Podcasts about apples

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Edible fruit of domesticated deciduous tree

  • 3,131PODCASTS
  • 5,018EPISODES
  • 47mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • May 20, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about apples

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Latest podcast episodes about apples

Radio Giga
Starkes Apple-Bundle: AirPods Pro mit Tarif zum Spitzenpreis

Radio Giga

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022


Wer einen neuen Handyvertrag benötigt und statt eines neuen iPhones lieber die AirPods Pro als Zugabe bevorzugt, hat aktuell gute Karten. Gleich drei Mobilfunkhändler haben derzeit günstige Tarif-Angebote mit Apples beliebten TWS-Earbuds auf Lager. Wir haben uns die Deals näher angeschaut.

Three Song Stories
Episode 219 - Pat Mitchell

Three Song Stories

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 84:30


Pat Mitchell is a filmmaker and has made 4 films, including his latest, a feature called “Apples, Oranges, Lemons & Limes” which will be screened Saturday, May 21st, 2022 at the Fort Myers Film Festival in downtown Fort Myers. Other than films, Pat also produces music, mostly these days for his brother Freddie Forward who is a Southwest Florida-based hip hop artist. Pat was born in the Bronx and raised in Yonkers, New York. He's lived in Florida for about 15 years now. Pat says his current mindset is to grow and challenge himself more than ever, and that while he loves finishing a film his goal is always to make treasured memories along the way with his casts and crews.

Tastemasters
Ep. 126: Single Varietal Cider Apples

Tastemasters

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 102:26


On this Episode, we sit down with our favorite Cider Broker in Utah, Matthew Ostrander of Ibantik Craft Beverages. Matthew has been educating Utah with Cider one apple at a time. Today, he teaches us the what “Single Varietal Cider” means and how one apple can be manipulated to produce an amazing end product. Tune … Continue reading "Ep. 126: Single Varietal Cider Apples" The post Ep. 126: Single Varietal Cider Apples appeared first on Tastemasters.

Middle Country Public Library Podcast
Episode 223 - Summer Concerts at Jones Beach + Celebrity Authors

Middle Country Public Library Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 23:29


Sara has a list of the concerts and events coming up this summer at Jones Beach! Check out our extensive Music CD collection to get you ready to see your favorite artists live. Interested in attending a concert at Jones Beach? Check out the link here for details: https://www.livenation.com/venue/KovZpZAE6eAA/northwell-health-at-jones-beach-theater-events Nicole was surprised at just how many "celebrity authors" have written children's books. Here's a sample of some books mentioned on today's episode: Mr. Peabody's Apples / by Madonna ; art by Loren Long http://mcpac.mcpl.lib.ny.us/record=b1395875 The one and only Sparkella / Channing Tatum ; illustrated by Kim Barnes http://mcpac.mcpl.lib.ny.us/record=b2056571 Perfectly prima / Whoopi Goldberg, with Deborah Underwood ; illustrated by Maryn Roos http://mcpac.mcpl.lib.ny.us/record=b1535170 The very fairy princess / by Julie Andrews & Emma Walton Hamilton ; illustrated by Christine Davenier http://mcpac.mcpl.lib.ny.us/record=b1540073 Out of the ballpark / by Alex Rodriguez ; illustrated by Frank Morrison http://mcpac.mcpl.lib.ny.us/record=b1450121 This is me : a story of who we are & where we came from / by Jamie Lee Curtis ; illustrated by Laura Cornell http://mcpac.mcpl.lib.ny.us/record=b1772153 Snowball fight! / by Jimmy Fallon ; illustrated by Adam Stower http://mcpac.mcpl.lib.ny.us/record=b1438182 If roast beef could fly [sound recording] / Jay Leno ; illustrated by S.B. Whitehead http://mcpac.mcpl.lib.ny.us/record=b2069371 Please, baby, please / by Spike Lee and Tonya Lewis Lee ; illustrated by Kadir Nelson http://mcpac.mcpl.lib.ny.us/record=b1384530 The case of the time-capsule bandit / Octavia Spencer http://mcpac.mcpl.lib.ny.us/record=b1611708 The book with no pictures / B.J. Novak http://mcpac.mcpl.lib.ny.us/record=b1633352 She persisted : 13 American women who changed the world / written by Chelsea Clinton ; illustrated by Alexandra Boiger http://mcpac.mcpl.lib.ny.us/record=b1813012 River Rose and the magical lullaby / Kelly Clarkson ; illustrated by Laura Hughes http://lilink.org/record=b14173144~S0

RNZ: The Detail
The complexities of pulling products from Russia

RNZ: The Detail

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 16:34


It's not illegal to send food products to Russia under New Zealand's sanctions regime, but many exporters are boycotting the market in response to the invasion of Ukraine. The Detail talks to one apple grower about what that means for business.

Big Table
Episode 34: Adam Clair on the Elephant 6 Collective

Big Table

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 36:31


Adam Clair was barely out of undergrad when he began the manuscript for Endless Endless: A Lo-Fi History of the Elephant 6 Mystery (Hachette Books, 2022).The book is a definitive history of the 1990s underground musical movement known as the Elephant 6 Collective. Founded by Robert Schneider, Bill Doss, Will Cullen Hart, and Jeff Mangum, who grew up as friends in the small town of Ruston, Louisiana, the Elephant 6 was initially centered around three bands—the Apples in Stereo, Neutral Milk Hotel, and Olivia Tremor Control—whose records were expertly produced in home studios in Denver and Athens, Georgia, by Robert Schneider, who wouldn't mind being referred to as the Brian Wilson-like engineer extraordinaire of the collective. (Schneider is currently a professor of math in Georgia, having earned a PhD in his post-rocker years.)By the late-1990s, the Elephant 6 had exploded onto the musical scene in a way that hasn't really been felt since—their '60s psychedelia-inspired, almost utopian mindset of a better world with their music as the soundtrack was as intoxicating then as it is now.Rock ‘n' Roll stardom was something that seemed to frighten and elude the collective's founders, however, who were more focused on the art of the music than on the business side.By the turn of the century, relentless touring and recording schedules led Neutral Milk Hotel's front man Jeff Mangum to retreat from performing—and even from doing interviews. The Olivia's disbanded for a time, the Apples changed line ups, and the second-generation bands, like Of Montreal and Beulah, began to build their own audiences. In 2013, the original members of Neutral Milk Hotel reunited for a year or two of touring. Then Bill Doss from Olivia Tremor Control passed away suddenly, thwarting their comeback.All the while, Adam Clair was gathering reportage. He conducted over 100 interviews over 13 years to complete Endless Endless. Although the reclusive Jeff Mangum did not speak to him for the book, Clair was able to carve in Mangum's voice from past interviews (more than I remember taking place, having been around to see it unfold in real time the first time around). Clair and I spoke recently about Endless Endless and how it came to be. Tune in for all the details.For the Reading this episode, Adam Clair reads from his introduction to Endless Endless.Music by The Olivia Tremor Control

Zone D
How Bout Them Apples (and the Dallas Equivalent...Them Oil Wells?)

Zone D

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 11:47


Joe is off saving nature, but Dave gives a quick recap of the week and looks ahead to some exciting conference finals matchups! 

The Jeremiah Show
SN9 | Ep463 - Mr Restaurant, Will Knox Interviews Best-Selling Author - Ruth Reichl

The Jeremiah Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 71:14


"Mr. Restaurant," Will Knox Interviews Legendary, Best-Selling Author Ruth Reichl! Ruth Reichl is the author of My Kitchen Year: 136 Recipes That Saved My Life, a cookbook published in September 2015. She was Editor in Chief of Gourmet Magazine from 1999 to 2009. Before that she was the restaurant critic of both The New York Times (1993-1999) and the Los Angeles Times (1984-1993), where she was also named food editor. As co-owner of The Swallow Restaurant from 1974 to 1977, she played a part in the culinary revolution that took place in Berkeley, California. In the years that followed, she served as restaurant critic for New West and California magazines. Ms. Reichl began writing about food in 1972, when she published Mmmmm: A Feastiary. Since then, she has authored the critically acclaimed, best-selling memoirs Tender at the Bone, Comfort Me with Apples, Garlic and Sapphires, and For You Mom, Finally, which have been translated into 18 languages. In 2014 she published her first novel: Delicious! Ms. Reichl hosted Eating Out Loud, three specials on Food Network, covering New York (2002), San Francisco (2003), and Miami (2003). She is the executive producer of Gourmet's Diary of a Foodie, public television's 30-episode series, which debuted in October 2006 and Executive Producer and host of Gourmet's Adventures with Ruth, a 10-episode public television (2009.) She was also a judge on Top Chef Masters. Ms. Reichl has been honored with 6 James Beard Awards (one for magazine feature writing and one for multimedia food journalism in 2009; two for restaurant criticism, in 1996 and 1998; one for journalism, in 1994; and Who's Who of Food and Beverage in America, 1984. In 2007, she was named Adweek's Editor of the Year. She received the Missouri Honor Medal for Distinguished Service in Journalism, presented by the Missouri School of Journalism, in October 2007. Ms. Reichl received the 2008 Matrix Award for Magazines from New York Women in Communications, Inc., in April 2008. She holds a B.A. and an M.A. in the History of Art from the University of Michigan and lives in Upstate New York with her husband, Michael Singer, a television news producer. http://ruthreichl.com/home/

Del Dine Dimser - Talkshow
Talkshow 58 – Apples Peek Performance event

Del Dine Dimser - Talkshow

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 90:42


Den 8 marts på kvindernes internationale kampdag, var der Apple Keynote, og denne gang var titlen Peek Performance. Og som vi plejer, dækkede vi det live med et talkshow, delt op i et pre show hvor vi klogede os på hvad vi ville få at se, og et after party, hvor vi samlede op på det vi faktisk fik at se. Før keynoten havde der været rygter ude om at vi ville se en ny iPhone SE, og at vi nok fik præsenteret en ny Mac computer med navnet Mac Studio, med en ny tilhørende skærm der ville være knap så dyr som den dyre skærm til Mac Pro computeren. Men der var også rygter om at Apple havde leget med titlen til eventet, og at Peek i virkeligheden var fordi de ville lancere en AR brille Du ved på nuværende tidspunkt alt hvad der blev præsenteret, men vi kommer rundt omkring i snakken i vores pre show del. Og i vores After Party del, kan du høre om de nye maskiner er drømmen for Video producenter (som Hans og Brille jo er) Og jo de har travlt med at producere Video og live stream hos Create Media, så jo der er blevet lidt langt mellem vores talkshows. Om de flækker firmakortet og køber de nye Mac computere, ja det får du nok først at vide i næste Talkshow :-)

Dig It - Discussions on Gardening Topics
How to be a Better Wildlife Gardener

Dig It - Discussions on Gardening Topics

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 70:21


How to be a better wildlife gardenerIn this podcast Peter Brown and Chris Day chat with gardening expert and nature lover Martin Fish. Topics covered include invaluable advice on developing a wildlife friendly garden, lawn meadows, managing wildlife and how best to achieve the right balance of potential pests and wildlife, his thoughts, and observations on the new trends in re-wilding and his take on ‘No Mow May'. We also discover how Martin started in horticulture, his nursery growing days and career moves into TV, local radio, writing and judging at major flower shows. Martin shares his love and passion for gardening and gives his views on the right mix of plants, habitats and the key considerations you should follow to help achieve a good wildlife balance in the garden.Plants mentionedClematis macropetala ‘Stolwijk Gold' (and Goldfinches).Wildlife lawn plants for pollinators including Daisies, Buttercups, Primroses (in verges) and Clover.Children plants; English Marigolds (Calendula), Cosmos, Sunflowers, Strawberries and fruiting plants.Butterflies and Moths plants: Verbena bonariensis, Night-scented stocks, Nicotiana (Tobacco plant) and clumps of perennial stinging nettles.Range of plants that provide year-round wildlife interest include Crocus, Hellebores, Snowdrops, blossom on Apples, Pears, Plums, hardy annuals, single flowered Dahlias, Foxgloves and hardy groundcover Geraniums.Products mentionedCompost bin, lawn rake, strimmer and rotary mower. Pre-formed liner, butyl liner or even a large washing bowl buried to the rim will draw the wildlife in. Bird feeds, drinkers and nesting boxes. Hedgehog houses and feeds. Swan food. If you have to control pests and diseases, opt for organic plant-based insecticides and fungicides and use them sparingly.Animals mentionedRobins, Goldfinches. Blackbirds, Greenfinches, Blue Tits, Sparrow, House Martins, Swifts, Yellow Hammers. Hedgehogs, Rabbits, Butterflies, Bees, Frogs, Newts, Damselflies and Lacewings.Useful websites: Re-wilding and No Mow MayRHS Plant for pollinators pdfThe Wildlife TrustRSPBRHS WildlifeMartin's cast away plant and tool: Apple tree and the variety ‘Sunset', plus a pair of trusted secateurs to maintain the tree!Martin Fish website Martin's Pots and Trowels YouTube Channel Our thanks to Chiltern Music Therapy for providing the music. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Drop Da Mic.
EPISODE 271: THEM APPLES (GOOD WILL HUNTING 97' film review)

Drop Da Mic.

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 94:05


This week we dive into the archives for a look back on director, Gus Van Sant's ‘GOOD WILL HUNTING.' + A wide variety of current pop culture news and weekly recommendations. Thank for listening and happy Friday the 13th!Intro/outro by: Admiral Atlas.Podcast music track by:Onarres.Mixed and edited by:Wesley Swanson.RIP Trevor StrnadRIP Fred Ward.RIP Robin Williams.

The Culinary Institute of America
Dutch Baby with Maple-Glazed Apples and Turkey Sausage and Turkey Bacon

The Culinary Institute of America

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 3:16


These fluffy, golden Dutch babies are topped with browned turkey bacon and turkey sausage, as well as apples that have been caramelized in maple syrup. The combination of flavors will conjure childhood breakfast memories, yet the simple prep and impressive presentation set the stage for a decidedly more grown-up breakfast or brunch. Get the Dutch Baby with Maple-Glazed Apples and Turkey Sausage and Turkey Bacon recipe here!

Serienweise
"Tokyo Vice", "Die Schlange von Essex" plus Fazits zu "Ozark", "Stark Trek: Picard" und "Moon Knight"

Serienweise

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 82:00


Öfter wurden wir bereits von Hörer:innen gebeten, Serien noch einmal zu diskutieren nachdem wir sie komplett gesehen haben. Das machen Michael und Rüdiger in dieser Woche mit gleich drei Serien und ziehen ein Fazit zum Finale von "Ozark" (49:45), der zweiten Staffel von "Star Trek: Picard" (58:15) sowie Marvel's "Moon Knight" (1:08:27). Bevor wir dort spoilern, stellen wir aber natürlich spoilerfrei zwei neue Serienstarts vor. Zum einen Apples starbesetzte Romanverfilmung "Die Schlange von Essex" (4:14) mit Tom Hiddleston und Claire Danes, zum anderen die HBO-Serie "Tokyo Vice" (22:55), die in Deutschland überraschend bei Starzplay kommt. Ist Michael Manns Rückkehr zur Serie ein Erfolg? Oder wirft Hauptdarsteller Ansel Elgort einen zu großen Schatten?Cold-Open-Frage: "Welche Werbung erwarten wir künftig bei Netflix"?

Exploring Washington State
Rick Hastings: Liberty Ciderworks Makers of Fine American Ciders in Spokane Washington

Exploring Washington State

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 73:37


Rick Hastings owner of Liberty Ciderworks is our guest for this episode.Rick started making cider because some family members were having challenges with Gluten. What started as a hobby quickly became an urban cidery.Liberty specializes in making cider from Apples grown in the area that thrive in the area.  Thanks for tuning into this episode of the Exploring Washington State Podcast! If the information in our conversations and interviews are enjoyable and valuable to you, please head over to iTunes, subscribe to the show, and leave us an honest review.Your reviews and feedback will not only help us continue to deliver great, helpful content, but it will also help us reach even more amazing listeners just like you!If you want to read about some of the many amazing places to explore in Washington State, you should just pack your bags and go! Explore Washington State is the perfect place for inspiration.    Check it out today.  Support the show

Quite Frankly
"Thursday Night Roulette" ft Rob 5/12/22

Quite Frankly

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 135:15


It's Thursday night and Rob is back in studio for a visit, and there are a number of directions we can go in so we shall spin the Roulette wheel and see what sticks. Mailbag questions have arrived from the audience; we have a food supply addendum from J Gulinello at Perpetual Health regarding last night's conversation with Sean and Corey; nudes sent into space; more on Apples, and who knows what else. A good evening of talk nonetheless. Support Our Proud Sponsors: Blue Monster Prep: An Online Superstore for Emergency Preparedness Gear (Storable Food, Water, Filters, Radios, MEDICAL SUPPLIES, and so much more). Use code 'FRANKLY' for Free Shipping on every purchase you make @ https://bluemonsterprep.com/ Secret Nature CBD: 100% organic CBD rich cannabis flower bred so low in THC that they are legally certified as hemp and can be shipped nationwide. High-CBD, low-THC means all the benefits of full spectrum cannabinoids and terpenes without the high, or negative effects like anxiety and paranoia. Pre-rolls, Oils, Tinctures, and more - Promo Code 'FRANKLY' at SecretNatureCBD.com for 20% OFF SUPPORT the Show and New Media: Sponsor through QFTV: https://www.quitefrankly.tv/sponsor SubscribeStar: https://www.subscribestar.com/quitefrankly One-Time Gift: http://www.paypal.me/QuiteFranklyLive Official QF Merch: https://bit.ly/3tOgRsV Sign up for the Free Mailing List: https://bit.ly/3frUdOj Send Crypto: BTC: 1EafWUDPHY6y6HQNBjZ4kLWzQJFnE5k9PK LTC: LRs6my7scMxpTD5j7i8WkgBgxpbjXABYXX ETH: 0x80cd26f708815003F11Bd99310a47069320641fC FULL Episodes On Demand: Spotify: https://spoti.fi/301gcES iTunes: http://apple.co/2dMURMq Amazon: https://amzn.to/3afgEXZ SoundCloud: http://bit.ly/2dTMD13 Google Play: https://bit.ly/2SMi1SF Stitcher: https://bit.ly/2tI5THI BitChute: https://bit.ly/2vNSMFq Rumble: https://bit.ly/31h2HUg Watch Live On: QuiteFrankly.tv (Powered by Foxhole) DLive: https://bit.ly/2In9ipw Rokfin: https://bit.ly/3rjrh4q Twitch: https://bit.ly/2TGAeB6 YouTube: https://bit.ly/2exPzj4 CloutHub: https://bit.ly/37uzr0o Theta: https://bit.ly/3v62oIw Rumble: https://bit.ly/31h2HUg How Else to Find Us: Official WebSite: http://www.QuiteFrankly.tv Official Telegram: https://t.me/quitefranklytv DISCORD Hangout: https://bit.ly/2FpkS11 QF Subreddit: https://bit.ly/2HdvzEC Twitter: @PoliticalOrgy Gab: @QuiteFrankly Truth Social: @QuiteFrankly GETTR: @QuiteFrankly

Radio Giga
Alle iPhones bis 2026: Apples Fahrplan für eine makellose Zukunft – Experte packt aus

Radio Giga

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022


Makellos ist der Bildschirm des iPhones bisher nicht, stört doch den einen oder anderen Kunden noch immer die Notch. Also diese Display-Kerbe im oberen Bildschirmbereich. Die ist bald Geschichte, nicht aber bei allen Modellen. Wie geht's dann weiter? Eine Experte packt jetzt aus und verrät Apples wahrscheinlichen Fahrplan für eine echte, makellose Zukunft.

TwentyOnePod
Apples

TwentyOnePod

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 34:01


Eventually we're going to get this lifestyle change thing right and all will be well in the world. Until then, here's another installment of "Amir & John talk about how they're going to lose weight and get healthy."Thanks for listening and supporting our show! If you're a fan of the show, please tell a friend or coworker about us - we'd really appreciate it as we build our fanbase! And If you happen to be listening on Apple Podcasts or Spotify, please take a quick moment to leave us a rating and review - it'll greatly help other listeners find us too!Website: TwentyOnePod | Facebook: @TwentyOnePodTwitter: @TwentyOnePod | IG: @TwentyOnePod

Elevate Construction
Ep.552 - You Cannot Count the Apples in a Seed

Elevate Construction

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 9:07


You can count the seeds in an apple, but you cannot count the apples in a seed. In this podcast we cover: The impact we have when we plant seeds What is our legacy in all that we do? If you like the Elevate Construction podcast, please subscribe for free and you'll never miss an episode.  And if you really like the Elevate Construction podcast, I'd appreciate you telling a friend (Maybe even two 

P3 Musikdokumentär
Miss Li - hur livet förändrar musiken

P3 Musikdokumentär

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 67:30


Det här är berättelsen om den svenska indiepopdrottningen som vägrade att lyssna på sin kropp, kraschade, men lyckades komma igen. Det är mars 2010 i staden Austin i Texas. Genom det stora sovrumsfönstret syns folklivet nere på gatan. Årets festival South by Southwest har dragit hit närmare 2000 band från hela världen och festen pågår dygnet runt. Men Linda orkar inte ens titta ut. Hon ligger däckad i sängen och under täcket är det tyst och lugnt. Att få spela som Miss Li på festivalen South by Southwest är hur stort som helst. Men Linda har svårt att njuta. Medan alla andra i bandet är ute och minglar stänger hon in sig på det trånga och bleka hotellrummet. Under den senaste tidens turnerande har smärtan blivit allt mer intensiv. Ena dagen är  högerhanden så svullen att hon tvingas spela piano med bara en hand. Andra dagen är det knät eller foten som blivit dubbelt så stor. När väckarklockan till slut ringer drar sig Linda motvilligt upp ur sängen. Hon klär på sig, stoppar i sig mer smärtstillande. När hon en stund senare kliver upp på scenen känns det som att hon återfått energin igen, men så snart hon kommer upp till det bleka hotellrummet igen, återkommer den svåra smärtan.Linda står precis på tröskeln inför sin stora USA-satsning, och hon är livrädd för vad som skulle hända om hon inte lyckas fullfölja turnén. Kommer allt hon kämpat för de senaste åren vara förgäves? Kommer hon ens kunna fortsätta vara artist?P3 Musikdokumentär om Miss Li handlar om en artist som vägrar ge uppMedverkande: Linda "Miss Li" Karlsson, Sonny Gustavsson, Erika Nemeti, Natasha Azarmi och Lars Winnerbäck.Dokumentären är gjord av Hanna Frelin våren 2022.  Producent Joanna Korbutiak. Exekutiv Anna Johanessen. Tekniker Fredrik Nilsson. P3 Musikdokumentär produceras av Tredje Statsmakten Media.Ljudklipp i dokumentären kommer från SVT:s lokala nyheter Gävledala (2007), Svensktoppen (2007 och 2011), P3 Nyheter (2012), Apples reklam för Ipods (2009) och Youtubekanalen Top News (2015).

Jack Hyles Podcast
“Apples of Gold in Baskets of Silver” by Jack Hyles

Jack Hyles Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 58:49


Radio Giga
Vergiss das iPhone 14: Sollte so Apples nächster Schritt aussehen?

Radio Giga

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022


Beim iPhone 14 scheut Apple wohl erneut größere Design-Experimente, so die Gerüchteküche. Da stellt sich die Frage: Sollte Apples nächster Schritt vielleicht nicht besser so aussehen, wie ein spannendes Konzept anmahnt? Einen Blick wert ist das „iPhone Studio“ allemal.

Pride Talk
Pride Talk S3 #2: Underwear & Apples

Pride Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 26:36


Our discussion with Telly Leung continues as we discuss  identity, coming out, married life, and family acceptance. The conversation gets a bit personal as he shares his experience with dating girls and his first sexual encounter with another man. You'll want to listen to find out how Calvin Klein underwear ads and a trip to Costco fits into the conversation.  Guest: Telly Leung Website: https://pride.naaap.org Email: PrideTalk@naaap.org Phone: 4197-PRIDE-5 or (419) 777-4335

Spooky Sh*t
Crimes of Passion and All My Friends Hate Apples

Spooky Sh*t

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 65:58


We talk about Els Van Doren and David Harris. This isn't a threat, it's a promise. FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA twitter/spookyshit_pod instagram/spookyshit_pod EMAIL US EPISODE IDEAS OR YOUR PERSONAL SPOOKY TALES thespookyshit.pod@gmail.com CHECK OUT OUR MERCH https://spooky-sht.creator-spring.com/ VISIT OUR WEBSITE https://www.spookyshit-pod.com OTHER PLACES TO LISTEN anchor: https://anchor.fm/spookyshit-pod spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/66cjcqqtA4dQdjVkIp04hN castbox: https://castbox.fm/channel/id2607105? apple podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/spooky-sh-t/id1498566333 google podcasts: https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9hbmNob3IuZm0vcy8xMmQxODkxMC9wb2RjYXN0L3Jzcw== TAGS: true crime, ghost stories, spooky, horror, podcast --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/spookyshit-pod/support

Your Place And Mine
The North West 200, and Armagh's Apples.

Your Place And Mine

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 15:18


A special bike and the North West 200, and the Troughton family with their Armagh Apples.

Computer Talk Radio
Computer Talk Radio Broadcast 05-07-2022

Computer Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 90:02


Computer Talk Radio Broadcast 05-07-2022; Apple, Twitter, what3words, CDC, WFH, more; spotting spam scams; Apples hits and misses; Mothers Day tech; student loan scam; talking watches; ghost guns; 3D printed guns; Zoom calls concealing; budget laptops

Cider Chat
318: Manoir de Montreuil | 13 Generations in Cider

Cider Chat

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 36:24


Domaine du Manoir de Montreuil with Patrice Giard In this episode: Patrice Giard recorded during the Totally Cider Tour to Normandy France in September 2018. The upcoming 2022 French Cider Tour will be making a stop at this ciderie. Patrice is a 13th generation cidermaker at this family farm. Patrice, his wife and his daughter are running the farm. His daughter's focus is on milk production with Patrice focusing on the cider production. The trees in the orchard that we were walking in were planted in 1996. In the tasting room Patrice Giard Some of the Apples tasted during this recording Domaine du Calvados  also known as De Clou Bisque Frequin Rouge Orchard at Domaine du Manoir de Montreuil 30 hectares of orchards on a 120 hectare farm Standard size trees The orchard management is to prunes the apples trees every three years. The orchards itself has 50 different varieties As required by the appellation of Pays d'Auge Patrice needs to have a map of the apple varieties in the orchard Patrice does not use any pesticides on his orchards. Orchard management tip: When Patrice notices insects on the trees, he lets the cows in the orchard to graze and they will scratch their bodies on the trees and in turn knock off the insects. While standing in the oak barrel room I asked ‘What is the minimum time that the barrels stay empty” The reply is that “There is no reason to keep the barrels empty” :) Contact for Domaine du Manoir de Montreuil Address: D101 -D85A, 14340 MONTREUIL-EN-AUGE Mentions in this Chat French Cider Tour Normandy & Brittany, France - September 18th-24th, 2022 Please Help Support Cider Chat Please donate today. Help keep the chat thriving! Find this episode and all episodes at the page for Cider Chat's podcasts. Listen also at iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher (for Android), iHeartRadio , Spotify and wherever you love to listen to podcasts. Follow on Cider Chat's blog, social media and podcast Twitter @ciderchat Instagram: @ciderchatciderville Cider Chat FaceBook Page Cider Chat YouTube Join the #ciderGoingUP Campaign today! 

Mike Gallagher Podcast
5-02-22 The Mike Gallagher Show Hour 3

Mike Gallagher Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 34:49


Donald Trump held a raucous rally in Nebraska giving us all a breathe of sanity that we desperately need right now. Plus, Apples employees are telling Apple that the request to go back into the office is racist. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Cooking with Bruce and Mark
All About Boozy Apples, An Interview With Ken Wurtz of Sauvage Distillers, Our One-Minute Cooking Tip, Passover Candy & Dinner Parties!

Cooking with Bruce and Mark

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 33:13


Hi, we're Bruce Weinstein and Mark Scarbrough. Join us for our food and cooking podcast! This episode is mostly about apples. No, not eating them. Fermenting them in hard cider and distilling them into vodka. We love apples in the fall. But we drink them in the summer. Join us to find out more. Here are the segments for this episode of COOKING WITH BRUCE AND MARK: [00:47] Our experiences with the growing number of cideries in the United States--all about fermenting and bottling apple juice. [14:26] Our one-minute cooking tip: Add a tiny bit of baking soda to the pan to make onions caramelize faster. [15:54] Bruce's interview with Ken Wurtz of Sauvage distillers, makers of UPSTATE VODKA, from New York apples. [30:31] What's making us happy in food this week? Marked-down Passover candy and dinner parties!

Hope & Anchor Church Podcast
Grafted In (or Concerning Heirloom Apples)

Hope & Anchor Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022


Transformative Principal
Looking For A New Job? Use This Strategy Transformative Principal 479

Transformative Principal

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 21:58


I have several friends who are looking for new positions right now, and there is a lot that goes into making a decision like this. I'm dedicating this episode to my friends who are looking for something, so imagine that we are in a coffee shop and I'm having this conversation with you. If you do want to have this conversation, because, admittedly, it is easier to have over the phone with someone, or in person. I'm going to ask some questions in here, and when I do that, if you take the time to pause the podcast and actually answer the questions, it will be a valuable experience. Just saying them out loud while you're driving or exercising will be valuable. Bonus points if you actually write out your answers. And, if you want to go through this with me, just give me a call. (801) 7-JETHRO. Seriously, that's my phone number. You're probably not going to take me up on that because you'll think I'm too busy, or you don't matter enough. That's baloney! If you don't call me, call someone else you trust! Before we get into the rest of the episode, I want to recognize a new partner for the Transformative Principal Podcast. This is Just Right Reader at justrightreader.com When I was an elementary principal, I saw firsthand how important reading was. If kids can read, they can do anything. But our decodable readers were not great. There are boring, repetitive and kind of bland. A few weeks ago, Sarah, from just right reader, shared her decodables with me. Kids see themselves in these books. They are enjoyable and actually funny. I'm going to talk more about this in the future, but in the meantime, check out just right reader.com for some decodables that kids will love reading. Recently, a friend shared this article on LinkedIn with me called “[[Tribe, Brand, Domain (TBD)–How to Think about Building Career]] (link) and I want to highlight some pieces. It is written by David Boyce, who ”is a serial software entrepreneur who has helped build and sell four companies. Currently he is Chief Strategy Officer of XANT and board member for Forrester (NASDAQ: FORR). Dave is an adjunct professor of marketing at Brigham Young University's Marriott School of Business and a frequent guest lecturer at Harvard Business School." I regularly have given similar advice to what Dave offers here, but he did it much more eloquently than I have. I encourage you to check out this article First and foremost, let's remember what a job is. David describes a job as “a transitional arrangement with an employer that has certain features easy to measure and compare: title, compensation, benefits, etc. ” A job is just a thing. They come and go. They are largely out of your control, no matter how secure you think that job may be. I would have used the word Transactional (because you're trading time for money) but I like how Dave uses the word Transitional because it connotes that it is a time of transition, not a permanent thing. A career is different than a job. Dave says, “A career is something you invest in over the long term. It takes shape longitudinally, layer upon layer. While the person in charge of your job may be your boss, the person in charge of your career is you.” Two important things: Your career is your responsibility. No Career can only be defined with a specific path. For example, let's say in your career, you want to be a superintendent. There are some people who say that in order to be a superintendent, you have to have X years experience as a teacher, then X years as a principal, then X years as curriculum director, then X years assistant superintendent. Then you can “qualify” for that role. That is made up. If I took a poll of superintendents, I am sure many would have followed a similar path to that, and that could be the tried and true way to do it, but that doesn't mean it is the only way to be a superintendent. I recently shared a sad story on my other podcast, Cybertraps, where a superintendent in a district in Massachusetts started out as a substitute teacher and eventually became the superintendent. Unfortunately, we were talking about her situation because she got caught in a cybertrap and allegedly sent threatening messages to a police officer to dissuade him from applying to be police chief. I only bring this weird story in to illustrate that you are in charge of your career, while you may not always be in charge of your job. Your career and how you talk about it is completely up to you. Dave says, “Who will decide how to sequence jobs, layer experiences, and develop facets of your professional self? Nobody but you.” When I left being a principal in 2020, I told my wife that even if I went back into schools, I would never define myself by my role again. I get to decide who I am and what that means. So do you. And that's exactly the point that Dave is making. You are in charge of your career. When you're making a choice about a job, Dave continues, “it's important to focus on things that will matter over the long run. Starting salary doesn't matter. Starting title doesn't matter (much). Benefits don't matter… so what does matter?” Dave calls the things that matter TBD, Tribe, Brand, Domain. Let's talk about each of them: Tribe The 2008 book Tribes: We Need You to Lead Us by Seth Godin really brought this idea of tribes to our collective consciousness. I'm sure others have thought and written about it, but that's when it really became apparent to me. Dave talks about Tribe like this: “Look to your left and to your right. Who do you see? People who inspire you? Challenge you? Stretch you? Do you get energy from your peers, or do they suck energy from you? Do they encourage you to do your best work or do they bore you? Are you your best professional self among your workmates?” Your best professional self! That doesn't mean you are perfect, but it does mean that your peers encourage you to strive. I remember working for one district where we were in a principal meeting, and as soon as the district person left, the other principals started ragging on the district as a whole and complaining about anything and everything. This group of principals did not inspire me to be my best professional self. I knew I had to get out of there. That's the negative part, but let me talk about when I worked with Damon, Courtney, and Carla. These were my three assistant principals when I was in Alaska. Although they were all very different, they truly brought out my best professional self. And that made all the difference. I still talk to all three of them regularly, and anytime I'm thinking of something new, they're some of the first people I talk to about it. They've always set me up for success. And this is the point of the tribe, truly: “If one of your peers finds the opportunity of a lifetime, and they need the best and brightest to join them and reap the rewards of an amazing product, market, etc., who will they call? The people they know and respect. If one of those people is you–lucky you!” Earlier on when Dave mentioned that salary and title don't matter, he was right. He says, “On the other hand, if you look to your left and see Sleepy, and to your right and see Dopey, you may be in trouble. It almost doesn't matter how much an employer pays you–no amount is enough to sacrifice the opportunity to build relationships with best-and-brightest peers.” Thankfully, shortly after I got hired in Fairbanks, I got to interview for an assistant principal. Courtney was clearly the best and brightest. Brand The next piece in this framework is Brand. And we're again talking about ourselves as we are finding a position. One of the pieces of advice I give to anyone looking for a job is that you are interviewing them as much as they are interviewing you. You have got to see if who they are aligns with your personal brand. Dave introduces a really simple way to evaluate this: “Do you love talking about your work at parties, family gatherings, reunions? If so, your work is aligned with your personal Brand.” I had a job cleaning up construction sites once. I hated every minute of it, and I try to never talk about it. More than anything, it taught me what I don't want to do. I'm not afraid of working hard, in fact, that was the only part of the job that was rewarding: I was outside and building muscle daily. As I look back on my career now, I'm so grateful for where I worked and what I learned while I was there. Most of my positions are highlights on my resume, but some didn't really align to my brand. I'm certainly not saying that you can't learn things, even in difficult or non-ideal situations, but it really is so much better when you are proud of where you work. In education, most of us are going to work for “Just Another School”. In How to be a Transformative Principal, I teach principals how to NOT be just another school. Regardless, most of us are not going to work at a well-known or popular school. There aren't many Teslas, Twitters, Amazons, or Apples in the education space. But I encourage you to make your school that way. Be innovative! Disrupt the status quo! Serve your families so well that people want to know what you are doing. Or not. If that's not your brand, you'd hate working in a school like that. I was talking to Steve Miletto, host of the podcast Teaching Learning Leading K12. He is the executive director of a regional education service agency in the heart of Georgia. He said that people say they want change agents, but then when the change starts happening, many people say, “Wait, it was good enough before!” Lean into your brand and find places that complement your brand, as in make it complete! Domain Finally, the last piece of this is Domain. Dave says, “A key piece of a successful career is getting good at something…No one develops all the required domain expertise in one single job, so it is up to you to sequence experiences so you can develop each facet of your professional expertise deliberately.” This goes back to having a vision for your life! Do you have a vision for your life? If not, it would be very worth your time to sit down and make a vision for your life so you know how to build your career, know what you want to get good in, and know how to make sure that you have plans in place to support your growth, because you know who you want to become. Dave continues, “No one develops all the required domain expertise in one single job, so it is up to you to sequence experiences so you can develop each facet of your professional expertise deliberately.” If you don't have a vision and goals for your life, you'll be more likely to coast along and make some decisions that may or may not be in your best interest. Have you watched the show Severance on Apple's streaming service? It's is a bizarre, crazy show but so good. Here's the premise, in order to achieve “work-life balance” people get an implant that makes their work and personal lives separate. Their work life has no idea what happens with their personal life (not knowing their names, families, relationships, where they live) and their personal self has no idea what happens at work. Just that they show up and then leave at the end of the day. Each side calls themselves awake when they are in that state. Anyway, these people have a reason why they want to know nothing about the work they do all day. At the end of season 1, you're left with more questions than answers! But one man, Mark S. chose to do the severance procedure because he lost his wife in a terrible car accident and chose to do this to deal with the grief he was experiencing. He has no desire to know or get good at anything and while he was a professor before, he couldn't handle being a professor after his wife died. Thankfully, this dystopic world does not exist yet, and so we need to build domain expertise in our careers. And that is actually quite fulfilling. The framework is TBD, Tribe, Brand, Domain, created by Dave Boyce. You can use TBD to decide a single job opportunity, or you can use it to determine if your life is heading in the direction that you want it to go. I'm actually actively evaluating some things in my life right now through this framework and I'll tell you more about it in episode 484 on June 6th! Be sure to check out justrightreader.com for some amazing decodables that your students will actually enjoy reading. Sponsors Transformative Principal Mastermind Lead a school everyone can be proud of. Being a principal is tough work. You're pulled in all kinds of directions. You never have the time to do the work that really matters. Join me as I help school leaders find the time to do the work they became principals to do. I help you stop putting out fires and start leading. Learn more at https://transformativeprincipal.com Just Right Reader Just Right Reader Decodables are a great way to help your students learn how to read, with research-based strategies that are proven to be effective. Each grade level has over 100 books. Send books home in packs of ten, with video lessons accessible via QR codes on each book, with lessons in Spanish and English. Learn more at https://justrightreader.com

Hard Core
Getting Back To The Land

Hard Core

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 37:43


Hard Core is back! The first season of Hard Core came out before the pandemic. While we're still drinking cider, the world is a very different place. That's why we're returning to you with season two. We can't wait to travel through history and across the US with you.In this episode, we'll start our journey at the root. Before labeling, bottling, and fermentation, all cider starts out on the tree. We can't talk about farming in the US without talking about land access. According to a 2017 report from the USDA, of over 3 million farms assessed, 95 percent of farm producers in this country are white and 65 percent of all farmers identify as male. The lack of representation in farming results in the same deficit in the world of cider making. In the season two premier, we're going to learn about some individuals and organizations who are working to rebalance, repair, and regrow. Learn more about the organizations and businesses we mentioned:Quarter Acre for the PeopleRedbyrd CiderThe Reparations Cider Package Ironbound CiderHard Core is powered by Simplecast.

Talking Biotech Podcast
Breeding the Next Amazing Apple

Talking Biotech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 45:06


Apples are a beloved fruit, with over 8000 varieties available worldwide. The apples in the grocery store represent just a tiny section of apple genetic potential, a few flavors that ship well and can be stored for a long period of time.  But today in the genomics era new tools seek to speed the breeding of apples to create new varieties, flavors, and disease resistance packages.  The goal is to help farmers and consumers produce the next generation of superior apple varieties.  With Dr. Awais Khan, apple breeder from Cornell University. 

Fruit Grower Report
Cold Snap Pt 2

Fruit Grower Report

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022


Washington State Tree Fruit Association's Tim Kovis says the recent patch of cold weather was a mixed bag for growers who will be keeping an eye on their orchards for possible damage.

Radio Giga
iPhone 14: Apples Bauteile decken die ganze Wahrheit auf

Radio Giga

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022


Wer bisher immer noch nicht so recht an Apples ungewöhnliches Bildschirm-Design des iPhone 14 Pro glaubte, der wird jetzt eines Besseren belehrt. Erste Bilder der Frontgläser bestätigen nämlich bisherige Berichte und decken die ganze Wahrheit auf.

Fruit Grower Report
Cold Snap Pt 1

Fruit Grower Report

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022


Washington State Tree Fruit Association's Tim Kovis says the recent patch of cold weather was a mixed bag for growers who will be keeping an eye on their orchards for possible damage.

Cider Chat
317: How a "Cyder" Teapot fueled the American Revolution

Cider Chat

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 56:01


Yes! Cider has a back story behind the American Revolution In the 1700s ceramic teapots were the political bumper stickers of the day! In this episode we hear about the Cyder Act teapot that the Museum of the American Revolution located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania has just acquired. The museum's Curator of Collections, Mark Turdo, tells us how the British based uprisings against the over reaching Cyder Act played a pivotal role in the American Revolution -  in that they help to teach American how to protest! Placing your dissent on teapots was an obvious protest and that is exactly what the Cyder Pot helped to teach! In these modern time uprising against tyranny happens on a daily basis, but colonist in the New World were dedicated to the crown and it was unheard of to revolt...That is until they began seeing English cidermakers revolt against taxation when the Cyder Act was introduced. These ceramic Cyder Act Pots were made in England and displayed in homes, but their symbolism was far reaching. Taxation's heavy hand was being push back and that alone was monumental forward thinking! The Stamp Act in America Gets Repealed Great Britain was on the hunt for more revenue and the Stamp Act was their ticket in the New World. It was set up to stamp a duty (tax) on newspapers and legal and commercial documents. Thanks to the models of resistance displayed by the British cidermakers and their Cyder Act Teapots, Americans saw that they too could revolt against taxation! The Stamp Act never gained footing and was repealed a year after it was introduced.  This is all to say that the path to freedom and independence from tyranny is not always a straight forward path. The Cyder Act Pot is a perfect example of  a monumental sidebar lesson that helped fuel the American Revolution! Take a deep dive into this story in English Cider Fermented the American Revolution via Mark Turdo's blog Pommel Cyder Mark A. Turdo Mark also recommends Chapter 4 "The Cider Tax, Popular Symbolism and Opposition in Mid-Hanoverian England," in Markets, Market Culture and Popular Protest in Eighteenth-Century Britain and Ireland, edited by Adrian Randall and Andrew Charlesworth. Help show case Cider's place in the American Revolution Your tax-deductible gift will allow The Museum of the American Revolution to complete the acquisition of this 18th-century teapot with the inscriptions “No Cyder Act” and “Apples at Liberty”. Adding this rare piece to the Museum's collection will help visitors see how taxation incited protests for increased liberty on both sides of the Atlantic, and ultimately led Americans to declare independence. Go to http://support.amrevmuseum.org/cider Hear English cidermaker Julian Temperly  share his tale and take on the historial Cyder Act Clock Contact for the Museum of the American Revolution Museum website: https://www.amrevmuseum.org/cyderpot Address: 101 South Third Street Philadelphia, PA 19106 Mentions in this Chat  Mentions in this Chat French Cider Tour | Normandy and Brittany September 18th-24th, 2022 InciderJapan - Japan's first and only bilingual magazine dedicated to all things cider Episode 181: The Cider Insider | 100 Craft Ciders to Drink Now with Little Pomona/UK Support these Sponsors of Cider Chat so they can continue to support this podcast and help you make great cider! Fermentis - Yeast and Fermentation Solutions for Cidermakers. Send in your yeast quesitons for an upcoming interview with a Fermentis tech to info@ciderchat.com Sraml - Food Processing and Cidermaking equipment specialist Help Support Cider Chat Please donate today. Help keep the chat thriving! Find this episode and all episodes at the page for Cider Chat's podcasts. Listen also at iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher (for Android), iHeartRadio , Spotify and wherever you love to listen to podcasts. Follow on Cider Chat's blog, social media and podcast Twitter @ciderchat Instagram: @ciderchatciderville Cider Chat FaceBook Page Cider Chat YouTube

From Apples To Fromage
Golden Russet and MouCo Camembert

From Apples To Fromage

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 23:24


Join Colleen and Talia while they taste local Colorado MouCo Camembert  alongside Haykin's Golden RussetWe talk about what the difference is between Camembert and Brie (hint: not much), how a cider can taste like vacation, and crazy apple trees growing from litter.NOTE: We are so sorry for the delay in releasing new episodes... both Talia and Colleen were pregnant. This episode was recorded in September 2021. We have both since had our babies and promise to get back on it!Like the podcast? Have a question or something you want us to try? Email us!Glasses we used - Riedel Extreme Restaurant Rose/Champagne glassFollow Apples to Fromage on Instagram! And come back for another episode soon!Find Colleen and Behind The Rind on InstagramFind Talia and Haykin Family Cider on Instagram

Squares of the Round Table
Squares of the Round Table 04/25/2022

Squares of the Round Table

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 159:29


Episode 194: Apples and Alfredos! This episode, CBR reports of the star from Iron Man 2 buys Twitter, Jeff wins a public speaking award! Yay! His thoughts on season 2 of The Flight Attendant, the Julia Childs show and Young Justice, Winning Time's fact vs. fiction problem, Mike had a birthday, Ivan's week and future DJ gigs, Moon Knight episode 4, news and the streaming wars, Jeff vs. Steve Bartman, Roger Ebert's top ten films of the 90's, DC's George Perez tribute, a lengthy comics discussion, and more! Thanks for listening, and thanks to our Clubhouse guests for stopping by! Available on Spotify and the Apple & Google Podcast apps! Anchor: https://anchor.fm/sotrt​​​​​​​​​​​​​​ Email us at sotrtpodcast@gmail.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sotrtpodcast/​​

The Daily Break
Elon Buys Twitter, Imagined Apples, and Phones at the Table

The Daily Break

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 7:14


Andrew Tallman brings you the latests from across newsweek.comSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Fascinating Podcast
Catherynne Valente Comforts Us with Apples - Fascinating Season 8

The Fascinating Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 76:48


What could possibly be so bad about paradise? Catherynne Valente joins us to dish on her terrific new novella COMFORT ME WITH APPLES. Plus: the French Revolution, the Masked Singer and more!

Sirr's Movies
S03E02 - Everything Everywhere All at Once(2022)

Sirr's Movies

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 28:02


My Movie Fix is a place where I come to get...my movie fix. I have takes that need taking, and this is the place to hear my deep dive discussions on new movies, as well as thoughts on other content in the media world. Ending as always with a sendoff to help lighten your load this week. Todays episode is a SOLO pod covering "Everything Everywhere All at Once" What I've been Watching 3:35 Review 6:27 Spoilers 14:12 Parting Gift 25:00 Briana Babineaux Make Me Over Again Credits: Follow Me @MyMovieFixPod on Twitter GIve me a 5 star rating wherever 5 star ratings are found Email questions/comments/concerns/Apples to MyMovieFixPodcast@Gmail.com Outro music by Xander --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mymoviefixpodcast/message

Today in the History of Freedom
Episode 24: William of Orange

Today in the History of Freedom

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2022 3:13


The Apples of Catholicism did not mesh well with the Oranges of the Dutch.

Does This Happen to You
I Have A Beef with Cosmic Crisp Apples

Does This Happen to You

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2022 6:44


The search for a cosmic crisp ends. For more wonderful stories, visit Bev on Medium.com or Substack.  Striving to bring a giggle and weirdness to your day, this podcast's mission is to feature fantastic writers whose wonderful stories deserve to be heard in audio. And it feeds my love of telling funny stories about life, befuddlement, and the odd adventures in life.  I have an affinity for the funny in the mundane, always have. I cataloged my weird adventures at the gym into a one-woman show that you can watch on my YouTube channel. It's entitled Does This Happen to You at the Gym. I got a lot of joy out of that, so I began writing about my adventures, now featured in the serial publication, Channillo. There was no way I could write enough for a weekly podcast, so I began telling funny stories by other writers. And I'm still at it. You can subscribe to Does This Happen to You on YouTube and check out my written Does This Happen to You stories on WordPress or Kris Keppeler on Medium.  Visit my website for my audiobook narration/production and voice-over work. You can hire me to narrate your book or your blog. Sign up here for my quarterly newsletter featuring the most downloaded episode of my podcast, and the latest odd but good news I've found from around the world.   

NutritionFacts.org Video Podcast
Flashback Friday: Are Apples the Best Food for a Better Sex Life in Women?

NutritionFacts.org Video Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 7:26


Addyi (flibanserin), the drug marketed for “hypoactive sexual desire disorder,” is ineffective and unsafe. What about dietary approaches for female sexual dysfunction?

Field Notes by AgChoice
Episode 112: Growing Specialty Apples for Cider

Field Notes by AgChoice

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 15:26


Grant Winner Spotlight: Joel and Emily Kuhns will run Odyssey Orchard, a veteran-owned business. Odyssey Orchard focuses on producing high quality sharp and bitter-sharp apples for the fine and craft cider markets. 

Minecraft Short Stories
Does the Sculk Like Golden Apples? - Listener Stories

Minecraft Short Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 10:48


Thank you to Wyatt, Nathan, Uni, Thomas, Ninja Meow, and SilverSoldierGaming for submitting and willing for their stories to be read on this episode. Enjoy! If you want to submit a short story or sign up for my email for extra bonus content, go to minecraftshortstories.com! Follow me on Spotify for playlists and the newest episodes. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/minecraftshortstories/message

That Real Blind Tech Show
Episode 79 - Wassup, How Do You Like Them Apples!

That Real Blind Tech Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 83:28


It's an all new That Real Blind Tech Show as the gang is back together and one of us has an all new podcast lair.   We start off discussing the fun back and forth we have been having with our friends over at Blind Guy Talks Tech.   We begin our tech segment of the show discussing how Uber and Lift's initial response to the NYC Subway shooting was to hike all passenger fares in time of an emergency. Did you hear the one about the cops that pulled over a self driving car in San Francisco? We did.   Elon Musk is interested in buying Twitter. His bid came in just a smidge ahead of ours.   In our legal corner this week, some Russians are attempting to sue Netflix over them shutting down in their country.   Zuckhead wants Meta's AR glasses to be Facebook's iPhone moment. Here's a role reversal, Apple is now calling out Facebook for their plans to take 50% from Mettaverse sales. Apple is rumored to be testing a feature that would allow app developers to automatically charge users for subscription price increases. Bad apple, Bad Apple. Are Apple's own privacy concerns getting in their own way of innovation? With WWDC sneaking up on us, we decided to put together a wish list for Apple stock app improvements. You may want to hold off on buying a new Mac anytime soon as Apple is rumored to be working on 9 different M2 Macs.   We then check in on our Android experiences and discuss our thoughts of using the device, the gestures, and whether or not we plan to keep our Android phones.   We then discuss the state of accessibility for a few apps that are really failing pretty miserably.        We then talk about a new topic, NFT's. We actually had to look up what they are!   In honor of Spring Cleaning, we decided to talk robot vacuums. If you have a model you are loving, please do let us know and email us in at ThatRealBlindTechShow@gmail.com.   And of course its more of What's Pissing Off Brian Now and Watcha Streaming, Watcha Reading.   To contact That Real Blind Tech Show, you can email us at ThatRealBlindTechShow@gmail.com, join our Facebook Group That Real Blind Tech Show, join us on the Twitter @BlindTechShow , or leave us an old school phone message at 929-367-1005.

Sirr's Movies
S03E01 - Morbius (2022)

Sirr's Movies

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 17, 2022 40:30


My Movie Fix is a place where I come to get...my movie fix. I have takes that need taking, and this is the place to hear my deep dive discussions on new movies, as well as thoughts on other content in the media world. Ending as always with a sendoff to help lighten your load this week. Todays episode is a SOLO pod covering "Morbius" What I've been Watching 5:40 Review 12:20 Spoilers 26:50 Parting Gift 37:50 Credits: Follow Me @MyMovieFixPod on Twitter GIve me a 5 star rating wherever 5 star ratings are found Email questions/comments/concerns/Apples to MyMovieFixPodcast@Gmail.com Outro music by Xander --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mymoviefixpodcast/message

Your Brain on Facts
Apple of Our Eye (ep. 191)

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 34:16


1-star review shirt! and shirt raising money for Ukraine Red Cross. It's another one of those episodes all about a topic that sounds totally mundane and boring!  Where did apples come from?  Was Johnny Appleseed real?  Why does planting apple seeds lead to disappointment?  And why are some apples considered intellectual property?     Links to all the research resources are on the website. Hang out with your fellow Brainiacs.  Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter,  or Instagram.  Become a patron of the podcast arts! Patreon or Ko-Fi.  Or buy the book and a shirt. Music: Kevin MacLeod, Tabletop Audio, and Steve Oxen.  Want to start a podcast or need a better podcast host?  Get up to TWO months hosting for free from Libsyn with coupon code "moxie." Sponsor: Starfleet Leadership Academy   What's more wholesome and iconic than an apple?  In the Bible, Eve ate an apple and now half of us have to have periods and crap.  In fairness to apples, the Bible just says “fruit” and it was Milton's “Paradise Lost” that declared the fruit was an apple because the Latin word for apple, m-a-l-u-s, is also the word for evil.  There's the Greek myth of Atalanta, who would only marry the man who beat her in a footrace, so Aphrodite helped a Melanion cheat by dropping golden apples that she stopped to pick up.  An apple fell on the head of Isaac Newton, leading to the discovery of gravity – prior to that, everyone weighed a lot less.  The record label that gave the world the Beatles and one of the largest consumer electronics companies in the world use an apple as their logo.  [tiktok] Bonus fact: The Apple computer logo has a bite taken out of it so it isn't mistaken for a cherry, which I don't think would really have been so great a danger, and is *not a nod to Alan Turing, the famous mathematician who helped Britain win WWII but was hounded by that same government for being gay and took his own life with a poisoned apple.  Steve Jobs and co repeatedly said they wished it was that clever.   We say something is “as American as apple pie” and even though Ralph Waldo Emerson dubbed apples “the American fruit,” the tasty, sweet malus domestica as you're used to it is about as native to North America as white people.  That's not to say there was nothing of the genus malus in the new world; there was the crabapple, a small, hard, exceedingly tart apple, which is better used for adding the natural thickener pectin to preserves than anything.   The story of apples actually begins in Kazakhstan, in central Asia east of the Caspian Sea.  Malus sieversii is a wild apple, native to Kazakhstan's Tian Shan Mountains, where they have been growing over millions of years and where they can still be found fruiting today.  There's evidence of Paleolithic people harvesting and using native crabapples 750,000 years ago, give or take a week.  The original wild apples grew in ‘apple forests' at the foot of the snow-tipped mountains, full of different shapes,sizes and flavors, most of them bad.  Kazakhstan is hugely proud of its fruity history.  The former capital city of Almaty claimed the honor of ‘birth place of the apple' about 100 years ago.  Seems a suitable sobriquet since the name ‘Almaty' was previously recorded as ‘Alma-Ata' which translates from Kazakh as ‘Father of the Apples,' though in Latin Alma means mother or nurturer, which feels more fitting but that's beside the point.   This origin story was not without controversy, but what am I here for if not to teach the controversy?  In 1929, Russian scientist Nikolai Vavilov first traced the apple genome. He identified the primary ancestor of most cultivars of the domesticated apple to be the ancient apple tree: Malus sieversii. There used to be some controversy over this, but it has since been confirmed, through detailed DNA testing, and a full sequencing of the genome, as recently as 2010.   It was probably birds and traveling mammal species that initially transported apple seeds out of Kazakhstan long before humans started to cultivate them – by eating the apples and then pooping out the seeds.  By 1500 BC apple seeds had been carried throughout Europe by the Greeks, Etruscans, and Romans.  Bloody Romans.  What have they ever done for us?  I mean apart from the sanitation, the medicine, education, wine, public order, irrigation, roads, a fresh water system, and public health, what have the Romans really ever done for us?  Oh yeah, apples.  The Romans discovered apples growing in Syria and were central in dispersing them around the world from there, using the Silk Road as a means of transport from East to West.  Romans were a fair hand at grafting, taking a cutting from one apple variety and attaching it to a rootstock (young roots and trunk) from another tree – more on that later.  As such, the Romans started to grow apples in Europe and Britain that were bigger, sweeter, and tastier than any before.  Let's not forget variety.  There are a whopping 2,170 English cultivars of malus domestica alone.     Apples arrived in the new world first with the Spanish in the warm bits and then with English settlers in the cooler bits, which when I say it sounds like it was done on purpose.  Ask an American child how apples spread across the nascent US and they'll tell you it was Johnny Appleseed.  We tend to learn about him around the time we learn about “tall tales,” i.e. American folklore –stories like the giant lumberjack Paul Bunyan and his blue ox, or John Henry, who could hammer railroad spikes in ahead of a moving train – so it can be a little tricky to be sure if Johnny Appleseed is real or not.  Don't feel bad, a friend of mine just learned that narwhals were real the other year when she wanted to be one in a cryptid-themed burlesque show.    Johnny Appleseed, real name John Chapman, was a real person, though naturally some aspects of his life were mythologized over time.  Details are sparse on his early life, but we know that Chapman was born in Massachusetts in 1774 and planted his first apple tree trees in the Allegheny Valley in Pennsylvania in his mid-twenties.  He then began traveling west through Ohio, planting as he went.  These were frontier times.  We're talking about a good 70 years before the transcontinental railroad, so much of the area he went through did not yet have white settlers in it, but Chapman seems to have a knack for predicting where they would settle and planting nurseries in those spots.  Chapman was also a devout follower of the mystical teachings of Swedish theologian Emanuel Swedenborg, and he tried to spread Swedenborgian doctrine as well.  People were open to some parts of it, like kindness to all animals, even the unpleasant ones.   The apples that Chapman brought to the frontier were completely distinct from the apples available at any modern grocery store or farmers' market, and they weren't primarily used for eating, but for making hard apple cider.  Cider was a mainstay item for the same reason people drank beer at breakfast, because it was safer than the water supply.  This didn't actually apply as much in the not-yet-destroyed frontier as it had back in London, but old habits die hard.    I've often wondered why cider is such a staple beverage in the UK, but only resurfaced in the last 20 or so years here in the States, where we have to specify hard cider” because the word “cider” normally means a glorious, thick, flavorful unfiltered apple juice you only get in the fall.  It's thanks to the colossal failure that was that “noble experiment,” Prohibition, when some people didn't like drinking and told the rest of us we couldn't either.   "Up until Prohibition, an apple grown in America was far less likely to be eaten than to wind up in a barrel of cider," writes Michael Pollan in The Botany of Desire. "In rural areas cider took the place of not only wine and beer but of coffee and tea, juice, and even water."  The cider apples are small and unpleasant to eat, so they were really only good for cider-making.  As such, during Prohibition, cider apple trees were often chopped down by FBI agents, effectively erasing cider, along with Chapman's true history, from American life.   But Johnny “Appleseed” Chapman wouldn't know anything about all that.  Within his own lifetime, tales of his activities began to circulate.  Most of these focused on his wilderness skills and his remarkable physical endurance.  Chapman cut an eccentric figure.  He wore a sack with holes for his head and arms rather than a proper shirt and after he'd worn through multiple pairs of shoes, he gave up and went barefoot.  Perhaps his most distinct feature, the one always included in drawings, apart from a bag of apple seeds, is his soup pot, just about his only possession, which he wore on his head like a hat.   Starting in 1792, the Ohio Company of Associates made an offer of 100 acres of land to anyone willing to make a homestead on the wilderness beyond Ohio's first permanent settlement.  These homesteads had to be permanent; no pitching a tent and saying ‘where's my land?'  To prove their homesteads were the real deal, settlers were required to plant 50 apple trees and 20 peach trees in three years.  Since an average apple tree took roughly ten years to bear fruit, you wouldn't bother unless you were in it for the long haul.  He might have looked like a crazy hermit, but Chapman realized that if he could do the difficult work of planting these orchards, he could sell them for a handsome profit to incoming frontiersmen.  “On this week's episode of Frontier Flipper, Johnny plants an orchard…again.”  Wandering from Pennsylvania to Illinois, Chapman would advance just ahead of settlers, cultivating orchards that he would sell them when they arrived, and then head to more undeveloped land.     That was very clever.  What wasn't clever was Chapman growing apples from seed at all.  This is the bit about grafting, in case you were jumping around looking for it.  Statistically, at least one person was really waiting for this part.  Apple trees don't grow “true-to-type,” as WSU tree fruit breeder Kate Evans explains. That means that if you were to plant, for instance, Red Delicious seeds in your backyard, you wouldn't get Red Delicious apples, not that you'd want to, but more on that later.  Boy, what a tease.  Instead, planting and breeding means matching a scion to a rootstock.  The scion is the fruiting part of the tree – most of what you actually see. The rootstock is everything that goes in the ground, as well as the first few inches of the trunk.  Buds from one variety are attached to the rootstock of another and they grow into a tree that will produce apples. But matching up the scion and rootstock isn't enough to grow good apples. You also need a tree to act as a pollinator.  “If you don't have good pollination, you can end up with misshapen or small unattractive fruit,” says Jim McFerson, director of the Wenatchee extension. Up to ten percent of an orchard can be pollinators, and most today are crabapple trees.  Apple trees cannot normally pollinate themselves.  Unlike, say, peaches, which can and do self-pollinate, predictably producing peaches virtually identical to the parents, the viable seeds (or pips) will produce apples which don't resemble the parents.  This requirement for pollination is how there have come to be so many varieties in the world, at least 20k and that's a conservative estimate.   For context, there are only two varieties of commercial banana and just one kiwifruit.    Grafting was an established way of propagating apples and was commonly done in New England, so why didn't Chapman do that?  Apart from the fact that it's easier to travel with just seeds and planting is faster than graftering, as a member of the Swedenborgian Church, Chapman was forbidden from cutting two trees to cobble together a new tree and it was thought to make the plants suffer.  John “Johnny Appleseed” Chapman died in Fort Wayne, Indiana, in 1845, having planted apple trees as far west as Illinois or Iowa.   A century later, in 1948, Disney solidified his legend with an animated version of his life.  The cartoon emphasized his Christian faith, but conveniently left out all the Swedenborgian stuff. MIDROLL Speaking of varieties, as well we might, what would you guess the most popular apple variety has been for the past, say, 70 years?  The apple whose name is half-lying but unfortunately it's lying about the important half, the Red Delicious.  They are the most iconic apple across most of the world.  Don't believe me, just check emoji packs in other countries.  Their appearance is the whole reason these apples exist, with their deep, even red color and dimpled bottom that look so enticing in the produce department; it's also the reason they suck and are terrible.  They taste of wet cardboard and have the mouthfeel of resentment.  Their flavor and texture were sacrificed for botanical vanity and shippability.   Even apple growers hate them.  Mike Beck, who tends 80 acres of apples at Uncle John's Cider Mill, admits he grows some Red Delicious to add color to some of his ciders, but he won't eat them.    The Red Delicious was first called the Hawkeye, and one Jesse Hiatt found it growing as a random sapling on his Iowa farm around 1870.  The fruit that eventual tree produced was sweet and fruity, but it wasn't red, rather red and yellow-striped, like an heirloom tomato.  Of course, back then, those were just called tomatoes.   It was introduced to the market in 1874 and the rights to the Hawkeye apple were sold to the Stark Brothers Nursery, whose owner thought it was the best apple he'd ever tasted.  By 1914, Stark's renamed the variety Red Delicious, and over time, produced a fruit with less yellow and more red year over year.  It also gained its buxom top-heavy shape and five little feet nubs on the bottom.   As with any product, it took a hefty shovelful of marketing for Red Delicious to gain a following, but gain it did.  Current estimates have Red Delicious being 90% of the apple crop at one point.  That point happened in the 1950s, thanks to that force of nature, changes in buying habits.  PreWWII, people would buy food right from the farm or at farmers markets, then the modern grocery store, with its cold storage, and the refrigerated truck courtesy of Frederick Jones.  Bigger stores need to move more product and a big pyramid of shiny, sports car red apples by the front window will really bring the punters in.  Growers could sell them to packers, who in turn sold them to those grocery store chains, which also fueled a change in their taste.  Orchardists bred and crossbreed the Red Delicious to get that perfect shape and color, uniformity and resilience to handling and shipping; they just left off tiny considerations, very minor concessions really, like taste and texture.   But there's change a-foot again.  People began to realize you can have an apple in your pack lunch or the big bowl at the fancy hotel reception desk that you'd actually want to eat.  Now we're all about those Sweet Tangos, Braseburns, and Honeycrips.  Unwilling or unable to admit defeat, however, the Red Delicious is still out there.  But like a lot of has-beens, its seeing more success abroad than at home, and they're exported to the western Pacific Rim, Mexico and parts of Europe.      Apart from random saplings popping up randomly, new varieties of apples take a lot of people a lot of time and effort, to say nothing of a robust research & development budget.  Take Washington State University Tree Fruit Research and Extension Center, for example.  In 1981, now-retired horticulturist Bruce Barritt set out to create an apple bred for flavor and long storage instead of appearance, to compete with the Fuji from Japan and the Gala from New Zealand.  Like breeding animals, you start with two parents with known traits, then selectively breed for the ones you want over the course of several generations.  You have to have the patience of a Buddhist monk, since apple trees take four to five years to bear fruit and you know whether or not it worked.  Barritt needed that patience to eventually create the apple that actually made mainstream, even international, news in 2019 – the Cosmic Crisp.  These are no small potatoes, either.  There's probably a French language joke in there.  The marketing budget alone is $10 million.  A $10mil marketing budget….for an apple.     Cosmic Crisps are mostly a dark-ish red with yellowy speckles reminiscent of stars.  The website, did I mention it has its own website, says [commercial read] “The large, juicy apple has a remarkably firm and crisp texture. Some say it snaps when you bite into it!  The Cosmic Crisp® flavor profile is the perfect balance of sweet and tart, making it ideal for snacking, baking, cooking, juicing or any other way you like to enjoy apples.”  Hire me for voiceovers at moxielabouche.com for lightning-fast voiceovers because I was one time hit by lightning.   The first Cosmic Crisp seed began in 1997 with pollen from a Honeycrisp flower, applied by hand to the stigma of an Enterprise.  Racy stuff.  Honeycrisp as we know are lovely and Enterprise apples were known for disease-resistance and long storage life.  Storage life is important because an apple has to be as good in late spring as it was when it was picked in the fall, as most to all of the apples you buy are.  Yep, all apples are picked at once and sold for months to come.  Holding up in winter storage is one of malus domestica's best features.  If that bothers you on principle, though, don't look up harvesting oranges for juice – it's positively depressing.      After two years of greenhouse germination, the very first Cosmic Crisp trees were planted, and a few years later after that, fruit happened.  That was when, according to Barritt, the real work began.  He'd go through the orchard, randomly picking apples and taking a bite. “Most were terrible, but when I found one with good texture and flavor, I'd pick 10 or 20 of them. Then I put them in cold storage to see how they would hold up after a few months,” he told PopSci in 2018.  Barritt's team would compare the apples for crispness, acidity, firmness, how well it stored, and on and on anon, to determine which trees to cross with which and start the cycle all over again.  They weren't testing only Honeycrisp and Enterprise, but lots of crisp varieties – Honeycrisp is just the one that worked.  It took until 2017, a full 20 years after the first seeds went in the ground, for Cosmic Crisp trees to become available to growers, to say nothing of the fruit reaching the public.  The project actually outlived Barritt's participation, when he retired back in 2008 and turned everything over to WSU horticulture professor Kate Evans.   There's still the question of why, why spend literally hundreds of millions of dollars to create a new apple?  This wasn't about developing a product to sell and make money, it was about saving an entire region's industry.  The pacific northwest farmed Red Delicious apples like there was no tomorrow and in the 90's, tomorrow got real uncertain.  In the last three years of the decade, farmers lost around $760mil with fields full of fruit fewer and fewer folks wanted to fork over their funds for.  That was the problem that Barritt set out to solve.  They needed an apple that had it all - movie star good looks, full of flavor with a crunchy bit.  By the end of 2019, Washington farmers were growing 12,000 acres of Cosmic Crisp trees and there's talk of Cosmic Crisp's having a strong chance at taking over the market.   If you have a bit of land and want to grow your own Cosmic Crisp, you going to have to wait even longer than usual.  It's only available to grower in WA for the first ten years to give the growers an advantage.  Remember, you can't plant seeds and get a tree that gives you fruit like the one you ate to get the seeds.  Don't worry, just five more years.     But you can't, like, own a tree man.  I can but that's because I'm not a penniless hippie.  Sorry, Futurama moment, but the point still stands.  Because this is America and we've never seen a person, place, thing, or idea we didn't want to legally own and monetize.  We're talking about patents and before I go any further, do you have any idea what a pain it is to search for apple patents and *not get results about Apple the company.  According to the US Patent and Trademark Office, “a plant patent is granted …to an inventor … who has invented or discovered and asexually reproduced a distinct and new variety of plant, other than a tuber propagated plant or a plant found in an uncultivated state. The grant, which lasts for 20 years from the date of filing the application, protects the inventor's right to exclude others from asexually reproducing, selling, or using the plant so reproduced.”  So if you make a variety of plant that no one else has ever made, or at least no one has patented, you have ultra-dibs for 20 and no one else is supposed to breed, sell, or do anything else with plants of that variety.   Plant patents became a thing in the early 1930's, a fine time in American agriculture *sough*dustbowl*cough* first granted to Henry Bosenberg for a CLIMBING OR TRAILING ROSE (USPP1 P).  Since then, thousands of plant patents have been granted, and that includes apples.  Apples as intellectual property.  The beloved Honeycrisp was patented in the late 1980's by the University of Minnesota.  The Honeycrisp blossomed in popularity, pun allowed, among consumers, both grocery shoppers and growers.  Nurseries would sell the trees to anyone who called and ordered one, but since it was patented, buuuut growers would have to pay a royalty of one dollar per tree to the University of Minnesota until the patent has expired.  With an average size of 50 acres per orchard and 36 trees per acre, that only comes to $1800, which isn't too, too bad.  A much tighter rein was kept on University of Minnesota's patented MINNEISKA, which produces the SweeTango apple.  Only a small group of apple growers has been given license to grow this variety of apple and they have to pay royalties as well.  UM also has multiple trademarks registered, so anyone who tries to sell an apple under that name or a similar one may find themselves in court.  Now how about them apples?  Hey, at least I waited until the end. Sources: https://historicsites.nc.gov/all-sites/horne-creek-farm/southern-heritage-apple-orchard/apples/apple-history/origins-apples https://www.americanscientist.org/article/the-mysterious-origin-of-the-sweet-apple https://www.theorchardproject.org.uk/blog/where-do-apples-come-from/ https://www.britannica.com/story/was-johnny-appleseed-a-real-person https://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/real-johnny-appleseed-brought-applesand-booze-american-frontier-180953263/ https://www.nwpb.org/2017/05/03/want-to-grow-an-apple-tree-dont-start-with-apple-seeds/ https://www.popsci.com/story/diy/cosmic-crisp-apple-guide/ https://www.huffpost.com/entry/red-delicious-apples-suck_n_5b630199e4b0b15abaa061af https://suiter.com/how-do-you-like-them-apples-enough-to-patent-them/ https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/04/30/526069512/paradise-lost-how-the-apple-became-the-forbidden-fruit https://www.businessinsider.com/cosmic-crisp-apple-washington-state-scientists-2020-11 https://suiter.com/how-do-you-like-them-apples-enough-to-patent-them/  

BrainStuff
How Old Are Grocery Store Apples?

BrainStuff

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 8:21


The apples you find in your chain grocery store may have been picked a year ago -- but that's OK. Learn about apple storage technology in this episode of BrainStuff, based on this article: https://recipes.howstuffworks.com/grocery-store-apple-one-year-old.htm Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com