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Best podcasts about Tetris

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Latest podcast episodes about Tetris

Leveling Up with Benjamin Banks
Marbles and Tetris with the Dungeon Master, Kieran Regan

Leveling Up with Benjamin Banks

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 77:18


Bank's birthday month celebration continues with the podcasts brand new best friend, Kieran Regan. They are talking theater, anime, marbles, Tetris, D&D and so much more. You can listen to Kieran as the voice of Rio on the brand new anime, Seirei Gensouki: Spirit Chronicles, every Monday on Crunchyroll!As always make sure you support the podcast by rating and subscribing to us on Apple Podcast, it really helps us out in the algorithms, you can also listen on all podcast platforms. You can find those by clicking the link below:https://pod.link/levelingupbanksAlso, make sure you subscribe to the YouTube channel where we post a brand new video everyday and upload the video portion of this episode on Friday. You can find that by clicking the link below:https://www.youtube.com/c/LevelingUpwithBenjaminBanksGolden Ink Tattoo Golden Ink Tattoo is the premiere nerd tattoo shop in Portsmouth, VA! Get your tattoo at Golden Ink!Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/LevelingUpBanks)

It's A Thing
A Twee Tequila Twitch Stream - It's a Thing 197

It's A Thing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 22:32


Tom basks in the raging TikTok fire of twee and Molly discovers the benefits of barrel ownership. Then Tom embraces bing bong, while Molly gets to relive the glory of Tetris.LINKS:TweeTokBarrelsBottle from your barrelTetrisBing Bong See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Screaming in the Cloud
GCP's Many Profundities with Miles Ward

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 42:06


About MilesAs Chief Technology Officer at SADA, Miles Ward leads SADA's cloud strategy and solutions capabilities. His remit includes delivering next-generation solutions to challenges in big data and analytics, application migration, infrastructure automation, and cost optimization; reinforcing our engineering culture; and engaging with customers on their most complex and ambitious plans around Google Cloud.Previously, Miles served as Director and Global Lead for Solutions at Google Cloud. He founded the Google Cloud's Solutions Architecture practice, launched hundreds of solutions, built Style-Detection and Hummus AI APIs, built CloudHero, designed the pricing and TCO calculators, and helped thousands of customers like Twitter who migrated the world's largest Hadoop cluster to public cloud and Audi USA who re-platformed to k8s before it was out of alpha, and helped Banco Itau design the intercloud architecture for the bank of the future.Before Google, Miles helped build the AWS Solutions Architecture team. He wrote the first AWS Well-Architected framework, proposed Trusted Advisor and the Snowmobile, invented GameDay, worked as a core part of the Obama for America 2012 “tech” team, helped NASA stream the Curiosity Mars Rover landing, and rebooted Skype in a pinch.Earning his Bachelor of Science in Rhetoric and Media Studies from Willamette University, Miles is a three-time technology startup entrepreneur who also plays a mean electric sousaphone.Links: SADA.com: https://sada.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/milesward Email: miles@sada.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: It seems like there is a new security breach every day. Are you confident that an old SSH key, or a shared admin account, isn't going to come back and bite you? If not, check out Teleport. Teleport is the easiest, most secure way to access all of your infrastructure. The open source Teleport Access Plane consolidates everything you need for secure access to your Linux and Windows servers—and I assure you there is no third option there. Kubernetes clusters, databases, and internal applications like AWS Management Console, Yankins, GitLab, Grafana, Jupyter Notebooks, and more. Teleport's unique approach is not only more secure, it also improves developer productivity. To learn more visit: goteleport.com. And not, that is not me telling you to go away, it is: goteleport.com.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Redis, the company behind the incredibly popular open source database that is not the bind DNS server. If you're tired of managing open source Redis on your own, or you're using one of the vanilla cloud caching services, these folks have you covered with the go to manage Redis service for global caching and primary database capabilities; Redis Enterprise. To learn more and deploy not only a cache but a single operational data platform for one Redis experience, visit redis.com/hero. Thats r-e-d-i-s.com/hero. And my thanks to my friends at Redis for sponsoring my ridiculous non-sense.  Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I am joined today, once again by my friend and yours, Miles Ward, who's the CTO at SADA. However, he is, as I think of him, the closest thing the Google Cloud world has to Corey Quinn. Now, let's be clear, not the music and dancing part that is Forrest Brazeal, but Forrest works at Google Cloud, whereas Miles is a reasonably salty third-party. Miles, thank you for coming back and letting me subject you to that introduction.Miles: Corey, I appreciate that introduction. I am happy to provide substantial salt. It is easy, as I play brass instruments that produce my spit in high volumes. It's the most disgusting part of any possible introduction. For the folks in the audience, I am surrounded by a collection of giant sousaphones, tubas, trombones, baritones, marching baritones, trumpets, and pocket trumpets.So, Forrest threw down the gauntlet and was like, I can play a keyboard, and sing, and look cute at the same time. And so I decided to fail at all three. We put out a new song just a bit ago that's, like, us thanking all of our customers and partners, covering Kool & the Gang “Celebration,” and I neither look good, [laugh] play piano, or smiling, or [capturing 00:01:46] any of the notes; I just play the bass part, it's all I got to do.Corey: So, one thing that I didn't get to talk a lot about because it's not quite in my universe, for one, and for another, it is during the pre re:Invent—pre:Invent, my nonsense thing—run up, which is Google Cloud Next.Miles: Yes.Corey: And my gag a few years ago is that I'm not saying that Google is more interested in what they're building and what they're shipping, but even their conference is called Next. Buh dum, hiss.Miles: [laugh].Corey: So, I didn't really get to spend a lot of attention on the Google Cloud releases that came out this year, but given that SADA is in fact the, I believe, largest Google Cloud partner on the internet, and thus the world—Miles: [unintelligible 00:02:27] new year, three years in a row back, baby.Corey: Fantastic. I assume someone's watch got stuck or something. But good work. So, you have that bias in the way that I have a bias, which is your business is focused around Google Cloud the way that mine is focused on AWS, but neither of us is particularly beholden to that given company. I mean, you do have the not getting fired as partner, but that's a bit of a heavy lift; I don't think I can mouth off well enough to get you there.So, we have a position of relative independence. So, you were tracking Google Next, the same way that I track re:Invent. Well, not quite the same way I track re:Invent; there are some significant differences. What happened at Cloud Next 2021, that the worst of us should be paying attention to?Miles: Sure. I presented 10% of the material at the first re:Invent. There are 55 sessions; I did six. And so I have been at Cloud events for a really long time and really excited about Google's willingness to dive into demos in a way that I think they have been a little shy about. Kelsey Hightower is the kind of notable deep exception to that. Historically, he's been ready to dive into the, kind of, heavy hands-on piece but—Corey: Wait, those were demos? [Thought 00:03:39] was just playing Tetris on stage for the love of it.Miles: [laugh]. No. And he really codes all that stuff up, him and the whole team.Corey: Oh, absol—I'm sorry. If I ever grow up, I wish to be Kelsey Hightower.Miles: [laugh]. You and me both. So, he had kind of led the charge. We did a couple of fun little demos while I was there, but they've really gotten a lot further into that, and I think are doing a better job of packaging the benefits to not just developers, but also operators and data scientists and the broader roles in the cloud ecosystem from the new features that are being launched. And I think, different than the in-person events where there's 10, 20,000, 40,000 people in the audience paying attention, I think they have to work double-hard to capture attention and get engineers to tune in to what's being launched.But if you squint and look close, there are some, I think, very interesting trends that sit in the back of some of the very first launches in what I think are going to be whole veins of launches from Google over the course of the next several years that we are working really hard to track along with and make sure we're extracting maximum value from for our customers.Corey: So, what was it that they announced that is worth paying attention to? Now, through the cacophony of noise, one announcement that [I want to note 00:04:49] was tied to Next was the announcement that GME group, I believe, is going to be putting their futures exchange core trading systems on Google Cloud. At which point that to me—and I know people are going to yell at me, and I don't even slightly care—that is the last nail in the coffin of the idea that well, Google is going to turn this off in a couple years. Sorry, no. That is not a thing that's going to happen. Worst case, they might just stop investing it as aggressively as they are now, but even that would be just a clown-shoes move that I have a hard time envisioning.Miles: Yeah, you're talking now over a dozen, over ten year, over a billion-dollar commitments. So, you've got to just really, really hate your stock price if you're going to decide to vaporize that much shareholder value, right? I mean, we think that, in Google, stock price is a material fraction of the recognition of the growth trajectory for cloud, which is now basically just third place behind YouTube. And I think you can do the curve math, it's not like it's going to take long.Corey: Right. That requires effectively ejecting Thomas Kurian as the head of Google Cloud and replacing him with the former SVP of Bad Decisions at Yahoo.Miles: [laugh]. Sure. Google has no shyness about continuing to rotate leadership. I was there through three heads of Google Cloud, so I don't expect that Thomas will be the last although I think he may well go down in history as having been the best. The level of rotation to the focuses that I think are most critical, getting enterprise customers happy, successful, committed, building macroscale systems, in systems that are critical to the core of the business on GCP has grown at an incredible rate under his stewardship. So, I think he's doing a great job.Corey: He gets a lot of criticism—often from Googlers—when I wind up getting the real talk from them, which is, “Can you tell me what you really think?” Their answer is, “No,” I'm like, “Okay, next question. Can I go out and buy you eight beers and then”— and it's like, “Yeah.” And the answer that I get pretty commonly is that he's brought too much Oracle into Google. And okay, that sounds like a bad thing because, you know, Oracle, but let's be clear here, but what are you talking about specifically? And what they say distills down to engineers are no longer the end-all be-all of everything that Google Cloud. Engineers don't get to make sales decisions, or marketing decisions, or in some cases, product decisions. And that is not how Google has historically been run, and they don't like the change. I get it, but engineering is not the only hard thing in the world and it's not the only business area that builds value, let's be clear on this. So, I think that the things that they don't like are in fact, what Google absolutely needs.Miles: I think, one, the man is exceptionally intimidating and intentionally just hyper, hyper attentive to his business. So, one of my best employees, Brad [Svee 00:07:44], he worked together with me to lay out what was the book of our whole department, my team of 86 people there. What are we about? What do we do? And like I wanted this as like a memoriam to teach new hires as got brought in. So, this is, like, 38 pages of detail about our process, our hiring method, our promotional approach, all of it. I showed that to my new boss who had come in at the time, and he thought some of the pictures looked good. When we showed it to TK, he read every paragraph. I watched him highlight the paragraphs as he went through, and he read it twice as fast as I can read the thing. I think he does that to everybody's documents, everywhere. So, there's a level of just manual rigor that he's brought to the practice that was certainly not there before that. So, that alone, it can be intimidating for folks, but I think people that are high performance find that very attractive.Corey: Well, from my perspective, he is clearly head and shoulders above Adam Selipsky, and Scott Guthrie—the respective heads of AWS and Azure—for one key reason: He is the only one of those three people who follows me on Twitter. And—Miles: [laugh].Corey: —honestly, that is how I evaluate vendors.Miles: That's the thing. That's the only measure, yep. I've worked on for a long time with Selipsky, and I think that it will be interesting to see whether Adam's approach to capital allocation—where he really, I think, thinks of himself as the manager of thousands of startups, as opposed to a manager of a global business—whether that's a more efficient process for creating value for customers, then, where I think TK is absolutely trying to build a much more unified, much more singular platform. And a bunch of the launches really speak to that, right? So, one of the product announcements that I think is critical is this idea of the global distributed cloud, Google Distributed Cloud.We started with Kubernetes. And then you layer on to that, okay, we'll take care of Kubernetes for you; we call that Anthos. We'll build a bunch of structural controls and features into Anthos to make it so that you can really deal with stuff in a global way. Okay, what does that look like further? How do we get out into edge environments? Out into diverse hardware? How do we partner up with everybody to make sure that, kind of like comparing Apple's approach to Google's approach, you have an Android ecosystem of Kubernetes providers instead of just one place you can buy an outpost. That's generally the idea of GDC. I think that's a spot where you're going to watch Google actually leverage the muscle that it already built in understanding open-source dynamics and understanding collaboration between companies as opposed to feeling like it's got to be built here. We've got to sell it here. It's got to have our brand on it.Corey: I think that there's a stupendous and extreme story that is still unfolding over at Google Cloud. Now, re:Invent this year, they wound up talking all about how what they were rolling out was a focus on improving primitives. And they're right. I love their managed database service that they launched because it didn't exist.Miles: Yeah Werner's slide, “It's primitives, not frameworks.” I was like, I think customers want solutions, not frameworks or primitives. [laugh]. What's your plan?Corey: Yeah. However, I take a different perspective on all of this, which is that is a terrific spin on the big headline launches all missed the re:Invent timeline, and… oops, so now we're just going to talk about these other things instead. And that's great, but then they start talking about industrial IOT, and mainframe migrations, and the idea of private 5G, and running fleets of robots. And it's—Miles: Yeah, that's a cool product.Corey: Which one? I'm sorry, they're all very different things.Miles: Private 5G.Corey: Yeah, if someone someday will explain to me how it differs from Wavelength, but that's neither here nor there. You're right, they're all interesting, but none of them are actually doing the thing that I do, which is build websites, [unintelligible 00:11:31] looking for web services, it kind of says it in the name. And it feels like it's very much broadening into everything, and it's very difficult for me to identify—and if I have trouble that I guarantee you customers do—of, which services are for me and which are very much not? In some cases, the only answer to that is to check the pricing. I thought Kendra, their corporate information search thing was for me, then it's 7500 bucks a month to get started with that thing, and that is, “I can hire an internal corporate librarian to just go and hunt through our Google Drive.” Great.Miles: Yeah.Corey: So, there are—or our Dropbox, or our Slack. We have, like, five different information repositories, and this is how corporate nonsense starts, let me assure you.Miles: Yes. We call that luxury SaaS, you must enjoy your dozens of overlapping bills for, you know, what Workspace gives you as a single flat rate.Corey: Well, we have [unintelligible 00:12:22] a lot of this stuff, too. Google Drive is great, but we use Dropbox for holding anything that touches our customer's billing information, just because I—to be clear, I do not distrust Google, but it also seems a little weird to put the confidential billing information for one of their competitors on there to thing if a customer were to ask about it. So, it's the, like, I don't believe anyone's doing anything nefarious, but let's go ahead and just make sure, in this case.Miles: Go further man. Vimeo runs on GCP. You think YouTube doesn't want to look at Vimeo stats? Like they run everything on GCP, so they have to have arrived at a position of trust somehow. Oh, I know how it's called encryption. You've heard of encryption before? It's the best.Corey: Oh, yes. I love these rumors that crop up every now and again that Amazon is going to start scanning all of its customer content, somehow. It's first, do you have any idea how many compute resources that would take and to if they can actually do that and access something you're storing in there, against their attestations to the contrary, then that's your story because one of them just makes them look bad, the other one utterly destroys their entire business.Miles: Yeah.Corey: I think that that's the one that gets the better clicks. So no, they're not doing that.Miles: No, they're not doing that. Another product launch that I thought was super interesting that describes, let's call it second place—the third place will be the one where we get off into the technical deep end—but there's a whole set of coordinated work they're calling Cortex. So, let's imagine you go to a customer, they say, “I want to understand what's happening with my business.” You go, “Great.” So, you use SAP, right? So, you're a big corporate shop, and that's your infrastructure of choice. There are a bunch of different options at that layer.When you set up SAP, one of the advantages that something like that has is they have, kind of, pre-built configurations for roughly your business, but whatever behaviors SAP doesn't do, right, say, data warehousing, advanced analytics, regression and projection and stuff like that, maybe that's somewhat outside of the core wheelhouse for SAP, you would expect like, oh okay, I'll bolt on BigQuery. I'll build that stuff over there. We'll stream the data between the two. Yeah, I'm off to the races, but the BigQuery side of the house doesn't have this like bitching menu that says, “You're a retailer, and so you probably want to see these 75 KPIs, and you probably want to chew up your SKUs in exactly this way. And here's some presets that make it so that this is operable out of the box.”So, they are doing the three way combination: Consultancies plus ISVs plus Google products, and doing all the pre-work configuration to go out to a customer and go I know what you probably just want. Why don't I just give you the whole thing so that it does the stuff that you want? That I think—if that's the very first one, this little triangle between SAP, and Big Query, and a bunch of consultancies like mine, you have to imagine they go a lot further with that a lot faster, right? I mean, what does that look like when they do it with Epic, when they go do it with Go just generally, when they go do it with Apache? I've heard of that software, right? Like, there's no reason not to bundle up what the obvious choices are for a bunch of these combinations.Corey: The idea of moving up the stack and offering full on solutions, that's what customers actually want. “Well, here's a bunch of things you can do to wind up wiring together to build a solution,” is, “Cool. Then I'm going to go hire a company who's already done that is going to sell it to me at a significant markup because I just don't care.” I pay way more to WP Engine than I would to just run WordPress myself on top of AWS or Google Cloud. In fact, it is on Google Cloud, but okay.Miles: You and me both, man. WP Engine is the best. I—Corey: It's great because—Miles: You're welcome. I designed a bunch of the hosting on the back of that.Corey: Oh, yeah. But it's also the—I—well, it costs a little bit more that way. Yeah, but guess what's not—guess what's more expensive than that bill, is my time spent doing the care and feeding of this stuff. I like giving money to experts and making it their problem.Miles: Yeah. I heard it said best, Lego is an incredible business. I love their product, and you can build almost any toy with it. And they have not displaced all other plastic toy makers.Corey: Right.Miles: Some kids just want to buy a little car. [laugh].Corey: Oh, yeah, you can build anything you want out of Lego bricks, which are great, which absolutely explains why they are a reference AWS customer.Miles: Yeah, they're great. But they didn't beat all other toy companies worldwide, and eliminate the rest of that market because they had the better primitive, right? These other solutions are just as valuable, just as interesting, tend to have much bigger markets. Lego is not the largest toy manufacturer in the world. They are not in the top five of toy manufacturers in the world, right?Like, so chasing that thread, and getting all the way down into the spots where I think many of the cloud providers on their own, internally, had been very uncomfortable. Like, you got to go all the way to building this stuff that they need for that division, inside of that company, in that geo, in that industry? That's maybe, like, a little too far afield. I think Google has a natural advantage in its more partner-oriented approach to create these combinations that lower the cost to them and to customers to getting out of that solution quick.Corey: So, getting into the weeds of Google Next, I suppose, rather than a whole bunch of things that don't seem to apply to anyone except the four or five companies that really could use it, what things did Google release that make the lives of people building, you know, web apps better?Miles: This is the one. So, I'm at Amazon, hanging out as a part of the team that built up the infrastructure for the Obama campaign in 2012, and there are a bunch of Googlers there, and we are fighting with databases. We are fighting so hard, in fact, with RDS that I think we are the only ones that [Raju 00:17:51] has ever allowed to SSH into our RDS instances to screw with them.Corey: Until now, with the advent of RDS Custom, meaning that you can actually get in as root; where that hell that lands between RDS and EC2 is ridiculous. I just know that RDS can now run containers.Miles: Yeah. I know how many things we did in there that were good for us, and how many things we did in there that were bad for us. And I have to imagine, this is not a feature that they really ought to let everybody have, myself included. But I will say that what all of the Googlers that I talk to, you know, at the first blush, were I'm the evil Amazon guy in to, sort of, distract them and make them build a system that, you know, was very reliable and ended up winning an election was that they had a better database, and they had Spanner, and they didn't understand why this whole thing wasn't sitting on Spanner. So, we looked, and I read the white paper, and then I got all drooly, and I was like, yes, that is a much better database than everybody else's database, and I don't understand why everybody else isn't on it. Oh, there's that one reason, but you've heard of it: No other software works with it, anywhere in the world, right? It's utterly proprietary to Google. Yes, they were kind—Corey: Oh, you want to migrate it off somewhere else, or a fraction of it? Great. Step one, redo your data architecture.Miles: Yeah, take all of my software everywhere, rewrite every bit of it. And, oh all those commercial applications? Yeah, forget all those, you got, too. Right? It was very much where Google was eight years ago. So, for me, it was immensely meaningful to see the launch at Next where they described what they are building—and have now built; we have alpha access to it—a Postgres layer for Spanner.Corey: Is that effectively you have to treat it as Postgres at all times, or is it multimodal access?Miles: You can get in and tickle it like Spanner, if you want to tickle it like Spanner. And in reality, Spanner is ANSI SQL compliant; you're still writing SQL, you just don't have to talk to it like a REST endpoint, or a GRPC endpoint, or something; you can, you know, have like a—Corey: So, similar to Azure's Cosmos DB, on some level, except for the part where you can apparently look at other customers' data in that thing?Miles: [laugh]. Exactly. Yeah, you will not have a sweeping discovery of incredible security violations in the structure Spanner, in that it is the control system that Google uses to place every ad, and so it does not suck. You can't put a trillion-dollar business on top of a database and not have it be safe. That's kind of a thing.Corey: The thing that I find is the most interesting area of tech right now is there's been this rise of distributed databases. Yugabyte—or You-ji-byte—Pla-netScale—or PlanetScale, depending on how you pronounce these things.Miles: [laugh]. Yeah, why, why is G such an adversarial consonant? I don't understand why we've all gotten to this place.Corey: Oh, yeah. But at the same time, it's—so you take a look at all these—and they all are speaking Postgres; it is pretty clear that ‘Postgres-squeal' is the thing that is taking over the world as far as databases go. If I were building something from scratch that used—Miles: For folks in the back, that's PostgreSQL, for the rest of us, it's okay, it's going to be, all right.Corey: Same difference. But yeah, it's the thing that is eating the world. Although recently, I've got to say, MongoDB is absolutely stepping up in a bunch of really interesting ways.Miles: I mean, I think the 4.0 release, I'm the guy who wrote the MongoDB on AWS Best Practices white paper, and I would grab a lot of customer's and—Corey: They have to change it since then of, step one: Do not use DocumentDB; if you want to use Mongo, use Mongo.Miles: Yeah, that's right. No, there were a lot of customers I was on the phone with where Mongo had summarily vaporized their data, and I think they have made huge strides in structural reliability over the course of—you know, especially this 4.0 launch, but the last couple of years, for sure.Corey: And with all the people they've been hiring from AWS, it's one of those, “Well, we'll look at this now who's losing important things from production?”Miles: [laugh]. Right? So, maybe there's only actually five humans who know how to do operations, and we just sort of keep moving around these different companies.Corey: That's sort of my assumption on these things. But Postgres, for those who are not looking to depart from the relational model, is eating the world. And—Miles: There's this, like, basic emotional thing. My buddy Martin, who set up MySQL, and took it public, and then promptly got it gobbled up by the Oracle people, like, there was a bet there that said, hey, there's going to be a real open database, and then squish, like, the man came and got it. And so like, if you're going to be an independent, open-source software developer, I think you're probably not pushing your pull requests to our friends at Oracle, that seems weird. So instead, I think Postgres has gobbled up the best minds on that stuff.And it works. It's reliable, it's consistent, and it's functional in all these different, sort of, reapplications and subdivisions, right? I mean, you have to sort of squint real hard, but down there in the guts of Redshift, that's Postgres, right? Like, there's Postgres behind all sorts of stuff. So, as an interface layer, I'm not as interested about how it manages to be successful at bossing around hardware and getting people the zeros and ones that they ask for back in a timely manner.I'm interested in it as a compatibility standard, right? If I have software that says, “I need to have Postgres under here and then it all will work,” that creates this layer of interop that a bunch of other products can use. So, folks like PlanetScale, and Yugabyte can say, “No, no, no, it's cool. We talk Postgres; that'll make it so your application works right. You can bring a SQL alchemy and plug it into this, or whatever your interface layer looks like.”That's the spot where, if I can trade what is a fairly limited global distribution, global transactional management on literally ridiculously unlimited scalability and zero operations, I can handle the hard parts of running a database over to somebody else, but I get my layer, and my software talks to it, I think that's a huge step.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by my friends at Cloud Academy. Something special just for you folks. If you missed their offer on Black Friday or Cyber Monday or whatever day of the week doing sales it is—good news! They've opened up their Black Friday promotion for a very limited time. Same deal, $100 off a yearly plan, $249 a year for the highest quality cloud and tech skills content. Nobody else can get this because they have a assured me this not going to last for much longer. Go to CloudAcademy.com, hit the "start free trial" button on the homepage, and use the Promo code cloud at checkout. That's c-l-o-u-d, like loud, what I am, with a “C” in front of it. It's a free trial, so you'll get 7 days to try it out to make sure it's really a good fit for you, nothing to lose except your ignorance about cloud. My thanks again for sponsoring my ridiculous nonsense.Corey: I think that there's a strong movement toward building out on something like this. If it works, just because—well, I'm not multiregion today, but I can easily see a world in which I'd want to be. So, great. How do you approach the decision between—once this comes out of alpha; let's be clear. Let's turn this into something that actually ships, and no, Google that does not mean slapping a beta label on it for five years is the answer here; you actually have to stand behind this thing—but once it goes GA—Miles: GA is a good thing.Corey: Yeah. How do you decide between using that, or PlanetScale? Or Yugabyte?Miles: Or Cockroach or or SingleStore, right? I mean, there's a zillion of them that sit in this market. I think the core of the decision making for me is in every team you're looking at what skills do you bring to bear and what problem that you're off to go solve for customers? Do the nuances of these products make it easier to solve? So, I think there are some products that the nature of what you're building isn't all that dependent on one part of the application talking to another one, or an event happening someplace else mattering to an event over here. But some applications, that's, like, utterly critical, like, totally, totally necessary.So, we worked with a bunch of like Forex exchange trading desks that literally turn off 12 hours out of the day because they can only keep it consistent in one geographical location right near the main exchanges in New York. So, that's a place where I go, “Would you like to trade all day?” And they go, “Yes, but I can't because databases.” So, “Awesome. Let's call the folks on the Spanner side. They can solve that problem.”I go, “Would you like to trade all day and rewrite all your software?” And they go, “No.” And I go, “Oh, okay. What about trade all day, but not rewrite all your software?” There we go. Now, we've got a solution to that kind of problem.So like, we built this crazy game, like, totally other end of the ecosystem with the Dragon Ball Z people, hysterical; your like—you literally play like Rock, Paper, Scissors with your phone, and if you get a rock, I throw a fireball, and you get a paper, then I throw a punch, and we figure out who wins. But they can play these games like Europe versus Japan, thousands of people on each side, real-time, and it works.Corey: So, let's be clear, I have lobbied a consistent criticism at Google for a while now, which is the Google Cloud global control plane. So, you wind up with things like global service outages from time to time, you wind up with this thing is now broken for everyone everywhere. And that, for a lot of these use cases, is a problem. And I said that AWS's approach to regional isolation is the right way to do it. And I do stand by that assessment, except for the part where it turns out there's a lot of control plane stuff that winds up single tracking through us-east-1, as we learned in the great us-east-1 outage of 2021.Miles: Yeah, when I see customers move from data center to AWS, what they expect is a higher count of outages that lasts less time. That's the trade off, right? There's going to be more weird spurious stuff, and maybe—maybe—if they're lucky, that outage will be over there at some other region they're not using. I see almost exactly the same promise happening to folks that come from AWS—and in particular from Azure—over onto GCP, which is, there will be probably a higher frequency of outages at a per product level, right? So, like sometimes, like, some weird product takes a screw sideways, where there is structural interdependence between quite a few products—we actually published a whole internal structural map of like, you know, it turns out that Cloud SQL runs on top of GCE not on GKE, so you can expect if GKE goes sideways, Cloud SQL is probably not going to go sideways; the two aren't dependent on each other.Corey: You take the status page and Amazon FreeRTOS in a region is having an outage today or something like that. You're like, “Oh, no. That's terrible. First, let me go look up what the hell that is.” And I'm not using it? Absolutely not. Great. As hyperscalers, well, hyperscale, they're always things that are broken in different ways, in different locations, and if you had a truly accurate status page, it would all be red all the time, or varying shades of red, which is not helpful. So, I understand the challenge there, but very often, it's a partition that is you are not exposed to, or the way that you've architected things, ideally, means it doesn't really matter. And that is a good thing. So, raw outage counts don't solve that. I also maintain that if I were to run in a single region of AWS or even a single AZ, in all likelihood, I will have a significantly better uptime across the board than I would if I ran it myself. Because—Miles: Oh, for sure.Corey: —it is—Miles: For sure they're way better at ops than you are. Me, right?Corey: Of course.Miles: Right? Like, ridiculous.Corey: And they got that way, by learning. Like, I think in 2022, it is unlikely that there's going to be an outage in an AWS availability zone by someone tripping over a power cable, whereas I have actually done that. So, there's a—to be clear in a data center, not an AWS facility; that would not have flown. So, there is the better idea of of going in that direction. But the things like Route 53 is control plane single-tracking through the us-east-1, if you can't make DNS changes in an outage scenario, you may as well not have a DR plan, for most use cases.Miles: To be really clear, it was a part of the internal documentation on the AWS side that we would share with customers to be absolutely explicit with them. It's not just that there are mistakes and accidents which we try to limit to AZs, but no, go further, that we may intentionally cause outages to AZs if that's what allows us to keep broader service health higher, right? They are not just a blast radius because you, oops, pulled the pin on the grenade; they can actually intentionally step on the off button. And that's different than the way Google operates. They think of each of the AZs, and each of the regions, and the global system as an always-on, all the time environment, and they do not have systems where one gets, sort of, sacrificed for the benefit of the rest, right, or they will intentionally plan to take a system offline.There is no planned downtime in the SLA, where the SLAs from my friends at Amazon and Azure are explicit to, if they choose to, they decide to take it offline, they can. Now, that's—I don't know, I kind of want the contract that has the other thing where you don't get that.Corey: I don't know what the right answer is for a lot of these things. I think multi-cloud is dumb. I think that the idea of having this workload that you're going to seamlessly deploy to two providers in case of an outage, well guess what? The orchestration between those two providers is going to cause you more outages than you would take just sticking on one. And in most cases, unless you are able to have complete duplication of not just functionality but capacity between those two, congratulations, you've now just doubled your number of single points of failure, you made the problem actively worse and more expensive. Good job.Miles: I wrote an article about this, and I think it's important to differentiate between dumb and terrifyingly shockingly expensive, right? So, I have a bunch of customers who I would characterize as rich, as like, shockingly rich, as producing businesses that have 80-plus percent gross margins. And for them, the costs associated with this stuff are utterly rational, and they take on that work, and they are seeing benefits, or they wouldn't be doing it.Corey: Of course.Miles: So, I think their trajectory in technology—you know, this is a quote from a Google engineer—it's just like, “Oh, you want to see what the future looks like? Hang out with rich people.” I went into houses when I was a little kid that had whole-home automation. I couldn't afford them; my mom was cleaning house there, but now my house, I can use my phone to turn on the lights. Like—Corey: You know, unless us-east-1 is having a problem.Miles: Hey, and then no Roomba for you, right? Like utterly offline. So—Corey: Roomba has now failed to room.Miles: Conveniently, my lights are Philips Hue, and that's on Google, so that baby works. But it is definitely a spot where the barrier of entry and the level of complexity required is going down over time. And it is definitely a horrible choice for 99% of the companies that are out there right now. But next year, it'll be 98. And the year after that, it'll probably be 97. [laugh].And if I go inside of Amazon's data centers, there's not one manufacturer of hard drives, there's a bunch. So, that got so easy that now, of course you use more than one; you got to do—that's just like, sort of, a natural thing, right? These technologies, it'll move over time. We just aren't there yet for the vast, vast majority of workloads.Corey: I hope that in the future, this stuff becomes easier, but data transfer fees are going to continue to be a concern—Miles: Just—[makes explosion noise]—Corey: Oh, man—Miles: —like, right in the face.Corey: —especially with the Cambrian explosion of data because the data science folks have successfully convinced the entire industry that there's value in those mode balancer logs in 2012. Okay, great. We're never deleting anything again, but now you've got to replicate all of that stuff because no one has a decent handle on lifecycle management and won't for the foreseeable future. Great, to multiple providers so that you can work on these things? Like, that is incredibly expensive.Miles: Yeah. Cool tech, from this announcement at Next that I think is very applicable, and recognized the level of like, utter technical mastery—and security mastery to our earlier conversation—that something like this requires, the product is called BigQuery Omni, what Omni allows you to do is go into the Google Cloud Console, go to BigQuery, say I want to do analysis on this data that's in S3, or in Azure Blob Storage, Google will spin up an account on your behalf on Amazon and Azure, and run the compute there for you, bring the result back. So, just transfer the answers, not the raw data that you just scanned, and no work on your part, no management, no crapola. So, there's like—that's multi-cloud. If I've got—I can do a join between a bunch of rows that are in real BigQuery over on GCP side and rows that are over there in S3. The cross-eyedness of getting something like that to work is mind blowing.Corey: To give this a little more context, just because it gets difficult to reason about these things, I can either have data that is in a private subnet in AWS that traverses their horribly priced Managed NAT Gateways, and then goes out to the internet and sent there once, for the same cost as I could take that same data and store it in S3 in their standard tier for just shy of six full months. That's a little imbalanced, if we're being direct here. And then when you add in things like intelligent tiering and archive access classes, that becomes something that… there's no contest there. It's, if we're talking about things that are now approaching exabyte scale, that's one of those, “Yeah, do you want us to pay by a credit card?”—get serious. You can't at that scale anyway—“Invoice billing, or do we just, like, drive a dump truck full of gold bricks and drop them off in Seattle?”Miles: Sure. Same trajectory, on the multi-cloud thing. So, like a partner of ours, PacketFabric, you know, if you're a big, big company, you go out and you call Amazon and you buy 100 gigabit interconnect on—I think they call theirs Direct Connect, and then you hook that up to the Google one that's called Dedicated Interconnect. And voila, the price goes from twelve cents a gig down to two cents a gig; everybody's much happier. But Jesus, you pay the upfront for that, you got to set the thing up, it takes days to get deployed, and now you're culpable for the whole pipe if you don't use it up. Like, there are charges that are static over the course of the month.So, PacketFabric just buys one of those and lets you rent a slice of it you need. And I think they've got an incredible product. We're working with them on a whole bunch of different projects. But I also expect—like, there's no reason the cloud providers shouldn't be working hard to vend that kind of solution over time. If a hundred gigabit is where it is now, what does it look like when I get to ten gigabit? When I get to one gigabit? When I get to half gigabit? You know, utility price that for us so that we get to rational pricing.I think there's a bunch of baked-in business and cost logic that is a part of the pricing system, where egress is the source of all of the funding at Amazon for internal networking, right? I don't pay anything for the switches that connect to this machine to that machine, in region. It's not like those things are cheap or free; they have to be there. But the funding for that comes from egress. So, I think you're going to end up seeing a different model where you'll maybe have different approaches to egress pricing, but you'll be paying like an in-system networking fee.And I think folks will be surprised at how big that fee likely is because of the cost of the level of networking infrastructure that the providers deploy, right? I mean, like, I don't know, if you've gone and tried to buy a 40 port, 40 gig switch anytime recently. It's not like they're those little, you know, blue Netgear ones for 90 bucks.Corey: Exactly. It becomes this, [sigh] I don't know, I keep thinking that's not the right answer, but part of it also is like, well, you know, for things that I really need local and don't want to worry about if the internet's melting today, I kind of just want to get, like, some kind of Raspberry Pi shoved under my desk for some reason.Miles: Yeah. I think there is a lot where as more and more businesses bet bigger and bigger slices of the farm on this kind of thing, I think it's Jassy's line that you're, you know, the fat in the margin in your business is my opportunity. Like, there's a whole ecosystem of partners and competitors that are hunting all of those opportunities. I think that pressure can only be good for customers.Corey: Miles, thank you for taking the time to speak with me. If people want to learn more about you, what you're up to, your bad opinions, your ridiculous company, et cetera—Miles: [laugh].Corey: —where can they find you?Miles: Well, it's really easy to spell: SADA.com, S-A-D-A dot com. I'm Miles Ward, it's @milesward on Twitter; you don't have to do too hard of a math. It's miles@sada.com, if you want to send me an email. It's real straightforward. So, eager to reach out, happy to help. We've got a bunch of engineers that like helping people move from Amazon to GCP. So, let us know.Corey: Excellent. And we will, of course, put links to this in the [show notes 00:37:17] because that's how we roll.Miles: Yay.Corey: Thanks so much for being so generous with your time, and I look forward to seeing what comes out next year from these various cloud companies.Miles: Oh, I know some of them already, and they're good. Oh, they're super good.Corey: This is why I don't do predictions because like, the stuff that I know about, like, for example, I was I was aware of the Graviton 3 was coming—Miles: Sure.Corey: —and it turns out that if your—guess what's going to come up and you don't name Graviton 3, it's like, “Are you simple? Did you not see that one coming?” It's like—or if I don't know it's coming and I make that guess—which is not the hardest thing in the world—someone would think I knew and leaked. There's no benefit to doing predictions.Miles: No. It's very tough, very happy to do predictions in private, for customers. [laugh].Corey: Absolutely. Thanks again for your time. I appreciate it.Miles: Cheers.Corey: Myles Ward, CTO at SADA. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice and be very angry in your opinion when you write that obnoxious comment, but then it's going to get lost because it's using MySQL instead of Postgres.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

It's Super Effective: A Pokémon Podcast
Pokémon Legends Countdown

It's Super Effective: A Pokémon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 86:01


A bit confused after a 6 min Pokémon Legends Arceus trailer, this game is right around the corner. Tetris 99 is getting a Legends event as we lead up to the release of that game.  Converse x Pokémon merch has arrived and already sold out. Pokémon Snap gets some more details talked about in the making of that game. Pokémon GO has a new rock event with Mega Aerodactyl making it's debut. 00:00:20 - Introduction00:02:30 -  Legends Trailer00:11:10 -  Tetris 99 x Pokémon 00:19:40 - Converse x Pokémon00:25:20 - VStar Glaceon & Leafeon00:33:40 - Break00:38:10 - Pokémon Snap Creation00:50:30 - Pokémon GO News01:12:00 - Question of the Week01:25:00 - Post Credits

Another Woodshop Podcast
Best of AWP: Fix Build This That Ep. 50

Another Woodshop Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022 77:23


THIS IS A RERUN! Dan and Pete flew out to Mike's house to do a collaborative promotion with Semi Exact and do a meetup at Mike's property so we took the week off to get some rest and tackle 2022 head on! This episode was our most downloaded of 2021 so we thought we'd share it again.  The giveaway in the episode is not valid!Episode 50 - Dan is till working on his giant Tetris shelf. Pete worked on a custom sign with CNC working epoxy and he's in love. And Mike is working on a large bench build again and had a massive surge of orders on Etsy.Sign up for Patreon for Early access, and special Patreon-only content:https://www.patreon.com/anotherwoodshoppodcastVoicemails:Adrienne (aka Barbara)Congrats on 50! AdamBarnett custom woodworksWhat are some of your favorite moments from the shows so far?Henry GoncalvesHG's Alfresco and collate bar Whats a project that you really want to do but have not had time to start.JoshJosh The Dad1How did you guys get so awesome?Kimani StrayhornHow do you guys track finances? And what do you track?Lee OhmanRegal St.Congrats on 50! Mike PhillipsThe Otter MillAccount management. What do you do with fake accounts?Scott Dad It Yourself DIYCongrats on 50! Juice Groove, is that a default, or a custom request?Tyler IsacsWooden Whiskers Trading Co.Congrats on 50! What have you guys done well? What did you do in the beginning that is now?Matt TaylorI'm wondering for those that don't have a domino, whats another good way to mimic those joints?You can follow us all and the podcast on Instagram and YouTube!Podcast:https://www.instagram.com/anotherwoodshoppodcast/https://www.youtube.com/anotherwoodshoppodcasthttps://www.etsy.com/shop/awpstoreDan:https://www.instagram.com/danieldunlap.woodworks/https://www.youtube.com/danieldunlap https://www.etsy.com/shop/ddwwstoreMike:https://www.instagram.com/coffeycustombuilds/https://www.youtube.com/coffeycustombuildshttps://www.etsy.com/shop/coffeycustombuildsPete:https://www.instagram.com/ptreesworkshop/https://www.youtube.com/ptreesworkshophttps://www.etsy.com/shop/pTreesWorkShopSupport the show (http://www.patreon.com/anotherwoodshoppodcast)Support the show (http://www.patreon.com/anotherwoodshoppodcast)

The History Hour
A history of games

The History Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 50:25


The inside story of games that shaped the modern world. Including Atari's Nolan Bushnell on his game Pong which helped launch the video game industry. Plus the origin of Grand Theft Auto, the man who invented Tetris, the son of the Lego brick pioneer and the true story of Monopoly. Max Pearson also talks to the technology journalist Louise Blain about the development of the huge gaming industry and where it goes next. Photo: Pong being played at a retro games event in Germany (Getty Images)

HowLongToBeat Podcast
S2 E57 - A Full Calendar Game of the Year

HowLongToBeat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 102:23


After a series of super special episodes, the gang is back again with one final special episode to ring in the new year! Alex, Paula, and Ric discuss the games they played this year and try to choose their favourites! We've got some "serious" categories and a whole lot of silly ones. They wrap it all up with everyone's favourite game: How Long to Beat? The Game!HowLongToBeat forums - https://howlongtobeat.com/forumDiscord – https://discord.gg/v5F26DkEmail - hltbpodcast@gmail.comMusic – Ian EdwardGraphic design – M4thew00:00:43 - GOTY 202100:13:23 - Best Game Played in 202100:25:23 - Most Underrated/Hidden Gem00:34:22 - Biggest Stinker you Retired00:38:00 - Biggest Stinker you Completed00:43:20 - Most 2021 Completion of 202100:50:55 - Guilty Pleasure or Time Sink01:00:18 - Most Surprisingly Sexual Game01:08:03 - Unexpected Game you Loved01:14:09 - Most Anticipated game of 202201:22:30 - Game you wished you hadn't retired01:30:08 - How Long To Beat? The Game!Games Mentioned:Alex: Resident Evil Village [Xbox], Chicory: A Colorful Tale [PC], The Great Ace Attorney Collection [Switch], Ori and the Will of the Wisps [Xbox], Ghost Trick: Phantom Detective [NDS], Yakuza: Like a Dragon [Xbox], Dragon Quest Heroes: Rocket Slime [NDS], Tobu Tobu Girl Deluxe [GBC], Sumire [Switch], E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial [GBA], 10mg: You Are Such A Soft And Round Kitten [PC], Umurangi Generation [Switch], Loop Hero [PC], i am still here [browser], Tetris 99 [Switch], Psychedelica of the Ashen Hawk [Vita] (lulz), Yu-Gi-Oh: The Eternal Duelist Soul [GBA], Mario & Luigi: Superstar Saga [GBA], Gravity Rush [Vita], Myst [Xbox], Pixel Puzzle Makeout League[Switch], Assassin's Creed Unity [Switch], Hollow Knight: Silksong, Starfield, Pokémon Card GB2: Great Rocket-Dan Sanjou! [GBC]Paula: Bustafellows [Switch], New Pokemon Snap [Switch], Olympia Soirée [Switch], Ghost Trick: Phantom Detective [DS], Fire Emblem: New Mystery of the Emblem [DS], 13 Sentinels: Aegis Rim, missed messages.(PC), Luna's Fishing Garden (PC), Forest's Secret [PC|itch], Catlateral Damage (PC), Persona 5: Dancing in Starlight [PS4], The Banner Saga [Switch], i am still here [browser], Olympia Soirée [Switch], How We Know We're Alive [PC], The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild [Switch], Potion Craft (DEMO), Pokemon Shining Pearl [Switch], Olympia Soirée [Switch], OZMAFIA!! [PC], Dreaming Treat [PC], Timberborn (Steam, early access), Potion Craft (Steam, Early Access), Opossum Country, TLoZ: Breath of the Wild sequel, Slime Rancher 2, Kimiyuki, ABZÛ [PC], Sumire [PC], TAISHO x Alice [PC], Dairoku: Agents of Sakuratani [Switch]Ric: Sumire (PC), Space Court (PC), Cyberpunk 2077 (PS4), The Swapper (Vita) [replay], Devotion (PC), Sumire (PC), Guardians of the Galaxy (PS4), Dadish 2 (Android), Crazy Frog Racer (DS), Emily is Away (PC), Narita Boy (PC), Rocket League (PC), Earth Defense Force 4.1 (PS4), COD: Cold War (PS4), The Good Time Garden (PC), Cosmic Star Heroine (Vita), Nex Machina (PS4), novena (browser), Sifu, Neon White, N1-RV Ann-A, Freedom Wars (Vita)

Notnerd Podcast: Tech Better
Episode 316: Bulking Up for the Winter

Notnerd Podcast: Tech Better

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 51:30


We finish up the wonderful year of 2021 with another tech-packed episode. Of course, we've got some tech gifts to discuss. The news was a bit slow so we talk about some top-grossing games and the most visited domains of the past year. Followup:   Christmas Gifts and Tech (01:05) New AirCard product announced (09:30) Dave's Pro Tip of the Week: Hardwire everything (14:00) Takes:  8 games break $1 Billion in 2021 spending (23:10) Top domains of 2021 (29:55) Americans distrust social media with their data (33:45) Portland chain McMenamins hit by ransomware (36:20) T-Mobile says it blocked 21 billion scam calls this year (38:25) Bonus Odd Take: Watch an AI break Tetris (40:45) Picks of the Week:  Dave: Wyze Scale (42:45) Nate: Notchmeister (47:10) Find us elsewhere: https://www.notnerd.com https://ratethispodcast.com/notnerd https://www.tiktok.com/@notnerdpod https://www.twitter.com/n0tnerd/ https://www.instagram.com/n0tnerd https://www.facebook.com/n0tnerd/ info@Notnerd.com Call or text 608.618.NERD(6373) If you would like to help support Notnerd financially, mentally, or physically, please contact us via any of the methods above. Consider any product/app links to be affiliate links.

Ida y Vuelta
Ida y Vuelta: 29 de diciembre de 2021

Ida y Vuelta

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 42:50


Recta final del año y sigue de fondo nuestro conteo del 2021 que podría sonar hasta en ChillOut (?); fallece la leyenda del fútbol americano, John Madden; las probabilidades de cada equipo para ganar el Super Bowl; el campeón mundial de Tetris tan solo tiene 14 años; repasamos los 10 artículos más buscados en New York Times.

Witness History
Tetris

Witness History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 10:01


In 1984 Tetris, one of the most popular computer games ever, was invented in Moscow. Chloe Hadjimatheou speaks to its creator, Alexey Pajitnov, and to Henk Rogers, an American businessman who helped bring Tetris to the world. This programme was first broadcast in 2011. PHOTO: Tetris being played on a mobile phone (Getty Images)

DailyQuarks – Dein täglicher Wissenspodcast
SPEZIAL: Spielen - Darum solltest Du es immer wieder tun

DailyQuarks – Dein täglicher Wissenspodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 32:30


Wer spielt, produziert nichts? Arbeitet nicht an seiner Karriere? Verschwendet seine Zeit? Ganz im Gegenteil! Spielen ist wichtig für unsere Entwicklung, unsere Gemeinschaft und unser Gehirn, auch später. Und Spielen ist universell, egal, ob Jung oder Alt, Mensch oder Tier. // Alle Quellen, Infos und weitere Spezials findest Du hier: https://www.quarks.de/daily-quarks-spezial/

241 Happy Hour
Duke Nukem and Mario Kart (PS Ep. 6)

241 Happy Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 59:48


Conscious Millionaire  J V Crum III ~ Business Coaching Now 6 Days a Week
2258: Best of Henk Rogers: When to Sell Your Business

Conscious Millionaire J V Crum III ~ Business Coaching Now 6 Days a Week

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 34:53


Welcome to the Conscious Millionaire Show for entrepreneurs,  who want to create an abundant future for themselves and humanity. Heard by millions in 190 countries.  Do you want to put more money in the bank, create a powerful impact, and enjoy a purposeful life? This is the podcast for you! Join host, JV Crum III, as he goes inside the minds of Millionaire Entrepreneurs and World-Class Business Experts. Today's featured episode... Henk Rogers: When to Sell Your Business Henk Rogers is a Dutch born Tetris entrepreneur and moved on to his missions, that are 1] End Carbon Based Fuels 2] End War 3] Make a backup Life on Earth and 4] Find out how the Universe Ends. Blue Planet Foundation and Blue Planet Energy are working on End Carbon Based Fuels and PISCES and HI-SEAS are working on Make a backup Life on Earth. Like this Podcast? Get every episode delivered to you free!  Subscribe in iTunes Download Your Free Money-Making Gift Now... "Born to Make Millions" Hypnotic Audio - Click Here Now! Please help spread the word. Subscribing and leaving a review helps others find our podcast. Thanks so much! Inc Magazine "Top 13 Business Podcasts." Conscious Millionaire Network has over 3,000 episodes and millions of listeners in 190 countries. Join us as a regular listener to get money-making secrets on how you can grow your business and profits faster! 

Conscious Millionaire Show
2258: Best of Henk Rogers: When to Sell Your Business

Conscious Millionaire Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 34:53


Welcome to the Conscious Millionaire Show for entrepreneurs,  who want to create an abundant future for themselves and humanity. Heard by millions in 190 countries.  Do you want to put more money in the bank, create a powerful impact, and enjoy a purposeful life? This is the podcast for you! Join host, JV Crum III, as he goes inside the minds of Millionaire Entrepreneurs and World-Class Business Experts. Today's featured episode... Henk Rogers: When to Sell Your Business Henk Rogers is a Dutch born Tetris entrepreneur and moved on to his missions, that are 1] End Carbon Based Fuels 2] End War 3] Make a backup Life on Earth and 4] Find out how the Universe Ends. Blue Planet Foundation and Blue Planet Energy are working on End Carbon Based Fuels and PISCES and HI-SEAS are working on Make a backup Life on Earth. Like this Podcast? Get every episode delivered to you free!  Subscribe in iTunes Download Your Free Money-Making Gift Now... "Born to Make Millions" Hypnotic Audio - Click Here Now! Please help spread the word. Subscribing and leaving a review helps others find our podcast. Thanks so much! Inc Magazine "Top 13 Business Podcasts." Conscious Millionaire Network has over 3,000 episodes and millions of listeners in 190 countries. Join us as a regular listener to get money-making secrets on how you can grow your business and profits faster! 

Ghost Town
184: The Tetris Murders

Ghost Town

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 24:03


The wildly popular puzzle game Tetris has a dark, complex, and deadly history. Blog: https://www.ghosttownpod.com/blog/the-tetris-murders/ More Ghost Town: https://youtu.be/JXm3r2-YZ14 Haunted Merch: http://bit.ly/ghosttownstuff Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/ghosttownpod Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ghosttownpod Sources: https://bit.ly/3FePJID Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

TADPOG: Tyler and Dave Play Old Games
Ep. 642 – Ultraman: Towards the Future

TADPOG: Tyler and Dave Play Old Games

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 147:45


Ultraman: Towards the Future. Towards? Would it be towards or toward? This game slides TOWORDS the garbage can. We discuss the tornado that ended the last episode so abruptly (not that Tetris 2 was a banger anyway), we talk about odd pediatricians, the male Sex and the City reboot, Peloton spoilers, Ultraman as a series … Continue reading → The post Ep. 642 – Ultraman: Towards the Future appeared first on TADPOG: Tyler and Dave Play Old Games.

Muskelnerdene
78. Super People, Klang 2, Kingdom, jul og vektoppgang!

Muskelnerdene

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 88:11


Episode 78!! er siste episode i sesong 4 før Muskelnerdene tar seg en velfortjent juleferie! Kaaanskje vi slipper en liten juleepisode, men ingen lovnad. Vi snakker med om battle royal-spillet Super People, Halo Infinte, Warzone, Man of Medan, Klang 2, Fornite og Tetris. Finalen i proteinbartesten vår utsettes til neste gang siden vi har fått tak i to av tre barer til i dag. Men i stedet tester vi endelig en STOR bar ;P Det sies at man ikke trenger å bry seg om hva man spiser fra jul til nyttår, men forskningen er ikke helt enig i den påstanden. Hva sier den mer spesifikt? Ellers blir det mye random prat om forskjellige ting og lattern sitter veldig løst i denne episoden, kanskje fordi vi endelig kan spille inn fysisk sammen igjen. God jul!

Cool Weird Awesome with Brady Carlson
A 16 Year Old In Nebraska Once Bought His Town's Jail

Cool Weird Awesome with Brady Carlson

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 3:41


Harvard, Nebraska is home to about a thousand people and six historic markers, one of which tells the strange but true story of a teenager who ended up owning the city jail. Plus: if you're still looking for a present for somebody this week, how about an official Tetris waffle maker? The Jailhouse That Got Accidentally Sold (Amusing Planet) History of Harvard (Harvard, Nebraska) Tetris Waffle Iron (The Awesomer) Our Patreon backers helped us get a high-tech new microphone! Join them and help make this show even better! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/coolweirdawesome/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/coolweirdawesome/support

NWR's Radio Trivia: Podcast Edition
Episode 176: Anger Management

NWR's Radio Trivia: Podcast Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 102:12


Usher the year that was 2021 out the door with Guillaume, TYP, and Radio Trivia.

Global Math Department Podcast
Beast Academy Playground: Math Games and Crafts to Foster Curiosity and Build Problem-Solving Skills

Global Math Department Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 57:59


Beast Academy Playground: Math Games and Crafts to Foster Curiosity and Build Problem-Solving Skills Presenter: Mark Hendrickson Date: December 14, 2021 Think of games you loved to play as a kid: Tic-Tac-Toe, Crazy Eights, Connect Four, Tetris. Many of these involve strategic thinking and problem-solving. When we give students opportunities to play and be creative, […]

Solomonic Sound System Podcast
Episode #20 (DJ Tetris - Soundation Live Mix)

Solomonic Sound System Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 43:53


Solomonic's newest selector DJ Tetris drops in with his live set from Soundation 11-21-21 featuring a wicked mix of dub, dancehall, and roots! 1. alien invasion - mad professor 2. queen in my empire - rhythm & sound 3. see mi yah - rhythm & sound 4. free for all - rhythm & sound 5. let jah love come - rhythm & sound 6. your recipe - aswad 7. general - runkus 8. zambia - king tubby & prince jammy 9. gin and juice - prince fatty 10. jah i thank you - tony curtis 11. just be good - half pint 12. they gonna talk - beres hammond 13. little steps - nostalgia 77 14. one more night - busy signal 15. sitting and watching - dennis brown 16. fight this feeling - shaggy ft. beres hammond 17. without love - royal blu 18. trikster - edi fitzroy 19. danger in your eyes - mafia & fluxy 20. love is for jah - johnny osbourne 21. one in a million - half pint 22. you make me feel brand new - george nooks 23. mind of a king - protoje 24. the harder they fall - koffee 25. strange - runkus 26. lucky man - courtney john

Simplify and Enjoy
How to Fun While Hitting Your Money Goals in 2022

Simplify and Enjoy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 35:28


In today's bonus episode, we're diving into hitting your money goals while still having fun!  Ready to Stack Some Benjamins in 2022?  Welcome to this end of year bonus episode!  As we're winding down and wrapping things up for 2021, one of the best things we can do is setting things up to make it easier to achieve our family and financial goals. For us, it's doing a review of the numbers to see what's worked and what's not. We're also spending time now deciding on what we really want to do in 2022 while of course keeping some flexibility because COVID is still a thing.   A big challenge many families face is creating and sticking with a plan that allows them to pay down their debts, save for priorities, and invest more.  Today's episode has something that I think will be a huge help.  I had the pleasure of chatting with Joe Saul-Sehy of the award winning Stacking Benjamins and personal finance author Emily Guy Birken about their new book, Stacked: Your Serious Guide to Modern Money Management.  Which is a mouthful of a title, but I got to tell you, the thing that jumped out at me about the book was how fun it was to read! Joe and Emily do an incredible job not just explaining key financial points, but they weave it in with game references (Oregon Trail, Tetris, and Monopoly are included in the first few chapters), but they have inside jokes, comics, and more.  It's all about making personal finance accessible and well, not boring.  So if you're looking for a reset, reboot, whatever you want to call it, I think you'll enjoy our conversation!  Stacked Giveaway To celebrate having an incredible 2022 and the release of Joe and Emily's book, we're hosting a giveaway! I'll be doing a random drawing to reimburse 5 listeners who pre-order Stacked as well as give them Amazon gift cards! Just enter here! Thank You to Our Sponsor Coastal! Support for this podcast comes from Coastal Credit Union. If you're living in the Raleigh Durham area and looking to bank better, come check out Coastal today! We've been members for years and love their service and competitive rates on checking and savings accounts! Support the Podcast! Thank you so much for listening to the podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and found it helpful, here are some ways to support it. Spread the word! If you enjoyed this episode and think it can help a buddy get on the path to dumping debt and become financially free, please share. Leave a review. Honest feedback and reviews make a big difference and gets the word out about the podcast. Leave your review on Apple or Stitcher. Grab a copy of Jumpstart Your Marriage and Your Money. My book is designed for a busy couple to set up their finances in 4 weeks. Get tips and tools that have worked for other couples on their journey of building their marriage and wealth together! Music Credit Music in this episode was provided by artists from Audiio.

Couple Money Podcast
Stacking Benjamins in 2022 (End of Year Bonus Episode!)

Couple Money Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 36:17


In today's bonus episode, we're diving into hitting your money goals while still having fun!  Ready to Stack Some Benjamins in 2022?  Welcome to this end of year bonus episode!  As we're winding down and wrapping things up for 2021, one of the best things we can do is setting things up to make it easier to achieve our family and financial goals. For us, it's doing a review of the numbers to see what's worked and what's not. We're also spending time now deciding on what we really want to do in 2022 while of course keeping some flexibility because COVID is still a thing.   A big challenge many families face is creating and sticking with a plan that allows them to pay down their debts, save for priorities, and invest more.  Today's episode has something that I think will be a huge help.  I had the pleasure of chatting with Joe Saul-Sehy of the award winning Stacking Benjamins and personal finance author Emily Guy Birken about their new book, Stacked: Your Serious Guide to Modern Money Management.  Which is a mouthful of a title, but I got to tell you, the thing that jumped out at me about the book was how fun it was to read! Joe and Emily do an incredible job not just explaining key financial points, but they weave it in with game references (Oregon Trail, Tetris, and Monopoly are included in the first few chapters), but they have inside jokes, comics, and more.  It's all about making personal finance accessible and well, not boring.  So if you're looking for a reset, reboot, whatever you want to call it, I think you'll enjoy our conversation!  Stacked Giveaway To celebrate having an incredible 2022 and the release of Joe and Emily's book, we're hosting a giveaway! I'll be doing a random drawing to reimburse 5 listeners who pre-order Stacked as well as give them Amazon gift cards! Just enter here! Thank You to Our Sponsor Coastal! Support for this podcast comes from Coastal Credit Union. If you're living in the Raleigh Durham area and looking to bank better, come check out Coastal today! We've been members for years and love their service and competitive rates on checking and savings accounts! Support the Podcast! Thank you so much for listening to the podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and found it helpful, here are some ways to support it. Spread the word! If you enjoyed this episode and think it can help a buddy get on the path to dumping debt and become financially free, please share. Leave a review. Honest feedback and reviews make a big difference and gets the word out about the podcast. Leave your review on Apple or Stitcher. Grab a copy of Jumpstart Your Marriage and Your Money. My book is designed for a busy couple to set up their finances in 4 weeks. Get tips and tools that have worked for other couples on their journey of building their marriage and wealth together! Music Credit Music in this episode was provided by artists from Audiio.

TADPOG: Tyler and Dave Play Old Games
Ep. 641 – Tetris 2

TADPOG: Tyler and Dave Play Old Games

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 86:54


Tetris 2. Did you know there was a Tetris 2? If you’re like use and didn’t there may be a pretty good reason for that. Also, this episode goes from damp to danger zone over the course of an hour and a half. We recorded this episode on the night of the tornado that destroyed … Continue reading → The post Ep. 641 – Tetris 2 appeared first on TADPOG: Tyler and Dave Play Old Games.

Open Source Security Podcast
Episode 301 - You're holding it wrong: the importance of unlearning

Open Source Security Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 31:52


Josh and Kurt talk about the epic failure that was episode 300. But this ties nicely into the topic of the day which is new ways to do things. The example is a new way to hold a controller when playing Tetris. There are always new tools and new ideas in security. Sometimes we have to abandon the old way because the new way to too good to ignore. Show Notes Lawfare Apple NSO podcast New way to play Tetris

Retrologic
Ep 61 - The hobby of collecting

Retrologic

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 140:23


RetroLogic - Episode 61   31:03 - Price Is Retro/Spot the fake 1:07:34 - Show Topic - The Hobby of Collecting 2:06:04 - Community Couch RetroLogic isn't just a podcast, It's also a Community! Visit RetroLogic.games, scroll down, click the discord link to join the least toxic retro bunch of retro gamers on the internet! We have weekly giveaways, question submissions, collection show-and-tell, and more. Join today! Icebreaker - what did you buy? And what did you play? Adam: NES, SMB/DH/T&F, SMB2, SMB3, Ninja Gaiden, Dr Mario, Tiger Heli, Tetris, Super Spike VBall, Arctic White GBA, Switch: Mario + Rabbids, Immortals Fenyx, Analog to HDMI upconverter, capture box Sam: Bought: gloomhaven (PC) Played: Civilization VI, enter the gungeon Dan: Nintendo Power 50, Disney Classics Collection, Archvale. The price is RETRO How to play: I'm going to list off 4-5 games. You're going to guess how much the games are worth in total, dollars and cents. Whoever is closest to guessing the actual price of the lot, wins! Everyone has a list, and everyone guesses. The “ghost” always guesses $300 Dan's list Sam's list Adam's list Andross's list Flightsy's list “Spot the fake game” Andross The Ambassador Sam Check out the Price Is Retro Database in the discord server for history and stats for all of our past games! Show Topic Topic: the hobby of collecting What do you collect and how did you get into it? Within your hobby what do you decidedly NOT collect? Differences in types of collecting Video Games Vinyl Toys/figures Why do we collect? Nostalgia Escapism Hoarding FOMO Community What would cause you to sell everything and never look back? Community submissions Community Couch Retro Rewind January is Odama-rama! Pick up a copy of Odama for GameCube (dont forget the mic!) Play with us in January! Questions: ChrisHL94

Optimal Living Daily: Personal Development & Minimalism
2187: Minimum Viable Home by Colin Wright of Exile Lifestyle on Intentional Spending & Curating Your Life

Optimal Living Daily: Personal Development & Minimalism

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 10:51


Colin Wright of Exile Lifestyle talks about intentional spending and curating your life Episode 2187: Minimum Viable Home by Colin Wright of Exile Lifestyle on Intentional Spending & Curating Your Life Colin Wright is a professional author and international speaker who co-founded a publishing company and travels full-time, moving to a new country every four months or so--that country determined by the votes of his readers! He also blogs. Colin's a minimalist in that he owns very few things and is careful in how he consumes. He tends to buy less, but invest in quality when he does, and trends toward the same in relationships, business endeavors, and just about everything else. He's left-handed, blue-eyed, scary good at Tetris, and can't cook. The original post can be found here: https://exilelifestyle.com/minimum-viable-home/  Truebill is the new app that helps you identify and stop paying for subscriptions you don't need, want, or simply forgot about. Go to Truebill.com/OLD - it could save you thousands a year.  Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com  Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalLivingDaily Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

La Noche de Adolfo Arjona
La Noche con Adolfo Arjona (03:00 a 04:00) lunes 29 de Noviembre 2021

La Noche de Adolfo Arjona

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 53:02


¿Por qué tenemos hernias? ¿Quién inventó el Tetris? Hoy, te lo contamos. Además, recordamos Historias para no dormir con Alejandro, el hijo de Chicho Ibáñez Serrador."La Noche de Adolfo Arjona" te acompaña en la madrugada del domingo a lunes de 01.30 a 04.00. Adolfo Arjona, Premio Nacional de Radio 2021, se pone un año más al frente de los micrófonos de COPE para consolidarse como referencia en la radio de madrugada.El programa arranca con "Los Especiales de La Noche de Arjona", sello indiscutible de este programa liderado por el periodista andaluz, que ha recibido diversos premios como el Premio Andalucía de Periodismo 2020 en la categoría de radio. A partir de las 03.00, estrenamos la sección "El por qué de las cosas", descubriremos la trayectoria de personajes famosos y recorreremos nuestro país en el nuevo espacio "Por qué me gusta tanto España"."La Noche de Adolfo Arjona", contigo una temporada más. Descarga gratis la nueva app de COPE y prueba todas las novedades.La app de COPE está disponible gratis para iPhone y Android, con nuevas funcionalidades. Todos los programas, emisoras y noticias

Hashtag Just Sayin - The Podcast
Episode 306 All That Tetris Paid Off

Hashtag Just Sayin - The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 98:39


Welcome to another episode of Hashtag Just Sayin' In this episode we discuss….Going to the movie theater, Joe's new truck is almost here and his grandmother fell, how do you eat oatmeal? Please don't forget to check out our Youtube Channel, where we post the first 20-30 mins of the show…for free. You can't beat free. We'd be forever in your debt if you could jump over to our Youtube channel and Subscribe - and tell a friend. If you haven't got a friend, we'll be happy to be your friend, After you subscribe. You can also follow us on social media on Facebook, Instagram, Tumblr and Twitter. That's all of them, correct? Does anyone read this far down? Email: Hashtagjustsayinpodcast@gmail.com

The Rutabaga
Capital, Race, Gender, and Other Things Not To Bring Up At Dinner - The Rutabaga Season 3 Episode 17

The Rutabaga

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 39:46


The Rutabaga run a 40-minute marathon for you where they break down a fix for every economic issue ever, racism and how to heal racial divides forever, gender roles and sexism in the radio industry and society at large, Thanksgiving plans, counting stats, the art of urination, Leonardo DiCaprio, playing Tetris - as well as some other games - at work, trying to start beef with your bosses and coworkers, and other topics you probably shouldn't bring up at Thanksgiving dinner. This one-shot episode is an instant classic, taking shots at everyone from NPR's Sprince Arbogast to the greatest members of Mercer Island's radio program as well as discussing the causes of the 2008 housing crisis (don't worry - if you're our age, we know you're confused too). The Rutabaga is great programming!

The Tuesday Club
Sambi Lokonga's Tetris Brain Fry

The Tuesday Club

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 57:52


Alan is joined by Damian and Keith, for the annual demolition at Anfield meeting. Plus Utd going Spursy and Batman vs Sherringham. Starring Alan Davies, Damian Harris and Keith Dover. Produced by Jay Beale.A 'Keep It Light Media' Production Sales, advertising, and general enquiries: hello@keepitlightmedia.com

KZYX News
Maps and mountain lions

KZYX News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 6:29


November 22, 2021 — The Board of Supervisors adopted a map reconfiguring the county's district boundaries at a special meeting last week. And wildlife organizations are offering to help, after a mountain lion killed two goats on an outdoor school campus in Anderson Valley. The redistricting effort is a follow-up to the census. It's meant to even out the population numbers so there is no more than a 10% variation in the number of voters in each district. That's to ensure fair representation, as is another top criteria, to avoid splitting communities of interest. Since the last census, the fourth district has lost population, while the third has gained. An early draft of the map proposed moving Laytonville from the third to the fourth district, but the community did not support that suggestion. The twelfth draft, which the board of supervisors adopted unanimously on Thursday afternoon, moves Bell Springs Road and part of Spyrock out of the third and into the fourth. In another adjustment, the Brooktrails boundary has shifted to the east. But the Russian Gulch boundary will stay where it is, and southern Caspar will remain in the fourth. Some more complicated multi-district shifts took place in Hopland and southern Ukiah. In an effort to make the fifth district more compact, the populated part of Hopland is now in the first district. Lief Farr, the county's mapping specialist, explained some of the Tetris-like rearranging that went into redrawing the map. Sometimes two of the top criteria were at odds with one another, as in a brief consideration to add heavily populated areas on the northern and southern ends of Ukiah to the second district. This would have kept communities of interest together, but bloated the population of the city. Supervisor Glenn McGourty noted that the new map consolidates an agricultural community of interest, while preserving a multi-party alliance in terms of water interests. “I'm glad that we have the Russian River villages all together,” in the first district, he said, “which are Hopland, Talmage, Calpella, Redwood Valley, and Potter Valley; and finally, I'm glad that the fifth district still comes down into the Russian River watershed, because I think having three supervisors together working on and aware of Russian River issues makes more of an impact to Mendocino County.” McGourty serves with Supervisor John Haschak on an ad hoc committee to come up with non-lethal solutions to conflicts that humans and livestock have with wildlife. The Board has voted to terminate the contract with USDA Wildlife Services, out of concerns that too many wild animals were being killed. During public comment, Louise Simson, Superintendent of the Anderson Valley Unified School District, told the Board that she has a problem. On Monday evening, she reported, two goats were killed by a mountain lion, and a third was injured. “I am super frustrated with this process for support,” she told the board. “I was able to get a hazing permit, which allows me to make loud noises at a mountain lion...this is a severe safety issue. The support I've been given on this is, build a bigger fence, a twelve foot fence, or build a bigger barn. Well, that's not feasible. My school district is going to be operating at almost a $400,000 deficit next year. And I need some real time, real solutions to keep my students safe.” Dr Quentin Martins of Living with Lions, a research and conservation group in the Mayacamas Mountains, called in to caution that killing a big cat could create a territorial vacuum that often results in more loss of livestock. Although the school is in a populated area, he said its location at the confluence of Mill Creek and Donnelly Creek also makes it a prime thoroughfare for mountain lions. He suggested involving students in an educational project to protect the livestock. Dr. Michelle Lute, the National Carnivore Conservation Manager for Project Coyote, said she is already working with Haschak and McGourty on the non-lethal program. She applauded Dr. Martins' idea, sympathized with the superintendent, and offered to help. “I hear the superintendent's concerns about limited resources and how much she can change in the setup, but I just assure her that there are resources to help address the situation,” she said. “I like Dr. Martins' idea about involving the kids in potentially a new project that would enhance the fencing, enhance the security in a number of different ways, so we can definitely talk about how we can all contribute and pool our resources and our expertise to address the situation.”

SpreadShotNews
SpreadShotNews Podcast 482: Morza Horizon - No es un escándalo, es un despelote monumental Edition

SpreadShotNews

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 208:18


¡Ni las franquicias inventadas para circunventar licencias podran salvarlos!¡Porque es lunes y SpreadShotNews Podcast ya llegó! En este episodio: Maxi termina el Halo: Reach, nos cuenta sus pensamientos finales y arranca The Legend of Tian-Ding. Nico por su parte nos cuenta sobre Forza Horizon 5, Age of Empires IV y la beta multiplayer de Halo Infinite. En el Rapid-Fire, nos ponemos al dia con lo que paso durante las ultimas 3 semanas, con actualizaciones al Psychonauts 2, Facebook dejando de ser Facebook y afectando sus productos VR, la vuelta de Tetris the Grandmaster, Devolver Digital es una empresa multimillonaria, en el micro Avengers: dan marcha atras con los XP boosters, Square Enix esta triste y finalmente Spider-man tiene fecha de salida. Una nueva edicion de #ESCANDALO con todo lo que sucedio en Activision/Blizzard, desde la partida de Jen O'Neal hasta el articulo del Wall Street Journal que puso en el ojo de la tormenta a Bobby Kotick y la junta de directorio, Denuvo demuestra una vez mas que el DRM solamente perjudica a los usuarios legales, la PS5 ya fue hackeada 2 veces, Rockstar tiene un monton de problemas y la Grand Theft Auto: The Trilogy - The Definitive Edition es uno de esos problemas, la jueza le dice a Apple que #AgarreLaPala, Riot anuncia un monton de spin-offs de LoL (algunos ya disponibles), Xbox festeja sus 20 años con un stream y Phil Spencer pide un deseo. Para finalizar, en el Special Move, Maxi nos recomienda el primer single del nuevo disco de  Porcupine Tree - Harridan . Nico por su parte nos recomienda el canal de youtube  Lu's Retro Source  y mencionamos la odisea de Santi Quiroga que arranco @ssn_rewatch, donde registrara sus impresiones de los (hasta ahora) 481 episodios de SpreadShotNews. Por ultimo, recuerden que ahora nos pueden escribir preguntas directamente a traves de google forms en el siguiente link: spreadshotnews.com/preguntas .

So You Think You Can Fanon
SYTYCF Viewer Reccomendations: Tetris, Snape, and Garfield

So You Think You Can Fanon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 38:58


Taking care of some short viewer recommendations before Colossalcon Main twitter - https://twitter.com/SYTYCFanon Sergio - https://twitter.com/hunter03_the Jakob - https://twitter.com/GregChudleyLLC Michael - https://twitter.com/equinoxdoodles Matt - Doesn't exist lol --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/sytycfanon/support

Data Protection Breakfast Club
The Encyclopedia Brittanica and Privacy with Phil Lee - Partner at Fieldfisher

Data Protection Breakfast Club

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 46:38


Phil Lee is an EU data privacy legend (in real life and in our minds too). Highly technical and practical, Phil is often the ideal outside counsel partner for a tech focused in-house legal team. He navigates an ever-changing field of laws and regulations - like a game of Tetris. He helps his clients twist, flip and shape their “pieces” to fit into a complex scheme. And he does it with calm and confidence, almost like there is the Tetris Tchaikovsky Nutcracker music playing the background of his conversations. And Phil is a deep thinker on privacy. So much so that he often walks along the Thames river, gazing out, dreamily envisioning all the ways in which a company can utilize “legitimate interests” as a basis for processing Personal Data….

Lit Century
Tetris

Lit Century

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 46:07


In this episode, video game designer Tracy Rae Bowling (The Fight) joins host Catherine Nichols to discuss the history and impact of the 1984 game Tetris—its place in the history of video games, the cultural impact on the late 20th century, and why it's not as popular as it used to be. Tracy Rae Bowling is a writer and video game designer. Their games include The Fight, available to play on itch.io, and The Color of the Moon, in development. Tracy also hosts Gift Horse, a comedy podcast about gift-giving with their husband, Mike Meginnis. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Going Terribly
Ep. 58: Two Holland Oats in a Game of Human Tetris

Going Terribly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 57:59


To Alice on Her 37th Birthday... That movie allusion FINALLY makes sense! Other discussion topics may include: - Listen, it's Alice's birthday. You don't need any other reasons to listen to this episode. It's her freaking birthday. Be a pal and listen. She's pretty awesome. [This shameless plea brought to you by Doug, Intern Sean, and Alfredo]

Optimal Business Daily
404: How to Be a Consultant by Colin Wright of Exile Lifestyle on Building A Consulting Career

Optimal Business Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 9:44


Colin Wright of Exile Lifestyle talks about how to be a consultant Episode 404: How to Be a Consultant by Colin Wright of Exile Lifestyle on Building A Consulting Career Colin Wright is a professional author and international speaker who co-founded a publishing company and travels full-time, moving to a new country every four months or so--that country determined by the votes of his readers! He also blogs. Colin's a minimalist in that he owns very few things and is careful in how he consumes. He tends to buy less, but invest in quality when he does, and trends toward the same in relationships, business endeavors, and just about everything else. He's left-handed, blue-eyed, scary good at Tetris, and can't cook. The original post can be found here: https://exilelifestyle.com/consultant/  Reach customers online and across social networks with an ever-growing suite of channel integrations and apps - including Facebook, Instagram, TikTok, Pinterest, and more. Go to Shopify.com/osd for a free 14-day trial Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com  Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalStartUpDaily Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Tri-Cities Influencer Podcast with Paul Casey
84. Growing Forward Podcast featuring Jeanne Dillner

Tri-Cities Influencer Podcast with Paul Casey

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 37:11


Paul Casey:                         Great team leaders notice an imbalance in the team and have the ability to adjust to it. But again, don't attack the person attack the problem. Speaker 1:                           Raising the water level of leadership in the Tri-Cities of Eastern Washington, it's the Tri-Cities Influencer Podcast. Welcome to the TCI podcast. We're local leadership and self-leadership expert, Paul Casey interviews, local CEOs, entrepreneurs, and nonprofit executives to hear how they lead themselves and their teams, so we can all benefit from their wisdom and experience. Here's your host, Paul Casey of Growing Forward Services, coaching and equipping individuals, and teams to spark breakthrough success. Paul Casey:                         It's a great day to grow forward. Thanks for joining me for today's episode with Jeanne Dillner, she is the CEO of SIGN Fracture Care. And I asked for a fun fact about her and it turned into a whole story. And so, Jeanne, I'm going to just let you roll with it. Jeanne Dillner:                  One of the women at work gave me the idea of playing with watercolor to relax. And so, I've been doing that for about a year now. And then on June 17th, at 9:30 at night, I was petting my dogs goodnight and somehow fell over and broke my arm. I'm lefthanded and I broke my left arm. So, I wasn't able to use that for about three months. And so, but I still needed to have that creative outlet. And so, I started to not only learn how to write with my right hand, but also do my art with my right hand. And so, I've just as a joke, decided to call it wrong handed art. And so, that my funny thing.                                                 And then another thing that I do with my dogs is entertaining to people who decide to walk with me, sometimes I just don't want to because I do this, but I make up voices for them and kind of relay what they're really thinking to others. And Wally has a weight problem. He has a lot of conversation about how I force him to become anorexic, but it's not true. It's really nice. [inaudible 00:02:11]. Paul Casey:                         Oh, that's awesome. And Tri-Cities Influencer listeners, Jeanne put up to the screen, one of her wrong handed art watercolors and it's lovely. She did this lovely. Well, we'll dive in after checking in with our Tri-Cities Influencer sponsor. Speaker 2:                           From the Columbia basin to the Pacific ocean, Basin Pacific Insurance & Benefits help protect families and businesses in a professional, timely manner. Our people are knowledgeable and service oriented, helping you ensure your home, auto and toys. As well as commercial business, large or small, health insurance, individual or group, agribusiness and crop insurance. At Basin Pacific Insurance & Benefits you get the service of a large broker with the care of a local agent. Locally owned since 2010, visit us online at basinpacifictricities.com. Paul Casey:                         Thank you for your support of leadership development in the Tri-Cities. Well welcome Jeanne. I was privileged to meet you many years ago. You reminded me that it was at the hammer facility, I was doing a training back then. I didn't remember. That was the first time I met you. But so since then I've enjoyed a tour of SIGN Fracture Care. I know a few of the employees there were leaders in the organization. I'm a donor of the organization and I just love the mission. So, I'm looking forward to interviewing here today. So, our TCI influencers can get to know you, tell us about what SIGN does and what do you spend about 80% of your day doing as a CEO? Jeanne Dillner:                  Those are two big questions. The first thing I'll answer is what do we do? We are a nonprofit organization. We are very unusual because we not only provide training to do orthopedic surgery in developing countries, but we also provide the implants. Our founder is Dr. Lewis Zirkle, a long term orthopedic surgeon here in town, and who dedicated his time off to helping surgeons in developing countries, get the skill and sustain the skill. And the only way he discovered to sustain the skill is for someone to provide the implant on an ongoing basis. And it just turns out that after many years of trying to get other people to manufacture it, it really meant that he needed to manufacture it. So, he, 22 years ago opened up a manufacturing plant and I've been working with SIGN ever since then, as well as a handful of our employees.                                                 Now, many of them are getting to retirement age. And so, we're doing exciting things to transition SIGN into the next generation is sort of what I call it. What I spend 80% of my time doing really is the people parts. It's not just the people overseas that we have to train and nurture, but it's also our own staff. So, for 2021, it's in everybody's goal to work on succession, sorry, succession planning. And that for us just means identifying tasks that need to be taught to another individual, so that you have the cross training that's there. And then also thinking about when we're doing new hires, especially in management, what's their potential for helping out in future positions in science? So, that's what we're working on in the near term. And it's really funny because I remember it was about 10 years ago that I started seeing other CEOs who are my age now, doing the same thing.                                                 They were saying, "Now, my focus is to prepare the company for when I'm not there anymore." So, that's what I'm, sounds kind of harsh to say, but that is what my next several years is... The goal is to have things set up so that SIGN can continue on with the successes that we've had so far. Paul Casey:                         That's very wise to have a succession plan, TCI listeners. Do you have a succession plan, no matter what position do you have? Is there someone coming up behind you who is getting equipped to take your spot when you get promoted to your dream job? I like that better than getting hit by a bus. Jeanne Dillner:                  Yeah. We just recently got inform one of our most experienced machinists is having to move on. So that puts a real challenge on us because that's a kind of a position that's harder to replace than others that we have at SIGN. So yeah, it's not just the CEO or the founder who needs to do succession plan. Paul Casey:                         Yeah, totally agree. And one thing I recommend to companies is you have a duty handbook, some kind of documented of your major processes and procedures. So, if you did this appear tomorrow, somebody could at least pick up the book and say, all right, here's what he did. Here's what she did. Jeanne Dillner:                  That's a great idea. I just wrote that down. Thank you. Paul Casey:                         Well, why do you love what you do, Jeanne? Jeanne Dillner:                  Well, I love helping people and while I do it indirectly by being CEO, I don't get to go in and I'm not a nurse or a doctor, so I get to go in and watch surgeries. During disasters, there are times when I help more directly, but I just love knowing that we're helping patients in developing world walk again and return to work, and children returning to school. If the parents don't return to work, then children get pulled out of school. So, we're really helping, not only families get out of poverty, but we're also helping the communities grow and expand, and improve because people are able to stay in their jobs and contribute to the society. Paul Casey:                         What a fantastic mission. Yep. It'd be easy to get excited about that for sure. So, in your journey to where you are today, you probably learned a lot from people that you watched, bosses, supervisors, leaders, what do you keep in mind, good or bad, from that education that you had while you lead today? Jeanne Dillner:                  I love that question because you did give us some questions ahead of time. And I love that one because it reminded me of Gary Coker who owned funny enough, a sign company. And I was hired as the office manager. We made signs, we were actually called the right name for once. But he gave me a lot of leeway. I just had to make sure that people paid their bills and we paid our bills, and that I managed the money appropriately when we had loans. Those are the days of 20% loans and we had a revolving loan kind of thing. And I made sure that got paid down as fast as it could. So anyway, he just really gave me the confidence, his trust in me gave me the confidence that I could do and learn just about anything.                                                 And then I moved from, that was in St Morgan where I was born. Then I moved there to go to Portland State as a night student. And worked full-time at another company. And that manager just the opposite. He was very nitpicky. He complained about any mistakes and it didn't take long for me to lose the confidence that I had built up under Gary Coker. So, not that I've been perfect at it, but that's what I've been trying to do at SIGN, is give people the leeway, step in at times maybe they don't like it. But when I feel like I haven't conveyed well enough what the path should be, but you can't just let people run free and not step in if they're going off track. But anyway, I've been trying that and I'm getting better at it over the years, I guess, I hope. Paul Casey:                         Yeah. Jeanne Dillner:                  [crosstalk 00:10:37] would say that about me at SIGN. Paul Casey:                         Let's get him on the line right now. I was kidding. Jeanne Dillner:                  Okay. Call him up.                                                 [inaudible 00:10:42] 107 [inaudible 00:10:47]. Paul Casey:                         Yeah. It sounds like you're more of a guide, right? You change your style and I think Ken Blanchard developed a situational leadership model right? Some people need more directions. You have to be super clear with your expert expectations. And this is the deliverable. This is what a win looks like. Other people want autonomy. Let's leave me alone, clear away the obstacles and let me do my job. Jeanne Dillner:                  Yeah. And sometimes it's not easy to find out who needs what, but... Paul Casey:                         Right. Jeanne Dillner:                  But we're figuring it out. Paul Casey:                         Yeah. Well, how do you keep yourself fired up Jeanne? Where do you go for inspiration as a leader? Jeanne Dillner:                  Well, one of the things that is inspiring to me course is the patients that we help. So, we get pretty frequently. We get patient stories and surgeons will send those to us, or they'll send us a story about just what it's like at their hospital. And that really is an encouragement to keep on going, especially during the pandemic when we can't travel there ourselves, because that was like the biggest high is to go see the people, see the dignity of even the impoverished, and know that you're helping their lives become better. It's not just the patients lives that are better, but it's also the surgeons because now they're doing something worthwhile. They have the tools they need to help their patients. So, that's what I would do during travel times, but now we're in staying at home times and I think you know that I'm Christian and that I have a faith in God.                                                 And so, I've tried to use this time to believe that it's something God is doing to help us get closer to Him and to pray more, and to consult, and practice, and strengthen our faith. So, I'm doing that quite a bit right now. And especially, in terms of just, I know this is a hard time for people they're working from home. They don't have that same social connection, human connection with people and it's not as energizing sometimes. So, I've prayed a lot to be energetic about my job and find something really intriguing to focus on so that I can get revved up and make progress. Paul Casey:                         Yeah. I think people do play off their leader, the energy that they bring or the vibe that they have. So, I love that you're really being intentional about that. Amping it up with a little bit more charisma or energy, or whatever that would take... Jeanne Dillner:                  Right. Paul Casey:                         To be a model for the team and also... Jeanne Dillner:                  [inaudible 00:13:30]. Paul Casey:                         Agree that yeah, that's true. Right. Some days harder than others. Yeah. Jeanne Dillner:                  Yep. Paul Casey:                         And the spiritual connection being sort of the key to mental health, emotional health, physical health, it's sort of like the core. And faith over fear, we've got that sign in our house here in a culture where there's a lot of fear. Jeanne Dillner:                  Oh yeah. Yep. Well, there's probably always been that fear. It's just that now we're seeing it. And so, how we handle what we see is what God, we have to go to God to understand what to do, so. Paul Casey:                         Absolutely. Well you have to keep improving yourself. You've probably shared little nuggets already there what you're working on as a leader, but what are you working on like right now and maybe even for the months to come as a leader to better yourself? Jeanne Dillner:                  Well, I think the other thing we're working on besides succession... That's such a hard word. Succession planning because it's psychological that it's hard to say [inaudible 00:14:33] is the long term. Well, I think a three year long term goal is good. Because it's not so far in the future that you can't touch it in a way. And it is hard to plan for three to five years right now just because you really don't know what the... It's just, things are so uncertain. Paul Casey:                         Yes. Jeanne Dillner:                  But we are working on that. I mean, we're more intentional about that now. And we're trying to learn and convey the lingo of that kind of thinking that is more than 12 months out thinking. We've been doing 12 month planning for a long time, but now let's turn that into 36 months planning.                                                 And so, we're learning how to define and report on KPIs, key performance indicators. Things like that, that are more businesslike as a nonprofit. We haven't had to be as rigid or disciplined. I don't know. We're disciplined, but we haven't had to use business lingo as much, but now we're transitioning into a new ERP system. So, we're going to have to change a lot of the ways that we do our work and it's going to, for the most part, be better than what we're doing now. And some of that is getting better information out of the data that's going in there about our costs or time to manufacture things, or whatever things that this new ERP will be tracking for us. So, we need to be thinking about what does it look like to have a new product, significantly different products.                                                 So, we're looking into, and talking very seriously with a few people about starting science spine. So, what it does that look like for us and how do we incorporate that into our database? It has ramifications that are tremendous. And we think that people would be excited about funding that, but we don't know yet until we get a core group set up and really a pilot project going, how it's going to work and whether the local surgeons really want to benefit from it. But that's the exciting thing for the next three to five years, is to see how that project pans out. We're pretty confident it's going to happen and going to start next year sometime. Paul Casey:                         Wow. SIGN spine. You heard here first. Jeanne Dillner:                  Yeah. Right. Well... Paul Casey:                         How exciting. Jeanne Dillner:                  Yeah. You try here first. Paul Casey:                         Yes. Jeanne Dillner:                  [crosstalk 00:17:23] a conversation within our walls for quite a while. Paul Casey:                         Yeah. Very, very exciting. And I love how you brought up key performance indicators. And no matter if you're in a nonprofit or in a for-profit or you're a solopreneur, I think tracking those KPIs for yourself and your performance, and as an organization just make you more effective. So, Jeanne, how do you balance or integrate your personal time, your family time with the work time, so that everything gets the priority it needs, right? It's a little bit of a Tetris trying to fit all those things into your schedule. How do you do that? Jeanne Dillner:                  I can say I've been super weird at that. Right now, my family consists two golden retrievers and myself, and then one of my brothers decided to move here. So, I make time for him and his wife. Every weekend, they come over and help me walk the dogs. And I just got back from Lake Oswego where my one year old grand niece had her first birthday. So, I am, I would would to say the first 20 years, I wasn't very good at it. And now that I'm looking more to the distant future. I'm focusing more on my brothers and their families, and making sure that I'm staying healthy, and able to participate in their lives more than I had been in the last 20 years, let's say. Paul Casey:                         Yeah, good stuff. It is a work of progress for all of us in leadership because we like the work, we do. There's so much that has to get done. Jeanne Dillner:                  Yeah. Paul Casey:                         But if we put ourselves off or our families off for too long there's consequences on that side of things. So, we have to raise it up the priority scale. Jeanne Dillner:                  We do. And some of that is they were busy with their careers too. So, it's just now that we're all able to really see the value and the need for us to stay connected because we need that. We need each other. And honestly, SIGN is out of a point where it can now afford to have more people. So, like in your situation, you are everything. And for many years I was a lot of more things than most CEOs are. So, we've got some incredibly talented and competent people on board now, who can and want to have that responsibility, share the responsibility, which is also healthy for the word I have a hard time saying, succession planning. To make sure we have more managers now that are, and they are all quite capable of handling things, whether I'm here or not. And all I'm doing now is fine tuning their knowledge to make the transition easier in the future. Paul Casey:                         Yes. I want to pick your brain more on employees, but let's go to a break here before we head into our next question on hiring and retaining great employees. Let's do a quick shout out to our sponsor. Speaker 2:                           A lot of sweat and hard work has been put into your farm and ranch, protecting it in your family's legacy is what matters most. At Basin Pacific Insurance & Benefits, we understand the challenges agribusinesses face today. Our team is knowledgeable and service oriented. From small farms and ranches to vertically integrated agriculture. Our team at Basin Pacific and Manley Crop Insurance provides the services of a large broker with the care of a local agent. Locally owned since 2010. Visit us online at basinpacifictricities.com. Paul Casey:                         So, Jeanne, what's your process for attracting great talent. You said it's sort of the key to work life balance is to have great people underneath you. So, I would agree with you there. And then how do you keep good people? How do you make the workplace a place where employees want to stay? You've had some long timers there. And I know the mission is probably one of those reasons, but it's probably culture. So, talk to us about that. Jeanne Dillner:                  So, I think mission is key to the fact that we're able to keep people for so many years. The machinists they're making the implants that go into the bodies of the patients. So, they know that the every day they make... How many nails do they make a day? Let's say they make a hundred nails a day. They're helping a hundred people walk again. Paul Casey:                         Wow. Jeanne Dillner:                  And that's pretty impactful, I think. And keeps you going when times are rough. And of course we try to pay a fair salary just because we're a nonprofit, we still have to compete for good employees. In terms of hiring the right people, the rightest people have come to us providentially. We've just been made aware of them or they found out about us, so we feel very strongly and thankful for that.                                                 There are some positions for us that are very hard to find the right fit. And so, we are having to change how we interview and assess a person before we bring them on because we consistently choose not the right person for it, or they're just not coming to us. Especially right now, it's hard to get people to apply for work for some reason. So, we have a one or two positions opened and we're just being a lot more selective now. Because it's very painful to hire somebody, have them not work out and then have to start it all over. Paul Casey:                         Yes. Jeanne Dillner:                  Painful for them and painful for us. But in terms of keeping people besides the mission, we're also fairly flexible. We can be more flexible in the non-manufacturing jobs, but we're pretty flexible there too, in terms of time that you work. So even in the shop, the shop is open, say from six o'clock, till 17:30. So, the people that want to come in at six and work till a certain time, they can do that. As opposed to always everybody having to be here from seven to four. And then we're also flexible for the office staff, like the engineers and the clerical people, et cetera. If they need to be off for a child's school play or sports or whatever, they just make it up on Friday or something. And I'm not being super forceful about people coming back into the building. There are some of our staff who are very afraid of the pandemic and about catching COVID, and they feel the safest place at home, and their work is fine from home.                                                 So, we accommodate that and we look to other companies for how they're handling it, and how they're informing how they're going to move back to the building eventually. But I've just not set a date because who knows when the next flare up will happen. So, I don't want to really enforce anything. And those that are staying home most of the time when I need them in, they come in and they're fine with it. But anyway, so yeah, it's a challenge though because we all enjoy each other's company. And I think ideas are exchanged much faster. If you're an innovative company, I think it happens more rapidly if you're in the same room together, but we're still making good changes despite being so far apart. Paul Casey:                         Yeah. Flexibility is such a key in today's work place. Many sources have said that's even more important than salary and almost benefits. I mean, it's just such a big deal for people to be able to have that flexibility. It used to just mean work hours and paid time off, and things like that, but now, it's working at home or working at the office, so. Jeanne Dillner:                  Yeah, I had one person who says, "Well, I'd really like to work in the office." And I said, "Okay, I'm not telling you can't, so that's fine." But the other thing that I was really excited to be able to offer to people when schools were closed is that they could bring their kids and have them learn alongside because not every child can study without some supervision, so. Paul Casey:                         Yeah. Jeanne Dillner:                  We were able to accommodate that as well. Since there were so many people gone, there were plenty of empty offices. Paul Casey:                         Yes. I like how you led with the mission. And of course for nonprofits, that's the key of why people sign on, is the mission. No matter what job you have as a leader, I think it's important to connect your people, your team to the constituents you serve. No matter if you're making widgets or developing people or providing some kind of service. I think when you get a glimpse of who you're serving and how that actual end user is benefiting, it sort of kicks you back in as a motivator, so... Jeanne Dillner:                  Yeah. Paul Casey:                         That's neat that like what you said, I'm going to save a hundred lives or help a hundred lives today. There isn't much greater motivation than that. Jeanne Dillner:                  But we're friends with Leatherman tools. They've been very supportive for SIGN. And their marketing is awesome and they sincerely believe their tool is saving lives. It's getting people out of predicaments. It's an amazing tool and series of tools that they've developed. And so, we're learning from them on how to reinvigorate your enthusiasm for the job that you have, so. Paul Casey:                         Good marketing. So, you mentioned succession plan, I won't make you say it again, but delegation is a part of sort an early stage of that. Making sure you're too deep in every position. And how do you feel about delegation? What are struggles for you or do you have some tips on how to do it well? Jeanne Dillner:                  Well, what I wrote was hire really good people. And it's true. It's lot easier to delegate when you're working with people who want to learn and who want to take on more responsibility, and have the aptitude for it. So, that's been very freeing for me. I've had a dream for one of our departments to be X, Y, Z, and the people that are in there are now, they have that same dream and so, they're making it happen. But if you have people that can't visualize that dream, then you it's just going to be slow coming. But now, that department is really swinging and helping educate more surgeons because of it. And then how do I encourage myself and others to delegate? That is harder, but I do check in with myself and say, "Jeanne, why are you doing this scan right now?"                                                 And well, right now, it's because we don't have a front desk person. So, after doing it for about a week, I realized this was not a good use of my time. So now, we're going to look at hiring a temp agency to fill that spot for at least part of the day, each day. Because it's a drain on my mental capacity, which should be thinking about [inaudible 00:29:26] not... Paul Casey:                         Yeah. Jeanne Dillner:                  "Did I push the right button to scan this thing?" Paul Casey:                         Yes. Jeanne Dillner:                  [crosstalk 00:29:32]. Yeah. I do have a personal assistant now, which is very wonderful and also frees up a lot of time for me. And she's helping me learn to what things to let her just go do, instead of me wanting to start the process and letting her finish, kind of a thing. Paul Casey:                         Yeah. Jeanne Dillner:                  So, I'm very relational. And so, that's hard because I like interfacing with all the people that report to me, but really there are some things that are better done by someone else. Paul Casey:                         Yeah. It's a good question you asked yourself like, "Am I the right person to be doing this right now?" And I think leaders should ask themselves that question often because you've been promoted or hired for 15,000 feet or 30,000 foot view... Jeanne Dillner:                  Right. Paul Casey:                         Of your team or organization. And not that you're unwilling to make a scan or sling a chair because servant leaders, no job too small. However, the organization only has hired you for a reason. And it's great that if there's other people that love doing the scans can be employed to do that and everybody wins. Jeanne Dillner:                  Yeah. Scan and file it and all those other things. So yes, there's a lot to those little jobs that really, if you can't find that piece of paper again, it can mean hours of work trying to remake it or whatever. Paul Casey:                         Yeah. Well finally, Jeanne, what advice would you give to new leaders or anyone who wants to keep growing and gaining more influence? Jeanne Dillner:                  I think new leaders oftentimes become afraid of failure maybe. And so, become micromanagy and they don't even know they're doing it. So, I would think a new leader would want to have someone who's honest with them, that they check in with, just to get honest feedback on how they're doing. And then to also find mentors that they've seen or feel like are good leaders and just spend time with them. One of the things that I realized I haven't done with my other managers, but the new managers I have, I am doing. I call it manager in training and I just let them pick my brain because I don't know what their question are, so. And they don't oftentimes either, so when we talk through how to let go of things, and how to train somebody else to do something, and how to think a little bit bigger than you are right now. So, that I can see that you're ready to take more.                                                 Those types of things that I didn't do with the other managers, probably because 20 years ago, when I was asked to do this position, we were all learning just how to do SIGN, period. Paul Casey:                         Yeah. Jeanne Dillner:                  And so, we're all busy learning together. We didn't have time to do manager in training because this manager was in their own training game, honestly. But yeah, I think that's been healthy for them and it's certainly helped us build a rapport that we might not have had, otherwise in trust that we wouldn't have had. So, I don't know, I guess that's what I [inaudible 00:33:05] of today. Paul Casey:                         Yeah. Putting on that mentor hat and making yourself available, and then the questions. Really in mentoring relationships, I've often found the mentee is in charge of the questions and then the mentor is available and then speaks from their experience. So, it sounds like a pretty good MIT system you got going there, Jeanne. Jeanne Dillner:                  Well, thanks. Because I thought, well, was I supposed to build a curriculum? I wasn't sure what I was doing, but it seems now they're just taking things they have quandaries about and then just talk through them. Paul Casey:                         Yeah. Jeanne Dillner:                  I meet just about every week with each one of, there are three, with each one of them. So, and then I meet with the more mature managers, I meet once a month or so. Paul Casey:                         Well Jeanne, how can our listeners best connect to you and to SIGN? Jeanne Dillner:                  Well, they can learn more about SIGN Fracture Care by going to www.signfracturecare.org. We have a really nice website and it's very informative and there's places to donate if you find that you feel like you want to support our organization. You're welcome to send me an email. I look at that all of the time and my email address is Jeanne, jeanne.dillner@signfracturecare.org. Paul Casey:                         Well thank you for all you do to make Tri-Cities a great place and keep leading well. Jeanne Dillner:                  Thank you, Paul. It's been a pleasure. Paul Casey:                         Let me wrap up our podcast today with a leadership resource to recommend. And it's a book I just read on vacation called, How to Say Anything to Anyone, by Shari Harley. And there's good stuff in there. And one of them hearkens back to one of Jeanne's last answers, is we need to get more feedback on ourselves from the people around us. So, who do you need to get feedback from today, specifically, on your performance? Because most people won't speak up and share that. So, that was one thing I gleaned from the book and also getting ahead of situations with your expectations right up front, even on a personal level, so people know where you're coming from. So, How to Say Anything to Anyone is a great read. Again, this is Paul Casey, and I want to thank my guest Jeanne Dillner from SIGN Fracture Care for being here today on the Tri-Cities Influencer Podcast. And we want to thank our TCI sponsor and invite you to support them. We appreciate you making this possible, so that we can collaborate to inspire leaders in our community.                                                 Finally, one more tidbit for the road to help you make a difference in your circle of influence it's by [Deep 00:35:45] Roy, he said, "Inspiration comes from within yourself. One has to be positive. When you're positive, good things happen." Until next time. KGF, keep growing forward. Speaker 1:                           Thank you to our listeners for tuning in to today's show. Paul Casey is on a mission to add value to leaders by providing practical tools and strategies that reduce stress in their lives and on their teams, so that they can enjoy life and leadership and experience their key desired results. If you'd like more help from Paul in your leadership development, connect with him at growingforward@paulcasey.org, for a consultation that could help you move past your current challenges and create a strategy for growing your life or your team forward. Paul would also like to help you restore your sanity, to your crazy schedule and getting your priorities done every day by offering you his free Control My Calendar Checklist. Go to www.takebackmycalendar.com for that productivity tool, or open a text message to 72000 and type the word, "Growing." Paul Casey:                         The Tri-Cities Influencer Podcast was recorded at fuse SPC, by Bill Wagner of safe strategies.

The Show with Sam & Joe
TS 358: Show Me Your Teeth

The Show with Sam & Joe

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 66:03


This week we talk about Starbucks Holiday Drinks, dental experiences, new underwear, Twitch animal streams, the new MacBook Pro, and sugar free gum! Support us on Patreon to keep the podcast going, view more detailed show notes, and to gain access to exclusive content at: http://www.patreon.com/theshowsamandjoe Favorite things: MacBook Pro 2021, Tetris 99, Boxer Briefs

The 0HITPOINTS Podcast
Ryan_Runs_16 - Tetris Factor

The 0HITPOINTS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 12:44


It was bound to happen.

POCKETOID
Pocketoid 191: Murder House, Evil Tonight, Tetris Effect Connected, and more!

POCKETOID

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021


In this episode of Pocketoid: Even MORE scary movies we've been watching! Addison discovers the Sega CD library, to our collective horror! Our impressions of the Nintendo Switch N64 games! Jordan gets way, way too deep into Forager. Jordan gives his impressions of Tetris Effect Connected, the best Tetris. Jordan reviews Puppet Combo's Murder House! Jordan reviews Evil Tonight! More spooky Halloween Switch games and we answer your questions!Have a great Halloween guys!Intro: Time Trials - Hyper PotionsOutro: Hut By The River (Pokemon Snap) - Sound Market

We Have Concerns
Corpse Medicine and Tetris Effects

We Have Concerns

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 84:49


Hey! If you're enjoying the show, please take a moment to rate/review it on whatever service you use to listen.Here's the iTunes link: http://bit.ly/wehaveconcerns And here's the Stitcher link: http://bit.ly/stitcherwhconcernsJeff on Twitter: http://twitter.com/jeffcannataAnthony on Twitter: http://twitter.com/acarboniDrink some skulls, for science: https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/drinking-skullsTetris and trauma: https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/04/09/523011446/how-playing-tetris-tames-the-trauma-of-a-car-crashIf you've seen a story you think belongs on the show, send it to wehaveconcernsshow@gmail.com or leave it on the subreddit: http://reddit.com/r/wehaveconcerns

Optimal Relationships Daily
1128: The Relativism of Advice by Colin Wright of Exile Lifestyle on Better Communication Skills & Travel Inspiration Tips

Optimal Relationships Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 9:07


Colin Wright of Exile Lifestyle shares his thoughts on the relativism of advice. Episode 1128: The Relativism of Advice by Colin Wright of Exile Lifestyle on Better Communication Skills & Travel Inspiration Tips Colin Wright is a professional author and international speaker who co-founded a publishing company and travels full-time, moving to a new country every four months or so--that country determined by the votes of his readers! He also blogs. Colin's a minimalist in that he owns very few things and is careful in how he consumes. He tends to buy less, but invest in quality when he does, and trends toward the same in relationships, business endeavors, and just about everything else. He's left-handed, blue-eyed, scary good at Tetris, and can't cook. The original post is located here: https://exilelifestyle.com/the-relativism-of-advice/ BetterHelp online counseling is there for you. Best of all it's a truly affordable option - Optimal Relationship Daily listeners get 10% off your first month with discount code ORD. So why not get started today? Go to BetterHelp.com/ord Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com  Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalRelationshipsDailyMarriageParenting Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Jrodconcerts: The Podcast
Musical Artists: Rob Garza (Thievery Corporation) and Racquel Jones

Jrodconcerts: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 19:27


Rob Garza, one half of internationally acclaimed electronic duo Thievery Corporation and friend of the show Singer/Songwriter Racquel Jones joins the show. Having just finished a sold-out acclaimed tour through North America, Rob and Racquel join us from St. Petersburg where Rob shares the story of his newly released debut album 'Daydream Accelerator' , his new video for 'Summer is Ours', creating a new TETRIS song & more. Racquel, our multi-talented friend who gave us an epic interview in early 2021, shares how she met Thievery Corporation, the magic of the return to the stages & lots more. For more on Thievery Corporation visit www.thieverycorporation.com

Rhythm and Pixels Video Game Music Podcast
Episode 30-1 The Music of Koichi Sugiyama

Rhythm and Pixels Video Game Music Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021


This week we're listening to music by the master composer of Dragon Quest: Koichi Sugiyama! Which is great, because there is very little Dragon Quest music in this episode! We talk about Tetris, puzzle games, and at one point we dive into the mind of Pernell to discover what his favorite game console of tall time is! Find more of the podcast! https://rhythmandpixels.com Support the show and get access to exclusive content! https://patreon.com/rhythmandpixels

Wonderful!
Wonderful! 201: Keep it up, Tetris Boy

Wonderful!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 31:42


Griffin's favorite motivational emotion! Rachel's favorite relatable poet!Music: “Money Won't Pay” by bo en and Augustus – https://open.spotify.com/album/7n6zRzTrGPIHt0kRvmWoya Support AAPI communities and those affected by anti-Asian violence: https://www.gofundme.com/c/act/stop-aapi-hate Support the AAPI Civic Engagement Fund: https://aapifund.org/

Pixel Therapy Pod
The Antidote to Doomscrolling and The Witcher 3 with Games Journalist Isaiah Colbert

Pixel Therapy Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 98:45


Happy SpOoKy SeAsOn!! Spencer has orange hair and Jamie wants a 12-foot tall skeleton! We're on theme with the games this week, too: join us as we dive into the bleak, unsettling-yet-sweet visual novel Little Misfortune from Killmonday Games, and the vibrant, gorgeous, decaying world of action-adventure debut Kena: Bridge of Spirits from Ember Lab. Then we're thrilled to be joined by Kotaku staff writer Isaiah Colbert (he/they)! We had an absolutely lovely time chatting with Isaiah on writing about games as experiences rather than products, striving to make space for seeking solutions in the industry, jumping into games journalism as a self-proclaimed filthy casual who plays Tetris every day, becoming emotionally ready to receive media, and how Geralt of Rivia awoke a new appreciation for fantasy inside of them - with some smooth JoJo references sprinkled in along the way. Follow Isaiah on Twitter: https://twitter.com/EyeZehUhh Patricia Hernandez' piece referenced ~1:05: https://kotaku.com/hello-kotaku-its-me-your-new-eic-1847192727 GIANT SKELETON: https://ebay.to/3oSGCIh Side Quest Support Black Streamers! Here are a few of our faves: https://www.twitch.tv/ctrlaltquin https://www.twitch.tv/cypheroftyr https://www.twitch.tv/gameonysus https://www.twitch.tv/chrislaawrence https://www.twitch.tv/iambrandon Supporting Twitch streamers with Amazon Prime: https://help.twitch.tv/s/article/how-to-subscribe?language=en_US#Prime About Pixel Therapy New episodes drop every other Tuesday. Learn more at pixeltherapypod.com or follow us on social media @pixeltherapypod. We're proud members of the But Why Tho? Podcast Network: visit ButWhyThoPodcast.com for everything pop culture in an inclusive geek community! If you like what you hear, please take a moment to rate us, leave us a review on Apple Podcasts (or your listening app of choice) & subscribe! Want more? Unlock monthly bonus episodes for $2/mo and help us save up for streaming equipment at patreon.com/pixeltherapypod ! Support this podcast

HANNAHLYZE THIS with Hannah Hart & Hannah Gelb
Hannah Gelb: Real Housewife of San Diego

HANNAHLYZE THIS with Hannah Hart & Hannah Gelb

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 44:33


The Hannahs recently spent a lovely Saturday together, streaming on Twitch! Catch up with them as they discuss live performance, their internal narratives, and the benefits of Tetris. Get into the nitty gritty of the (sometimes) toxic ways we connect to ourselves and disconnect from others, contemplate your inner Real Housewife, and revisit the mantra "comparison is death." Enjoy bonus content from this episode and more by supporting us on Patreon! Join your fellow Earbud Patrons in BTS splendor for as little as $5 a month. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/hannahlyze-this/support

Optimal Living Daily: Personal Development & Minimalism
2112: Outdated Limitations by Colin Wright of Exile Lifestyle on Defining Your Own Limits

Optimal Living Daily: Personal Development & Minimalism

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 9:03


Colin Wright of Exile Lifestyle talks about outdated limitations and how to define your own limits Episode 2112: Outdated Limitations by Colin Wright of Exile Lifestyle on Defining Your Own Limits Colin Wright is a professional author and international speaker who co-founded a publishing company and travels full-time, moving to a new country every four months or so--that country determined by the votes of his readers! He also blogs. Colin's a minimalist in that he owns very few things and is careful in how he consumes. He tends to buy less, but invest in quality when he does, and trends toward the same in relationships, business endeavors, and just about everything else. He's left-handed, blue-eyed, scary good at Tetris, and can't cook. The original post can be found here:   Gusto is making payroll, benefits, and HR easy for small businesses. Get 3 months free once you run your first payroll with our link:    and in    Interested in advertising on the show? Visit