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City-state in ancient Greece

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Many Minds
Myths, robots, and the origins of AI

Many Minds

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 64:32


When we talk about AI, we usually fixate on the future. What's coming next? Where is the technology going? How will artificial intelligences reshape our lives and worlds? But it's also worth looking to the past. When did the prospect of manufactured minds first enter the human imagination? When did we start building robots, and what did those early robots do? What are the deeper origins, in other words, not only of artificial intelligences themselves, but of our ideas about those intelligences?  For this episode, we have two guests who've spent a lot of time delving into the deeper history of AI. One is Adrienne Mayor; Adrienne is a Research Scholar in the Department of Classics at Stanford University and the author of the 2018 book, Gods and Robots: Myths, Machines, and Ancient Dreams of Technology. Our second guest is Elly Truitt; Elly is Associate Professor in the History & Sociology of Science at the University of Pennsylvania and the author of the 2015 book, Medieval Robots: Mechanism, Magic, Nature, and Art.  In this conversation, we draw on Adrienne's expertise in the classical era and Elly's expertise in the medieval period to dig into the surprisingly long and rich history of AI. We discuss some of the very first imaginings of artificial beings in Greek mythology, including Talos, the giant robot guarding the island of Crete. We talk about some of the very first historical examples of automata, or self-moving devices; these included statues that spoke, mechanical birds that flew, thrones that rose, and clocks that showed the movements of the heavens. We also discuss the long-standing and tangled relationships between AI and power, exoticism, slavery, prediction, and justice. And, finally, we consider some of the most prominent ideas we have about AI today and whether they had precedents in earlier times. This is an episode we've been hoping to do for some time now, to try to step back and put AI in a much broader context. It turns out the debates we're having now, the anxieties and narratives that swirl around AI today, are not so new. In some cases, they're millennia old.  Alright friends, now to my conversation with Elly Truitt and Adrienne Mayor. Enjoy!   A transcript of this episode will be available soon.   Notes and links 4:00 – See Adrienne's TedEd lesson about Talos, the “first robot.” See also Adrienne's 2019 talk for the Long Now Foundation. 7:15 – The Throne of Solomon does not survive, but it was often rendered in art, for example in this painting by Edward Poynter. 12:00 – For more on Adrienne's broader research program, see her website; for more on Elly's research program, see her website. 18:00 – For more on the etymology of ‘robot,' see here. 23:00 – A recent piece about Aristotle's writings on slavery. 26:00 – An article about the fact that Greek and Roman statues were much more colorful than we think of them today. 30:00 – A recent research article about the Antikythera mechanism. 34:00 – See Adrienne's popular article about the robots that guarded the relics of the Buddha. 38:45 – See Elly's article about how automata figured prominently in tombs. 47:00 – See Elly's recent video lecture about mechanical clocks and the “invention of time.” For more on the rise of mechanistic thinking—and clocks as important metaphors in that rise—see Jessica Riskin's book, The Restless Clock. 50:00 – An article about a “torture robot” of ancient Sparta. 58:00 – A painting of the “Iron Knight” in Spenser's The Faerie Queene.   Adrienne Mayor recommends: The Greeks and the New, by Armand D'Angour Classical Traditions in Science Fiction, edited by Brett Rogers and Benjamin Stevens In Our Own Image, by George Zarkadakis Ancient Inventions, by Peter James and Nick Thorpe   Elly Truitt recommends: AI Narratives, edited by Stephen Cave, Kanta Dihal, and Sarah Dillon The Love Makers, by Aifric Campbell The Mitchells vs the Machines   You can read more about Adrienne's work on her website and follow her on Twitter. You can read more about Elly's work on her website and follow her on Twitter.   Many Minds is a project of the Diverse Intelligences Summer Institute (DISI) (https://disi.org), which is made possible by a generous grant from the Templeton World Charity Foundation to UCLA. It is hosted and produced by Kensy Cooperrider, with help from Assistant Producer Urte Laukaityte and with creative support from DISI Directors Erica Cartmill and Jacob Foster. Our artwork is by Ben Oldroyd (https://www.mayhilldesigns.co.uk/). Our transcripts are created by Sarah Dopierala (https://sarahdopierala.wordpress.com/). You can subscribe to Many Minds on Apple, Stitcher, Spotify, Pocket Casts, Google Play, or wherever you like to listen to podcasts. **You can now subscribe to the Many Minds newsletter here!** We welcome your comments, questions, and suggestions. Feel free to email us at: manymindspodcast@gmail.com. For updates about the show, visit our website (https://disi.org/manyminds/), or follow us on Twitter: @ManyMindsPod.

The Lunar Society
Edward Glaeser - Cities, Terrorism, Housing, & Remote Work

The Lunar Society

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 57:08


Edward Glaeser is the chair of the Harvard department of economics, and the author of the best books and papers about cities (including Survival of the City and Triumph of the City).He explains why:* Cities are resilient to terrorism, remote work, & pandemics,* Silicon Valley may collapse but the Sunbelt will prosper, * Opioids show UBI is not a solution to AI* & much more!Watch on YouTube. Listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or any other podcast platform. Read the full transcript here.Follow me on Twitter for updates on future episodes.If you enjoy this episode, I would be super grateful if you shared it. Post it on Twitter, send it to your friends & group chats, and throw it up wherever else people might find it. Can't exaggerate how much it helps a small podcast like mine.A huge thanks to Graham Bessellieu for editing this podcast and Mia Aiyana for producing its transcript.Timestamps(0:00:00) - Mars, Terrorism, & Capitals (0:06:32) - Decline, Population Collapse, & Young Men (0:14:44) - Urban Education (0:18:35) - Georgism, Robert Moses, & Too Much Democracy? (0:25:29) - Opioids, Automation, & UBI (0:29:57) - Remote Work, Taxation, & Metaverse (0:42:29) - Past & Future of Silicon Valley (0:48:56) - Housing Reform (0:52:32) - Europe's Stagnation, Mumbai's Safety, & Climate ChangeTranscriptMars, Terrorism, & CapitalsDwarkesh Patel 0:00:00Okay, today, I have the pleasure of speaking with Professor Edward Glaeser, who is the chair of the Harvard Department of Economics, and author of some of the best books and papers about cities. Professor Glazer, thanks for coming on The Lunar Society.Edward Glaeser 0:00:25Oh, thank you so much for having me on! Especially given that The Lunar Society pays homage to one of my favorite moments in urban innovation in Birmingham during the 18th century.Dwarkesh Patel 0:00:26Oh wow, I didn't even catch that theme, but that's a great title. My first question is, What advice would you give to Elon Musk about building the first cities on Mars?Edward Glaeser 0:00:35[laughs] That's a great question. I think that demand for urbanism in Mars is going to be relatively limited. Cities are always shaped by the transportation costs that are dominant in the era in which they're created. That both determines the micro-shape of the city and determines its macro future. So cities on Mars are, of course, going to be limited by the likely prohibitive cost of traveling back and forth to the mother planet. But we also have to understand what cars people are going to be using on Mars. I assume these are all going to be Teslas, and everyone is going to be driving around in some appropriate Tesla on Mars. So it's going to be a very car-oriented living experience. I think the best strategy would be to create a fairly flexible plan, much like the 1811 grid plan in New York, that allows entrepreneurs to change land use over time and put a few bets on what's necessary for infrastructure and then just let the city evolve organically. Usually, the best way is to put more trust in individual initiative than central planning–– at least in terms of micromanaging what goes where. Dwarkesh Patel 0:01:58Gotcha. Now, since 9/11, many terrorist groups have obviously intended to cause harm to cities. But by and large, at least in Western countries, they haven't managed to kill off thousands of people like they were able to do during 9/11. What explains this? Do you think cities are just more resilient to these kinds of attacks than we would have otherwise thought? Or are the terrorists just not being creative enough?Edward Glaeser 0:02:20I don't know. There's also the question of what the objectives are. Even for the 9/11 terrorists, their end game was not to kill urbanites in America. It was to effect change in Saudi Arabia or in the Middle East more generally. We've also protected our cities better. If you think about it, two things go on simultaneously when you collect economic activity in one place in terms of defense: one of which is they become targets–– and of course, that's what we saw on 9/11; it's hard to think of a symbol that's clearer than those twin towers. But at the same time, they're also a defensible space. The origin of the urban agglomeration and use for cities and towns was the fact that they could be walled settlements. Those walls that brought together people collectively for defense are the ultimate reason why these towns came about. The walls provided protection.I think the same thing has been playing out with cities over the past 20 years. Just as New York was a target, it was also a place where post-2001, the city ramped up its anti-terrorism efforts. They put together a massive group as London had previously done. The cameras that implemented congestion pricing in London were the same cameras that used against the Irish terrorists. So both effects went on. I think we've been fortunate and that we've shown the strength of cities in terms of protecting themselves.Dwarkesh Patel 0:03:52If you look throughout ancient world history, there are so many examples of empires that are basically synonymous with their capital cities (ex. Rome or Athens, or Sparta). But today, you would never think of America as the ‘Washingtonian Empire.' What is the explanation for why the capital city has become much less salient in terms of the overall nation? Is there a Coasian answer here?Edward Glaeser 0:04:20There are specific things that went on with English offshoot colonies where in many cases, because they recognized the tendency of the capital city to attract lots of excess goodies that had been taken from elsewhere in the country, they located the capital city in a remote place. It's actually part of the story of the Hamilton musical in The Room Where it Happens. Part of the deal was about moving the capital of the US to a relatively remote Virginia location rather than having it be in Philadelphia, New York. That was partially to reflect the fact that the South needed to be protected against all of the extra assets going to New York and Philadelphia.So, whether or not this is Canberra or Ottawa, you see all of these English offshoot places without their capitals in the big metropoles. Whereas traditionally, what's happened in these places that have been around for centuries, is that even if the capital didn't start off as the largest city, it became the largest city because centuries of French leaders thought their business was to take wealth from elsewhere in France and make Paris great. I think the French Empire was as synonymous with Paris as most of those ancient empires were with their capital city. I guess the question I could throw back to you is, what are places where this is not true? Moscow, St. Peter's, and Beijing are examples. Do we think that Beijing is less synonymous with China than the Roman Empire is with Rome? Maybe a little–– possibly just because China is so big and Beijing is a relatively small share of the overall population of China. But it's more so certainly than Washington, D.C. is with the U.S. Decline, Population Collapse, & Young MenDwarkesh Patel 0:06:32That's a really interesting answer. Once a city goes through a period of decline (maybe an important industry moved out, or maybe it's had a sequence of bad governance), are you inclined to bet that there will be some sort of renewal, or do you think that things will continue to get worse? In other words, are you a momentum trader, or are you a reversion to the mean trader when it comes to cities?Edward Glaeser 0:06:54I can tell you different answers for different outcomes. For housing prices, I can tell you exactly what we know statistically about this, which is at higher frequencies, let's say one year, housing prices show wickedly large levels of momentum. For five years or more, they show very significant levels of mean reversion. It's a short-term cycle in housing prices followed by decline. Population just shows enormous persistence on the downside. So what happens is you typically will have an economic shock. Detroit used to be the most productive place on the planet in 1950, but a bunch of shocks occurred in transportation technology which made it no longer such a great place to make cars for the world. It takes a century for the city to respond in terms of its population because the housing is sticky. The housing remains there. So between the 50s and 60s, the population declines a little bit, and prices drop. They drop sufficiently far that you're not going to build a lot of new housing, but people are going to still stay in the houses. They're not going to become vacant. So, the people are still there because the houses are still there. During the 60s to 70s, the population drops a  little bit further and prices kind of stay constant, but still it's not enough to build new housing. So the declines are incredibly persistent, and growth is less so. So on the boom side, you have a boom over a 10-year period that's likely to mean revert and it's not nearly as persistent because it doesn't have this sticky housing element to it. In terms of GDP per capita, it's much more of a random walk there in terms of the straight income stuff. It's the population that's really persistent, which is, in fact, the reality of a persistent economy.Dwarkesh Patel 0:08:44Interesting. Why don't Americans move as much as they used to a century ago? So you have a paper from 2018 titled Jobs in the Heartland, where you talk about how there's increasing divergence between the unemployment rates between different parts of America. Why don't Americans just move to places where there are better economic circumstances? Edward Glaeser 0:09:04I want to highlight one point here, which is that you said “unemployment rate”, and I want to replace that with non-employment rate. That's partially what we're seeing now. It looks like America's labor force couldn't be better in terms of the low levels of unemployment, but what's happened over the last 50 years is there has been a very large rise in the share of prime-age men who are not in the labor force. So they've stopped looking for work, and those guys are miserable. It's not that those guys are somehow rather productive and happy,–– this is a very bad outcome for prime-age men. I'm separating men from women, not to say that the female labor markets aren't just as important, just as fascinating, just as critical. But labor force participation means something different for many women than it does for men. There are many women who are not in the labor force who are doing things that are enormously productive socially, like caring for their children and caring for their families.I wish it were symmetric across the genders. It just isn't true. I mean, there just are very few men not in the labor force who are doing anything much other than watching television. It's just a very different thing. So yes, there are big differences in the non-employment rate. There are some parts of America where, for much of the past decade, one in four prime-age men have been jobless. It's an enormous gap. The question is, why don't they get out?I think the answer is really twofold: one of which is the nature of how housing markets have frozen up. Historically, the differences in housing costs in the US weren't that huge across places. Most parts of America had some kind of affordable housing, and it was relatively easy to put up. At the dawn of the 20th century, these were kit helms sold by Sears and Roebuck that sprung up by the thousand. You bought the kit from Sears and Roebuck, and you just built it yourself. After World War II, it was mass-produced homes in places like Levittown.For most of the last 50 years, in places like coastal California or the East Coast, building has just become far more difficult. With the decline of mass-produced housing, it's become far more expensive, and it becomes harder and harder for relatively low-income people to find opportunities in places that have high levels of income, and high levels of opportunity. That's partially why there's not just a general decline in mobility, there's a decline in directed mobility for the poor. Historically, poor people moved from poor areas to rich areas. That's pretty much stopped. In part, that's because rich areas just have very, very expensive housing. The other thing is the rising importance of the informal safety net.So if you think about most particularly prime-aged men, they're not receiving significant handouts from the government except if they're on disability. But they will typically have some form of income, some form of housing that's being provided for them by someone other than themselves. A third of them are living in their parent's homes. That informal safety net is usually very place dependent. Let's say you're living in Eastern Kentucky; it's not like your parents were going to buy you a condo in San Francisco. You can still have your own bedroom, but you can't go anywhere else and still get that level of support. And so that's, I think, another reason why we're increasingly stuck in place.The third you mentioned, is that a third of the non-employed population of young men or is that a third of all young men? Non-employed is a third of non-employed prime aged men. So that's 25 to 54. There are a lot of 45 year olds who are living on their parents' couches or in their old bedroom. It's a fairly remarkable thing.Dwarkesh Patel 0:12:49Now, we'll get to housing in just a second, but first, I want to ask you: If the fertility trends in East Asia and many other places continue, what will the impact on cities be if the average age gets much older and the possible eventuality of depopulation?Edward Glaeser 0:12:53That's a really interesting question.The basic age fact on cities is that within the bracket of the sort of high-income or middle-income, for prime-aged parents, cities tend to be relatively bad for them. Once you're in the sort of high end of the upper middle class, the distrust of our public school systems, merited or not, means that that group tends to leave. You have plenty of parents with kids who are lower income, and then you have groups who are part of a demographic barbell that like cities. So this is partially about people who don't feel like they need the extra space and partially because if they're young, they're looking to find prospective mates of various forms.Cities are good for that. Urban proximity works well in the dating market. And they've got time on their hands to enjoy the tremendous amenities and consumption advantages that cities have. For older people, it's less about finding a mate typically, but the urban consumption amenity still has value. The ability to go to museums, the ability to go to concerts, and those sorts of activities continue to draw people in.Going forward, I would have continued to expect the barbell dimension to persist until we actually get around to solving our urban schools and declining population levels. If anything, I would have thought that COVID skews you a bit younger because older people are more anxious and remember that cities can also bring pandemics. They remember that it can be a nice thing to have a suburban home if you have to shelter in place. So that might lead some people who would have otherwise relocated to a dense urban core to move out, to stay out.Urban EducationDwarkesh Patel 0:14:44You just mentioned urban schools, and I'm curious because you've written about how urban schools are one of the reasons people who have children might not want to stay in cities. I'm curious why it's the case that American cities have some of the best colleges in the world, but for some reason, their K-to-12 is significantly worse, or it can be worse than the K-to-12 in other parts of the country. Why is it that the colleges are much better in cities, but K to 12 is worse? Edward Glaeser 0:15:19So it's interesting. It's not as if, I don't think there's ever been an Englishman who felt like they had to leave London to get better schools for the kids, or a Frenchman who thought they needed to leave Paris. It's not like there's something that's intrinsic to cities, but I've always thought it's a reflection of the fact that instead of allowing all of the competition and entrepreneurship that thrives in cities and that makes cities great, in the case of K to 12 public education, that's vanished.And your example of colleges is exactly right. I'm in this industry; I'm a participant in this industry and let me tell you, this industry is pretty competitive. Whether or not we're competing for the best students, at our level we go through an annual exercise of trying to make sure we get Ph.D. students to come to our program instead of our competitors, whether it's by hiring faculty members or attracting undergraduates, we occupy a highly competitive industry where we are constantly aware of what we need to do to make ourselves better. It doesn't mean that we're great along every dimension, but at least we're trying. K through 12 education has a local monopoly.So it's like you take the great urban food, leisure and hospitality, and food industries, and instead of having in New York City by a hyper-competitive world where you constantly have entry, you say, “You know what? We're going to have one publicly managed canteen and it's going to provide all the food in New York City and we're not going to allow any competitors or the competitors are going to have to pay a totally different thing.” That canteen is probably going to serve pretty crappy food. That's in some sense what happens when you have a large-scale public monopoly that replaces private competition.Dwarkesh Patel 0:16:50But isn't that also true of rural schools? Why are urban schools often worse? Edward Glaeser 0:17:46There's much more competition in suburban schools. So in terms of the suburban schools, typically there are lots of suburbs, and people are competing amongst them. The other thing that's actually important is (I don't want to over exaggerate this, but I think it is something that we need to think a little bit about) the role of public sector unions and particularly teachers unions in these cases. In the case of a suburban school district, the teachers union is no more empowered on the management side than they would be in the private sector.Dwarkesh Patel 0:17:30So in a normal private sector, you've got a large company, you've got a union, and they're arguing with each other. It's a level playing field. It's all kind of reasonable. I'm not saying management has done awful things, and that unions have done foolish things. I'm not saying that either are perfect, but it's kind of well-matched. It's matched that way in the suburbs as well. You've got highly empowered parents who are highly focused on their kids and they're not dominated.It's not like the teachers union dominates elections in Westchester County. Whereas if you go into a big city school district, you have two things going on. One of which is the teachers tend to be highly involved politically and quite capable of influencing management essentially, because they are an electoral force to be reckoned with, not just by the direct votes, but also with their campaign spending. On top of this, you're talking about a larger group of disparate parents, many of whom have lots of challenges to face and it becomes much harder for them to organize effectively on the other side. So for those reasons, big urban schools can do great things and many individual teachers can be fantastic, but it's an ongoing challenge. Georgism, Robert Moses, & Too Much Democracy?Dwarkesh Patel 0:18:35What is your opinion on Georgism? Do cities need a land value tax? Would it be better if all the other taxes are replaced by one?Edward Glaeser 0:18:41Okay. So Henry George, I don't know any economist who doesn't think that a land value tax is an attractive idea. The basic idea is we're going to tax land rather than taxing real estate values. And you would probably implement this in practice by evaluating the real estate and then subtracting the cost of construction, (at least for anything that was built up, meaning you'd form some value of the structures and you just subtract it).The attractive thing from most of our perspectives is it doesn't create the same disincentive to build that a real estate tax does. Real estate tax says, “Oh, you know what? I might want to keep this thing as a parking lot for a couple of years so I don't have to pay taxes on it.”If it were a land value tax, you're going to pay the same tax, whether or not it's a parking lot or whether or not you're going to put a high rise on it, so you might as well put the high rise on it and we could use the space. So I think by and large, that's a perfectly sensible idea. I'd like to see more places using land value taxes or using land value taxes in exchange for property taxes.Where George got it wrong is the idea that a land value tax is going to solve all the problems of society or all the problems of cities. That is ludicrously not true.One could make an argument that in those places that just have a property tax, you could replace it with a land value tax with little loss, but at the national level, it's not a particularly progressive tax in lots of ways. It would be hard to figure out how to fund all the things you want to fund, especially since there are lots of things that we do that are not very land intensive. I think George was imagining a world in which pretty much all value-creating enterprises had a lot of land engaged. So it's a good idea, yes. A panacea, no. Dwarkesh Patel 0:20:20No, that's a good point. I mean, Google's offices in San Francisco are probably generating more value than you would surmise just from the quantity of land they have there. Do American cities need more great builders like Robert Moses?Edward Glaeser 0:20:36Robert Caro's The Power Broker is one of the great biographies of the past 100 years, unquestionably. The only biography that I think is clearly better is Robert Caro's biography of Lyndon Baines Johnson, right? I mean, it's Caro is truly amazing. That being said, I would not exactly call it a fair and balanced view of Robert. I mean, it is true that Robert Moses was high handed, and it is true that there are things that he did that were terrible, that you never want to do again. But on the other hand, the man got stuff built. I mean, I think of myself as a child growing up in New York City, and whether or not it was the public pool that I swam in or the parks that I played in, or the roads that I traveled on, they were all delivered by Robert Moses. There's got to be a middle ground, which is, no, we're not going to run roughshod over the neighborhood as Robert Moses did, but we're still going to build stuff. We're still going to deliver new infrastructure and we're not going to do it for 10 times more than every other country in the world does it.Dwarkesh Patel 0:21:37We're actually going to have sensible procurement policies that bring in things at a reasonable cost, and I think we need to balance a little bit back towards Robert Moses in order to have slightly more empowered builders who actually are able to deliver American cities the infrastructure they need at an affordable cost. Dwarkesh Patel 0:21:57Do we have too much democracy at the local level? You wrote a paper in 2017 titled The Political Economy of Transportation Investments and one of the points you make there is that the local costs are much more salient to people for new construction than the public benefits, and the benefits to newcomers would be. Does that mean we have too much federalism? Should we just have far less power at the city level and not universally? There are lots of good things that local control does.Edward Glaeser 0:22:25I do think we have too much local ability to say no to new housing projects. So that's a particular case that I'm focused on. I think it's exactly right that the near neighbors to a project internalize all of the extra noise and perhaps extra traffic that they're going to have due to this project. They probably overestimate it because they are engaging in a bit of status quo bias and they think the present is great and can't imagine any change.By contrast, none of the people who would benefit from the new project are able to vote. All of the families that would love to move into this neighborhood are being zoned out by the insiders who get a say. I think the goal is to make sure that we have more ability to speak for outsiders. Cities at their best, are places where outsiders can find opportunities. That's part of what's so great about them. It's a tragic thing that we make that so hard. Now I'm not sure exactly that I'm claiming that I want less democracy, but I do want more limitations on how much regulations localities can do. So I think there are certain limitations on local power that I think are fine.I would prefer to call this not a limitation on local democracy, but an increase in the protection of individual rights or the individual rights of landowners to do what they want with their land. Which in effect, is a limit on democracy. But the Bill of Rights is a limit on democracy! The Bill of Rights says that they don't care if 51% of your voters want to take away your right to free assembly. They're not allowed to do that. So in some sense, what I'm just arguing for is more property owners' rights so that they can actually allow more housing in their building.In terms of transportation projects, it's a little bit dicier because here the builder is the government itself. I think the question is you want everyone to have a voice. You don't want every neighborhood to have a veto over every potential housing project or potential transportation project. So you need something that is done more at the state level with representation from the locality, but without the localities getting the ultimate sayDwarkesh Patel 0:24:33I wonder if that paper implies that I should be shorting highly educated areas, at least in terms of real estate. One of the things you mentioned in the paper was that highly educated areas that had much higher opposition were able to foment much more opposition. Edward Glaeser  0:24:49Okay. So here's the real estate strategy, which I have heard that actually there are buyers who do this. You take an area that has historically been very pro-housing. So it's got lots of housing, and it's affordable right now because supply is good. But lots of educated people have moved in. Which means that going forward, they're going to build much less, which means that going forward, they're likely to become much more expensive. So you should, in fact, buy options on that stuff rather than shorting it. You should short if you have a security that is related to the population level in that community. You should short that because the population growth is going to go down, but the prices are likely to go up. Opioids, Automation, & UBIDwarkesh Patel 0:25:29So you wrote a paper last year on the opioid epidemic. One of the points that you made there was that the opioid epidemic could be explained just by the demand side stuff about social isolation and joblessness. I wonder how this analysis makes you think about mass-scale automation in the future. What impact do you think that would have? Assume it's paired with universal basic income or something like that. Do you think it would cause a tremendous increase in opioid abuse?Edward Glaeser 0:26:03I would have phrased it slightly differently–– which is as opposed to the work of two amazing economists, Anne Case and Angus Deaton, who really emphasized the role of deaths of despair; we are much more focused on the supply side. WIth the demand side, meaning just the way that we handled the distribution of large-scale pain relieving medicines, we tell a story where every 30 to 50 years, someone comes up with the same sort of idea, which is we know that human beings love opioids in different forms. We also know they're highly addicted and lead to a terrible cycle. So all of a sudden comes along this innovator says, you know what? I've got a new opioid and it's safe. You don't have to worry about getting addicted to this one. It's magical.It won't work. 100 years ago, that thing was called heroin. 200 years ago, that thing was called morphine. 300 years ago, that thing was called Meldonium. We have these new drugs which have come in, and they've never been safe. But in our case, it was OxyContin and the magic of the time relief was supposed to make it safe, and it wasn't safe.Dwarkesh Patel 0:27:30There's a lot of great work that just shows that the patterns of opioid use was related to the places that just had a lot of pain 30 years ago. Those places came with a lot of tendency to prescribe various things for pain. So when opioids came in, when OxyContin came in, those were the places that got addicted most. Now it's also true that there are links between these economic issues. There are links with joblessness, and I basically do believe that things that create joblessness are pretty terrible and are actually much worse than income inequality. I push back against the universal basic income advocates who I think are basically engaging in a materialist fallacy of thinking that a human being's life is shaped by their take home pay or their unearned pay. I think for most people, a job is much more than that. A job is a sense of purpose. A job is a sense of social connection. When you look at human misery and opioid use, you look at the difference between high-income earners, mid-income earners. There are differences, but they're small. You then look at the difference between low-income earners and the jobless, then unhappiness spikes enormously, misery spikes enormously, family breakups spike enormously. So things like universal basic income, which the negative income tax experimented on in the 1970s, are the closest thing we have for its large-scale experiments in this area, which had very large effects on joblessness by just giving people money. They feel quite dangerous to me because they feel like they're going to play into rising joblessness in America, which feels like a path for its misery. I want to just quickly deviate and some of the UBI advocates have brought together UBI in the US and UBI in the developing world. So UBI in the developing world, basically means that you give poor farmers in Sub-Saharan Africa fairly modest amounts of money. This is a totally sensible strategy.These people are not about to live life permanently not working. They're darn poor. It's very efficient relative to other ways of giving.  I am in no sense pushing back on UBI with modest amounts of money in the poorest parts of the world. By all means, it's been deemed to be effective. It's just a very different thing if you're saying I'm going to give $100 to a poor Congolese farmer, or I'm going to give $10,000 to a long-term jobless person in Eastern Kentucky. You're not buying a PS5 for $100 in Congo.Remote Work, Taxation, & MetaverseDwarkesh Patel 0:29:57I want to ask you about remote work. You write in The Survival of the City, that improvements in information technology can lead to more demand for face-to-face contact because FaceTime complements time spent communicating electronically. I'm curious, what distinguishes situations where FaceTime substitutes for in-person contact from situations where it complements FaceTime complements virtual contact?Edward Glaeser 0:30:25So there's not a universal rule on this. I wrote a paper based on this in the 1990s about face-to-face contact complements or substitutes for electronic contacts. It was really based on a lot of anxiety in the 1970s that the information technology of their day, the fax machine, the personal computer was going to make face-to-face contact in the cities that enable that contact obsolete. That discussion has reappeared amazingly in the past two and a half years because of Zoom, and all of those questions still resonate. I think in the short run, typically these things are substitutes.Typically you don't necessarily need to meet some person who's your long-term contact. You can actually just telephone them, or you can connect with them electronically. In the long run, they seem to be much more likely to be complements, in part because these technologies change our world. The story that I tell over the last 40 years is that, yes, there were some face-to-face contacts that were made unnecessary because of electronic interactions. But it's not just that cities did well over the past 40 years–– business travel went through the roof over the past 40 years. You'd think that that would have been made unnecessary by all these electronic interactions, but I think what just happened was that these new technologies and globalization created a more interconnected world, a world in which knowledge was more important, and we become smart by interacting with people face-to-face. This world became more knowledge and information intensive and more complicated, and as things get more complicated, it's easier for ideas to get lost in translation. So we have these wonderful cues for communicating comprehension or confusion that are lost when we're not in the same room with one another. So I think over the longer time, they tend to complements, and over the shorter term, they tend to be substitutes.One of the things I think was helpful in my earlier work on this was looking at the history of information technology innovations. I think probably the first one is the book. It's hard to imagine an innovation that did more to flatten distance. Now you can read stuff that people are saying hundreds of miles away. Yet there's not a shred of evidence that the book led to less urbanization in Europe or to less connection. It helped create a totally different world in which people were passionate about ideas and wanted to talk to each other. They wanted to talk to each other about their books.Flash forward 350 years when we have the telephone. Telephones started being used more in cities, and they were used mostly by people who were going to meet face-to-face. There's no evidence that this has created a decline in the demand for face-to-face contact or a decline in the demand for cities. So I think if we look at Zoom, which unquestionably has allowed a certain amount of long-distance contact, that's very, very useful. In the short run, it certainly poses a threat to urban office markets. My guess is in the long run; it's probably going to be likely to be neutral at worst for face-to-face contact in the cities that enable that contact. Dwarkesh Patel 0:33:37I think that my podcast has been a great example for me about this. I mean, right now we're talking virtually. So maybe, in a way it's substituted, and perhaps I would have interviewed in person without the podcast. However, in another way, I've also met so many people that I've interviewed on the podcast or who have just connected with me because of the podcast in person. The amount of in-person interactions I've had because of a virtual podcast is a great anecdote to what you're talking about, so that makes total sense.Edward Glaeser 0:34:05Absolutely.Dwarkesh Patel 0:34:06Why do even the best software engineers in India or in Europe make so much less when they're working remotely from those locations than remote engineers working in America make? I mean, why don't employers just pay them more until the price discrepancy goes away?Edward Glaeser 0:34:23That's interesting. I don't fully know the answer to that question. I would suspect some of it just has to do with the nature of supply and demand. There are some things that are just very hard to be done remotely. Either because you have very precise informational needs that you have that are easier to communicate to people who are nearby or the person who's nearby has evolved in ways in terms of their mind that they actually know exactly what you want and they have exactly the product that you need. So even though the remote call center worker and the local one may be totally equivalent on raw programming talent, you may still end up in equilibrium and be willing to pay a lot more to the local one just because, right?So there's a slightly differentiated skill the local one has, and look, there's just a lot of competition for the remote ones, so the price is going to be pretty low. There's not that much supply of the one guy who's down the hall and knows exactly what you're looking for. So that guy gets much higher wages, just because he can offer you something that no one else can exactly reproduce.Dwarkesh Patel 0:35:27Let me clarify my question. Even remote engineers in America will make more than remote engineers in Europe or in India. If somebody is working remotely but he just happens to live in the US, is that just because they can communicate in English in the same way? Edward Glaeser 0:35:54I would take the same stance. I would say that they're likely to have just skills that are somewhat idiosyncratic and are valued in the US context.Dwarkesh Patel 0:35:56Are you optimistic about the ability of the metaverse and VR to be able to better puncture whatever makes in-person contact so valuable?Edward Glaeser 0:36:19No, I do not think the metaverse is going to change very much. I do think that there will be a lot of hours spent on various forms of gaming over the next 20 years, but I don't think it ultimately poses much of a threat to real-world interactions. In some sense, we saw this with the teenage world over the last three years. We saw a lot of America spend an awful lot of time, 15, 16-year-olds, 17-year-olds, gaming and connecting entirely virtually during the whole time of the pandemic lockdowns.Every single person that I've seen in that cohort, when you allowed them to interact with real members of their group live, leaped at the opportunity. They leaped at the opportunity of meeting and actually hanging out with real people until three o'clock in the morning and arguing over whatever it is–– whether or not it's football or Kant. I think particularly for the young, living life live just beats the alternative.Dwarkesh Patel 0:37:05That sounds like a very Harvard scenario, having to argue over football or Kant, those two topics. [laughs] Are you predicting lower taxes over the coming decades in places like California and New York, specifically because of how remote work sets a sort of maximum bar of how much you can tax highly productive people before they will just leave? Edward Glaeser 0:37:29This is a great question. It's a central issue of our day. Here's how I think about it. In part, it's why I wrote my recent book, Survival of the City. It's because I was worried about this. Two things happened simultaneously. One, as you correctly say, Zoom has made it easier to connect anywhere. I don't think that Zoom is going to cause our tech startup currently in Silicon Valley to say, oh, you know what? We're just going to go home to our Orange County suburban homes and never meet live again. I think that's a low-probability event.But what seems to be a perfectly high probability event is saying, “Oh, we can Zoom with our VCs, we can Zoom with our lawyers. Why don't we just relocate to Austin, Texas, not pay taxes, or relocate to Boulder, Colorado, so we can have beautiful scenery, or relocate to Honolulu so we can surf?” That seems like we've made the ability for smart people to relocate much easier, even if they're going to keep on seeing each other in the office three or four days a week. That collides with this very fervent desire to deal with festering social inequities at the local level. Be this limited upward mobility for poorer people, be this high housing costs, be this the rise of mass incarceration and police brutality towards particularly minority groups. There's this progressive urge which runs up against the fact that the rich guys can run away.If your model, which says, “Oh, the local governments are going to realize the rich guys can run away, so they will seamlessly lower tax rates in order to make sure that they attract those people,” that's running up against the fact that there's a whole lot of energy on the progressive side, which says, “No! Massachusetts just passed a millionaire's tax. For the first time ever, we have the possibility to have a progressive tax, which feels extraordinarily dangerous given this time period.”I think we may need to see a bunch of errors in this area before we start getting things right. We went through a lot of pain in the 1970s as cities first tried to deal with their progressive goals and rich people and companies ran away, and it wasn't until the 1980s that people started realizing this was the path to local bankruptcy and that we had real city limits on what the locality could do.Dwarkesh Patel 0:39:44You cited research on the survival of the city, which said that firms like Microsoft were much less willing to hire new people once they went online because of the pandemic. What do you make of the theory that this is similar to when industrialization first hit and we hadn't figured out exactly how to make the most use of it to be most productive, but over the long run, somebody will do to remote work what Henry Ford did to the factory floor and in fact, just make it much more effective and efficient than in-person contact just because we'll have better ways of interacting with people through remote work, since we'll have better systems?Dwarkesh Patel 0:40:17It's entirely possible. I never like betting against the ingenuity of humanity. On the other hand, you need a lot of technology to override 5 million years of evolution. We have evolved to be an in-person species, not just because we're productive and learn a lot face-to-face, but also because we just like it. A world of hyper-efficient remote work where you basically are puttering around your apartment doing things very quickly and getting things done, doesn't sound particularly joyful to me.Workplaces are not just places of productivity; they're also places of pleasure, particularly at the high end. Remember in 2019 and earlier, Google, and Yahoo, the companies that should have had the biggest capacity to do remote stuff, weren't sending their workers home; they were building these paradises for high-skilled workers, stuffed with foosball tables and free snacks and whatever else they had in these giant campuses in the Google lex. So they were certainly betting on the power of face-to-face and creativity rather than on the ability of remote work to make everything work. I think the most reasonable view, let's say that of Nick Bloom of Stanford, is that for those types of workers, 20% of your week being hybrid, maybe 40%, seems quite possible.That seems like a thing, particularly for workers who have families who really value that degree of flexibility. But fully remote, I guess that's a pretty niche thing. There's some jobs like call center workers where you could imagine it being the norm, but in part, that's just because it's just hard to learn the same amount remotely that you do face-to-face. This came out both in the earlier Bloom study on remote call center workers in China and on more recent work by Natalia Emmanuel and Emma Harrington. Both studies found the same thing, which is in these call centers, are plenty productive when they're remote, but the probability of being promoted drops by 50%.The entrepreneur may make it very efficient to do things in the short run remotely, but they're going to turn off this tendency that we have to be able to learn things from people around us, which is just much harder to duplicate remotely.Past & Future of Silicon ValleyDwarkesh Patel 0:42:29Now, I'm curious why Silicon Valley became the hub of technology. You wrote a paper in 2018 about where pioneer and non-pioneer firms locate. So, I was hoping you had insight on this. Does it stand for it? Is it where Fairchild Semiconductor is located? What is the explanation?Edward Glaeser 0:42:48So, we take it as being earlier. It is Stanford. I traced through this, I think in Triumph. Yeah, it was a company called Federal Telegraph Company that was founded by a guy called Cyril Frank Elwell, who was a radio pioneer, and he was tapped by his teacher to head this radio company. The story was, as I remember it, there'd been this local genius in San Francisco who had attracted all these investors and was going to do this wireless telegraphy company. Then he died in a freak carriage accident.These investors wanted to find someone else, and they went to Stanford's nearby factory and asked, who should we hire? It was this guy Elwell who founded Federal Telegraph. Federal Telegraph then licensed, I think Danish technology which was originally the Poulsen Telegraph Company. They then hired some fairly bright people like Lee DeForest and they did incredibly well in World War I off of federal Navy contracts, off of Navy contracts. They then did things like providing jobs for people like the young Fred Terman, whose father was a Stanford scientist. Now, Fred Terman then plays an outsized role in this story because he goes to MIT, studies engineering there, and then comes back to become Dean of Stanford's engineering program.He really played an outsized role in setting up the Stanford Industrial Park which attracting Fairchild Semiconductor. Then there's this sort of random thing about how the Fairchild Semiconductor attracts these people and then repels them because you have this brilliant guy Shockley, right? He's both brilliant and sort of personally abhorrent and manages to attract brilliant people and then repel all of them. So they all end up dispersing themselves into different companies, and they create this incredibly creative ecosystem that is the heart of Silicon Valley.In its day, it had this combination of really smart people and really entrepreneurial ethos, which just made it very, very healthy. I think the thing that many of us worry about is that Silicon Valley more recently, feels much more like it's a one-industry town, which is dangerous. It feels more like it's a bunch of industrial behemoths rather than a bunch of smart and scrappy startups. That's a recipe that feels much more like Detroit in the 1950s than it does like Silicon Valley in the 1960s.Dwarkesh Patel 0:45:52Speaking of startups, what does your study of cities imply about where tech startups should locate and what kind of organization in person or otherwise they should have? I think there's a lot to like about in person, certainly. Relying too much on remote feels quite dangerous if you're a scrappy startup. But I like a lot the Sunbelt smart cities.I sort of have a two-factor model of economic growth, which is it's about education, and it's about having governments that are pro-business. If you think about sort of the US, there's a lot of heterogeneity in this. If you think about the US versus other countries, it's heterogeneity. So the US has historically been better at being pro-business than, let's say, the Northern European social democracies, but the Northern European social democracies are great on the education front.So places like Sweden and the Netherlands, and Germany are also very successful places because they have enough education to counter the fact that they may not necessarily be as pro-business as the US is. Within the US, you also have this balance, whereas places like Massachusetts, and California are certainly much less pro-business, but they're pretty well-educated. Other parts of the country may be more pro-business, but they're less so. The real secret sauce is finding those places that are both highly educated and pro-business.So those are places like Charlotte and Austin and even Atlanta, places in the Sun Belt that have attracted lots of skilled people. They've done very, very well during COVID. I mean, Austin, by most dimensions, is the superstar of the COVID era in terms of just attracting people. So I think you had to wait for the real estate prices to come down a bit in Austin, but those are the places that I would be looking at. Dwarkesh Patel 0:47:46I don't know if you know, but I live in Austin, actually.Edward Glaeser 0:47:50I did not know that. [laughs]Dwarkesh Patel 0:47:54Well, actually, I'm surprised about what you said about education because you write in the paper, “general knowledge measured as average years of schooling is not a strong determinant of the survival of a pioneer firm, but relatedness of knowledge between past and present activities is.” So I'm surprised that you think education is a strong determinant for pioneer firms.Edward Glaeser 0:48:15No, I'm a big human capital determinist. So I tend to believe that individuals, cities, and nations rise and fall based on their skill levels. Certainly, if you look over the last 40 or 50 years, skills are very predictive of which cities (particularly colder cities) manage to do well versus poorly. If you ask yourself why Detroit and Seattle look different, more than 50% of Seattle's adults have college degrees, and maybe 14, 15% of Detroit's adults do.That's just a huge, huge gap. Certainly, when we think about your punitive startup, you're going to be looking for talent, right? You're going to be looking to hire talent, and having lots of educated people around you is going to be helpful for that.Housing ReformDwarkesh Patel 0:48:56Let's talk about housing. Houston has basically very little to no zoning. Why is it not more of interesting today? Nobody goes to Houston for tourism.Edward Glaeser 0:49:07I have. [laughs] I have, in fact, gone to Houston for tourism. Although part of it, I admit, was to look at the housing and to go to the woodlands and look at that. Interesting has a lot to do with age in this country. So the more that a city has… Boston is good for tourism just because it's been around for a long time, and it hasn't changed all that much. So it has this sort of historical thing. Houston's a new place, not just in the sense that the chronological age is lower but also in the sense that it's just grown so much, and it's dominated by new stuff, right?That new stuff tends to be more homogenous. It tends to have less history on it. I think those are things that make new cities typically less interesting than older cities. As witnessed by the fact that Rome, Jerusalem, London, are great tourist capitals of the world because they've just accreted all this interesting stuff over the millennium. So I think that's part of it. I'm not sure that if we look at more highly zoned new cities, we're so confident that they're all that more interesting.I don't want to be particularly disparaging any one city. So I'm not going to choose that, but there's actually a bunch that's pretty interesting in Houston, and I'm not sure that I would say that it's any less interesting than any comparably aged city in the country.Dwarkesh Patel 0:50:35Yeah. I'm visiting Houston later this month. I asked my friend there, should I stay here longer? I mean, is there anything interesting to do here? And then he responds, “Well, it's the fourth biggest city in the country, so no.”Dwarkesh Patel 0:50:47Many people, including many economists, have said that we should drastically increase US population through immigration to a figure like 1 billion. Do you think that our cities could accommodate that? We have the infrastructure, and I mean, let's say we reformed housing over a decade or so. Could we accommodate such a large influx of people? Edward Glaeser 0:51:24A billion people in a decade? I love the vision. Basically, in my heart, I'm an open borders person, right? I mean, it's a moral thing. I don't really like the idea that I get to enjoy the privileges of being an American and think that I'm going to deny that opportunity to anyone else. So I love this vision. A billion people over 10 years is an unimaginably large amount of people over a relatively short period of time. I'd love to give it a shot. I mean, it's certainly not as if there's any long-term reason why you couldn't do it.I mean, goodness knows we've got more than enough space in this country. It would be exciting to do that. But it would require a lot of reform in the housing space and require a fair amount of reform in the infrastructure space as well to be able to do this at some kind of large scale affordability.Dwarkesh Patel 0:52:05What does the evidence show about public libraries? Do they matter?Dwarkesh Patel 0:52:09My friend Eric Kleinberg has written a great book about… I think it's called Palaces for the People about all the different functions that libraries have played. I've never seen anything statistically or systematically about this, but you're not going to get a scholar to speak against books. It's not a possible thing.Europe's Stagnation, Mumbai's Safety, & Climate Change Dwarkesh Patel 0:52:32Why do European cities seem so much more similar to what they look like decades or even centuries ago than American cities, even American cities that are old, obviously not as old as European cities, but they seem to change much more over time. Edward Glaeser 0:52:46Lower population growth, much tougher zoning, much tougher historic preservation. All three of these things are going on. So it's very difficult to build in European cities. There's a lot of attention to caring about history. It's often part of the nationalist narrative. You often have huge amounts of national dollars going to preserve local stuff and relatively lower levels of population growth.An extreme example of this is Warsaw, where central Warsaw is completely destroyed during World War II, and they built it up to look exactly like it looked before the bombing. So this is a national choice, which is unlikely that we would necessarily make here in the US. Dwarkesh Patel 0:53:27Yeah. I was in Mumbai earlier this year, and I visited Dharavi, which is the biggest slum in Asia. And it's a pretty safe place for a slum. Why are slums in different countries? Why do they often have different levels of how safe they are? What is the reason?Edward Glaeser 0:53:45I, too, have been in Dharavi and felt perfectly safe. It's like walking around Belgravia and London in terms of it. I think my model of Dharavi is the same model as Jane Jacobs's model of Greenwich Village in 1960, which is this is just a well-functioning community.People have eyes on the street. If you're a stranger in these areas, they're going to be looking at you, and it's a community that just functions. There are lots of low-income communities throughout the world that have this. It requires a certain amount of permanence. So if the community is too much in flux, it becomes hard to enforce these norms and hard to enforce these sort of community rules. It's really helpful if there aren't either a massive number of guns floating around or an unbelievably lucrative narcotics trade, which is in the area. Those are both things that make things incredibly hard. Furthermore, US drug policy has partially been responsible for creating violence in some of the poor parts of Latin American cities.Dwarkesh Patel 0:54:43Maybe you don't play video games enough to know the answer to this question. But I'm curious, is there any video game, any strategic video game like Civilization or Europa that you feel does a good job representing the economics of cities? Edward Glaeser 0:55:07No, I will say that when I was in graduate school, I spent a few hours playing something called Sim City. I did think that was very fun. But I'm not going to claim that I think that it got it right. That was probably my largest engagement with city-building video games.Dwarkesh Patel 0:55:12What would you say we understand least about how cities work? Edward Glaeser 0:55:18I'm going to say the largest unsolved problem in cities is what the heck we're going to do about climate change and the cities of the developing world. This is the thing I do not feel like I have any answer for in terms of how it is that we're going to stop Manila or Mumbai from being leveled by some water-related climate event that we haven't yet foreseen.We think that we're going to spend tens of billions of dollars to protect New York and Miami, and that's going to happen; but the thing I don't understand and something we really need to need to invest in terms of knowledge creation is what are we going to do with the low-lying cities of the developing world to make them safe. Dwarkesh Patel 0:55:54Okay. Your most recent book is Survival of the City. And before that Triumph of the City, both of which I highly recommend to readers. Professor Glaeser, thank you so much for coming on the podcast. This was very interesting.Edward Glaeser 0:56:05I enjoyed this a lot. Thank you so much for having me on. I had a great deal of fun. This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.dwarkeshpatel.com

Rural Health Leadership Radio™
326: A Conversation with Jennifer Barbour

Rural Health Leadership Radio™

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 40:32


Rural healthcare centers have traditionally been the source of advocacy and education for their communities. This makes them primary sources for population health management. Today we are talking with Jennifer Barbour, the Director of Relations and a Community Champion. Jennifer will discuss the complex community she serves and why understanding your communities' needs is essential.  “Listen to your community. Do what your community says. Learn from it and repeat” -Jennifer Barbour Jennifer Barbour is the Director of Relations at Sparta Community Hospital in Sparta, Illinois, where she has spent the last three years serving as the Community Champion for the Delta Region Community Health Systems Development Program. Jennifer has over 15 years of experience in healthcare and social services marketing, public relations, and outreach. In addition to working with the community to help identify and address community health needs, Jennifer leads employee engagement and medical student recruitment efforts at Sparta Community Hospital.

The Logos Podcast
The Battle of Thermopylae: Timeless Lessons Now and Then

The Logos Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2022 115:04


In this stream I dive into a historical overview of the famously important Battle of Thermopylae in an attempt to draw out many life lessons that are as true now as they were then. I think this battle is fertile ground as lens to look at the forces and powers we are up against today and how we as men can respond to it. Make sure to check it out and let me know what you think. God bless Intro MusicFollow Keynan Here! https://linktr.ee/keynanrwilsb-dibe's Bandcamp: https://b-dibe.bandcamp.com/b-dibe's Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/b-dibeSuperchat Here https://streamlabs.com/churchoftheeternallogosRokfin: https://rokfin.com/dpharryWebsite: http://www.davidpatrickharry.com GAB: https://gab.com/dpharrySupport COTEL with Crypto!Bitcoin: 3QNWpM2qLGfaZ2nUXNDRnwV21UUiaBKVsyEthereum: 0x0b87E0494117C0adbC45F9F2c099489079d6F7DaLitecoin: MKATh5kwTdiZnPE5Ehr88Yg4KW99Zf7k8d If you enjoy this production, feel compelled, or appreciate my other videos, please support me through my website memberships (www.davidpatrickharry.com) or donate directly by PayPal or crypto! Any contribution would be greatly appreciated. Thank you Logos Subscription Membership: http://davidpatrickharry.com/register/ Venmo: @cotel - https://account.venmo.com/u/cotel PayPal: https://www.paypal.me/eternallogos Donations: http://www.davidpatrickharry.com/donate/PayPal: https://www.paypal.me/eternallogos Website: http://www.davidpatrickharry.com Rokfin: https://rokfin.com/dpharryOdysee: https://odysee.com/@ChurchoftheEternalLogos:dGAB: https://gab.com/dpharryTelegram: https://t.me/eternallogosMinds: https://www.minds.com/DpharryBitchute: https://www.bitchute.com/channel/W10R...DLive: https://dlive.tv/The_Eternal_LogosInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/dpharry/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/eternal_logos

Casting Through Ancient Greece
62: Crisis in the Aegean

Casting Through Ancient Greece

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 39:07


After the battle of Tanagra, Athens was able to focus on pursuing its aims throughout Boeotia, the Gulf of Corinth and the Peloponnese. This saw Athens power and influence grow even more at the expense of Sparta and its allies. However, the disaster that would take place in Egypt for Athens would see them now needing to change their policies to better deal with the crisis that was brewing in the Aegean.One of the first measures taken was to put in place a truce with Sparta, so as to reduce the threat of attack within Greece itself. This would then allow Athens to focus its now reduced resources to defending its control in the Aegean, this being the source of their power. The defeat in Egypt had seen some of the Delian league members view Athens in a weakened state. While, there was the fear Persia would once again campaign into Aegean.Athens would first focus on tightening its grip on the league. They would campaign to force the revolting cities back in as tribute paying members. While then taking measures to ensure it would prove more difficult for future rebellions to take place. These would come in the form of coercion, building relations and economic dependency.The other crisis Athens faced in the Aegean was the renewed threat of Persian actions into the Aegean. To deal with this they would arrange an expedition led by Cimon to the Persian controlled island of Cyprus. Although, the island would remain under Persian control the actions that took place would see what appear to be some sort of peace being made between Athens and Persia. Athens had now dealt with the crisis but matters on the Greek mainland had not been resolved and the truce with Sparta was soon due to expire.Support the show

What's Up Sparta! A local podcast about the town and people of Sparta, NJ.
31. Winter4kids.org, a nonprofit led by Sparta resident Schone Malliet

What's Up Sparta! A local podcast about the town and people of Sparta, NJ.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 18:37


We sit with Sparta resident Schone Malliet. Schone is a former Marine pilot, technology industry leader, and as President and CEO, leads local nonprofit Winter4Kids.org.  

Rockin' the Suburbs
1490: Rocktober New Music 4: Sloan, Cowboy Junkies, Gord Downie, Courting and Sparta

Rockin' the Suburbs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 17:07


We wrap up Rocktober 2022 New Music with selections from Mark Neese, Gerald Chyzenski and Jason Goebel. They discuss releases from Sloan, Cowboy Junkies, Gord Downie, Courting and Sparta. Subscribe to Rockin' the Suburbs on Apple Podcasts/iTunes or   other podcast platforms, including audioBoom, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon, iHeart, Stitcher and TuneIn. Or listen at SuburbsPod.com. Please rate/review the show on Apple Podcasts and share it with your friends. Visit our website at SuburbsPod.com Email Jim & Patrick at rock@suburbspod.com Follow us on the Twitter, Facebook or Instagram @suburbspod If you're glad or sad or high, call the Suburban Party Line — 612-440-1984. Theme music: "Ascension," originally by Quartjar, covered by Frank Muffin. Visit quartjar.bandcamp.com and frankmuffin.bandcamp.com

Po It Up
Episode 48: Hidden Barn featuring Jackie Zykan and Nate Winegar

Po It Up

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 68:30


Welcome back to All Things Whiskey Podcast!  On this episode the Partners Jackie Zykan and Nate Winegar from Hidden Barn Whiskey join Devin and Mike to discuss their brand and taste some great whiskey.  The crew tastes Hidden Barn Batch #4, Batch #3, and their Madeira Cask Finished whiskies all while talking about how unique each expression can be.  We also have a candid conversation around re-defining what "craft" means in the industry, how Hidden Barn came to be, their partnership with Neeley Family Distillery, what's next, and of course we giveaway a bottle of Hidden Barn Single Barrel!  Tune in to hear all about Hidden Barn - the whiskey that's made to poured and made to be shared! Cheers and enjoy the show! Support the show

Global Wellness Summit
63. The Search for Sweat

Global Wellness Summit

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 59:12


Exercise is everywhere today. It seems that most people have a gym membership, go for a daily run, or do some bodyweight exercises around the house. There are VR apps, video games, and at-home on-demand video courses to help people sweat at home and stay active. That's the role exercise plays in the present — but what was it like in the past?Bill Hayes is the author of seven books, with his most recent title being Sweat: A History of Exercise, the result of a Guggenheim fellowship in nonfiction writing he won. Bill also writes for The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Buzzfeed, and The Guardian, and is a published professional street photographer.What led Bill to look into the history of exercise? It all began at the gym. Bill looked around at everyone else there and thought to himself: How did we all end up here? He was inspired to trace a line backward in time to the history of gyms, exercise, and where it all began. From there, he immediately went to the library to look for a book on the history of exercise. When he didn't find that book, he decided to write it himself.The history of exercise spans over two millennia – from the beginnings of exercise in ancient Greece and Rome up through the pandemic. The research took Bill on a globetrotting adventure – including his discovery of a Latin text believed to be the first in-depth book on exercise from the Renaissance called D'Arte Gymnastica. First published in 1569, it is "one of the earliest books to discuss the therapeutic value of gymnastics and sports generally for the cure of disease and disability, and an important study of gymnastics in the ancient world" Inspired by his findings, the book SWEAT is also interlaced with Bill's personal journey as he tries nearly every form of exercise he discovers.With a title like Sweat, it's relevant to note that most people get the role of sweat wrong. While many think that sweat works to detox the body by pushing out unwanted components, the primary role of sweat is thermal regulation. Without it, we would not be able to survive.One frustration that came up in Bill's research was the gatekeeping against women and girls where they were not allowed or encouraged to exercise—One notable exception being ancient Sparta, which trained its women in the art of warfare. It wasn't until the suffragette movement, coinciding with the popularity of the bicycle, that women were both allowed and encouraged to exercise. In fact, Susan B. Anthony once said “The bicycle has done more for the emancipation of women than anything else in the world. I stand and rejoice every time I see a woman ride by on a wheel—the picture of free, untrammeled womanhood.”The Global Wellness Institute predicted Toxic Masculinity as a recent global trend in wellness. However, information from Bill's studies shows signs that this is not a recent phenomenon. In the ancient Greek athletic games, there was a large amount of idealization of the male form. It was taken to such an extreme that sweat from athletes was gathered and considered a valuable commodity.And for the wellness-curious out there who believe they hate to exercise, Bill offers this tip to help you get started: Replace the word “exercise” with “movement.” Whether it's walking up and down the stairs of your apartment, walking around the park, or playing with your kids, it all counts. Exercise should be joyful. If you think you hate exercise, you just haven't found the right kind of exercise. And while exercise has long-term benefits for your body and overall health, it's important to exercise for how it makes you feel now.To learn more, visit Bill Hayes' site at

Commercial Roofing Radio
32. Graham Dessert | League of Leaders

Commercial Roofing Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 44:46


For this episode, we got Graham Dessert on the podcast! Graham is a former business owner in the roofing space with multiple locations throughout California. He's now taking the solar industry by storm. Additionally, he has founded League of Leaders, helping people find their hidden strengths and clarify their vision to start leading like a champion. On top of being a champ in business, he's a super-athlete too! He's accomplished the “Murph” for a year straight, completed the Grand Canyon R2R2R and crushed the Sparta 300! Overall, he's a huge inspiration and we definitely learned a lot from him. Tune in if you're in need of a little inspiration too!

Free Ira Brown! - The Gonzaga Hoops Podcast
Zags Sink Sparta, Look to Slaughter Some Cattle

Free Ira Brown! - The Gonzaga Hoops Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 76:32


Spokesman-Review Gonzaga beat writer, Theo Lawson, joins the show! We exhaust all of our maritime puns, wax poetic about tingling Timme senses and generally gush about the lads' second half comeback on the USS Abraham Lincoln. If only the Persians had Drew Timme, they may have conquered Greece after all. With the Spartans vanquished, we look ahead to a big road challenge agains the Texas cows. Will Drew remind them of his 37 points in last year's match-up? We discuss that, before going on one final voyage on our top three boats. Patreon.com/freeirabrown @freeirabrown on twitter.

The After Dinner Scholar
The Truth About Sparta with Dr. Stephen Hodkinson

The After Dinner Scholar

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 21:43


Ancient Sparta in the public imagination has long been an armed camp. It's a city organized like an army to train all boys to be soldiers and all women to be hard as nails. And Spartans, we're told, always fight to the death as they did at Thermopylae. Dr. Stephen Hodkinson begs to differ. Dr. Hodkinson is Emeritus Professor of Ancient History at the University of Nottingham. He is co-organiser of the International Sparta Seminar and founder of the University of Nottingham's Centre for Spartan and Peloponnesian Studies. And in 2010 he was awarded Honorary Citizenship of modern Sparta for his contributions to Spartan history. He is also in Lander visiting his son, Wyoming Catholic College professor Christopher Hodkinson and kindly tells us about Ancient Sparta. Articles by Stephen Hodkinson can be found here.  

Be Crazy Well
USSF Lt Col. Bree Fram ~ Advocacy For Change

Be Crazy Well

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 0:34


Discrimination builds barriers to opportunities for those with brilliant minds to flourish. Today Suzi is joined by USSF Lt Col. Bree Fram, Astronautical Engineer, Author, D&I Speaker, to talk about the importance of sharing the stories of the LGBTQ military community and working towards social change. Additionally, Bree is the president of SPARTA which supports, educates and advocates on behalf of those service members within the LGBTQ military community. In this episode, Bree talks about her role as active duty Lieutenant Colonel in the United States Space Force and the highest ranking transgender officer in the US military on active duty in the Department of Defense, along with her mission to help others with in LGBTQ military community and their resiliency to thrive and service their country."Our military is going to fight and win wars in the future with brain power and it does not matter what bodies those brains are in as long as they can accomplish the mission and meet the standards." ~ Bree Fram With Honor and Integrity Transgender Troops In Their Own WordsFollow Bree on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/bree-fram/Contact Suzi at suzigma@gmail.com if you want to be a guest on Be Crazy Well Podcast.Music credit to Kalvin Love for the podcast's theme song “Bee Your Best Self”vetsandplayers.orgwildhorserescue.orgFollow us on our socialsYouTube @cominghomewellbehindtheserviceInstagram @cominghomewell_btsFacebook at Coming Home WellLinkedIn at Coming Home WellTwitter @ComingHomeWell

The Popperian Podcast
The Popperian Podcast #22 – Elyse Hargreaves – ‘The Open Society and Its Enemies, and Happiness'

The Popperian Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 84:30


This episode of the Popperian Podcast features an interview that Jed Lea-Henry conducted with Elyse Hargreaves. They speak about chapter 10 of Karl Popper's The Open Society and Its Enemies, the nature and often well-meaning origins of totalitarianism, the fall of Athens to Sparta, the betrayal of Socrates and Athenian democracy by Plato and the oligarchical class, and the one factor that Popper had neglected until then in his analysis – happiness, specifically the tyrannical dangers of trying to make people happy. Elyse Hargreaves is an ardent student of Popper, passionate about advancing the cause of the open society; for freedom, rationality and humanitarianism. Upon finding Popper in her early 20's, she has since been determined to popularise his ideas in whatever medium she can. Since then, she has released a free audiobook version of Popper's Conjectures and Refutations on YouTube which you can find here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtUn6tOI13ZF4iEhzYM0Dvg and has recently released an audiobook version of Rafe Champion's Guide to the Open Society and Its Enemies which you can find on Audible here: https://www.audible.com/pd/A-Guide-to-the-Open-Society-and-Its-Enemies-Audiobook/B0BF2MZ4FJ?qid=  Support via Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/jedleahenry Support via PayPal – https://www.paypal.me/jrleahenry Shop – https://shop.spreadshirt.com.au/JLH-shop/ Support via Bitcoin - 31wQMYixAJ7Tisp773cSvpUuzr2rmRhjaW Website – The Popperian Podcast — Jed Lea-Henry Libsyn – The Popperian Podcast (libsyn.com) Youtube – The Popperian Podcast - YouTube Twitter – https://twitter.com/jedleahenry RSS - https://popperian-podcast.libsyn.com/rss *** Underlying artwork by Arturo Espinosa

FC Afkicken
BORD OP SCHOOT 22/23 | SPEELRONDE 14

FC Afkicken

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 74:16


Speelronde 14 wordt Neal Petersen vergezeld door Lars van Eijden. Chronologisch loopt het tweetal door het Eredivisie-weekend heen. Van de kraker in de subtop tussen Sparta en Twente, via de gifbekers van Ajax en FC Groningen en de winst van AZ in Eindhoven naar de comeback van Vitesse tegen Go Ahead! Natuurlijk wordt er weer afgesloten met de Grote Speler en Hete Kolen awards en komt de Sound of Seun weer voorbij!(00:00) Intro(05:11) Sparta - Twente(10:17) FC Volendam - Utrecht(17:19) FC Emmen - Ajax(26:09) PSV - AZ(31:01) NEC - RKC(39:03) Groningen - Fortuna(47:35) Heerenveen - Cambuur(53:10) Feyenoord- Excelsior(57:36) Go Ahead Eagles - Vitesse(1:02:35) The Sound of SeunZie het privacybeleid op https://art19.com/privacy en de privacyverklaring van Californië op https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

History of Everything
History of Everything: Spartan Women

History of Everything

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 60:29


Sparta, which existed from 800 B.C. until A.D. 200, was renowned in the ancient world as a stoic and martial city-state, and most of what we know about Sparta concerns its military history and male-dominated social structure. But what of the women? Bonus episodes as well as ad-free episodes on Patreon. Find us on Instagram. Join us on Discord. Submit your relatives on our website Join the Book Club on http://chirpbooks.com/history Get some delicious COFFEE Podcast Youtube Channel Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Superior Men Podcast
“Gates of Fire” – Bookcast #42

The Superior Men Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022


Gates of Fire: An Epic Novel of the Battle of Thermopylae (1998) by Steven Pressfield Read and listen to "Gates of Fire" on Amazon! We're very excited to announce our books “Sexual Magnetism,” “The WASM Dating Handbook” and “Secrets of Sensual Massage” are now available! Follow these links to get your copies of "Sexual Magnetism," "The WASM Dating Handbook" and "Secrets of Sensual Massage" on Amazon.com. Want more great books? Check out our MUST READ LIST! Overview of “Gates of Fire: An Epic Novel of the Battle of Thermopylae” A very brief description of “Gates of Fire” At Thermopylae, a rocky mountain pass in northern Greece, 300 Spartan soldiers engaged in a suicide mission - to save their country they must hold the pass against the invading millions of the mighty Persian army. Day after bloody day they withstood the terrible onslaught, buying time for the Greeks to rally their forces and eventually overcome the world's most powerful empire. This is the story of the Spartan's legendary feat - the greatest military stand in history.What Pressfield sets out to do / Purpose of the bookPressfield's goal in the book isn't just to tell the spectacular legend of the 300 Spartan warriors, but to to explain how their children - born into a cult of spiritual courage, physical endurance, and unmatched battle skill - were raised to become men and women capable of accomplishing the impossible.The intended audience of the book / Who will benefit mostPeople who love action and adventure storiesPeople who historical novelsPeople who love philosophy - and especially philosophy in actionPeople who want to learn how to die wellPeople who want to understand war - in all its glory and horrorPeople who are obsessed with super buff men in tiny outfits beating each other to a bloody pulpWho probably WON'T like this book?People who can't handle extreme, graphic violencePeople who think war is always stupid and unnecessaryPeople who like easy-reading books (and don't want to look up words - especially in other languages)People who hated reading The Iliad or The Odyssey in High SchoolHow does Gates of Fire specifically benefit Men? This book has MANY things to teach men. It's required reading at West Point, the United States Naval Academy, and at the Marine Corps Basic School. It's about honor, skill, courage in the face of insurmountable odds, sacrifice, brotherhood, death, romance, love and so much more.Is this book Easy, Average or Difficult to read? / How long is it? The book is brilliant and very enjoyable but is also very dense with warfare terminology and historical and archaic terminology (plus dozens of Greek words). It's not easy reading but it's worth the work.531 pages, (Audiobook is 14 hours and 55 minutes)What are the overall book reviews? Is the book well-known? Popular? Significant?Kindle: 5,070 ratings, 4.7 stars#130 in Education & Reference #135 in Military Historical Fiction#248 in U.S. Historical FictionAudible: 5,764 ratings, 4.8 stars#17 in Military Thrillers#42 in Military Historical Fiction#63 in War & Military FictionBook-To-Movie Translation No movie has been made based directly on this book (although George Clooney does own the movie rights) but it could easily be argued that the movie ‘300' starring Gerard Butler is exactly that. Gates of Fire was published in 1998 and Frank Miller's graphic novel ‘300' (which is for all intents and purposes identical to the movie) came out in 1999. Coincidence? Not likely. Bio of Steven Pressfield Steven Pressfield (born September 1, 1943 - he's 79) is an American author of historical fiction, non-fiction, and screenplays.Pressfield was born in Port of Spain, Trinidad, in 1943, while his father was stationed there, in the Navy.Pressfield graduated from Duke University in 1965. In 1966, he joined the Marine Corps.Pressfield was an advertising copywriter, schoolteacher, tractor-trailer driver, bartender, oilfield roustabout, attendant in a mental hospital, fruit-picker in Washington state, and screenwriter. His struggles to make a living as an author, including the period when he was homeless and living out of the back of his car, are detailed in his 2002 book The War of Art.Pressfield's first book, The Legend of Bagger Vance, which was loosely based on the Bhagavad Gita, was published in 1995, and was made into a 2000 film of the same name directed by Robert Redford and starring Will Smith, Charlize Theron, and Matt Damon.His second novel, Gates of Fire (1998), is about the Spartans and the battle at Thermopylae. It is taught in the U.S. Military Academy, the United States Naval Academy, and the Marine Corps Basic School at Quantico.Pressfield has written ten novels, mostly military thrillers set in various time periods ranging from ancient Greece all the way to sci-fi future. He has also written nine non-fiction novels, including the best-selling book “The War of Art” that teaches artists how to become successful.Prior to publishing his first original works of fiction, Pressfield wrote several Hollywood screenplays including 1986's King Kong Lives, 1988's Above the Law starring Steven Seagal, 1992's Freejack, a fun B-movie sci-fi starring Emilio Estevez, Mick Jagger, and Anthony Hopkins, and 1993's Army of One starring Dolph Lundgren Breakdown of Themes Cities, Identity, and BelongingIn the ancient Greek context of Gates of Fire, a city was not just a geographic home, but the environment in which people forged relationships, learned their culture, and formed their sense of identity. To lose a city was really to lose one's self. This is what befalls the main character, XeoFaith and Divine InterventionWhile it's hardly surprising that gods and divine activity are a significant theme in Gates of Fire, Pressfield's treatment of the human/divine relationship is far from simplistic. The gods are interested in human lives—even seemingly insignificant human lives—yet their intentions for those lives are not always clear from a human perspective. Through a range of personal and collective encounters between Greeks and their gods, Pressfield suggests that religious faith is a complex matter.Warfare and BrotherhoodAfter Xeo's hometown is destroyed by the Argives, he longs to join the Spartans because they are the only warriors who can defeat the Argives. “The Spartans became for [him] the equivalent of avenging gods. [He] couldn't learn enough about these warriors who had so devastatingly defeated the murderers” of his family. In Xeo's journeys with the Spartans, he encounters different views of what being a warrior and engaging in battle entail.Fear, Courage, and LoveThroughout Gates of Fire, fear is pervasive, from the destruction of Xeo's city to the hovering threat of the Persian invasion to the horrors of Thermopylae. Dienekes, seasoned mentor to the young Alexandros and the master whom Xeo serves as squire, is preoccupied with the study of fear and how it may be overcome. Through Dienekes' exploration of the question of fear at pivotal moments in the story, Pressfield argues that fear can overcome everything except for love. Kingship, Loyalty, and FreedomThough Pressfield is not heavy-handed in his portrayal of Greece as the traditional birthplace of democracy, he does portray King Leonidas and the Spartans as fledgling freedom-fighters, in contrast to the enslaving Xerxes and the masses of soldiers Xerxes compels to dominate Asia and Europe on his behalf. More than a political or historical point, Pressfield uses the contrast between Leonidas and Xerxes to make a point about the nature of leadership itself.Female Strength and InfluenceThough Gates of Fire is very much dominated by male characters, women play a surprisingly prominent role throughout. Speaking of what prompted the monumental battle at Thermopylae, Xeo readily acknowledges that “In the end it was their women who galvanized the Spartans into action.” Though female characters are largely viewed through the eyes of male characters in the novel, Pressfield argues that women were the major inspiration for Spartan actions and character in war and at home.

Sisters-in-Service
Lt Col Bree Fram - Dispelling the Myths of Transgender in the Military

Sisters-in-Service

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 37:16


Bree Fram (she/her) is an active duty lieutenant colonel and astronautical engineer in the United States Space Force. She is also the President of SPARTA, a non-profit that advocates and educates about transgender military service and is dedicated to the support and professional development of over 1700 transgender service members. Bree came out publicly as transgender on the day the transgender ban in the military was dropped in 2016 and transitioned while in a command position. She served through the re- imposition of a transgender military ban from 2019-2021. She is currently one of the highest ranking out transgender officers in the United States military. Bree has appeared on ABC and NBC Nightly news, PBS News Hour, and NPRSPARTA - spartapride.orgWith Honor and Integrity - Book is available on AmazonSupport the show

AD Voetbal podcast
S5E84: ‘Ajax is onder Schreuder niet beter geworden'

AD Voetbal podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 45:55


Ruime aandacht voor Ajax-PSV in de AD Voetbalpodcast. Etienne Verhoeff neemt met Sjoerd Mossou en Maarten Wijffels de conclusies door. Over Luuk de Jong, vechtpartijen, het systeem van Ajax, de trainer, maar ook RKC, Sparta, Eagles, Wormuth en meer. PSV won in Amsterdam met 1-2. Weer verloor Ajax een topduel. 'De eerste goal van PSV vertelde alles over Ajax', analyseert Wijffels. 'Dat PSV meer dan een minuut kan rondspelen voordat er gescoord wordt. Niemand van Ajax pakte dat aan. Daar sprak angst uit en dat begon al met de opstelling. Schreuder had zijn team aangepast op PSV. Ze hadden daar Madueke bedacht in plaats van Simons. Blind werd het slachtoffer daarvan.' En dus waren er fluitconcerten en waren er spreekkoren richting Schreuder. 'Ik denk dat het voor eerst in lange tijd was dat een trainer onderwerp van een spreekkoor was bij Ajax', reageert Mossou. ‘Ajax begon goed aan het seizoen en je verwacht een ontwikkeling. Maar die blijft achter op alle fronten. Schreuder is een ander type coach dan Ten Hag en misschien wel ander kaliber coach. Al is dat nog te vroeg om te zetten.'PSV heeft met Luuk de Jong een belangrijke pion weer terug. 'Hij is aanvallend heel erg belangrijk, maar na een goal staat hij binnen een minuut in zijn eigen zestien om een bal weer weg te koppen.'Beluister de nu de hele podcast via AD.nl, de AD App of jouw favoriete podcastplatform.Support the show: https://krant.nlSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

FC Afkicken
BORD OP SCHOOT 22/23 | SPEELRONDE 13

FC Afkicken

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 63:32


Speelronde 13 wordt Jamil Mensah vergezeld door Wouter Boerkamp. Chronologisch loopt het tweetal door het Eredivisie-weekend heen. Van de degradatiekraker tussen Cambuur en N.E.C, via een overtuigend Sparta en de Derby van het Oosten naar verhitte topper! Natuurlijk wordt er weer afgesloten met de Grote Speler en Hete Kolen awards en komt de Sound of Seun weer voorbij!(00:00) Intro(02:17) Ajax - PSV(16:53) Cambuur - NEC(22:47) Vitesse - Sparta(27:27) Fortuna - Emmen(31:22) Excelsior - Heerenveen(35:12) Utrecht - Groningen(41:34) Volendam - Feyenoord(45:59) Twente - Go Ahead Eagles(49:04) RKC - AZ(57:35) The Sound of SeunZie het privacybeleid op https://art19.com/privacy en de privacyverklaring van Californië op https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Power Chord Hour Podcast
Ep 122 - October 2022 Rundown - Power Chord Hour Podcast

The Power Chord Hour Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 70:02


Talking new music and music news of October 2022 plus -- What shows I'm excited to go to before the end of the year- Playing an ungodly amount of Misfits on the radio show for Halloween- Interviews I'm looking forward to- Already thinking of most anticipated albums of 2023- What bands I listened to most on my recent Alaska trip & more!Check out the Power Chord Hour radio show every Friday night at 8 to midnight est on 107.9 WRFA in Jamestown, NY. Stream the station online at wrfalp.com/streaming/ or listen on the WRFA app.Donate to help show costs -https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/pchanthonyhttps://cash.app/$anthmerchpowerchordhour@gmail.comInstagram - www.instagram.com/powerchordhourTwitter - www.twitter.com/powerchordhourFacebook - www.facebook.com/powerchordhourYoutube - www.youtube.com/channel/UC6jTfzjB3-mzmWM-51c8LggSpotify Episode Playlists - https://open.spotify.com/user/kzavhk5ghelpnthfby9o41gnr?si=4WvOdgAmSsKoswf_HTh_Mg

It's a Continent
The Agojie: Dahomey's Warrior Women

It's a Continent

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 24:20


*This episode may contain The Woman King spoilers* The Agojie were fearless and skilled warrior women in the Dahomey Kingdom. By the mid 1800s, the all-female regiment was in its thousands, outmuscling rival kingdoms and participating in annual warfare. They lived in the royal palace and were taught how to fight and survive from an early age. However, the Agojie's existence is thought to have upset the invading French's understanding of gender roles, and their invasion led to the disbanding of the Agojie. Why has their history been neglected until recently? Let's dig in. Follow us on IG: itsacontinentpod and Twitter: itsacontinent. It's a Continent (published by Coronet) is available to purchase: itsacontinent.com/book We're on Buy me a Coffee too: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/itsacontinent Visit our website: itsacontinent.com Artwork by Margo Designs: https://margosdesigns.myportfolio.com Music provided by Free Vibes: https://goo.gl/NkGhTg Warm Nights by Lakey Inspired: https://soundcloud.com/lakeyinspired/... Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported— CC BY 3.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... Sources for further reading: They were the world's only all-female army. Their descendants are fighting to recapture their humanity. Law, Robin. “The ‘Amazons' of Dahomey.” Paideuma, vol. 39, 1993, pp. 245–60. JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org/stable/40341664. Accessed 30 Oct. 2022. Amazons of black Sparta : the women warriors of Dahomey, Stanley B Alpern The Dahomey Amazon Women, a story The legend of Benin's fearless female warriors The Real Warriors Behind ‘The Woman King'

Life Of Caesar
Nero #45 – Grand Slam

Life Of Caesar

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 54:50


Nero didn't visit Athens or Sparta while in Greece because he was scared of religious and political retribution. Besides, he was too busy trying to become the periodonikes, the Grand Slam champion of all of the Games. But things weren't going well back at Rome, so he is finally convinced to return. He had six months left to live. The post Nero #45 – Grand Slam appeared first on Life Of The Caesars.

FC Afkicken
BORD OP SCHOOT 22/23 | SPEELRONDE 12

FC Afkicken

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 51:08


Speelronde 12 wordt Neal Petersen vergezeld door oude rot Wouter Boerkamp. Chronologisch loopt het tweetal door het Eredivisie-weekend heen. Van een opnieuw winnend Sparta, naar een teleurstellend FC Volendam en de 0-0 in het Hoge Noorden! Natuurlijk wordt er weer afgesloten met de Grote Speler en Hete Kolen awards en komt de Sound of Seun weer voorbij!(00:00) Intro(02:01) Heerenveen - Utrecht(06:47) Sparta - Fortuna(15:47) Go Ahead Eagles - Excelsior(20:44) Emmen - Groningen(25:51) Twente - RKC(29:10) PSV - NEC(34:24) AZ - Volendam(42:32) The Sound of SeunZie het privacybeleid op https://art19.com/privacy en de privacyverklaring van Californië op https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Casting Through Ancient Greece
61: After Tanagra

Casting Through Ancient Greece

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 38:02


Sparta had defeated Athens at the battle of Tanagra in 457 BC, though both armies had taken heavy losses. Both would look to make a temporary truce so that they could regroup without the fear of being attacked while in a vulnerable position. This would see the forces of both Athens and Sparta return to their cities bringing a close to this campaign. However, this would not be the end of hostilities and campaigning for the first Peloponnesian war.Just 62 days after Tanagra, Athens would launch a fresh attack into Boeotian lands where Sparta had been active, with a possible agreement with Thebes. Sparta would remain within their home territory which would see Athens facing Theban and other Boeotian troops during this new campaign. Athens would win a major victory while also taking many cities, which would see them gain much control and influence within Boeotia.This would not be the only campaign launched. A naval campaign would also be arranged which would seem to further Athenian trade connections. There was also an element of gaining some revenge for Tanagra, where Athens would ravage a Spartan port. However, it would appear the main objective would be to establish and secure Athenian trade connections to the west through the Corinthian gulf, dominated by many Peloponnesian league members.These campaigns that would unfold and continue through the next couple of years would see Athen's influence within the Greek mainland increases to new heights. Though, news of the disastrous Egyptian campaign would arrive, seeing Athens having to direct its attention to defending its interests within the Delian league as well as counter the threat of possible hostile Persian moves within the Aegean.Support the show

The Midwest Scrubcast
Episode 70: Twas the Night Before Sparta (with Johnn)

The Midwest Scrubcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 71:37


The Scrubs welcome back special crew member Johnn (with 2 N's) to regale our listeners with the tales of our recent Fitwest-themed adventures. Also, Matt hates droids, and Clint's burning curiosity about Johnn is finally satisfied. Join our Discord! https://discord.gg/92WJYpz

Spoilers!
300 (2006) - Patreon Review! #430

Spoilers!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 180:00


Can 6 spoilerboys defeat the Persian hoards? -------- (Thanks so much Lindsey L. for this request!) Stay after the movie for special trivia that's unlike any other! ********** In 480 B.C. a state of war exists between Persia, led by King Xerxes (Rodrigo Santoro), and Greece. At the Battle of Thermopylae, Leonidas (Gerard Butler), king of the Greek city state of Sparta, leads his badly outnumbered warriors against the massive Persian army. Though certain death awaits the Spartans, their sacrifice inspires all of Greece to unite against their common enemy. Release date: March 9, 2007 (USA) Director: Zack Snyder Box office: 456.1 million USD Adapted from: 300 Nominations: MTV Movie & TV Award for Best Villain, MORE Sequel: 300: Rise of an Empire

Lady Empire
Chinwe Esimai - Harvard Lawyer Breaks the Corporate Glass Ceiling

Lady Empire

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 35:04


Chinwe Esimai is a multiple award-winning lawyer, trailblazing corporate executive, author, and speaker who helps women leaders discover and embrace their genius and live lives of impact and fulfillment. She is the author of Brilliance Beyond Borders: Remarkable Women Leaders Share the Power of Immigrace (Harper Horizon) and host of the Brilliance Beyond Borders podcast.She is managing director and Chief Compliance Officer for Legacy Franchises at Citigroup, Inc. Prior to that, she was Chief Anti-Bribery Officer at Citigroup. She's the first person to hold these titles in the bank's history. She is also an executive council member of the Ellevate Network, serves as a Cherie Blair Foundation mentor, and is a member of Apollo Theater's EmpowHer, a group of dynamic women supporting teens through a variety of initiatives. She obtained a Bachelor of Arts in political science, summa cum laude, from The City College of New York and a Juris Doctor from Harvard Law School. She lives in Sparta, New Jersey, with her husband and three children.First person to hold the title of Chief Anti-Bribery Officer at Citigroup.The Nigerian Lawyers Association named her Trailblazer of the Year.Chair of the Board of Harambee USA (2014-2020), a non-profit foundation dedicated to supporting education and sustainable development in Sub-Saharan Africa.Chinwe regularly speaks at conferences, including three times at the United Nations. She is passionate about and discusses:The Art of Navigating the Corporate Terrain: how to chart an innovative career.Leadership Lessons from Remarkable Immigrant Women Leaders: what all women leaders can learn from them.Talent as Leverage: how organizations can create and leverage high-performing talent, including diverse talent, to create winning cultures, market differentiation, and more effectively advance their missions. Global Anti-Corruption TrendsAfrican Economic Development  UN 2030 Sustainable Development Goals Africa Agenda 2063Leveraging Fintech to Promote Public Sector IntegrityWebsite: www.chinweesimai.comFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/chinweesimaiofficial/Twitter: @ChinweEsimaiInstagram: @chinweesimaiLinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/chinwe-esimaiPodcast: www.chinweesimai.com/podcast

Young Heretics
Ep. 128: A Government of Laws

Young Heretics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 72:24


In this final episode of his series on Athenian democracy and citizenship, Spencer Klavan tells a few rip-roaring myths and true stories from the history of Athen—from the birth of King Erichthonius out of the ground to the fraught relationship between Cleisthenes of Athens and King Cleomenes of Sparta. Then as now, the question was: what does it mean to be equal before the law? -- Rocket Money is the new app that helps you identify and stop paying for subscriptions you don't need, want, or simply forgot about. Save thousands of dollars a year: https://rocketmoney.com/heretics. -- Indeed is the hiring partner where you can attract, interview, and hire all in one place. Get a $75 sponsored job credit to upgrade your job post at https://Indeed.com/HERETICS. -- Stop throwing your tea into the harbor, and start celebrating America's tea heritage with Gold River Trading Co.'s specialty blends. Get 10% off your order with promo code HERETICS: https://goldriverco.com. -- You'll have more energy and feel healthier when you take Field of Greens. Get 15% off your first order and another 10% off when you subscribe for recurring orders. Use promo code HERETICS at https://fieldofgreens.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Run Into The Ground
043. Circling Back - Bury Within The Sound

Run Into The Ground

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 62:41


This week Dan and Andrew Circle Back to Engine Down's release To Bury Within the Sound. They discuss: it's fall now dawg, the Mason Dixon line, spotted lantern flies, the full spectrum of cover bands, Dan is embarrassed that Andrew likes Ghost, Spiritualized scene report, the sad emo bloodline, being whiny but not in a good way, Andrew hears Sparta for the first time, and the struggles of Electric Guest. // Follow us at @danbassini, @mysprocalledlife, and @runintotheground. Listen to our RITG Mixtape Vol. 9 here and our Best of RITG playlist here.

Ad Navseam
The Palladium (Gvrgle 5)

Ad Navseam

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 16:44


This week's fun-size offering tackles the mysterious, quasi-historical object known as the Palladium. Readers of myth might remember this as the talisman held in the Trojan citadel which protected the city until it was stolen away by Odysseus and Diomedes. But the story doesn't end there. Rumor says it went to Athens or Sparta, and then maybe Rome. Is the Palladium something that makes the jump from mythic symbol to historical artifact? Was it something like the ξόανον the Athenians kept in the Erechtheion? Did Elagabalus move the Palladium into his Rumpus Room? Did Constantine bury it under his column? Could it still be there?

Practical for Your Practice
Practical for Your (and Your Client's) Pronouns: What to do when you or a colleague misgenders a client

Practical for Your Practice

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 37:10


Why are pronouns important when working with your clients? Well, as this week's guest, Dr. Jacob Eleazer, explains, misgendering clients is a form of medical harm, especially for members of the Trans* community. As we all move toward greater awareness and competency when it comes to working with Trans* clients, mistakes will be made. In this episode, Dr. Eleazar provides some practical advice for responding compassionately and directly to examples of misgendering. Also, in a P4P first, Dr. Eleazar and the crew demonstrate a few key techniques through candid role plays!Dr. Jacob Eleazer (he/him) served in the Kentucky Army National Guard for 12 years and was among the first actively serving transgender soldiers to come out publicly in 2014. He completed his doctorate in counseling psychology at the University of Louisville and a postdoctoral clinical fellowship in LGBTQ+ Health and Psychosocial Rehabilitation at the Connecticut VA Healthcare System (VACHS). He is currently an Advanced Fellow in Health Services Research and Development at VACHS and the Yale School of Medicine and serves as the LGBTQ+ Veteran Care Coordinator for VACHS. Jacob's research investigates the experiences of actively serving transgender military personnel, health disparities for LGBTQ+ Veterans, and patient-centered interventions to improve access to care for transgender Veterans. Jacob also advocates for an inclusive military policy as the Director of Advocacy for SPARTA, A Transgender Military Advocacy Organization. Resources mentioned in this episode: Ruben MA, Kauth MR, Meterko M, Norton AM, Matza AR, Shipherd JC. Veterans' Reported Comfort in Disclosing Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity. Med Care. 2021 Jun 1;59(6):550-556. doi: 10.1097/MLR.0000000000001543. PMID: 33797509. [8:34]practicewithpronouns.com [32.23]CDP Presents: Psychological Practice with Transgender and Gender Nonconforming Service Members and Veterans [36:00] Calls-to-action: Subscribe to the Practical for Your Practice PodcastSubscribe to The Center for Deployment Psychology Monthly Email

Casting Through Ancient Greece
60: Disaster on the Nile

Casting Through Ancient Greece

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 38:12


Athens was engaging in developing new alliances on the Greek mainland in response to the hostility with Sparta. This would also see a number of campaigns launched by the Athenians to establish their security, these being fought by Sparta's allies. However, as these events on the mainland were unfolding, a plea for help from a rebel king in Egypt would arrive requesting Athenian assistance in fighting the Persians.In 465 BC Xerxes would be assassinated bringing his 21-year rule to an end. This would see his son Artaxerxes come to the throne, though, under suspicious circumstances. The coming to the throne of a new king was usually a period that would see regions attempt to breakaway from the empire. Artaxerxes accession would be no exception, seeing Egypt breakout in revolt, led by a Libyan king named Inaros. It would be he who would request the Athenians come and assist them in their bid for freedom.Athens would sail for Egypt and link up with the rebels in the Nile delta, while a Persian army was dispatched to put the revolt down. An initial battle would see the rebel forces rout the Persians, who would seek refuge at Memphis. A siege would now develop as the Athenians and Egyptians attempted to destroy the rest of the Persian forces. This would not be the end of the campaign, with Persia assembling a new army after Persian gold would not entice the Spartans in attacking the Athenians homeland.The appearance of this new Persian force in Egypt would now start to see Athens and the rebels fortune change. The siege of Memphis would be broken, the Persians defeating the besieges, this seeing Athens fallback into the Nile delta where they themselves would now be besieged. The majority of the Egyptian rebels would surrender to the Persians, while the Athenian force would be all but destroyed. This seeing the largest disaster suffered by Athens in generations. Support the show

The Drop with Danno on GFN 광주영어방송
2022.10.13 Sampled & AMPED with Dan Lloyd

The Drop with Danno on GFN 광주영어방송

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 119:32


As broadcast October 13, 2022 with plenty of Sam still kickin!  We open tonight wishing a belated birthday to Sam Moore, who was one half of the famed Sam & Dave duo.  Now a total legend and Rock Hall inductee, it's great to see one of the old timers still around and doing well.  After that, our funk & soul first hour has a bevvy of new joints out from big artists like Adrian Quesada, Nick Hakim, Allen Stone, and plenty more beyond just those.  Big new announcements and tunes follow that for our rock weekly that we call AMPED, as Dan Lloyd talks about what's up with Blink 182, Willow Smith, Sparta, and many more while finishing with our KROCKPOT spotlight on Say Sue Me's covers album just out called 10.#feelthegravityTracklist (st:rt)Part I (00:00)Sam & Dave – Hold On, I'm Coming (King Most remix)Carmy Love – Together AgainSurprise Chef – Bakery Pledge of AllegianceNick Hakim – M1L'Imperatrice feat Rejjie Snow – Everything Eventually EndsKraak & Smaak feat Durand Jones – All for Love Part II (30:03)Kendra Morris – This Life (Live)Yellow Days – Why?Allen Stone – 5 MinutesSay She She – Fortune Teller Adrian Quesada – Noble MetalsRyuichi Sakamoto – Thousand Knives (Thundercat remix)Garrett Saracho feat Adrian Younge & Ali Shaheed Muhammad – Sabor del Ritmo Part III (59:09)Blink 182 – AnthemBoston Manor – PassengerWillow – curious/furiousEnumclaw – 10th and J 2Sparta – Until the Kingdom Comes Part IV (89:57)The Real McKenzies – Scotland the BraveAnti-Flag – Modern Meta Medicine (Ft Jesse Leach)MSPAINT – AcidGinger Wildheart and the Sinners – Footprints in the SandWeeping Icon – Pigs, S*** and TrashSay Sue Me – Season of the Shark (Yo La Tengo cover)