Podcasts about FiveThirtyEight

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American data-based news website

  • 497PODCASTS
  • 959EPISODES
  • 49mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Dec 8, 2021LATEST
FiveThirtyEight

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Best podcasts about FiveThirtyEight

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Latest podcast episodes about FiveThirtyEight

Bet The Process
Season 5 Episode 18 - Josh Hermsmeyer joins

Bet The Process

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 60:11


Josh Hermsmeyer is a writer for FiveThirtyEight.com covering the NFL and a football analyst. This week, Josh is the guest for the guys who go deep into the rest of the NFL season.

Givin' Props
Week 12 Player Props

Givin' Props

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 28:47


This week, BetPrep's Player Prop Guru Brad Feinberg discusses his top player props for Week 12 of the 2021-2022 NFL season with host and BetPrep Editor Michael Salfino of The Athletic and FiveThirtyEight. Player props include Tom Brady, T.Y. Hilton, Jonathan Taylor, James Washington, Ben Roethlisberger, Ja'Marr Chase, and Dalvin Cook

Apple News Today
Who gets to claim self-defense in fatal shootings?

Apple News Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 9:58


Closing arguments have concluded in the trial of the three white men accused of killing Ahmaud Arbery, a 25-year-old Black man who was out jogging. The Washington Post reports that many people across the U.S. are viewing the jury’s decision as a test of the movement for racial justice. Teachers have experienced intense burnout during the pandemic. Unlike workers in many other industries, however, K–12 educators have not left their jobs in alarming numbers. FiveThirtyEight explores why. With the TSA expecting the number of airline passengers traveling for Thanksgiving to reach pre-pandemic levels this year, USA Today has a guide for any mishaps that may arise along your route. And be warned: Not all Thanksgiving food can fly in your carry-on bag. Travel & Leisure lists what you can bring. The Wall Street Journal looks at research showing that reconnecting with old friends can boost mood, self-esteem, and confidence.

The Best Soccer Show
1 Year Out From 2022 World Cup, MLS Cup Playoff Picks & NWSL Crowns a Champion

The Best Soccer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 73:19


We are less than 1 year out from the 2022 World Cup in Qatar! Jason and Jared look ahead to the tournament and try to figure out when games will kick off, react to FiveThirtyEight's USMNT qualification chances and possible playoff matches to get in. Next, Jason, Jared & Nick go through their MLS Cup Playoff brackets as the action kicked off this weekend. Finally, NWSL has crowned the Washington Spirit champions and the guys quickly preview the USL Championship Final next weekend.  Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/thebestsoccershow  Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/bestiessoccer Instagram: https://instagram.com/thebestsoccershow Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thebestsocce... Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/thebestsoccershow Subscribe and Review the Podcast! Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast... Or email your review to: bestsoccershowreviews@gmail.com

Givin' Props
Week 11 Player Props

Givin' Props

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 33:50


This week, BetPrep's Player Prop Guru Brad Feinberg discusses his top player props for Week 11 of the 2021-2022 NFL season with host and BetPrep Editor Michael Salfino of The Athletic and FiveThirtyEight. Player props include A.J. Brown, Christian McCaffrey, DeVonta Smith, Tyler Boyd, David Montgomery, Adam Trautman, Jimmy Garoppolo, and Bryan Edwards

Slate Daily Feed
Political: No Joe Mojo

Slate Daily Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 70:45


John, Emily and David discuss Biden's approval numbers, authoritarianism on the rise, and they are joined by author Jay Caspian Kang to talk about his new book, The Loneliest Americans. Here are some notes and references from this week's show: FiveThirtyEight, Latest Polls  Isaac Chotiner for the New Yorker: “Can Biden's Agenda Survive Inflation?” Jason Furman for the Wall Street Journal: “​​Biden Can Whip Inflation and Build Back Better” The Loneliest Americans, by Jay Caspian Kang Pew Research Center: “Where Do You Fit In The Political Typology?” Christopher Borrelli for the Chicago Tribune: “What We're Reading: 4 Korean American Memoirs, From Personal Stories To An Unsettling Confrontation on Identity and Assimilation” Anne Appelbaum for the Atlantic: “The Bad Guys Are Winning” Freedom House: “Freedom in the World 2021: Democracy Under Siege” The Dictator's Learning Curve: Inside the Global Battle for Democracy, by William J. Dobson Twitter and Tear Gas: The Power and Fragility of Networked Protest, by Zeynep Tufekci  Zeynep Tufekci for the Atlantic: “How the Coronavirus Revealed Authoritarianism's Fatal Flaw” Here's this week's chatter: Emily: Ashley Southall and Jonah E. Bromwich for the New York Times: “2 Men Convicted of Killing Malcolm X Will Be Exonerated After Decades” John: The Faber Book of Reportage, by John Carey; The Way We Live Now, by Anthony Trollope audiobook  David: Geoffrey Leavenworth for the New York Times: “One Chaste Marriage, Four Kids, and the Catholic Church”; Spencer Buell for Boston magazine: “New England Hidden Gems You'll Find on the New Atlas Obscura App”; City Cast Houston Listener chatter from Melissa Ocepek: A fox listens to the banjo For this week's Slate Plus bonus segment Emily, John, and David discuss the most useful friend to have. Tweet us your questions and chatters @SlateGabfest or email us at gabfest@slate.com. (Messages may be quoted by name unless the writer stipulates otherwise.) Podcast production by Jocelyn Frank. Research and show notes by Bridgette Dunlap. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Political Gabfest
No Joe Mojo

Political Gabfest

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 70:45


John, Emily and David discuss Biden's approval numbers, authoritarianism on the rise, and they are joined by author Jay Caspian Kang to talk about his new book, The Loneliest Americans. Here are some notes and references from this week's show: FiveThirtyEight, Latest Polls  Isaac Chotiner for the New Yorker: “Can Biden's Agenda Survive Inflation?” Jason Furman for the Wall Street Journal: “​​Biden Can Whip Inflation and Build Back Better” The Loneliest Americans, by Jay Caspian Kang Pew Research Center: “Where Do You Fit In The Political Typology?” Christopher Borrelli for the Chicago Tribune: “What We're Reading: 4 Korean American Memoirs, From Personal Stories To An Unsettling Confrontation on Identity and Assimilation” Anne Appelbaum for the Atlantic: “The Bad Guys Are Winning” Freedom House: “Freedom in the World 2021: Democracy Under Siege” The Dictator's Learning Curve: Inside the Global Battle for Democracy, by William J. Dobson Twitter and Tear Gas: The Power and Fragility of Networked Protest, by Zeynep Tufekci  Zeynep Tufekci for the Atlantic: “How the Coronavirus Revealed Authoritarianism's Fatal Flaw” Here's this week's chatter: Emily: Ashley Southall and Jonah E. Bromwich for the New York Times: “2 Men Convicted of Killing Malcolm X Will Be Exonerated After Decades” John: The Faber Book of Reportage, by John Carey; The Way We Live Now, by Anthony Trollope audiobook  David: Geoffrey Leavenworth for the New York Times: “One Chaste Marriage, Four Kids, and the Catholic Church”; Spencer Buell for Boston magazine: “New England Hidden Gems You'll Find on the New Atlas Obscura App”; City Cast Houston Listener chatter from Melissa Ocepek: A fox listens to the banjo For this week's Slate Plus bonus segment Emily, John, and David discuss the most useful friend to have. Tweet us your questions and chatters @SlateGabfest or email us at gabfest@slate.com. (Messages may be quoted by name unless the writer stipulates otherwise.) Podcast production by Jocelyn Frank. Research and show notes by Bridgette Dunlap. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Apple News Today
House votes largely on party lines to censure Paul Gosar

Apple News Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 8:41


The House censured Rep. Paul Gosar after he posted an anime video depicting him killing Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. The Washington Post has the story of the first vote of its kind in more than a decade. FiveThirtyEight reports on how the national shortage of school-bus drivers is hurting workers, students, and their families. Cryptocurrency fans are raising money to buy a rare copy of the U.S. Constitution, and it looks like they may pull it off. The Wall Street Journal got several organizers to reveal their names and speak on the record. The longest partial lunar eclipse in nearly 600 years is about to take place. Accuweather explains how to see it.

Givin' Props
Week 10 Player Props

Givin' Props

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 34:15


This week, BetPrep's Player Prop Guru Brad Feinberg discusses his top player props for Week 10 of the 2021-2022 NFL season with host and BetPrep Editor Michael Salfino of The Athletic and FiveThirtyEight. Player props include Jordan Howard, Matt Ryan, Russell Gage, Austin Ekeler, Adrian Peterson, A.J. Brown, and Jared Goff

Givin' Props
Week 9 Player Props

Givin' Props

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 34:54


This week, BetPrep's Player Prop Guru Brad Feinberg discusses his top player props for Week 9 of the 2021-2022 NFL season with host and BetPrep Editor Michael Salfino of The Athletic and FiveThirtyEight. Player props include Jalen Hurts, Austin Ekeler, Zay Jones, Josh Jacobs, Courtland Sutton, Boston Scott, Myles Gaskin, and Aaron Jones

Apple News Today
The people who clean up after climate disasters

Apple News Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 7:53


Police reform is on the ballot today in Minneapolis, where George Floyd’s murder ignited a new debate over the role of law enforcement. FiveThirtyEight breaks down what voters are deciding. And the Washington Post looks at how many Democratic mayoral candidates have moved from talking about reducing or reallocating police budgets to focusing on “law and order.” With natural disasters becoming more frequent and intense due to climate change, cleaning up after floods, wildfires, and hurricanes is a multibillion-dollar business. The New Yorker tells the stories of some of the often-exploited workers who do that dirty work. Heterosexual married couples in the U.S. still almost always give their kids the father’s surname. The Atlantic examines why. London cab drivers are famed for memorizing the city’s complicated streets. The Washington Post reports on new research that is scanning their brains for clues that may lead to better understanding of Alzheimer’s disease.

Read By AI
Why The Supreme Court Might Overturn Texas's Abortion Law

Read By AI

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 6:18


Hi! This is Lexie of Read by AI. I read human-curated content for you to listen to while working, exercising, commuting, or any other time. Without further ado: Why The Supreme Court Might Overturn Texas's Abortion Law by Amelia Thomson-DeVeaux from Five Thirty Eight.

POLITICO Playbook Audio Briefing
Nov. 1, 2021: It's zero hour for Virginia and Build Back Better

POLITICO Playbook Audio Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 4:38


Could prescription drug pricing reform make it into the reconciliation bill after all? Senate and House Democrats and the White House came close to reaching a deal on the issue Sunday, report Burgess Everett, Alice Miranda Ollstein and Heather Caygle. The plan in the works would allow some Medicare negotiations with pharmaceutical companies — but if it comes together, it would still be much narrower than many Democrats initially intended. And, the race for governor in Virginia heads into the final stretch. The final polls: FiveThirtyEight's poll tracker has Youngkin surging into a slight lead, now up by an average of 0.6 points. Raghu Manavalan is the host of POLITICO's Playbook. Jenny Ament is the senior producer for POLITICO Audio.  Irene Noguchi is the executive producer of POLITICO Audio.

Givin' Props
Week 8 Player Props

Givin' Props

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 29:25


This week, BetPrep's Player Prop Guru Brad Feinberg discusses his top player props for Week 8 of the 2021-2022 NFL season with host and BetPrep Editor Michael Salfino of The Athletic and FiveThirtyEight. Player props include Chuba Hubbard, Jameis Winston, Derrick Henry, Alvin Kamara, Mike Davis, Jonathan Taylor, Michael Carter, Robby Anderson, and Dalvin Cook

Givin' Props
Week 7 Player Props

Givin' Props

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 34:40


This week, BetPrep's Player Prop Guru Brad Feinberg discusses his top player props for Week 7 of the 2021-2022 NFL season with host and BetPrep Editor Michael Salfino of The Athletic and FiveThirtyEight. Player props include Myles Gaskin, Sam Darnold, D'Andre Swift, Kyle Pitts, Calvin Ridley, Cordarrelle Patterson, Cole Kmet, Corey Davis, Miles Sanders, Carson Wentz, Jimmy Garoppolo, and Deebo Samuel

Ball is Bae NBA Podcast
503: Of Ranveer, Pedigree, and Five Thirty-Eight

Ball is Bae NBA Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 72:08


In this episode of the often lambasted #BallisBae NBA Podcast, we talk about the brand new ambassador of the NBA in India, we discuss the effects of pedigree in the NBA, and ruminate about the pre-season analytical rankings going around the analytical world. Show Notes (3:30) - Was Ranveer the best choice for the NBA Ambassador in India (22:10) - Eastern conference top 10 (30:10) - We talk about our new fav team in the East - Chicago Bulls (43:35) - Eastern conference top 10 (54:00) - Is MPJ over-rated? Ashwin thinks so (1:07:40) - Should the Indian women's team get hate comments for their recent performance?

Be Legendary Podcast
#149- Michael Easter- The Comfort Crisis

Be Legendary Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 78:48


Michael Easter teaches journalism, with a special emphasis on health media. Before his role at UNLV, he was a senior-level editor at Men's Health magazine. There, he brainstormed, wrote, and edited stories about human health and performance, and his work was read by nearly 25 million people in 50 countries each month.  At Men's Health, he also led a digital transition team, acted as a brand editor, and is part of the team that won a National Magazine Award for General Excellence. His online writing at Men's Health is some of the most highly-trafficked of all time.  Michael hosts Nevada Health, a weekly health radio show on KUNV, and his writing appears in Men's Health, Outside, Vice, Cosmopolitan, Scientific American, Men's Journal, and FiveThirtyEight.   

Around The NBA
75 Has Arrived

Around The NBA

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 75:55


The 75th NBA season begins tonight and I give my playoff predictions before the start of the new year. I also go over “FiveThirtyEight” player-based forecast model and its own predictions for this upcoming year.

FiveThirtyEight Politics
What Makes A Party Or Politician Popular?

FiveThirtyEight Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 63:28


The crew talks about why President Biden's approval is underwater, what the consequences are for Democrats and what they can do about it. They also check in on the upcoming Virginia governor's race and discuss a FiveThirtyEight report about how Congress may have inadvertently legalized THC -- the main psychoactive compound in marijuana.

RealGM Radio with Danny Leroux
Jared Dubin on the 2021-22 Regular Season Start

RealGM Radio with Danny Leroux

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 58:07


Host Danny Leroux (@DannyLeroux) talks with Jared Dubin (@JADubin5) about the 2021-22 regular season as it begins. They discuss the challenges of high expectations heading into a season, the thin margin for error in both conferences, FiveThirtyEight's season projections and much more. Subscribe to RealGM Radio on iTunes or via the RSS feed.

Givin' Props
Week 6 Player Props

Givin' Props

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 35:04


This week, BetPrep's Player Prop Guru Brad Feinberg discusses his top player props for Week 6 of the 2021-2022 NFL season with host and BetPrep Editor Michael Salfino of The Athletic and FiveThirtyEight. Player props include CeeDee Lamb, Justin Fields, Ben Roethlisberger, Aaron Rodgers, Justin Herbert, Latavius Murray, Robert Tonyan, Van Jefferson, AJ Dillon, and Aaron Jones

Apple News Today
In Conversation: Is bipartisanship dead?

Apple News Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 18:34


For the past few decades, it seems like Congress has been stuck in a perpetual state of gridlock. Lawmakers may say they want to work together, but when push comes to shove, the party that’s in the majority often ends up going it alone. For FiveThirtyEight, Lee Drutman breaks down why bipartisanship in Congress is dying — and what that means for democracy. You can read Drutman’s article in FiveThirtyEight now on Apple News.

Givin' Props
Week 5 Player Props

Givin' Props

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 40:05


This week, BetPrep's Player Prop Guru Brad Feinberg discusses his top player props for Week 5 of the 2021-2022 NFL season with host and BetPrep Editor Michael Salfino of The Athletic and FiveThirtyEight. Player props include Tom Brady, Antonio Brown, A.J. Brown, Hunter Renfrow, Darnell Mooney, Damien Williams, James Robinson, James Conner, and Aaron Rodgers

Tipping Pitches
Politics Liberal, Baseball Conservative

Tipping Pitches

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 70:22


Alex and Bobby discuss the anti-climactic end to the regular season and what they want to see out of the playoff vs. what they actually expect to happen. This week's Three Up, Three Down features Congresspeople procrastinating, a dress down of rabid praise of the Rays, and a tapping of the “it's not your money” sign. Links: Giants concessions workers reach tentative contract agreement FiveThirtyEight polls congresspeople on, just like, baseball  Songs featured in this episode: Yo La Tengo — “Let's Save Tony Orlando's House” • Shuggie Otis — “Strawberry Letter 23” • Booker T & the M.G.'s — “Green Onions”

Givin' Props
Week 4 Player Props

Givin' Props

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 30:05


This week, BetPrep's Player Prop Guru Brad Feinberg discusses his top player props for Week 4 of the 2021-2022 NFL season with host and BetPrep Editor Michael Salfino of The Athletic and FiveThirtyEight. Player props include Najee Harris, Robby Anderson, Robert Woods, Damien Harris, Allen Robinson II, DeAndre Hopkins, Mike Gesicki, Mecole Hardman, and Hunter Henry

BBCollective
What the Fuck is the Debt Ceiling?

BBCollective

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 56:39


Welcome back to the Bill Bradley Collective, where this week your hosts attempt to answer the question many economic neophytes have had through our latest news cycle: what the f--- is the debt ceiling? At the center of recent political discourse amidst our latest Congressional standoff, the debt ceiling is something many find hard to grasp (including one of our very own), but fear not, for our resident politicos Zak and Ed are here to outline the debt ceiling's history and relevance to modern politics and economic policy. Exploited for electoral gain and manipulated for political expediency, the names change throughout the last half-century. Ronald Reagan, Newt Gingrich and his Republican controlled house, and most recently Trump; as one party decries government spending under the auspices of blue-controlled executive and legislative bodies, the very same party in fact raises the arbitrary spending allowance of our government to the extent that it fits their opportunistic intentions. But first we present a trio of appetizers in rant form, as Zak details the Geno Auriemma-cosplay of West Virginia's failed highest elected official; Andrew examines NBA COVID protocols with a nod to a former number one pick's refusal to take the most efficient shot of his underwhelming career; and finally Ed spotlights the irrelevancy of the man behind FiveThirtyEight via the lack of accountability taken by his oft-failed predictive models.

The Good Practice Podcast
264 — What's in your L&D book bag? (Part 3)

The Good Practice Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 49:00


This week on the podcast, Ross D, Owen and Ross G are taking another rummage through their L&D book bag. They discuss: Nudge by Richard H. Thaler and Cass R. Sunstein Naked Statistics by Charles Wheelan Think Again by Adam Grant The Selfish Gene by Richard Dawkins 13 Minutes to the Moon, a podcast presented by Kevin Fong  How to Write One Song by Jeff Tweedy These books are available from all good booksellers, and 13 Minutes to the Moon can be found wherever you get your podcasts. Show notes Ross G mentioned FiveThirtyEight's p-hacking project, which you can find out more about at: https://projects.fivethirtyeight.com/p-hacking/ In What I Learned This Week, Ross G also discussed what would happen if someone died on Mars: https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/what-happens-if-someone-dies-on-mars For more from us, including access to our back catalogue of podcasts, visit emeraldworks.com. There, you'll also find details of our award-winning performance support toolkit, our off-the-shelf e-learning, and our custom work. Connect with our speakers If you'd like to share your thoughts on this episode, connect with our speakers on Twitter: Ross Dickie - @RossDickieMT Owen Ferguson - @OwenFerguson Ross Garner - @RossGarnerMT

Hardwood Knocks
2021-22 Indiana Pacers Lookahead

Hardwood Knocks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 51:56


Dan is joined by the world-famous Caitlin Cooper (C2_Cooper) from Indy Corn Rows and FiveThirtyEight to cannonball into all things Indiana Pacers ahead of the 2021-22 NBA season. From Rick Carlisle's impact on the offense and the frontcourt rotation, to Caris LeVert and T.J. Warren, to quirky lineups and potential trade candidates, we cover everything you can imagine—and then some. TIMESTAMPS ⬇️

Givin' Props
Week 3 Player Props

Givin' Props

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 32:38


This week, BetPrep's Player Prop Guru Brad Feinberg discusses his top player props for Week 3 of the 2021-2022 NFL season with host and BetPrep Editor Michael Salfino of The Athletic and FiveThirtyEight. Player props include Kirk Cousins, Matthew Stafford, Robert Woods, Mike Evans, Chris Godwin, Jakobi Meyers, Jared Cook, Jared Goff, Josh Allen, and Justin Fields

Drew and Mike Show
Drew And Mike – September 21, 2021

Drew and Mike Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 187:32


Chet Hank's tough life, State Reps: Manoogian v. Marino, Rolling Stones play for Robert Kraft, WATP Karl joins us with the Murdaugh Murders, and Drew's high school tales of the James Hill Gang & Gabby.The Detroit Lions are not very good.The Manning brothers are doing something different on ESPN2 for Monday Night Football and we love it.Ariana Grande is being stalked and terrorized.Rep. Mari Manoogian is being stalked and terrorized by Rep. Steve Marino. *Allegedly (for Mike Rataj).Drew remembers the old 'James Hill Gang' and their "Gabby" chants.Gabby Petito's body has been identified. Brian Laundrie may have been spotted on a trail cam.Drew & Marc break down Heist featuring Heather Tallchief and Roberto Solis.Drew has a crush on Tamron Hall, who may or may not have gotten it on with Prince.Drew Crime: Thomas Clayton sucks at hockey and sucks at murdering.Karl from WATP joins us to rip life coaches, explain the Stuttering John/Robert Smigel beef and destroy the Murdaugh Murders Podcast. Some people are saying Mandy Matney has vocal fry.Yet another storm of the century is on the way to Metro Detroit.R. Kelly's defense is on the offense.Drew wants the sweatbox to make a comeback.Rolling Stone Magazine doesn't seem to like Eric Clapton very much. They also REALLY hate Morgan Wallen.CBS News brought in Nate Burleson, but have not done a story on his pizza incident.The dude who filmed the Rodney King beating has died of COVID.Chet Hanks does an exclusive interview on Channel 5 with Andrew Callaghan.The Rolling Stones kicked off their 1st tour without Charlie Watts... privately. Robert Kraft has hot girlfriends.Britney Spears has more manic Instagram posts today.Alleged wife murderer Barry Morphew has been released from jail with his daughters by his side.The Border Patrol is in trouble for being really mean to illegal immigrants.Brazil's president was denied entry to a New York pizza joint because he's unvaccinated.BLM vs Carmine's restaurant in NYC. The restaurant is not owned by The Big Ragoo.Not-a-Prince Harry and Meghan Markle are taking a trip to NYC to lecture us.FiveThirtyEight has Joe Biden's approval numbers.The Oklahoma Pooper has been arrested!Social media is dumb but we're on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter (Drew and Mike Show, Marc Fellhauer, Trudi Daniels and BranDon).

Raw Data By P3
Jeff Sagarin

Raw Data By P3

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 86:06


There's a place where sports and data meet, and it's as powerful a collision as on any football field!  Jeff Sagarin has been a figurehead in the sports analytics realm for decades, and we're thrilled to have had the chance to have him on to talk about his data journey!  There's a fair mix of math AND sports geek out time in this episode.  And, did we mention that Dr. Wayne Winston is sitting in on this episode as well? References in this Episode: 2 Frictionless Colliding Boxes Video Scorigami Episode Transcript: Rob Collie (00:00:00): Hello, friends. Today's guest is Jeff Sagarin. Is that name familiar to you? It's very familiar to me. In my life, Jeff's work might very well be my first brush with the concept of using data for any sort of advantage. His Power Ranking Columns, first appeared in USA Today in 1985, when I was 11 years old. And what a fascinating concept that was. Rob Collie (00:00:29): It probably won't surprise you if I confess that 11-year-old me was not particularly good at sports, but I was still fascinated and captivated by them. 11-year-old kids in my neighborhood were especially prone to associating sports with their tribal identity. Everyone had their favorite teams, their favorite sports stars. And invariably, this led to arguments about which sports star was better than the other sports star, who was going to win this game coming up and who would win a tournament amongst all of these teams and things of that sort. Rob Collie (00:01:01): Now that I've explained it that way though, I guess being an adult sports fan isn't too terribly different, is it? Those arguments, of course, aren't the sorts of arguments where there's anything resembling a clear winner. But in practice, the person who won was usually the one with the loudest voice or the sickest burn that they could deliver to their friends. And then in 1985, the idea was planted in my head by Jeff Sagarin's column in USA Today, that there actually was a relatively objective way to evaluate teams that had never played against one another and likely never would. Rob Collie (00:01:33): I wasn't into computers at the time. I certainly wasn't into the concept of data. I didn't know what a database was. I didn't know what a spreadsheet was. And yet, this was still an incredibly captivating and powerful idea. So in my life, Jeff Sagarin is the first public figure that I encountered in the sports analytics industry long before it was cool. And because it was sports, a topic that was relevant to 11-year-old me, he's really also my first brush with analytics at all. Rob Collie (00:02:07): It's not surprising then, that to me, Jeff is absolutely a celebrity. As a guest, in insider podcasting lingo, Jeff is what we call a good get. We owe that pleasure, of course, to him being close friends with Wayne Winston, a former guest on the show, who also joined us today as co-guest. Rob Collie (00:02:28): Now, if none of that speaks to you, let's try this alternate description. He's probably also the world's most famous active FORTRAN programmer. I admit that I was so starstruck by this that I didn't even really push as hard as I normally would, in terms of getting into the techniques that he uses. I didn't want to run afoul of asking him for trade secrets. At times, this conversation did devolve into four dudes sitting around talking about sports. Rob Collie (00:02:59): But setting that aside, there are some really, really interesting and heartwarming things happening in this conversation as well. Again, the accidental path to where he is today, the intersection of persistence and good fortune that's required really for success in anything. Bottom line, this is the story of a national and highly influential figure at the intersection of the sports industry and the analytics industry for more than three decades. It's not every day you get to hear that story. So let's get into it. Announcer (00:03:34): Ladies and gentlemen, may I have your attention, please? Announcer (00:03:39): This is the Raw Data by P3 Adaptive podcast with your host, Rob Colley and your co-host, Thomas LaRock. Find out what the experts at P3 Adaptive can do for your business. Just go to p3adaptive.com. Raw Data by P3 Adaptive is data with the human element. Rob Collie (00:04:02): Welcome to the show, Jeff Sagarin. And welcome back to the show. Wayne Winston. So thrilled to have the two of you with us today. This is awesome. We've been looking forward to this for a long time. So thank you very much gentlemen, for being here. Jeff Sagarin (00:04:16): You're welcome. Rob Collie (00:04:18): Jeff, usually we kick these things off with, "Hey, tell us a little about yourself, your background, blah, blah, blah." Let's start off with me telling you about you. It's a story about you that you wouldn't know. I remember for a very long time being aware of you. Rob Collie (00:04:35): So I'm 47 years old, born in 1974. My father had participated for many years in this shady off-the-books college football pick'em pool that was run out of the high school in a small town in Florida. Like the sheets with everybody's entries would show up. They were run on ditto paper, like that blue ink. It was done in the school ditto room and he did this every year. This was like the most fascinating thing that happened in the entire year to me. Like these things showing up at our house, this packet of all these picks, believe it or not, they were handwritten. These grids were handwritten with everyone's picks. It was ridiculous. Rob Collie (00:05:17): He got eliminated every year. There were a couple of hundred entries every year and he just got his butt kicked every year. But then one year, he did his homework. He researched common opponents and things like that or that kind of stuff. I seem to recall this having something to do timing wise with you. So I looked it up. Your column first appeared in USA Today in 1985. Is that correct? Jeff Sagarin (00:05:40): Yeah. Tuesday, January 8th 1985. Rob Collie (00:05:44): I remember my dad winning this pool that year and using the funds to buy a telescope to look at Halley's Comet when it showed up. And so I looked up Halley's Comet. What do you know? '86. So it would have been like the January ballgames of 1986, where he won this pool. And in '85, were you power ranking college football teams or was that other sports? Jeff Sagarin (00:06:11): Yes. Rob Collie (00:06:12): Okay. So when my dad said that he did his research that year, what he really did was read your stuff. You bought my dad a telescope in 1986 so that we could go have one of the worst family vacations of all time. It was just awful. Thank you. Jeff Sagarin (00:06:31): You're very welcome. Rob Collie (00:06:39): I kind of think of you as the first publicly known figure in sports analytics. You probably weren't the first person to apply math and computers to sports analytics, but you're the first person I heard of. Jeff Sagarin (00:06:51): There is a guy that people don't even talk about very much. Now a guy named Earnshaw Cook, who first inspired me when I was a sophomore in high school in the '63-'64 school year, there was an article by Frank Deford in Sports Illustrated about Earnshaw Cook publishing a book called Percentage Baseball. So I convinced my mom to let me have $10 to order it by mail and I got it. I started playing around with his various ideas in it. He was the first guy I ever heard of and that was in March of 1964. Rob Collie (00:07:28): All right, so everyone's got an origin story. Jeff Sagarin (00:07:31): The Dunkel family started doing the Dunkel ratings back I believe in 1929. Then there was a professor, I think he was at Vanderbilt, named [Lipkin House 00:07:41], he was I think at Vanderbilt. And for years, he did the high school ratings in states like maybe Tennessee and Kentucky. I think he gave Kentucky that Louisville courier his methodology before he died. But I don't know if they continue his work or not. But there were people way before me. Rob Collie (00:08:03): But they weren't in USA Today. Jeff Sagarin (00:08:04): That's true. Rob Collie (00:08:06): They weren't nationally distributed, like on a very regular basis. I've been hearing your name longer than I've even been working with computers. That's pretty crazy. How did you even get hooked up with USA Today? Jeff Sagarin (00:08:23): People might say, "You got lucky." My answer, as you'll see as well, I'd worked for 12 years to be in a position to get lucky. I started getting paid for doing this in September of 1972 with an in-house publication of pro football weekly called Insider's Pro Football Newsletter. Jeff Sagarin (00:08:45): In the Spring of '72, I'd written letters to like 100 newspapers saying because I had started by hand doing my own rating system for pro football in the fall of 1971. Just by hand, every Sunday night, I'd get the scores and add in the Monday night. I did it as a hobby. I wasn't doing it for a living. I did it week by week and charted the teams. It was all done with some charts I'd made up with a normal distribution and a slide rule. So I sent out letters in the spring of '72 to about 100 papers saying, "Hey, would you be interested in running my stuff?" Jeff Sagarin (00:09:19): They either didn't answer me or all said, "No, not interested." But I got a call right before I left to go to California when an old college friend that spring. It was from William Wallace, who was a big time football correspondent for The New York Times. That anecdote may be in that article by Andy Glockner. He called me up, he was at the New York Times, but he said also, "I write articles for extra money for pro football weekly. I wanted to just kind of talk to you." Jeff Sagarin (00:09:49): He wrote an article that appeared in Pro Quarterback magazine in September of '72. But during the middle of that summer, I got a phone call from Pro Football weekly, the publisher, a guy named [inaudible 00:10:04] said, "Hey Jeff. Have you seen our ad in street and Smith's?" It didn't matter. It could have been their pro magazine or college. I said, "Yeah, I did." And he said, "Do you notice it said we've got a world famous handicapper to do our predictions for us?" I said, "Yeah, I did see that." He said, "How would you like to be that world famous handicapper? We don't have anybody." Jeff Sagarin (00:10:25): We just said that because he said William Wallace told us to call you. So I said, "Okay, I'll be your world famous handicapper." I didn't start off that well and they had this customer, it was a paid newsletter and there was a customer from Hawaii. He had a great name, Charles Fujiwara. He'd send letters every week saying, "Sagarin's terrible, but he's winning a fortune for me. I just reverse his picks every week." So finally, finally, my numbers turn the tide and I had this one great week, where I went 8-0. He sent another letter saying, "I'm bankrupt. The kid destroyed me." Because he was reversing all my picks. That's a true story. Rob Collie (00:11:07): At least he had a sense of humor. It sounds like a pretty interesting fellow on the other end of that letter. Jeff Sagarin (00:11:13): He sounds like he could have been like the guy, if you've ever seen reruns of the old show, '77 Sunset Strip. In it, there this guy who's kind of a racetrack trout gambler named Roscoe. He sounds like he could have been Roscoe. Rob Collie (00:11:26): We have to look that one up. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:11:27): It's before your time. Rob Collie (00:11:28): I don't think I saw that show. Jeff Sagarin (00:11:29): Yeah. Wayne's seen it though. Rob Collie (00:11:31): Yes. I love that. There are things that are both before my time and I have like old man knees. So I've heard this kind of thing before, by the way. It's called the 10-year overnight success. Jeff Sagarin (00:11:47): I forgot. How did I get with USA Today? I started with Pro Football weekly and continued with them. I was with them until actually why don't we say sometime in the fall of '82. I ended up in other newspapers, little by little: The Boston Globe, Louisville Courier Journal. And then in the spring of '81, I got into a conversation over the phone with Jim van Valkenburg, who is the stat guy at the NCAA. I happened to mention that going into the tournament, I had Indiana to win the tournament. They were rated like 10th in the conventional polls. Jeff Sagarin (00:12:23): And so he remembered that and he kept talking behind the scenes to people in the NCAA about that. And so years later, in 1988, they called me out to talk to them. But anyhow, I had developed a good reputation and I gave him as a reference. Wayne called me up excitedly in let's say, early September of 1984. He said, "Hey, Jeff. You've got to buy a copy of today's USA Today and turn to the end of the sports section. You're going to be sick." Jeff Sagarin (00:12:53): I said, "Really? Okay." So I opened to where he said and I was sick. They had computer ratings by some guy. He was a good guy named Thomas Jech, J-E-C-H. And I said, "Damn, that should be me. I've been doing this for all these years and I didn't even know they were looking for this." So I call up on the phone. Sometimes there's a lot of luck involved. I got to talk to a guy named Bob Barbara who I believe is retired now there. He had on the phone this gruff sounding voice out of like a Grade B movie from the film, The War. "What's going on Kitty?" It sounds like he had a cigar in his mouth. Jeff Sagarin (00:13:30): I said, "Well, I do these computer ratings." [inaudible 00:13:33] Said "Well, really? That's interesting. We've already got somebody." He said, "But how would you even send it to us?" I said, "Well, I dictate over the phone." He said, "Dictate? We don't take dictation at USA Today, kid. Have you ever heard of personal computers and a modem?" I said, "Well, I have but I just do it on a mainframe at IU and I dictate over the phone to the Louisville Courier and the local..." Jeff Sagarin (00:13:58): Well, the local paper here, I gave them a printout. He said, "Kid, you need to buy yourself a PC and learn how to use a modem." So I kind of was embarrassed. I said, "Well, I'll see." So about 10 days later, I called him up and said, "Hey, what's the phone number for your modem?" He said, "Crap. You again, kid? I thought I got rid of you." He says, "All right. I'll give you the phone number." So I sent him a sample printout. He says, "Yeah, yeah, we got it. Keep in touch. We're not going to change for football. But this other guy, he may not want to do basketball. So keep in touch. Who knows what will happen for basketball?" Jeff Sagarin (00:14:31): So every month I'd call up saying, "It's me again, keeping touch." He said, "I can't get rid of you. You're like a bad penny that keeps turning up." So finally he says look, after about five of these calls, spreading out until maybe late November, "Look kid, why don't you wait... Call me up the first Sunday of the new year," which would have been like Sunday, January 6 of 1985 I believe. So I waited. I called him up. Sure enough, he said, "You again?" I said, "You told me you wanted to do college basketball." Jeff Sagarin (00:15:04): He said, "Yeah, you're kind of right. The other guy doesn't want to do it." So he said, "Well, do you mind if we call it the USA Today computer ratings? We kind of like to put our own name on everything." I said, "Well, wait a minute. During the World Series, you had Pete Rose as your guest columnist, you want not only gave his name, but you had a picture of him." He said, "God damn it." He said, "I can't..." He said, "You win again kid. Give us a bio." Jeff Sagarin (00:15:32): An old friend of both me and Wayne was on a business trip. He lived in California, but one of the companies he did work for was Magnavox, which at the time had a presence in Fort Wayne. So he had stopped off in Bloomington so we could say hi. We hadn't seen each other for many years. So he wrote my bio for me, which is still used in the agate in the USA Today. So it's the same bio all these years. Jeff Sagarin (00:15:56): So they started printing me on Tuesday, January 8 of 1985. On the front page that day and I got my editor of a couple years ago, he found an old physical copy of that paper and sent it to me and I thought that's pretty cool. And on the front page, they said, "Well, this would be the 50th birthday of Elvis Presley." I get, they did not have a banner headline at the top, "Turn to the sports and see Jeff Sagarin's debut." That was not what they did. It was all about Elvis Presley. And so people will tell me, "Wow! You got really lucky." Jeff Sagarin (00:16:30): Yeah, but I was in a position. I'd worked for 12 years since the fall of '72 to get in position to then get lucky. They told me I had some good recommendations from people. Rob Collie (00:16:42): Well, even that persistence to keep calling in the face of relatively discouraging feedback. So that conversation took place, and then two days later, you're in the paper. Jeff Sagarin (00:16:54): Well, yeah. He said, "Send us the ratings." They might have needed a time lag. So if I sent the ratings in on a Sunday night or Monday morning, they'd print them on Tuesday. They're not as instant. Now, I update every day on their website. For the paper, they take whatever the most recent ones they can access off their website, depending on I've sent it in, which is I always send them in early in the morning like when I get up. So they print on a Tuesday there'll be taking the ratings that they would have had in their hands Monday, which would be through Sunday's games. Rob Collie (00:17:26): That Tuesday, was that just college basketball? Jeff Sagarin (00:17:28): Then it was. Then in the fall of 85. They began using me for college football, not that they thought I was better or worse one way or the other than Thomas Jech who was a smart guy, he was a math professor at the time at Penn State. He just got tired of doing it. He had more important things to do. Serious, I don't mean that sarcastically. That was just like a fun hobby for him from what I understand. Rob Collie (00:17:50): I was going to ask you if you hadn't already gone and answered the question ahead of time. I was going to ask you well, what happened to the other guy? Did you go like all Tonya Harding on him or whatever? Did you take out your rival? No, sounds like Nancy Kerrigan just went ahead and retired. Although I hate to make you Tonya Harding in this analogy and I just realized I just Hardinged you. Jeff Sagarin (00:18:10): He was just evidently a really good math professor. It was just something he did for fun to do the ratings. Rob Collie (00:18:17): Opportunity and preparation right where they intersect. That's "luck". Jeff Sagarin (00:18:22): It would be as if Wally Pipp had retired and Lou Gehrig got to replace him in the analogy, Lou Gehrig gets the first base job but actually Wally Pipp in real life did not retire. He had the bad luck to get a cold or something or an injury and he never got back in the starting lineup after that. Rob Collie (00:18:38): What about Drew Bledsoe? I think he did get hurt. Did we ever see him again? Thomas LaRock (00:18:43): The very next season, he was in Buffalo and then he went to Dallas. Rob Collie (00:18:46): I don't remember this at all. Thomas LaRock (00:18:47): And not only that, but when he went to Dallas, he got hurt again and Tony Romo came on to take over. Rob Collie (00:18:53): Oh my god! So Drew Bledsoe is Wally Pipp X2. Thomas LaRock (00:18:58): Yeah, X2. Rob Collie (00:19:02): I just need to go find wherever Drew Bledsoe is right now and go get in line behind him. Thomas LaRock (00:19:08): He's making wine in Walla Walla, Washington. I know exactly where he is. Rob Collie (00:19:12): I'm about to inherit a vineyard gentlemen. Okay, so Wayne's already factored into this story. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:19:23): A little bit. Rob Collie (00:19:23): A bit part but an important one. We would call you Mr. Narrative Hook in the movie. Like you'd be the guy that's like, "Jeff, you've got to get a copy of USA Today and turn to page 10. You're going to be sick." Jeff Sagarin (00:19:37): Well, I was I'm glad Wayne told me to do it. If I'd never known that, who knows what I'd be doing right now? Rob Collie (00:19:44): Yeah. So you guys are longtime friends, right? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:19:47): Yeah. Jeff, should take this. Jeff Sagarin (00:19:49): September 1967 in the TV room at Ashdown Graduate's House across from the dorm we lived, because the graduate students there had rigged up, we call it a full screen TV that was actually quite huge. It's simply projected from a regular TV onto a maybe a 10 foot by 10 foot old fashioned movie projector screen. We'd go there to watch ballgames. Okay, because better than watching on a 10 inch diagonal black and white TV in the dorm. And it turned out we both had a love for baseball and football games. Thomas LaRock (00:20:26): So just to be clear, though, this was no ordinary school. This is MIT. Because this is what people at MIT would do is take some weird tech thing and go, "We can make this even better, make a big screen TV." Jeff Sagarin (00:20:38): We didn't know how to do it, which leads into Wayne's favorite story about our joint science escapades at MIT. If Wayne wants to start it off, you might like this. I was a junior and Wayne was a sophomore at the time. I'll set Wayne up for it, there was a requirement that MIT no matter what your major, one of the sort of distribution courses you had to take was a laboratory class. Why don't we let Wayne take the ball for a while on this? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:21:05): I'm not very mechanically inclined. I got a D in wood shop and a D in metal shop. Jeff's not very mechanically inclined either. We took this lab class and we were trying to figure out identifying a coin based on the sound waves it would produce under the Scylla scope. And so the first week, we couldn't get the machine to work. And the professor said, "Turn it on." And so we figured that step out and the next week, the machine didn't work. He said, "Plug it in." Jeff can take it from there. Jeff Sagarin (00:21:46): It didn't really fit the mathematical narrative exactly of what metals we knew were in the coin. But then I noticed, nowadays we'd probably figure out this a reason. If we multiplied our answers by something like 100 pi, we got the right numbers. So they were correctly proportional. So we just multiplied our answers by 100 pi and said, "As you can see, it's perfectly deducible." Rob Collie (00:22:14): There's a YouTube video that we should probably link that is crazy. It shows that two boxes on a frictionless surface a simulation and the number of times that they collide, when you slide them towards a wall together, when they're like at 10X ratio of mass, the number of times that they impact each other starts to become the digits of pi. Jeff Sagarin (00:22:34): Wow. Rob Collie (00:22:35): Before they separate. Jeff Sagarin (00:22:36): That's interesting. Rob Collie (00:22:36): It's just bizarre. And then they go through explaining like why it is pi and you understand it while the video is playing. And then the video ends and you've completely lost it. Jeff Sagarin (00:22:49): I'm just asking now, are they saying if you do that experiment an infinite amount of times, the average number of times they collide will be pi? Rob Collie (00:22:57): That's a really good question. I think it's like the number of collisions as you increase the ratios of the weight or something like that start to become. It's like you'll get 314 collisions, for instance, in a certain weight ratio, because that's the only three digits of pi that I remember. It's 3.14. It's a fascinating little watch. So the 100 pi thing, you said that, I'm like, "Yeah, that just... Of course it's 100 pi." Even boxes colliding on a frictionless surface do pi things apparently. Jeff Sagarin (00:23:29): Maybe it's a universal constant in everything we do. Rob Collie (00:23:29): You just don't expect pi to surface itself. It has nothing to do with waves, no wavelength, no arcs of circles, nothing like that. But that sneaky video, they do show you that it actually has something to do with circles and angles and stuff. Jeff Sagarin (00:23:44): Mutual friend of me and Wayne, this guy named Robin. He loves Fibonacci. And so every time I see a particular game end by a certain score, I'll just say, "Hey, Robin. Research the score of..." I think it was blooming to North against some other team. And he did. It turned out Bloomington North had won 155-34, which are the two adjacent Fibonacci, the two particular adjacent Fibonacci. Robin loves that stuff. You'll find a lot of that actually. It's hard to double Fibonacci a team though. That would be like 89-34. Rob Collie (00:24:18): I know about the Fibonacci sequence. But I can't pick Fibonacci sequence numbers out of the wild. Are you familiar with Scorigami? Jeff Sagarin (00:24:26): Who? I'd never heard of it obviously. Rob Collie (00:24:29): I think a Scorigami is a score in the NFL that's never happened. Jeff Sagarin (00:24:32): There was one like that about 10 years ago, 11-10, I believe. Pittsburgh was involved in the game or 12-11, something like that. Rob Collie (00:24:40): I think there was a Scorigami in last season. With scoring going up, the chances of Scorigami is increasing. There's just more variance at the higher end of the spectrum of numbers, right? Jeff Sagarin (00:24:50): I've always thought about this. In Canada, Canadian football, they have this extra rule that I think is kind of cool because it would probably make more scores happen. If a punter kicks the ball into the end zone, it can't roll there. Like if he kicks it on the fly into the end zone and the other team can't run it out, it's called a rouge and the kicking team gets one point for it. That's kind of cool. Because once you add the concept of scoring one point, you make a lot more scores more probable of happening. Rob Collie (00:25:21): Oh, yeah, yeah, yeah, totally. You can win 1-0. Thomas LaRock (00:25:25): So the end zone is also... It's 20 yards deep. So the field's longer, it's 110 yards. But the end zone's deeper and part of it is that it's too far to kick for a field goal. But you know what? If I can punt it into the end zone and if I get a cover team down there, we can get one point out. I'm in favor of it. I think that'd be great. Jeff Sagarin (00:25:43): I think you have to kick out on the fly into the end zone. It's not like if it rolls into it. Thomas LaRock (00:25:47): No, no, no. It's like a pop flop. Jeff Sagarin (00:25:50): Yeah. Okay. Rob Collie (00:25:50): If you punt it out of the end zone, is it also a point? Thomas LaRock (00:25:52): It's a touch back. No, touch back. Jeff Sagarin (00:25:54): That'd be too easy of a way to get a point. Rob Collie (00:25:57): You've had a 20 yard deep target to land in. In Canadian fantasy football, if there was such a thing, maybe there is, punters, you actually could have punters as a position because they can score points. That would be a really sad and un-fun way to play. Rob Collie (00:26:14): But so we're amateur sports analytics people here on the show. We're not professionals. We're probably not even very good at it. But that doesn't mean that we aren't fascinated by it. We're business analytics people here for sure. Business and sports, they might share some techniques, but it's just very, very, very different, the things that are valuable in the two spaces. I mean, they're sort of spiritually linked but they're not really tools or methods that provide value. Rob Collie (00:26:39): Not that you would give them. But we're not looking for any of your secrets here today. But you're not just writing for USA Today, there's a number of places where your skills are used these days, right? Jeff Sagarin (00:26:51): Well, not as much as that. But I want to make a favorable analogy for Wayne. In the world of sports analytics, whatever the phrases are, I consider myself to be maybe an experimental applied physicist. Wayne is an advanced theoretical physicist. I do the grunt work of collecting data and doing stuff with it. But Wayne has a large over-viewing of things. He's like a theoretical physicist. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:27:17): Jeff is too modest because he's experimented for years on the best parameters for his models. Rob Collie (00:27:27): It's again that 10-year, 20-year overnight success type of thing. You've just got to keep grinding at it. Do the two of you collaborate at all? Jeff Sagarin (00:27:35): Well, we did on two things, the Hoops computer game and Win Val. I forgot. How could I forget? It was actually my favorite thing that we did even though we've made no money doing the randomization using Game Theory of play calling for football. And we based it actually and it turned out that I got great numerical results that jive with empirical stuff that Virgil Carter had gotten and our economist, named Romer, had gotten and we had more detailed results than them. Jeff Sagarin (00:28:06): But in the areas that we intersected, we had the same as them. We used a game called Pro Quarterback and we modeled it. We had actually, a fellow, I wasn't a professor but a fellow professor of Wayne's, a great guy, just a great guy named Vic Cabot, who wrote a particular routine to insert the FORTRAN program that solved that particular linear programming problem that would constantly reoccur or else we couldn't do it. That was the favorite thing and we got to show it once to Sam White, who we really liked. And White said, "I like this guy. I may have played this particular game," we told him what we based it on, "when I was a teenager." Jeff Sagarin (00:28:46): He said, "I know exactly what you want to do." You don't make the same call in the same situation all the time. You have a random, but there's an optimal mix Game Theory, as you probably know for both offense and defense. White said, "The problem is this is my first year here. It was the summer of '83." And he said, "I don't really have the security." Said, "Imagine it's third and one, we're on our own 15 yard line. And it's third and one. And the random number generator says, 'Throw the bomb on this play with a 10% chance of calling up but it'll still be in the mix. And it happens to come up.'" Jeff Sagarin (00:29:23): He said, "It was my eight year here. I used to play these games myself. I know exactly." But then he patted his hip. He said, "It's mine on the line this first year." He said, "It's kind of nerve wracking to do that when you're a rookie coach somewhere, to call the bomb when it's third and one on your own 15. If it's incomplete, you'll be booed out of the stadium." Rob Collie (00:29:46): Yeah, I mean, it's similar to there's the general reluctance in coaches for so long to go for it on fourth and one. When the analytics were very, very, very clear that this was a plus expected value, +EV, move to go for it on fourth and one. But the thing is, you've got to consider the bigger picture. Right? The incentives, the coaches number one goal is actually don't get fired. Jeff Sagarin (00:30:14): You were right. That's what White was telling us. Rob Collie (00:30:14): Yeah. Winning a Super Bowl is a great thing to do. Because it helps you not get fired. It's actually weird. Like, if your goal is to win as many games as possible, yes, go for it on fourth and one. But if your goal is to not get fired, maybe. So it takes a bit more courage even to follow the numbers. And for good reason, because the incentives aren't really aligned the way that we think they are when you first glance at a situation. Jeff Sagarin (00:30:41): Well, there's a human factor that there's no way unless you're making a guess how to take it into account. It may be demoralizing to your defense if you go for it on fourth and one and you're on your own 15. I've seen the numbers, we used to do this. It's a good mathematical move to go for it. Because you could say, "Well, if you're forced to punt, the other team is going to start on the 50. So what's so good about that? But psychologically, your defense may be kind of pissed off and demoralized when they have to come out on the field and defend from their own 15 after you've not made it and the numbers don't take that into account. Rob Collie (00:31:19): Again, it's that judgment thing. Like the coach hung out to dry. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:31:22): Can I say a word about Vic Cabot, that Jeff mentioned? Jeff Sagarin (00:31:26): Yeah, He's great. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:31:27): Yeah. So Vic was the greatest guy any of us in the business school ever knew. He was a fantastic person. He died of throat cancer in 1994, actually 27 years ago this week or last week. Jeff Sagarin (00:31:43): Last week. It was right around Labor Day. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:31:46): Right. But I want to mention, basically, when he died, his daughter was working in the NYU housing office. After he died, she wrote a little book called The Princess Diaries. She's worth how many millions of dollars now? But he never got to see it. Jeff Sagarin (00:32:06): He had a son, a big kid named Matt Cabot, who played at Bloomington South High School. I got a nice story about Matthew. I believe the last time I know of him, he was a state trooper in the state of Colorado. I used to tell him when I was still young enough and Spry enough, we'd play a little pickup or something. I'd say, "Matthew, forget about points. The most important thing, a real man gets rebounds." Jeff Sagarin (00:32:32): They played in the semi state is when it was just one class. In '88, me and Wayne and a couple of Wayne's professor buddies, we all... Of course, Vic would have been there but we didn't go in the same car. It was me, Wayne and maybe [inaudible 00:32:48] and somebody else, Wayne? Jeff Sagarin (00:32:49): They played against Chandler Thompson's great team from Muncie Central. In the first three minutes, Chris Lawson, who was the star of the team went up for his patented turn around jumper from six feet away in the lane and Chandler Thompson spiked it like a volleyball and on the run of Muncie Central player took it with no one near him and laid it in and the game essentially ended but Matt Cabot had the game of his life. Jeff Sagarin (00:33:21): I think he may have led the game of anyone, the most rebounds in the game. I compliment him. He was proud of that. And he's played, he said many a pickup game with Chandler Thompson, he said the greatest jumper he's ever been on the court within his entire life. You guys look up because I don't know if you know who Chandler Thompson. Is he played at Ball State. Look up on YouTube his put back dunk against UNLV in the 90 tournaments, the year UNLV won it at all. Look up Chandler Thompson's put back dunk. Rob Collie (00:33:52): Yeah, I was just getting into basketball then, I think. Like in the Loyola Marymount days. Yeah, Jerry Tarkanian. Does college basketball have the same amount of personalities it used to like in the coaching figures. I kind of doubt that it does. Rob Collie (00:34:06): With Tark gone, and of course, Bob Knight, it'll be hard to replace personalities like that. I don't know. I don't really watch college basketball anymore, so I wouldn't really know. But I get invited into those pick'em pools for the tournament March Madness every year and I never had the stamina to fill them out. And they offer those sheets where they'll fill it out for you. But why would I do that? Jeff Sagarin (00:34:28): I've got to tell you a story involving Wayne and I. Rob Collie (00:34:31): Okay. Jeff Sagarin (00:34:31): In the 80 tournament, I had gotten a program running that would to simulate the tournament if you fed in the power ratings. It understood who'd play who and you simulate it a zillion times, come up with the odds. So going into the tournament, we had Purdue maybe the true odds against him should have been let's say, I'll make it up seven to one. Purdue and Iowa, they had Ronnie Lester, I remember. Jeff Sagarin (00:34:57): The true odds against them should have been about 7-1. The bookmakers were giving odds of 40-1. So Wayne and I looked at each other and said, "That seems like a big edge." In theory, well, odds are still against them. Let's bet $25 apiece on both Purdue and Iowa. The two of them made the final four. Jeff Sagarin (00:35:20): In Indianapolis, I'll put it this way, their consolation game gave us no consolation. Rob Collie (00:35:30): Man. Jeff Sagarin (00:35:31): And then one of the games, Joe Barry Carroll of Purdue, they're down by one they UCLA. I'm sure he was being contested. I don't mean he was all by himself. It's always easy for the fan who can't play to mock the player. I don't mean... He was being fiercely contested by UCLA. The net result was he missed with fierce contesting one foot layup that would have won the game for Purdue, that would have put them into the championship game and Iowa could have beaten Louisville, except their best player, Ronnie Lester had to leave the game because he had aggravated a bad knee injury that he just couldn't play well on. Jeff Sagarin (00:36:11): But as I said, no consolation, right Wayne? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:36:14): Right. Jeff Sagarin (00:36:15): That was the next to the last year they ever had a consolation game. The last one was in '81 between LSU and Virginia. Rob Collie (00:36:23): Was it the '81 tournament that you said that you liked Indiana to win it? Jeff Sagarin (00:36:28): Wait, I'm going to show you how you get punished for hubris. I learned my lesson. The next year in '82, I had gotten a lot of notoriety, good kind of notoriety for having them to win in '81. People thought, "Wow! This is like the Oracle." So now as the tournament's about to begin in '82, I started getting a lot of calls, which I never used to do like from the media, "Who do you got Jeff?" I said confidently, "Oregon State." I had them number one, I think they'd only lost one game the whole year and they had a guy named Charlie Sitting, a 6'8 guy who was there all American forward. Jeff Sagarin (00:37:06): He was the star and I was pretty confident and to be honest, probably obnoxious when I'd be talking to the press. So they make the regional final against Georgetown and it was being held out west. I'm sort of confidently waiting for the game to be played and I'm sure there'll be advancing to the final four. And they were playing against freshmen, Patrick Ewing. Jeff Sagarin (00:37:29): In the first 10 seconds of the game, maybe you can find the video, there was a lob pass into Ewing, his back was to the basket, he's like three feet from the basket without even looking, he dunks backwards over his head over Charlie Sitton. And you should see the expression on Charlie Sitton's face. I said, "Oh my god! This game is over." The final score was 68-43 in Georgetown's favor. It was a massacre. It taught me the lesson, never be cocky, at least in public because you get slapped down, you get slapped down when you do that. Rob Collie (00:38:05): I don't want to get into this yet again on this show. But you should call up Nate Silver and maybe talk to him a little bit about the same sort of thing. Makes very big public calls that haven't been necessarily so great lately. Just for everyone's benefit, because even though I'd live in the state of Indiana, I didn't grow up here. Let's just be clear. Who won the NCAA tournament in 1981? Jeff Sagarin (00:38:29): Indiana. Rob Collie (00:38:30): Okay. All right, so there you go. Right. Jeff Sagarin (00:38:33): But who didn't win it in 1982? Oregon State. Rob Collie (00:38:38): Yeah. Did you see The Hunt for Red October where Jack Ryan's character, there's a point where he guesses. He says, "Ramy, as always, goes to port in the bottom half of the hour with his crazy Ivan maneuvers and he turns out to be right." And that's how he ends up getting the captain of the American sub to trust him as Jack Ryan knew this Captain so well, even knew which direction he would turn in the crazy Ivan. But it turns out he was just bluffing. He knew he needed a break and it was 50/50. Rob Collie (00:39:08): So it's a good thing that they were talking to you in the Indiana year, originally. Not the Oregon State year. That wouldn't be a good first impression. If you had to have it go one way or the other in those two years, the order in which it happened was the right order. Jeff Sagarin (00:39:22): Yeah, nobody would have listened to me. They would have said, "You got lucky." They said, "You still were terrible in the Oregon State year." Rob Collie (00:39:28): But you just pick the 10th rated team and be right. The chances of that being just luck are pretty low. I like it. That's a good story. So the two of you have never collaborated like on the Mark Cuban stuff? On the Mavs or any of that? Jeff Sagarin (00:39:43): We've done three things together. The Hoops computer game, which we did from '86-'95. And then we did the Game Theory thing for football, but we never got a client. But we did get White to kind of follow it. There's an interesting anecdote, I won't I mentioned the guy who kind of screwed it up. But he assigned a particular grad assistant to fill and we needed a matrix filled in each week with a bunch of numbers with regarding various things like turnovers. Jeff Sagarin (00:40:13): If play A is called against defense B, what would happen type of thing? The grad assistant hated doing it. And one week, he gave us numbers such that the computer came back with when Indiana had the ball, it should quick kick on first down every time it got the ball. We figured it out what was going on, the guy had given Indiana a 15% chance of a turnover, no matter what play they called in any situation against any defense. Jeff Sagarin (00:40:44): So the computer correctly surmised it were better to punt the ball. This is like playing Russian roulette with the ball. Let's just kick it away. So we ended up losing the game in real life 10-0. White told us then when we next saw him, we used to see him on Monday or Tuesday mornings, real early in the day, like seven o'clock, but that's when you could catch him. And he kind of looked at us and said, "You know what? We couldn't have done any worse said had we kicked [inaudible 00:41:14]." Rob Collie (00:41:13): That's nice. Jeff Sagarin (00:41:14): And then we did Mark Cuban. That was the last thing. We did that with Cuban from basically 2000-2011 with a couple of random projects in the summer for him, but really on a day to day basis during a season from 2000-2011. Rob Collie (00:41:30): And during that era is when I met Wayne at Microsoft. That was very much an active, ongoing project when Wayne was there in Redmond a couple of times that we crossed paths. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:41:43): And we worked for the Knicks one year, and they won 54 games. Jeff Sagarin (00:41:47): Here with Glen Grunwald. So they won more games than they'd ever won in a whole bunch of years. And like three weeks before the season starts or so in mid September, the next fire, Glen Grunwald. Let's put it this way, it didn't bother us that the Knicks never made the playoffs again until this past season. Rob Collie (00:42:10): That's great. You were doing, was it lineup optimization for those teams? Jeff Sagarin (00:42:15): Wayne knows more about this than I do. Because I would create the raw data, well, I call it output, but it needed refinement. That was Wayne's department. So you do all the talking now, Wayne. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:42:26): Yeah. Jeff wrote an amazing FORTRAN program. So basically, Jeff rated teams and we figured out we could rate players based on how the score of the game moved during the game. We could evaluate lineups and figure out head to head how certain players did against each other. Now, every team does this stuff and ESPN has Real Plus-Minus and Nate Silver has Raptor. But we started this. Jeff Sagarin (00:42:58): I mean, everybody years ago knew about Plus-Minus. Well, intuitively, let's say you're a gym rat, you first come to a gym, you don't know anyone there and you start getting in the crowd of guys that show up every afternoon to play pickup. You start sensing, you don't even have to know their names. Hey, when that guy is on the court, no matter who his teammates are, they seem to win. Jeff Sagarin (00:43:20): Or when this guy's on the court, they always seem to lose. Intuitively since it matters, who's on the court with you and who your opponents are. Like to make an example for Rob, let's say you happen to be in a pickup game. You've snuck into Pauley Pavilion during the summer and you end up with like four NBA current playing professionals on your team and let's say an aging Michael Jordan now shows up. He ends up with four guys who are graduate students in philosophy because they have to exercise. You're going to have a better plus-minus than Michael Jordan. But when you take into account who your teammates were and who's his were, if you knew enough about the players, he'd have a better rating than you, new Michael Jordan would. Jeff Sagarin (00:44:08): But you'd have a better raw plus-minus than he would. You have to know who the people on the court were. That was Wayne's insight. Tell them how it all started, how you met ran into Mark Cuban, Wayne, when you were in Dallas? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:44:20): Well, Mark was in my class in 1981, statistics class and I guess the year 1999, we went to a Pacers Maverick game in Dallas. Jeff Sagarin (00:44:31): March of 2000. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:44:33): March of 2000, because our son really liked the Pacers. Mark saw me in the stands. He said, "I remember you from class and I remember you for being on Jeopardy." He had just bought the team. And he said, "If you can do anything to help the Mavericks, let me know." And then I was swimming in the pool one day and I said, "If Jeff rates teams, we should rate players." And so we worked on this and Jeff wrote this amazing FORTRAN program, which I'm sure he could not rewrite today. Jeff Sagarin (00:45:04): Oh, God. Well, I was motivated then. Willingness to work hard for many hours at a time, for days at a time to get something to work when you could use the money that would result from it. I don't have that in me anymore. I'm amazed when I look at the source code. I say, "Man, I couldn't do that now." I like to think I could. Necessity is the mother of invention. Rob Collie (00:45:28): I've many, many, many times said and this is still true to this day, like a previous version of me that made something amazing like built a model or something like that, I look back and go, "Whoo, I was really smart back then." Well, at the same time I know I'm improving. I know that I'm more capable today than I was a year ago. Even just accrued wisdom makes a big difference. When you really get lasered in on something and are very, very focused on it, you're suddenly able to execute at just a higher level than what you're typically used to. Jeff Sagarin (00:46:01): As time went on, we realized what Cuban wanted and other teams like the next would want. Nobody really wanted to wade through the monster set of files that the FORTRAN would create. I call that the raw output that nobody wanted to read, but it was needed. Wayne wrote these amazing routines in Excel that became understandable and usable by the clients. Jeff Sagarin (00:46:26): The way Wayne wrote the Excel, they could basically say, "Tell us what happens when these three guys are in the lineup, but these two guys are not in the lineup." It was amazing the stuff that he wrote. Wayne doesn't give himself the credit that otherwise after a while, nobody would have wanted what we were doing because what I did was this sort of monstrous and to some extent boring. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:46:48): This is what Rob's company does basically. They try and distill data into understandable form that basically helps the company make decisions. Rob Collie (00:46:58): It is a heck of a discipline, right? Because if you have the technical and sort of mental skills to execute on something that's that complex, and it starts down in the weeds and just raw inputs, it's actually really, really, really easy to hand it off in a form that isn't yet quite actionable for the intended audience. It's really fascinating to you, the person that created it. Rob Collie (00:47:23): It's not digestible or actionable yet for the consumer crowd, whoever the target consumer is. I've been there. I've handed off a lot of things back in the day and said, "The professional equivalent of..." And it turned out to not be... It turned out to be, "Go back and actually make it useful, Rob." So I'm familiar with that. For sure. I think I've gotten better at that over the years. As a journey, you're never really complete with. Something I wanted to throw in here before I forget, which is, Jeff, you have an amazing command of certain dates. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:47:56): Oh, yeah. Jeff Sagarin (00:47:57): Give me some date that you know the answer about what day of the week it was, and I'll tell you, but I'll tell you how I did it. Rob Collie (00:48:04): Okay, how about June 6, 1974? Jeff Sagarin (00:48:08): That'd be a Thursday. Rob Collie (00:48:10): Holy cow. Okay. How do you do that? Jeff Sagarin (00:48:11): June 11th of 1974 would be a Tuesday, so five days earlier would be a Thursday. Rob Collie (00:48:19): How do you know June 11? Jeff Sagarin (00:48:19): I just do. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:48:23): It's his birthday. Rob Collie (00:48:24): No, it's not. He wasn't born in '74. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:48:27): No, but June 11th. Jeff Sagarin (00:48:29): I happen to know that June 11 was a Tuesday in 1974, that's all. Rob Collie (00:48:34): I'm still sitting here waiting what passes for an explanation. Is one coming? Jeff Sagarin (00:48:39): I'll tell you another way I could have done it, but I didn't. In 1963, John Kennedy gave his famous speech in Berlin, Ich bin ein Berliner, on Wednesday, June 26th. That means that three weeks earlier was June 5, the Wednesday. So Thursday would have been June 6th. You're going to say, "Well, why is that relevant?" Well, 1963 is congruent to 1974 days of the week was. Rob Collie (00:49:07): Okay. This is really, really impressive. Jeff, you seem so normal up until now. Thomas LaRock (00:49:16): You want throw him off? Just ask for any date before 1759? Jeff Sagarin (00:49:20): No, I can do that. It'll take me a little longer though. Thomas LaRock (00:49:22): Because once they switch from Gregorian- Jeff Sagarin (00:49:25): No, well, I'll give it a Gregorian style, all right. I'm assuming that it's a Gregorian date. The calendar totally, totally repeats every possible cycle every 400 years. For example, if you happen to say, "What was September 10, of 1621?" I would quickly say, "It's a Friday." Because 1621 is exactly the same as 2021 says. Rob Collie (00:49:52): Does this translate into other domains as well? Do you have sort of other things that you can sort of get this quick, intuitive mastery over or is it very, very specific to this date arithmetic? Jeff Sagarin (00:50:02): Probably specific. In other words, I think Wayne's a bit quicker than me. I'm certain does mental arithmetic stuff, but to put everybody in their place, I don't think you ever met him, Wayne. Remember the soccer player, John Swan? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:50:14): Yeah. Jeff Sagarin (00:50:15): He had a friend from high school, they went to Brownsburg High School. I forgot the kid's name. He was like a regular student at IU. He was not a well scholar, but he was a smart kid. I'd say he was slightly faster than me at most mental arithmetic things. So you should never get cocky and think that other people, "Oh, they don't have the pedigree." Some people are really good at stuff you don't expect them to be good at, really good. This kid was really good. Rob Collie (00:50:45): As humans, we need to hyper simplify things in order to have a mental model we can use to navigate a very, very complicated world. That's a bit of a strength. But it's also a weakness in many ways. We tend to try to reduce intelligence down to this single linear number line, when it's really like a vast multi dimensional coordinate space. There are so many dimensions of intelligence. Rob Collie (00:51:11): I grew up with the trope in my head that athletes weren't very bright. Until the first time that I had to try to run a pick and roll versus pick and pop. I discovered that my brain has a clock speed that's too slow to run the pick and roll versus pick and pop. It's not that I'm not smart enough to know if this, than that. I can't process it fast enough to react. You look at like an NFL receiver or an NFL linebacker or whatever, has to process on every single snap. Rob Collie (00:51:45): It's amazing how much information they have the processor. Set aside the physical skill that they have, which I also don't have and never did. On top of that, I don't have the brain at all to do these sorts of things. It's crazy. Jeff Sagarin (00:52:00): With the first few years, I was in Bloomington from, let's say, '77 to '81, I needed the money, so I tutored for the athletic department. They tutored math. And I remember once I was given an assignment, it was a defensive end, real nice kid. He was having trouble with the kind of math we would find really easy. But you could tell he had a mental block. These guys had had bad experiences and they just, "I can't do this. I can't do this." Jeff Sagarin (00:52:25): I asked this defensive end, "Tell me what happens when the ball snap, what do you have to do?" I said, "In real time, you're being physically pulverized, the other guy's putting a forearm or more right into your face. And your brain has to be checking about five different things going on in the backfield, other linemen." I said, "What you're doing with somebody else trying to hurt you physically is much more intellectually difficult, at least to my mind than this problem in the book in front of you and the book is not punching you in the face." Jeff Sagarin (00:52:57): He relaxed and he can do the problems in the room. I'd make sure. I picked not a problem that I had solved. I'd give him another one that I hadn't solved and he could do it. I realized, my God, what these guys they're doing takes actually very quick reacting brainpower and my own personal experience in elementary school, let's say in sixth grade after school, we'd be playing street football, just touch football. When I'd be quarterback, I'd start running towards the line of scrimmage. Jeff Sagarin (00:53:26): If the other team came after me, they'd leave a receiver wide open. I said, "This is easy." So I throw for touchdown. Well, in seventh grade, we go to junior high. We have squads in gym class, and on a particular day, I got to be quarterback. Now, instead of guys sort of leisurely counting one Mississippi, two Mississippi, they are pouring in. It's not that you're going to get hurt, but you're going to get tagged and the play would be over. It says touch football, and I'd be frantically looking for receivers to get open. Let's just say it was not a good experience. I realized there's a lot more to be in quarterback than playing in the street. It's so simple. Jeff Sagarin (00:54:08): They come after you and they leave the receivers wide open. That's what evidently sets apart. Let's say the Tom Brady's from the guys who don't even make it after one year in the NFL. If you gave them a contest throwing the ball, seeing who could throw it through a tire at 50 yards, maybe the young kid is better than Tom Brady but his brain can't process what's happening on the field fast enough. Thomas LaRock (00:54:32): As someone who likes to you know, test things thoroughly, that student of yours who was having trouble on the test, you said the book wasn't hitting him physically. Did you try possibly? Jeff Sagarin (00:54:45): I should have shoved it in his face. Thomas LaRock (00:54:49): Physically, just [crosstalk 00:54:50]. Rob Collie (00:54:50): Just throw things at him. Yeah. Thomas LaRock (00:54:52): Throw an eraser, a piece of chalk. Just something. Jeff Sagarin (00:54:56): I'll tell you now, I don't want to name him. He's a real nice guy. I'll tell you a funny anecdote about him. I had hurt my knuckle in a pickup basketball game. I had a cast on it and I was talking to my friend. And he had just missed making a pro football team the previous summer and he was on the last cut. He'd made it to the final four guys. Jeff Sagarin (00:55:18): He was trying to become a linebacker I think. They told him, "You're just not mean enough." That was in my mind. I thought, "Well, I don't know about that." He said, "Yeah, I had the same kind of fractured knuckle you got." I said, "How'd you get it?" "Pick up [inaudible 00:55:32]. Punching a guy in the face." But he wasn't mean enough for the NFL. And I heard a story from a friend of mine who I witnessed it, this guy was at one point working security at a local holiday inn that would have these dances. Jeff Sagarin (00:55:47): There was some guy who was like from the Hells Angels who was causing trouble. He's a big guy, 6'5, 300 whatever. And he actually got into an argument with my friend who was the security guy. Angel guy throws a punch at this guy who's not mean enough for the NFL. With one punch the Jeff Sagarin tutoree knocked the Hell's Angels guy flat unconscious. He was a comatose on the floor. But he wasn't mean enough for the NFL. Rob Collie (00:56:17): Tom if I told my plus minus story about my 1992 dream team on this show, I think maybe I have. I don't remember. Thomas LaRock (00:56:24): You might have but this seems like a perfect episode for that. Rob Collie (00:56:27): I think Jeff and Wayne, if I have told it before, it was probably with Wayne. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:56:31): I don't remember. Rob Collie (00:56:32): Perfect. It'll be new to everyone that matters. Tom remembers. So, in 1992, the Orlando Magic were a recent expansion team in the NBA. Sometime in that summer, the same summer where the 1992 Dream Team Olympic team went and dominated, there was a friend of our family who ran a like a luxury automotive accessories store downtown and he basically hit the jackpot. He'd been there forever. There was like right next to like the magic practice facility. Rob Collie (00:57:09): And so all the magic players started frequenting his shop. That was where they tricked out all their cars and added all the... So his business was just booming as a result of magic coming to town. I don't know this guy ever had ever been necessarily terribly athletic at any point in his life. He had this bright idea to assemble a YMCA team that would play in the local YMCA league in Orlando, the city league. Rob Collie (00:57:35): He had secured the commitment of multiple magic players to be on our team as well as like Jack Givens, who was the radio commentator for The Magic and had been a longtime NBA star with his loaded team. And then it was like, this guy, we'll call this guy Bill. It's not his real name. So it was Bill and the NBA players and me and my dad, a couple of younger guys that actually I didn't know, but were pretty good but they weren't even like college level players. Rob Collie (00:58:07): And so we signed up for the A league, the most competitive league that Orlando had to offer. And then none of the NBA players ever showed up. I said never, but they did show up one time. But we were getting blown out. Some of the people who were playing against us were clearly ex college players. We couldn't even get the ball across half court. Jeff Sagarin (00:58:33): Wayne, does this sound familiar to you? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:58:35): Yes, tell this story. Jeff Sagarin (00:58:38): Wayne, when he was a grad student at Yale, and I'm living in the White Irish neighborhood called Dorchester in Boston, I was young and spry. At that time, I would think I could play. Wayne as a grad student at Yale had entered a team with a really intimidating name of administration science in the New Haven City League, which was played I believe at Hill House high school at night. So Wayne said, "Hey Jeff, why don't you take a Greyhound bus down. We're going to play against this team called the New Haven All Stars. It ought to be interesting." Rob Collie (00:59:14): Wayne's voice in that story sound a little bit like the guy at USA Today for a moment. It was the same voice, the cigar chomping. Anyway, continue. Jeff Sagarin (00:59:25): They edged this out 75-31. I thought I was lined up against the guy... I thought it was Paul Silas who was may be sort of having a bus man's holiday playing for the New Haven all-stars. So a couple weeks later, Paul Silas was my favorite player on the Celtics. He could rebound, that's all I could do. I was pitiful at anything else. But I worked at that and I was pretty strong and I worked at jumping, etc. Jeff Sagarin (00:59:53): So a few weeks later, Wayne calls me up and says, "Hey Jeff, we're playing the New Haven All-Stars again. Why don't you come down again and we'll get revenge against them this time?" Let's just say it didn't work out that way. And I remember one time I had Paul Silas completely boxed out. It was perfect textbook and I could jump. If my hands were maybe at rim level and I could see a pair of pants a foot over mine from behind, he didn't tell me and he got the rebound and I'm at rim level. Jeff Sagarin (01:00:24): We were edged out by a score so monstrous, I won't repeat it here. I'm not a guard at all. But I ended up with the ball... They full court pressed the whole game. Rob Collie (01:00:34): Of course, once they figure out- Jeff Sagarin (01:00:36): That we can't play and I'm not even a guard. It was ludicrous. My four teammates left me in terror. They just said, "We're going down court." So I'm all alone, they have four guys on me and my computer like my thought, "Well, they've got four guys on me. That must mean my four teammates are being guarded by one guy down court. This should be easy." I look, I look. They didn't steal the ball out of my hands or nothing. I'm still holding on to it. They're pecking away but they didn't foul me. I give them credit for that. I was like, "Where the hell are my teammates?" Jeff Sagarin (01:01:08): They were in terror hiding in single file behind the one guy and I basically... I don't care if you bleeping or not, I said, "Fuck it." And I just threw the ball. Good two overhand pass, long pass. I had my four teammates down there and they had one guy and you can guess who got the ball. After the game I asked them, I said, "You guys seem fairly good. Are you anybody?" The guy said, "Yeah, we're the former Fairfield varsity we were in the NIT about two years ago." Jeff Sagarin (01:01:39): I looked it up once. Fairfield did make the NIT, I think in '72. And this took place in like February of '74. It taught me a lesson because I looked up what my computer rating for Fairfield would have been compared that to, let's say, UCLA and NC State and figured at a minimum, we'd be at least a 100-200 point underdog against them in a real game, but it would have been worse because we would never get the ball pass mid-court. Rob Collie (01:02:10): Yeah, I mean, those games that I'm talking about in that YMCA League, I mean, the scores were far worse. We were losing like 130-11. Jeff Sagarin (01:02:19): Hey, good that's worse than New Haven all-stars beat us but not quite that bad. Rob Collie (01:02:24): I remember one time actually managing to get the ball across half court and pulling up for a three-point shot off of the break. And then having the guy that had assembled the team, take me aside at the next time out and tell me that I needed to pass that. I'm just like, "No. You got us into this embarrassment. If I get to the point where like, there's actually a shot we can take like a shot, we could take a shot. I'm not going to dump it off to you." Thomas LaRock (01:02:57): Not just a shot, but the shot of gold. Rob Collie (01:03:00): The one time we did get those guys to show up, we were still kind of losing because those guys didn't want to get hurt. It didn't make any sense for them to be there. There was no upside for them to be in this game. I'm sure that they just sort of been guilted into showing up. But then this Christian Laettner lookalike on the other team. He was as big as Laettner. Rob Collie (01:03:25): This is the kind of teams we were playing against. There was a long rebound and that Laettner lookalike got that long rebound and basically launched from the free throw line and dunked over Terry Catledge, the power forward for the Magic at the time. And at that moment, Terry Catledge scored the next 45 points in the game himself. That was all it was. Rob Collie (01:03:50): He'd just be standing there waiting for me to inbound the ball to him, he would take it coast to coast and score. He'd backpedal on defense and he would somehow steal the ball and he'd go down and score again. He just sent a message. And if that guy hadn't dunked over Catledge, we would have never seen what Catledge was capable of. So remember, this is a team th

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Givin' Props
Week 2 Player Props

Givin' Props

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 37:14


This week, BetPrep's Player Prop Guru Brad Feinberg discusses his top player props for Week 2 of the 2021-2022 NFL season with host and BetPrep Editor Michael Salfino of The Athletic and FiveThirtyEight. Player props include Allen Robinson II, Jakobi Meyers, Ben Roethlisberger, Mecole Hardman, Mike Williams, Jarvis Landry, David Montgomery, Mark Ingram Jr., and DeVonta Smith

Givin' Props
Week 1 Player Props

Givin' Props

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 39:17


This week, BetPrep's Player Prop Guru Brad Feinberg discusses his top player props for Week 1 of the 2021-2022 NFL season with host and BetPrep Editor Michael Salfino of The Athletic and FiveThirtyEight. Player props include Devin Singletary, Julio Jones, Raheem Mostert, Ja'Marr Chase, Jared Cook, Kyle Pitts, Nick Chubb, and Eric Ebron

Corner Of The Galaxy
Chicharito is back, and the Galaxy haven't beaten Colorado in a long time

Corner Of The Galaxy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 76:14


- SUBSCRIBE TO OUR PODCAST: http://cornerofthegalaxy.com/subscribe/ - COG LA GALAXY DISCORD: https://discord.gg/drr9HFZY2P - COG MERCHANDISE (SCARVES, T-SHIRTS, BUTTONS, COASTERS): http://www.cornerofthegalaxy.com/SHOP COG STUDIOS, Calif. -- There are just 12 games left in the 2021 regular season for the LA Galaxy. Are the Galaxy prepared to start winning right now? And are they ready to get Javier "Chicharito" Hernandez back on the field? Today's show will get you ready for the Galaxy's next game against the Colorado Rapids. And that's going to be a massive test for a team that doesn't know what their best lineup is and is having to go to altitude to try and beat a team they haven't beat since 2017. Hosts Josh Guesman and Eric Vieira discuss the Galaxy's media conference call and tell you about the positivity exuding from Galaxy head coach Greg Vanney. Will Chicharito play in a single striker formation? Will Vanney pair with Dejan Joveljić? And what circumstances might the Galaxy use Chicharito in during the game? The guys will also talk about the Galaxy's odds to make the playoffs, according to FiveThirtyEight, and why betting on them to win MLS Cup might be a steal! But there's also talk from Josh and Eric about some international players returning that haven't been vaccinated. Will they be available for Saturday's game? And how could this hurt the team down the road when the next international window opens? We've got a packed show that is jammed with stats and information that will get you ready for the Rocky Mountain clash on Saturday. What was Josh's best advice about the game? Start drinking early! Thanks for joining us on the podcast today! And let's hope the Galaxy can find a way to make the final 12 games of the regular season a happy experience.

Corner Of The Galaxy
Chicharito is back, and the Galaxy haven't beaten Colorado in a long time

Corner Of The Galaxy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 76:14


- SUBSCRIBE TO OUR PODCAST: http://cornerofthegalaxy.com/subscribe/ - COG LA GALAXY DISCORD: https://discord.gg/drr9HFZY2P - COG MERCHANDISE (SCARVES, T-SHIRTS, BUTTONS, COASTERS): http://www.cornerofthegalaxy.com/SHOP COG STUDIOS, Calif. -- There are just 12 games left in the 2021 regular season for the LA Galaxy. Are the Galaxy prepared to start winning right now? And are they ready to get Javier "Chicharito" Hernandez back on the field? Today's show will get you ready for the Galaxy's next game against the Colorado Rapids. And that's going to be a massive test for a team that doesn't know what their best lineup is and is having to go to altitude to try and beat a team they haven't beat since 2017. Hosts Josh Guesman and Eric Vieira discuss the Galaxy's media conference call and tell you about the positivity exuding from Galaxy head coach Greg Vanney. Will Chicharito play in a single striker formation? Will Vanney pair with Dejan Joveljić? And what circumstances might the Galaxy use Chicharito in during the game? The guys will also talk about the Galaxy's odds to make the playoffs, according to FiveThirtyEight, and why betting on them to win MLS Cup might be a steal! But there's also talk from Josh and Eric about some international players returning that haven't been vaccinated. Will they be available for Saturday's game? And how could this hurt the team down the road when the next international window opens? We've got a packed show that is jammed with stats and information that will get you ready for the Rocky Mountain clash on Saturday. What was Josh's best advice about the game? Start drinking early! Thanks for joining us on the podcast today! And let's hope the Galaxy can find a way to make the final 12 games of the regular season a happy experience.

Apple News Today
How 9/11 launched a new era of security spending

Apple News Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 7:22


After the 9/11 terror attacks, federal defense spending surged. The Wall Street Journal explains how the funding increase transformed the national-security industry and paid for a vast surveillance system. The News-Times reports on how families of the Sandy Hook Elementary shooting victims are working to block a move by Remington’s lawyers to subpoena the school records of some of the students and educators killed. As the NFL season kicks off, FiveThirtyEight releases its football projections. Many gardeners think talking to plants helps them grow. The BBC looks at research on the controversial question of whether plants might be able to listen and even talk back.

Grant and Danny
Hour 2 Grant and Danny 9.7.21

Grant and Danny

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 44:54


Hour 2 of Grant and Danny kicks off with Neil Paine from Five Thirty Eight joining to talk about his QB rankings and why he has such high expectations for Ryan Fitzpatrick.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Givin' Props
Season-Long Hedges and Look-Aheads

Givin' Props

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 27:17


This week, BetPrep's Player Prop Guru Brad Feinberg discusses his top season-long hedges and look-aheads for the 2021-2022 NFL season with host and BetPrep Editor Michael Salfino of The Athletic and FiveThirtyEight. Player props include Laviska Shenault, Jr., Corey Davis, Michael Pittman, Jr., Ronald Jones II, Damien Harris, and more

Science Friday
Schools And The Delta Variant, Doubts For High-Tech Air Purifiers. Sept 3, 2021, Part 1

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 47:02


Nation Grapples With Several Climate Disasters At Once Hurricane Ida wreaked havoc on the eastern U.S. this week. It all started in Louisiana, leaving daunting damage and a long road to recovery for residents. Even though Ida was downgraded to a tropical storm after leaving the state, it left a trail of destruction through the eastern U.S. and mid-Atlantic, flooding cities and damaging homes. In the New York area, at least a dozen people died after the region was pummeled by more than half a foot of rain in just a few hours. This happened all while the western U.S. continues to battle wildfires, from Oregon to Colorado. In California, the extreme wildfire season led the state to close its National Forests through Labor Day weekend, a time where many people get outside and enjoy nature. If it feels like these apocalyptic-level events are happening more and more frequently, you're correct. Extreme weather is inextricably tied to climate change, and the science backs that up. Joining Ira to talk about these climate stories and more is Maggie Koerth, science reporter for FiveThirtyEight based in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Florida Schools With Mask Mandates Lose Funding The state Department of Education said Tuesday it was investigating the school districts of Hillsborough, Sarasota and Orange counties over mask mandates that do not allow for a parental exemption. In a letter to district officials, Education Commissioner Richard Corcoran wrote the districts were in violation of a state Department of Health emergency rule triggered by Gov. Ron DeSantis' executive order intended to block districts from enacting school mask mandates. On Friday, Leon County Circuit Judge John Cooper ruled the executive order was unconstitutional and cannot be enforced. However, DeSantis said an appeal is planned and his office has said it will continue to act in defense of parents' rights until a signed judge's order was issued. Corcoran's letters were sent Friday, and the three districts were given until 5 p.m. Wednesday to respond. If they remain noncompliant, they could face financial penalties. All three counties have mandates that allow exemptions only for medical reasons with a medical professional's note. Read more at sciencefriday.com. Back to School During The Delta Variant Back-to-school is usually an exciting time, with some nerves mixed in. But this year is a little different. All across the country, arguments about mask mandates are exploding in school board meetings and courtrooms. In places with no mask mandates, parents are weighing difficult decisions over how much risk is too much. But masks are just part of the equation for school safety. Air ventilation and distance are both important parts of the COVID-19 transmission equation, and many parents have questions about how their schools are preparing. With pediatric COVID-19 cases rising, and Delta's high transmission rates, many are wondering how we're going to keep our kids safe in schools. Joining Ira to mull over this question is Dr. Katelyn Jetelina, assistant professor at the University of Texas School of Public Health in Dallas, Texas. Many Schools Are Buying High-Tech Air Purifiers. Do They Actually Work? As students head back to school, parents are getting a lot of mail about what schools are doing to better protect kids in the classroom—from mask policies to spacing to lunch plans. One item on many administrators' lists of protective measures is improving classrooms' ventilation. Many studies have shown that better ventilation and air circulation can greatly reduce COVID-19 transmission. But rather than stocking up on HEPA filters, some districts are turning to high-tech air purification schemes, including untested electronic approaches and airborne chemicals. Christina Jewett, a senior correspondent for Kaiser Health News, has written extensively about school air filtration and purification. She joins Ira to explain why some air quality experts are less than convinced by the marketing claims made by many electronic air purifier companies.

Givin' Props
Season-Long RB Props

Givin' Props

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 39:29


This week, BetPrep's Player Prop Guru Brad Feinberg discusses his top season-long RB props for the 2021-2022 NFL season with host and BetPrep Editor Michael Salfino of The Athletic and FiveThirtyEight. Player props include rushing touchdowns and rushing yards for Derrick Henry, Christian McCaffrey, Saquon Barkley, Jonathan Taylor, Najee Harris, and more

Combos Court
Episode 297 - New York NBA Free Agency, Simmons' Situation, Lakers Roster & More w/ Jared Dubin

Combos Court

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 21:35


Jared Dubin joins in on this installment of Combo's Court. Jared covers the NFL at CBS and the NBA everywhere else including FiveThirtyEight. Jared chimes in on the Knicks and Nets off season. Combo shares what he sees with the Lakers roster. Combo asks Jared what he thinks about the Bucks chances to repeat. They get into a discussion about the Ben Simmons/Sixers situation. Jared also shares thoughts on Larry Nance Jr.'s move to Portland. And More! Find Jared on Twitter @JADubin5 Find Combo on Instagram @OneTwoCombo

Newочём
Почему люди верят в теории заговора

Newочём

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 11:19


Верите ли вы в то, что Майкл Джексон жив, масоны правят миром, а после вакцинации Билл Гейтс заставит вас купить Windows Pro? Если нет, то давайте поразмышляем, что отличает вас от тех, кто верит в теории заговора. Что в вашем мышлении не позволяет вам свалиться в кроличью нору, где не действуют законы логики? Текстовая версия: https://newochem.io/teoriyah-zagovora/ По материалам FiveThirtyEight Авторы: Кейли Роджерс и Жасмин Митани Озвучил: Глеб Рандалайен (TED на русском) Переводили: Юлия Рудакова и Елизавета Яковлева Редактировала: Александра Листьева Хочешь слушать наши подкасты чаще? Поддержи проект: Patreon https://www.patreon.com/join/newochem Тинькофф 5536 9138 1693 4463 Сбербанк 5469 5200 1501 6108 PayPal paypal.me/anastasiafff ЮMoney 410011215014412 Хочешь предложить партнерство или заказать рекламу? Напиши нам: https://t.me/newochem go@newochem.io

Givin' Props
Season-Long Player Props with Fantasy Consideration

Givin' Props

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 52:27


This week, BetPrep's Player Prop Guru Brad Feinberg discusses his top season-long player props for the 2021-2022 NFL season in the context of fantasy football Average Draft Position (ADP) with host and BetPrep Editor Michael Salfino of The Athletic and FiveThirtyEight. Player props include yards and touchdowns for Dak Prescott, Ben Roethlisberger, Zach Wilson, Ja'Marr Chase, Nick Chubb, and more

Clearer Thinking with Spencer Greenberg
How broken is social science? (with Matt Grossman)

Clearer Thinking with Spencer Greenberg

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 65:24


What makes studying humans harder than studying other parts of the universe? Is social science currently improving its rigor, relevance, and self-reflection? Is it improving its predictive power over time? Why have sample sizes historically been so small in social science studies? Is social science actually able to accumulate knowledge? Have social scientists been able to move the "needle" on real-world problems like vaccine adoption? Is social science becoming more diverse? Specifically, does social science have a political bias? Are universities in crisis? Do the incentive structures in universities make them difficult or even impossible to reform? Matt Grossmann is Director of the Institute for Public Policy and Social Research and Professor of Political Science at Michigan State University. He is also Senior Fellow at the Niskanen Center and a Contributor at FiveThirtyEight. He has published analysis in The New York Times, The Washington Post, and Politico, and hosts the Science of Politics podcast. He is the author or co-author of How Social Science Got Better, Asymmetric Politics, Red State Blues, The Not-So-Special Interests, Artists of the Possible, and Campaigns & Elections, as well as dozens of journal articles. You can find more about him on his website.

Clearer Thinking with Spencer Greenberg
How broken is social science? (with Matt Grossman)

Clearer Thinking with Spencer Greenberg

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 65:24


What makes studying humans harder than studying other parts of the universe? Is social science currently improving its rigor, relevance, and self-reflection? Is it improving its predictive power over time? Why have sample sizes historically been so small in social science studies? Is social science actually able to accumulate knowledge? Have social scientists been able to move the "needle" on real-world problems like vaccine adoption? Is social science becoming more diverse? Specifically, does social science have a political bias? Are universities in crisis? Do the incentive structures in universities make them difficult or even impossible to reform?Matt Grossmann is Director of the Institute for Public Policy and Social Research and Professor of Political Science at Michigan State University. He is also Senior Fellow at the Niskanen Center and a Contributor at FiveThirtyEight. He has published analysis in The New York Times, The Washington Post, and Politico, and hosts the Science of Politics podcast. He is the author or co-author of How Social Science Got Better, Asymmetric Politics, Red State Blues, The Not-So-Special Interests, Artists of the Possible, and Campaigns & Elections, as well as dozens of journal articles. You can find more about him on his website.

Doug Polk Podcast
Nate Silver's Poker Strategy & 2024 POTUS Predictions

Doug Polk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 129:29


FiveThirtyEight founder Nate Silver joins Doug Polk to talk about poker, politics, COVID, Twitter beefs and more.0:52 Nate joins2:55 Political betting, FiveThirtyEight vs sports betting markets11:00 2020 Primaries, Superdelegates16:29 Polarization of the US population22:30 WSOP Covid restrictions34:28 Nonsensical Covid policies41:42 Nate's upcoming book on gambling/risk46:22 Nate's poker background, talking all things poker1:25:38 The Nassim Taleb beef1:29:35 Why is Nate trending on Twitter today?, Covid talk1:48:48 Stimulus checks, GOP's future1:59:32 2024 Election predictions?2:07:13 Parting words, Nate's WSOP schedule

Turley Talks
Ep. 606 Biden's BORDER CRISIS is DESTROYING the Democrats!!!

Turley Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 11:18


Highlights:     “A number of pundits are recognizing that the crisis in the Southern border itself is enough to sink the Biden presidency.”“It's being widely recognized that public opinion is shifting way to the right when it comes to immigration under the Bumblin' Biden regime.”“Fun fact here: FiveThirtyEight observed that Fox News mentioned immigration and the border nearly 40,000 times over the last 7 months of the Biden regime. In stark contrast, the ultra-leftist propaganda outlets CNN and MSNBC mentioned the border less than 9,000 times during the same time period.”“According to Rasmussen, 73%, 3 in 4 likely voters are very concerned about the flooded immigrants coming through the Southern border. 48% are extremely concerned and 51% oppose giving them amnesty.”“Unfortunately for Bumblin' Biden, the crisis at the border is only going to get worse because of the mass amounts of Afghans coming to the country as a result of his perceived 'incompetence'.”“This border crisis is going to absolutely destroy the Democrats politically and they have only themselves to blame.”Timestamps:       [01:43] On the fall of Afghanistan and the crisis in the Southern border[03:18] How public and Republican views on immigration are shifting further to the right[06:42] How the crisis at the border and Biden's polls will get worse because of the fall of Kabul[08:56] How the Democrats are doomed at the next electionResources: Ep. 605 BREAKING! BIDEN IN DANGER OF REMOVAL!!!Ep. 515 RED WAVE! GOP SWEEPS WEEKEND ELECTIONS!!!Join our ARMY!! Our Virtual gathering of New Conservative Patriots on September 3rd and 4th needs YOU! Register today at https://conferences.turleytalks.com/Get your FREE copy of Scott's Ebook, Bigger IS Better: 7 Reasons Why Commercial Beats Single-Family Investing here: Commercial Academy & Turley TalksJoin Commercial Academy 3-Day LIVE Training Experience here: Commercial Academy Live Event Get Your Brand-New PATRIOT T-Shirts and Merch Here:https://store.turleytalks.com/Become a Turley Talks Insiders Club Member: https://insidersclub.turleytalks.com/welcomeThank you for taking the time to listen to this episode.  If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe and/or leave a review.Do you want to be a part of the podcast and be our sponsor? Click here to partner with us and defy liberal culture!If you would like to get lots of articles on conservative trends make sure to sign-up for the 'New Conservative Age Rising' Email Alerts. 

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast
Effectively Wild Episode 1726: Hit, Stand, or Surrender

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 77:33


Ben Lindbergh and Meg Rowley banter about the one-for-one A's-Marlins swap involving Starling Marte and Jesús Luzardo, Marte's underrated career, and Miami's enviable pitching stockpile, then discuss the circumstances surrounding a potential trade of Max Scherzer. After that (35:21), they talk to FiveThirtyEight senior writer Neil Paine about the factors that affect whether teams add […]

Science Friday
Surgeon General, Blockchain. July 23, 2021, Part 1

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 47:04


Flooding Worldwide Fits Climate Change Models While the western United States is burning again this summer, other parts of the world are drowning. Germany, Belgium, and China saw floods this week after intense rainstorms that dropped many inches of rain in matters of hours, killing hundreds and displacing thousands. In Turkey and Nigeria, less deadly rain events throughout July have still flooded streets and destroyed homes. And as climate change continues around the globe, scientists say these intense rain events will only worsen, putting flood-prone areas at risk of longer-lasting, and faster-raining storms. FiveThirtyEight science writer Maggie Koerth talks to Ira about the rising cost of rain events under climate change. Plus, why climate change may be hurting monarch butterflies more than a lack of milkweed, a first step toward experiments in geoengineering, and how Australia's cockatoos are spreading a culture of dumpster-diving.     Biden's Surgeon General On How To Tackle Vaccine Hesitancy It's a tale of two pandemics. In some parts of the country, communities are opening up, saying it's time to get back to normal. In other pockets of the country, infection numbers and hospital admissions are creeping up again—and some places, such as Los Angeles County, have moved to reinstate mask mandates, even for the vaccinated.   The key factor in the pandemic response in many communities is the local vaccination level, with outlooks very different for vaccinated and unvaccinated people. But even as public health workers advocate for widespread vaccination, misinformation and disinformation is discouraging some vulnerable people from taking the vaccine. Dr. Vivek Murthy, Surgeon General of the United States, joins Ira to talk about vaccine hesitancy, the U.S. response to the pandemic, preparing for public health on a global scale, and post-pandemic public health priorities.      Will Blockchain Really Change The Way The Internet Runs? The internet has changed quite a bit over the last few decades. People of a certain age may remember having to use dial-up to get connected, or Netscape as the first web browser. Now, social networking is king, and it's easier than ever to find information at the click of a mouse. But the modern internet has massive privacy concerns, with many sites collecting, retaining, and sometimes sharing user's personal information. This has led many technology-minded people to think about what the future of the web might look like. Enter blockchain, a decentralized database technology that some say will change the way the internet runs, while giving users more control over their data. Some say that blockchain will be the basis for the next version of the internet, a so-called “Web 3.0.”  But where are we now with blockchain technology, and can it be everything we want it to be? Joining Ira to wade through the jargon of blockchain and the future of the internet is Morgen Peck, freelance technology journalist based in New York.  

FiveThirtyEight Politics
What We Learned From This Supreme Court Term

FiveThirtyEight Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2021 45:02


On Thursday, the Supreme Court wrapped up its first term with a 6-3 conservative majority on the bench. FiveThirtyEight contributor Laura Bronner shares what the data can tell us about the ideological direction of the court with the addition of Justice Amy Coney Barrett. Legal scholar Kate Shaw also digs into some of the specifics of the term's major cases, particularly on election law.