiece uncovered..” 9/21/2022. https://www.vindolanda.com/news/instruments-of-war-roman-cornu-mouthpiece-uncovered. Whiteman, Hilary. “Somerton man mystery ‘solved' as DNA points to man's identity, professor claims.” CNN. 7/26/2022. https://www.cnn.com/2022/07/26/australia/australia-somerton-man-mystery-solved-claim-intl-hnk-dst/index.html Wu, Tara. “Three Men Charged for Trying to Sell Stolen ‘Hotel California' Notes and Lyrics.” Smithsonian. 7/13/2022. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/three-men-charged-for-trying-to-sell-stolen-hotel-california-notes-and-lyrics-180980415/ Xavier Roca-Rada et al, A 1000-year-old case of Klinefelter's syndrome diagnosed by integrating morphology, osteology, and genetics, The Lancet (2022). DOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(22)01476-3 “5,200-year-old stone carving chrysalis found in north China.” 7/18/2022. http://www.chinaview.cn/20220718/9ff4915a83394d1089cea9e76c3f5517/c.html Yildiz, Kadir. “Rare 1,600-year-old writing set unearthed in Istanbul.” AA. 9/15/2022. https://www.aa.com.tr/en/culture/rare-1-600-year-old-writing-set-unearthed-in-istanbul/2685964 See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Of The Eldest Gods
S3E12 I Go Snowboarding with a Pig feat. Lelia Hilton from The Restricted Section

Of The Eldest Gods

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 82:36


This week we discuss how Heracles defeated a monster by using pig calls. And since Lelia joins us, of course the chapter conversation somehow becomes about cults. Send us an Iris message at oftheeldestgodspod@gmail.com with your thoughts and theories going forward! We would love to hear from you. Make sure to subscribe so you know when our next episode drops and rate and review if you like what we are doing. IG: www.instagram.com/oftheeldestgodspod/ Twitter: twitter.com/oftheeldestgods SUPPORT US ON PATREON: www.patreon.com/oftheeldestgods BUY OUR MERCH, PLZ: tee.pub/lic/iqnn8laIbzg Follow Leila: IG: https://www.instagram.com/leelz4realz/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/Leelz4Realz Plug: Aunty Donna's Big Ol' House of Fun Follow Charlie: IG: www.instagram.com/greenpixie12/ and www.instagram.com/greenpixiedraws/ Twitter: twitter.com/greenpixie123 Plug: iZombie (tv show) Follow Raye: https://twitter.com/heyheyraye Barbie Movies Slap: https://twitter.com/barbieslaps Plug: Strong Songs (podcast)

Stuff You Missed in History Class
Unearthed! Autumn 2022, Part 1

Stuff You Missed in History Class

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 34:59 Very Popular


Fall is here and so is the latest two-part edition of Unearthed! Part one includes updates, oldest things, books and letters, and a late entry into our Halloween stuff.  Research: Abbott, Dennis. “Archaeologists unearth skeleton dating from Battle of Waterloo” Brussels Times. 7/13/2022. https://www.brusselstimes.com/belgium/254695/archaeologists-unearth-skeleton-dating-from-battle-of-waterloo Amaral, Brian. “A R.I. wreck that may be Captain Cook's Endeavour is being eaten by ‘shipworms'.” Boston Globe. 8/11/2022. https://www.bostonglobe.com/2022/08/11/metro/ri-wreck-that-may-be-captain-cooks-endeavour-is-being-eaten-by-shipworms/ Andalou Agency. “164-square-meter Heracles mosaic found in Turkey's Alanya.” 7/26/2022. https://www.dailysabah.com/life/history/164-square-meter-heracles-mosaic-found-in-turkeys-alanya “Van Gogh self-portrait found hidden behind another painting.” 7/14/2022. https://apnews.com/article/hidden-van-gogh-self-portrait-b703b4391c4ec0ba5bcf381ae44a6c3b Banfield-Nwachi, Mabel. “Rare original copy of Shakespeare's First Folio sells for £2m.” The Guardian. 7/22/2022. https://www.theguardian.com/culture/2022/jul/22/shakespeare-first-folio-sells-for-2m-at-auction Behrendt, Marcin. “Keep demons in the grave.” Nicolaus Copernicus University in Torun. 9/19/2022. https://portal.umk.pl/en/article/keep-demons-in-the-grave Benke, Kristopher. “Medieval mass burial shows centuries-earlier origin of Ashkenazi genetic bottleneck.” 8/30/2022. https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/963008 Bennett-Begaye, Jourdan and Kolby KickingWoman. “Jim Thorpe's Olympic record reinstated.” Indian Country Today. https://indiancountrytoday.com/news/jim-thorpes-olympic-record-reinstated Bergstrøm, Ida Irene. “The last person who touched this three-bladed arrowhead was a Viking.” 8/26/2022. https://sciencenorway.no/archaeology-viking-age-vikings/the-last-person-who-touched-this-three-bladed-arrowhead-was-a-viking/2069302 Bergstrøm, Ida Irene. “This gold ring once belonged to a powerful Viking Chief. It was found in a pile of cheap jewellery auctioned off online.” Science Norway. 7/8/2022. https://sciencenorway.no/archaeology-viking-age-vikings/this-gold-ring-once-belonged-to-a-powerful-viking-chief-it-was-found-in-a-pile-of-cheap-jewellery-auctioned-off-online/2052329 Bir, Burak. “Historical artifact from AD 250 returns to Türkiye after 140 years.” AA. 7/1/2022. https://www.aa.com.tr/en/culture/historical-artifact-from-ad-250-returns-to-turkiye-after-140-years/2628092 Brewer, Graham Lee. “Search for missing Native artifacts led to the discovery of bodies stored in ‘the most inhumane way possible'.” NBC News. 9/4/2022. https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/search-missing-native-artifacts-led-discovery-bodies-stored-inhumane-w-rcna46151 Brownlee, Emma. “Bed Burials in Early Medieval Europe.” Medieval Archaeology. Vol. 66, 2002. https://doi.org/10.1080/00766097.2022.2065060 Buschschlüter, Vanessa. “Pedro I: Emperor's embalmed heart arrives in Brazil.” BBC. 8/22/2022. https://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-62561928 Cardiff University. ‘Bronze Age enclosure could offer earliest clues on the origins of Cardiff.” 7/14/2022. https://phys.org/news/2022-07-bronze-age-enclosure-earliest-clues.html Cheng, Lucia. “After More Than 150 Years, Sculptor Edmonia Lewis Finally Gets Her Degree.” Smithsonian. 7/20/2022. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/sculptor-edmonia-lewis-receives-her-degree-180980429/ Davis, Nicola. “DIY fertiliser may be behind monks' parasite torment, say archaeologists.” The Guardian. 8/19/2022. https://www.theguardian.com/science/2022/aug/19/diy-fertiliser-may-be-behind-monk-parasite-torment-say-archaeologists-cambridge Dennehy, John. “UAE-led project makes groundbreaking discovery in Zanzibar's famed Stone Town.” The National News. 9/30/2022. https://www.thenationalnews.com/uae/heritage/2022/09/01/uae-led-project-makes-groundbreaking-discovery-in-zanzibars-famed-stone-town/ Donn, Natasha. “Portuguese scientists discover 100,000 year old case of deafness.” 7/18/2022. https://www.portugalresident.com/portuguese-scientists-discover-100000-year-old-case-of-deafness/ Eerkens, J.W., de Voogt, A. Why are Roman-period dice asymmetrical? An experimental and quantitative approach. Archaeol Anthropol Sci 14, 134 (2022). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12520-022-01599-y Elis-Williams, Elinor. “Finding the ship that sent out a warning to The Titanic.” 9/26/2022. https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/965748 Enking, Molly. “Kentucky Floods Damage Irreplaceable Appalachian Archives.” Smithsonian. 8/3/2022. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/kentucky-floods-damage-irreplaceable-appalachian-archives-180980517/ Fels, Tony. “What Elizabeth Johnson's Exoneration Teaches about the Salem Witch Hunt.” History News Network. 8/22/2022. https://historynewsnetwork.org/article/183740 Golder, Joseph. “New Technique Used to Free 1,300-Year-Old 'Ice Prince'.” Newsweek. 6/30/2022. https://www.newsweek.com/new-technique-used-free-1300-year-old-ice-prince-1720801 Grescoe, Taras. “This miracle plant was eaten into extinction 2,000 years ago—or was it?” National Geographic. 9/23/2022. https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history/article/miracle-plant-eaten-extinction-2000-years-ago-silphion?loggedout=true Griffith University. “Massive Outback rock art site reveals ancient narrative.” Phys.org. 9/21/2022. https://phys.org/news/2022-09-massive-outback-art-site-reveals.html Hauck, Grace. “How a missing foot in Borneo is upending what we've known about human history.” Phys.org. 9/7/2022. https://phys.org/news/2022-09-foot-borneo-upending-weve-human.html Hussain, Abid. “Record rains in Pakistan damage Mohenjo Daro archaeological site.” MSN. 9/8/2022. https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/record-rains-in-pakistan-damage-mohenjo-daro-archaeological-site/ar-AA11B0zH IOC News. “IOC to display the name of Jim Thorpe as sole Stockholm 1912 pentathlon and decathlon gold medallist.” 7/15/2022. https://olympics.com/ioc/news/ioc-to-display-the-name-of-jim-thorpe-as-sole-stockholm-1912-pentathlon-and-decathlon-gold-medallist Johnston, Chuck. “Grand jury declines to indict Carolyn Bryant Donham, the woman whose accusations led to the murder of Emmett Till.” CNN. 8/10/2022. https://amp.cnn.com/cnn/2022/08/09/us/emmett-till-carolyn-bryant-no-indictment-reaj/index.html Katz, Brigit. “Albuquerque Museum Returns Long-Forgotten Cache of Sculptures to Mexico.” Smithsonian. 7/29/2022. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/albuquerque-museum-returns-long-forgotten-cache-of-sculptures-to-mexico-180980501/ Katz, Brigit. “London's Horniman Museum Will Return Stolen Benin Bronzes to Nigeria.” Smithsonian Magazine. 8/9/2022. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/london-horniman-museum-return-stolen-benin-bronzes-nigeria-180980541/ Katz, Brigit. “Museum of the Bible Returns Centuries-Old Gospel Manuscript to Greece.” Smithsonian. 8/30/2022. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/museum-of-the-bible-returns-centuries-old-gospel-manuscript-to-greece-180980670/ Kiel University. “Examination of recently discovered wreck from the 17th century.” PhysOrg. 7/28/2022. https://phys.org/news/2022-07-17th-century.html Kuta, Sarah. “Can Tree Rings Solve the Mystery of a 19th-Century American Shipwreck?” Smithsonian. 9/1/2022. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/tree-rings-american-shipwreck-Dolphin-1859-180980676/ Kuta, Sarah. “Man Pays $75 for Medieval Text That Could Be Worth $10,000.” Smithsonian. 9/29/2022. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/man-pays-75-for-700-year-old-medieval-text-that-could-be-worth-10000-180980858/ Lewsey, Fred. “Prehistoric roots of ‘cold sore' virus traced through ancient herpes DNA.” 7/27/2022. https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/959525 Macmillan, Jade. “Indigenous leaders bring their ancestors home after 90 years at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History.” ABC. 8/3/2022. https://www.abc.net.au/news/2022-08-04/indigenous-remains-repatriated-from-smithsonian/101272318 McEnchroe, Thomas. “Uniquely preserved medieval kitchen unearthed north of Moravia.” Radio Prague International. 8/8/2022. https://english.radio.cz/uniquely-preserved-medieval-kitchen-unearthed-north-moravia-8758128 net. “Research from Viking latrines helps reveal the long history of a parasite.” https://www.medievalists.net/2022/09/research-from-viking-latrines-helps-reveal-the-long-history-of-a-parasite/ net. “Site of 13th-century shipwreck to be protected.” https://www.medievalists.net/2022/07/site-of-13th-century-shipwreck-to-be-protected/ Metcalfe, Tom. “1,000 years ago, a woman was buried in a canoe on her way to the 'destination of souls'.” LiveScience. 8/24/2022. https://www.livescience.com/indigenous-canoe-burial-argentina Nick J. Overton et al, Not All That Glitters is Gold? Rock Crystal in the Early British Neolithic at Dorstone Hill, Herefordshire, and the Wider British and Irish Context, Cambridge Archaeological Journal (2022). DOI: 10.1017/S0959774322000142 Nyberg, Elin. “Jewellery from grave of high status Viking woman delivered at museum's door.” University of Stavanger. 7/9/2022. https://www.uis.no/en/research/jewellery-from-grave-of-high-status-viking-woman-delivered-at-museums-door Nyberg, Elin. “Unique sword casts new light on Viking voyages across the North Sea.” Phys.org. 7/18/2022. https://phys.org/news/2022-07-unique-sword-viking-voyages-north.html Oltermann, Philip. “Germany hands over two Benin bronzes to Nigeria.” 7/1/2022. https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/jul/01/germany-hands-over-two-benin-bronzes-to-nigeria Orie, Amarachi and Christian Edwards. “This ship tried to warn the Titanic about the iceberg. Now scientists have found its wreckage.” CNN. 9/30/2022. https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/titanic-warning-ss-mesaba-irish-sea-intl-scli-scn/index.html Pannett, Rachel. “Scientists find evidence of oldest known surgery, from 31,000 years ago.” Washington Post. 9/7/2022. https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/2022/09/07/oldest-amputation-surgery-borneo-hunter/ Patel, Vimal. “Last Conviction in Salem Witch Trials Is Cleared 329 Years Later.” New York Times. 7/31/2022. https://www.nytimes.com/2022/07/31/us/elizabeth-johnson-witchcraft-exoneration.html Peek, Madison. “A voice for their ancestors: Exhumations begin at Williamsburg's First Baptist Church site.” Daily Press. 7/18/2022. https://www.dailypress.com/virginiagazette/va-vg-archaeology-discovery-burial-20220718-jequutuz2rbkvbrjposwovxot4-story.html Public Library of Science. “High-status Danish Vikings wore exotic beaver furs.” Phys.org. 7/27/2022. https://phys.org/news/2022-07-high-status-danish-vikings-wore-exotic.html Rebosio, Cameron. “SLAC researchers scan 600-year-old documents for clues about first printing presses.” 8/13/2022. https://www.paloaltoonline.com/news/2022/08/13/slac-researchers-scan-600-year-old-documents-for-clues-about-first-printing-presses Recker, Jane. “Five Stolen Paintings Go on Display in Virtual Reality.” Smithsonian. 7/13/2022. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/virtual-reality-stolen-artwork-180980389/ Recker, Jane. “Harvard Returns Chief Standing Bear's Pipe Tomahawk to the Ponca Tribe.” Smithsonian. 7/7/2022. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/civil-rights-leader-standing-bears-tomahawk-returned-to-his-tribe-180980369/ Rose, Andy. “3,000-year-old canoe found in Wisconsin's Lake Mendota is the oldest ever found in Great Lakes region.” CNN. 9/23/2022. https://www.cnn.com/2022/09/23/us/canoe-native-wisconsin-lake-mendota/index.html Scislowska, Monika. “Is Danish king who gave name to Bluetooth buried in Poland?” Phys.org. 7/31/2022. https://phys.org/news/2022-07-danish-king-gave-bluetooth-poland.html Solly, Meilan. “Bones Found in Medieval Well Likely Belong to Victims of Anti-Semitic Massacre.” Smithsonian. 9/1/2022. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/bones-found-in-medieval-well-likely-belong-to-victims-of-anti-semitic-massacre-180980692/ Solly, Meilan. “England's Oldest Surviving Shipwreck Is a 13th-Century Merchant Vessel.” Smithsonian. 7/26/2022. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/englands-oldest-surviving-shipwreck-is-a-13th-century-merchant-vessel-180980474/ Stafford, Joe. “Archaeologists carry out first dig at tomb linked to King Arthur.” 7/1/2022. https://www.manchester.ac.uk/discover/news/tomb-linked-to-king-arthur/ Tabikha, Kamal. “Archaeologists uncover 2,600-year-old blocks of white cheese in Egypt.” Mena/The National News. 11/12/2022. https://www.thenationalnews.com/mena/2022/09/12/archaeologists-uncover-2600-year-old-blocks-of-white-cheese-in-egypt/ Tamisiea, Jack. “Beloved Chincoteague ponies' mythical origins may be real.” National Geographic. 7/27/2022. https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/article/famous-chincoteague-ponies-may-actually-descend-from-a-spanish-shipwreck Taylor & Francis Group. “More digging needed to see whether bones of fallen Waterloo soldiers were sold as fertilizer, as few human remains have ever been found.” Science Daily. 6/18/2022. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/06/220617210054.htm Taylor, Luke. “Evolution of lactose tolerance probably driven by famine and disease.” New Scientist. 7/272022. https://www.newscientist.com/article/2331213-evolution-of-lactose-tolerance-probably-driven-by-famine-and-disease/ The History Blog. “1,400-year-old iron folding chair found in Bavaria.” http://www.thehistoryblog.com/archives/65004 The History Blog. “Conserving an 18th c. portrait and the waistcoat in it.” http://www.thehistoryblog.com/archives/64758 The History Blog. “Flash-frozen 7th c. boy warrior grave thawed.” http://www.thehistoryblog.com/archives/64490 The History Blog. “Getty returns unique Greek terracotta sculptural group.” http://www.thehistoryblog.com/archives/64992 The History Blog. “Hiker Finds Viking Brooch From Woman's Burial.” http://www.thehistoryblog.com/archives/64949 The History Blog. “Roman “refrigerator” found in Bulgaria.” http://www.thehistoryblog.com/archives/65258 The History Blog. “Roman anchor retrieved from North Sea.” http://www.thehistoryblog.com/archives/65211 The History Blog. “Secrets of Vermeer's Milkmaid revealed.” http://www.thehistoryblog.com/archives/65195 The History Blog. “Shrimp fishermen haul in wooden figurehead.” http://www.thehistoryblog.com/archives/64893 UNC University Communications. “Excavations by UNC-Chapel Hill archaeologist reveal first known depictions of two biblical heroines, episode in ancient Jewish art.” 7/5/2022. https://uncnews.unc.edu/2022/07/05/excavations-by-unc-chapel-hill-archaeologist-reveal-first-known-depictions-of-two-biblical-heroines-episode-in-ancient-jewish-art/ University of Cincinatti. “Using science to solve a 1,300-year-old art mystery.” 9/6/2022. https://phys.org/news/2022-09-science-year-old-art-mystery.html University of Helsinkin. “Human bones used for making pendants in the Stone Age.” EurekAlert. 7/4/2022. https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/957821 Vindolanda Charitable Trust. “Instruments of War: Roman cornu mouthpiece uncovered..” 9/21/2022. https://www.vindolanda.com/news/instruments-of-war-roman-cornu-mouthpiece-uncovered. Whiteman, Hilary. “Somerton man mystery ‘solved' as DNA points to man's identity, professor claims.” CNN. 7/26/2022. https://www.cnn.com/2022/07/26/australia/australia-somerton-man-mystery-solved-claim-intl-hnk-dst/index.html Wu, Tara. “Three Men Charged for Trying to Sell Stolen ‘Hotel California' Notes and Lyrics.” Smithsonian. 7/13/2022. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/three-men-charged-for-trying-to-sell-stolen-hotel-california-notes-and-lyrics-180980415/ Xavier Roca-Rada et al, A 1000-year-old case of Klinefelter's syndrome diagnosed by integrating morphology, osteology, and genetics, The Lancet (2022). DOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(22)01476-3 “5,200-year-old stone carving chrysalis found in north China.” 7/18/2022. http://www.chinaview.cn/20220718/9ff4915a83394d1089cea9e76c3f5517/c.html Yildiz, Kadir. “Rare 1,600-year-old writing set unearthed in Istanbul.” AA. 9/15/2022. https://www.aa.com.tr/en/culture/rare-1-600-year-old-writing-set-unearthed-in-istanbul/2685964 See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Good Way Podcast
Season 2 Episode 8 Rerun

Good Way Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 21:14


Psalm 100, "This Is My Father's World", Heracles, "Feather or Fur" by John Becker

Mythlok - The Home of Mythology
Hercules : The Roman Hero

Mythlok - The Home of Mythology

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 8:15


The demi-god Hercules was regarded as a great hero for the people of Rome and Greece. He was known for performing various deeds that no mortal could. Hercules was an everyman who had bad days and even died due to another's trickery. These stories were entertaining, but they also told an important lesson to an audience: If bad things can happen to a hero, they have nothing to be ashamed of.The most famous of his activities was the 12 labours that Hercules was asked to perform by his cousin Eurystheus, who was the king of Mycenae and Tiryns. The first set of labours numbered only ten, but they eventually grew to twelve.To kill the Nemean Lion who was impervious to all weapons. To kill the monster known as the Hydra who had nine venomous heads and, when one was cut off, two more would grow in its place. To capture the Cerynitian Hind who was sacred to the goddess Artemis.To capture the Erymanthian Boar. Cleaning the Stables of Augeius in a day.To drive away the Stymphalian Birds.To bring back the Cretan Bull from Knossos.To bring back the Mares of Diomedes.To bring back Hippolyte's Girdle.To bring back the cattle of Geryon, king of Cadiz.To bring back the Golden Apples of Hesperides.To bring back Cerberus, the guard dog of the underworld.Read more at https://mythlok.com/hercules/

Mythlok - The Home of Mythology
Heracles : The Greek Hero

Mythlok - The Home of Mythology

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 7:47


Heracles, also known as Hercules, is one of the most celebrated characters in Greek mythology. He was the son of Zeus and the goddess Hera, and he was regarded as a symbol of bravery and strength. Even today, people still use the word "Herculean" to refer to this mythological hero.He had many interesting stories to tell, as he appeared in hundreds of myths. Heracles was almost killed after his wife, Deianira, gave him a poisoned shirt, which caused him to experience severe pain. To end his suffering, he built a funeral pyre on Mount Oeta. He climbed on top of the pyre and waited for someone to pass by so it could be set alight.After his friend Poeas lit the fire, Heracles was then burned to death. He was then taken to Mount Olympus and became an immortal deity where he married the goddess Hebe.According to Greek mythology, Heracles was the strongest man that ever lived. He was depicted as a large and muscular man, and he could be identified by his various weapons, such as his bow, his club, and the skin of the Nemean Lion.Read more at https://mythlok.com/heracles/

The Open Minded Skeptic
The Crystal Channelers: Rain (Part Two)

The Open Minded Skeptic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 22:54


In today's podcast, we continue Sam's past life journey of Deirdre and Varnin's past life of Heracles, as well as witness the outcome of the Rain on humanity.  Enjoy our next instalment of 'The Crystal Channelers and the Last Reincarnation'.  To check out future podcast information and dates, go to www.addictiontofiction.com.Support the show

Lucretius Today -  Epicurus and Epicurean Philosophy
Episode 143 - Diogenes of Oinoanda (Part 3) The Superiority of The Epicurean Viewpoint on "Gods"

Lucretius Today - Epicurus and Epicurean Philosophy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 62:52


Episode 143 - Diogenes of Oinoanda (Part 3) The Superiority of The Epicurean Viewpoint on "Gods"Welcome to Episode One Hundred Forty-Three of Lucretius Today. This is a podcast dedicated to the poet Lucretius, who wrote "On The Nature of Things," the only complete presentation of Epicurean philosophy left to us from the ancient world. I am your host Cassius, and together with our panelists from the EpicureanFriends.com forum, we'll walk you through the ancient Epicurean texts, and we'll discuss how Epicurean philosophy can apply to you today. We encourage you to study Epicurus for yourself, and we suggest the best place to start is the book "Epicurus and His Philosophy" by Canadian professor Norman DeWitt. If you find the Epicurean worldview attractive, we invite you to join us in the study of Epicurus at EpicureanFriends.com, where you will find a discussion thread for each of our podcast episodes and many other topics. This week we will continue with the Inscription of Diogenes of Oinoanda, and discuss Epicurean view of the superiority of their point of view about divinity over the supernatural religious views of much of the rest of the world. Now let's join Joshua reading today's text, starting with Fragment 16:Fr. 16 ..... and [they vehemently] denounce the [most pious people] as [atheistic]. And in fact it will become evident that it is not we [who deny] the [gods, but others.] Thus [Diagoras of Melos, with certain others who closely followed his] theory, categorically asserted that gods do not exist and [vigorously] attacked [all those who thought otherwise.] Protagoras of Abdera in effect put forward the same view as Diagoras, but expressed it differently to avoid its excessive audacity. For he said that he did not know whether gods exist, which is the same as saying that he knew that they do not exist. If indeed he had balanced the first statement with «However, I do not know that they do not exist,» [perhaps] he [would] almost have a [circumlocution] to [avoid the appearance of denying] the gods completely. [But he said] «I do not know that they exist,» [and not] «I do not know that they do not exist,» doing [exactly] the same [as Diagoras, who indefatigably did not stop] saying that [he did] not [know] that they exist. ....Fr. 19 [Let us then contradict Homer, who] talks [all sorts of nonsense] about them, [representing them sometimes as adulterers, sometimes as] lame, [sometimes as thievish, or even as being struck by mortals with a spear,] as well as inducing the craftsmen to produce inappropriate portrayals. Some statues of gods shoot arrows and are produced holding] a bow, [represented] like Heracles in Homer; others are attended by a body-guard of wild beasts; others are angry with the prosperous, like Nemesis according to popular opinion; whereas we ought to make statues of the gods genial and smiling, so that we may smile back at them rather than be afraid of them. Well, then, you people, let us reverence the gods [rightly] both at festivals and on [unhallowed occasions, both] publicly [and privately], and let us observe the customs [of our fathers in relation to them and let not the imperishable beings be falsely accused at all] by us [in our vain fear that they are responsible for all misfortunes], bringing [sufferings to us] and [contriving burdensome obligations] for themselves. ,,,,Fr. 20 [So it is obvious that wrong-doers, given that they do not fear the penalties imposed by the laws, are not] afraid of [the gods.] This [has to be] conceded. For if they were [afraid, they] would not [do wrong]. As for [all] the others, [it is my opinion] that the [wise] are not [(reasoning indicates) righteous] on account of the gods, but on account of [thinking] correctly and the [opinions] they hold [regarding] certain things [and especially] pains and death (for indeed invariably and without exception human beings do wrong either on account of fear or on account of pleasures), and that ordinary people on the other hand are righteous, in so far as they are righteous, on account of the laws and the penalties, imposed by the laws, hanging over them. But even if some of their number are conscientious on account of the laws, they are few: only just two or three individuals are to be found among great segments of multitudes, and not even these are steadfast in acting righteously; for they are not soundly persuaded about providence. A clear indication of the complete inability of the gods to prevent wrong-doings is provided by the nations of the Jews and Egyptians, who, as well as being the most superstitious of all peoples, are the vilest of all peoples. On account of what kind of gods, then, will human beings be righteous? For they are not righteous on account of the real ones or on account of Plato's and Socrates' Judges in Hades. We are left with this conclusion; otherwise, why should not those who disregard the laws scorn fables much more? So, with regard to righteousness, neither does our doctrine do harm [nor does] the opposite [doctrine help], while, with regard to the other condition, the opposite doctrine not only does not help, but on the contrary also does harm, whereas our doctrine not only does not harm, but also helps. For the one removes disturbances, while the other adds them, as has already been made clear to you before.That not only [is our doctrine] helpful, [but also the opposite doctrine harmful, is clearly shown by] the [Stoics as they go astray. For they say in opposition to us] that the god both is maker of [the] world and takes providential care of it, providing for all things, including human beings. Well, in the first place, we come to this question: was it, may I ask, for his own sake that the god created the world [or for the sake of human beings? For it is obvious that it was from a wish to benefit either himself or human beings that he embarked on this] undertaking. For how could it have been otherwise, if nothing is produced without a cause and these things are produced by a god? Let us then examine this view and what Stoics mean. It was, they say, from a wish to have a city and fellow-citizens, just as if [he were an exile from a city, that] the god [created the world and human beings. However, this supposition, a concoction of empty talking, is] self-evidently a fable, composed to gain the attention of an audience, not a natural philosopher's argument searching for the truth and inferring from probabilities things not palpable to sense. Yet even if, in the belief that he was doing some good [to himself, the god] really [made the world and human beings], ................. For god [is, I say], a living being, indestructible [and] blessed from [age to] age, having complete [self-sufficiency]. Moreover, what [god, if] he had existed for infinite [time] and enjoyed tranquillity [for thousands of years, would have got] this idea that he needed a city and fellow-citizens? Add to this absurdity that he, being a god, should seek to have beings as fellow-citizens. And there is this further point too: if he had created the world as a habitation and city for himself, I seek to know where he was living before the world was created; I do not find an answer, at any rate not one consistent with the doctrine of these people when they declare that this world is unique. So for that infinite time, apparently, the god of these people was cityless and homeless and, like an unfortunate man — I do not say «god» —, having neither city nor fellow-citizens, he was destitute and roaming about at random. If therefore the divine nature shall be deemed to have created things for its own sake, all this is absurd; and if for the sake of men, there are yet other more absurd consequences.