Podcasts about Colonialism

Creation and maintenance of colonies by people from another area

  • 1,839PODCASTS
  • 3,260EPISODES
  • 48mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Sep 30, 2022LATEST
Colonialism

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about Colonialism

Show all podcasts related to colonialism

Latest podcast episodes about Colonialism

The Literary Life with Mitchell Kaplan
Ibram X. Kendi on Why Our Children Need to Be Told the Stories of Slavery and Colonialism

The Literary Life with Mitchell Kaplan

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 59:39


On today's episode of The Literary Life, Dr. Precious Symonette, Miami-Dade County Teacher of the Year and creative writing teacher, is joined by Ibram X. Kendi to discuss his latest book, Magnolia Flower, out now from One World. Dr. Ibram X. Kendi is the Andrew W. Mellon Professor in the Humanities at Boston University and the founding director of the BU Center for Antiracist Research. He is a contributing writer at The Atlantic and a CBS News racial justice contributor. He is the host of the new action podcast Be Antiracist. Dr. Kendi is the author of many highly acclaimed books including Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America, which won the National Book Award for Nonfiction, making him the youngest-ever winner of that award. He has also produced five straight #1 New York Times bestsellers, including How to Be an Antiracist, Antiracist Baby, and Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You, co-authored by Jason Reynolds. In 2020, Time magazine named Dr. Kendi one of the 100 most influential people in the world. He was awarded a 2021 MacArthur Fellowship, popularly known as the Genius Grant. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

CounterSpin
Julio López Varona on Puerto Rico Colonialism, Guerline Jozef on Haitian Refugee Abuse

CounterSpin

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 27:52


Tax giveaways to non–Puerto Ricans mean money not going to Puerto Rico's energy systems, schools, hospitals, housing. The post Julio López Varona on Puerto Rico Colonialism, Guerline Jozef on Haitian Refugee Abuse appeared first on FAIR.

On Religion
On Sacred Sites, Indigenous History, and Spanish Colonialism

On Religion

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 67:30


Abel R. Gómez (he/him/his) is a Ph.D. candidate in the Religion Department and earned a Certificate of Advanced Studies from the Women's and Gender Studies Department at Syracuse University. His research focuses on sacred sites, ritual, and decolonization in the context of contemporary Indigenous religions. Abel is currently completing his dissertation, an ethnography of sacred sites protection movements among the Ohlone peoples of the San Francisco and Monterey regions. He is a steering committee member for the Native Traditions in the Americas Unit of the American Academy of Religion and recently served on the committee organizing the annual Bay Area American Indian Two-Spirits Powwow in San Francisco. He earned a B.A. in philosophy and religion from San Francisco State University and an M.A. in religious studies from the University of Missouri. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Sacred
Sathnam Sanghera on his Sikh faith, dealing with online abuse, and learning about colonialism

The Sacred

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 58:03


Sathnam Sanghera is journalist for The Times, and best-selling memoirist. His most recent book, Empireland: How Imperialism Has Shaped Modern Britain, has been showered with awards and endorsements. He spoke about growing up in Wolverhampton, his Sikh faith, dealing with online abuse, and his exploration of the history of colonialism.

Brown History Podcast
EP 48: Opium and Colonialism

Brown History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 65:22


We sit with Thomas Manuel, author of ‘Opium Inc.: How a Global Drug Trade Funded the British Empire,' and discuss the historic opium trade which unleased two wars, and ultimately shaped human history.  Support, shop and subscribe to our newsletter  

Haymarket Books Live
Learning As Rebellion: Resisting Right-Wing Attacks on Higher Ed Across the Americas

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 85:56


Join Haymarket Books, and NACLA for a discussion of how to resist the conservative attacks on higher education From Brazil to Puerto Rico to the United States, conservative politicians have set their sights on schools as key ideological battlegrounds. And when vulnerable students and scholars are targeted for their identities and/or politics, universities often fail to protect them for fear of alienating donors or powerful political allies. What can we do to fight back and protect one another? As right-wing forces work to dismantle accessible education and limit academic freedom in countries across the Americas, join us for a virtual roundtable inspired by Lorgia García Peña's recent book, Community as Rebellion: A Syllabus for Surviving Academia as a Woman of Color. In conversation with García Peña, scholar-activists Luciana Brito and Geo Maher, with moderation by Marisol LeBrón, will discuss the recent wave of attacks on education across the Americas and envision how to build liberatory spaces of learning and transformation. ----------------------------------------------------------------------- Speakers: Luciana Brito is a historian and professor at the Universidade Federal do Recôncavo da Bahia-Brasil, specializing in the history of slavery and abolition in Brazil and the United States. She is member of the Executive committee of ASWAD (Association for the Worldwide Diaspora), is columnist of Nexo Jornal and has been publishing a lot of academic and non-academic articles about race, gender, class and inequality in the Americas. She is the author of the book Fears of Africa: Security, Legislation and African Population in 19th Century Bahia. Instagram: @lucianabritohistoria Marisol LeBrón is associate professor in Feminist Studies and Critical Race and Ethnic Studies at the University of California, Santa Cruz. She is author of Against Muerto Rico: Lessons from the Verano Boricua/Contra Muerto Rico: Lecciones del Verano Boricua (Editora Educación Emergente, 2021) and Policing Life and Death: Race, Violence, and Resistance in Puerto Rico (University of California Press, 2019) and co-editor of Aftershocks of Disaster: Puerto Rico Before and After the Storm (Haymarket Books, 2019). Geo Maher is a Philadelphia-based writer and organizer, and Visiting Associate Professor of Global Political Thought at Vassar College. He has taught previously at Drexel University, San Quentin State Prison, and the Venezuelan School of Planning in Caracas, and has held visiting positions at the College of William and Mary's Decolonizing Humanities Project, NYU's Hemispheric Institute, and the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). He his co-editor of the Duke University Press series Radical Américas and author of five books: We Created Chávez (Duke, 2013), Building the Commune (Verso, 2016), Decolonizing Dialectics (Duke, 2017), A World Without Police (Verso, 2021), and Anticolonial Eruptions (University of California, 2022). Lorgia García Peña is the author of Community as Rebellion: A Syllabus for Surviving Academia as a Woman of Color and is a first generation Latinx Studies scholar. Dr. García Peña is the Mellon Associate Professor of Race, Colonialism and Diaspora Studies at Tufts University and a Casey Foundation 2021 Freedom Scholar. She studies global Blackness, colonialism, migration and diaspora with a special focus on Black Latinidad. Dr. García Peña is the co-founder of Freedom University Georgia and of Archives of Justice (Milan-Boston). Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/gJ2EnOVFAxk Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

The African History Network Show
The Woman King & The Real History of The Kingdom of Dahomey' - Prof. James Small

The African History Network Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 147:00


Historian, Prof. James Small, former Black Studies Prof. at CUNY and featured in the films, 'Hapi', 'Hidden Colors' & 'Elementary Genocide 3', joins Michael Imhotep to discuss 'The Woman King & The Real History of The West African Kingdom of Dahomey'. The #1 Movie, 'The Woman King' from producer Viola Davis and Director Gina Prince-Bythewood is amazing audience as it is 'Inspired by True Events' involving the African Female Warriors known as the Agojie or the Ahosi. We separate Fact from Fiction and deal with better Understanding The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade, the real history of Dahomey and more. (WATCH VIDEO) https://youtu.be/5B6FDnyOXHw No movie is 100% Historically accurate. Not even the White ones. These are not documentaries. They are Hollywood movies. These movies should lead people to seek out the real history of Dahomey, the Oyo Empire (Yoruba), The Agojie, African Martial Arts, African Spirituality, Ifa, the Orisha like Ogun mentioned in the film, The Franco-Dahomean Wars 1890s, Colonialism, Berlin Conference of 1884 - 1885, Great Britain abolishing Slavery in 1834 after being involved in Slavery for 272 years, etc. Support The African History Network through Cash App @ https://cash.app/$TheAHNShow or PayPal @ TheAHNShow@gmail.com or http://www.PayPal.me/TheAHNShow .

The Fight Site Podcast Network
TENGRIDOME Bonus: Ranting About Russia

The Fight Site Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 75:17


Iggy has been plenty busy for the last couple weeks, so he hasn't been able to really catch any of the fight events that happened, but seeing as he like many others has been cursed with living in interesting times, he has a lot of stories to tell about some OTHER events, particularly in regards to Russia, which he left almost immediately after it invaded Ukraine. Tune in as Iggy briefly explains what the hell's been happening to him for the past seven months and some of the reasons why. He also offers a brief overview of Russian history, particularly in the realm of some of its regions — such as his birthplace, the Republic of Buryatia, and the centuries-old tradition of Russian imperialism and chauvinism that still informs Kremlin's decisions. Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/FightSitedotcom Support us on Patreon: patreon.com/fightsite If you wish to help us find Iggy a new home, please give these posts a read: https://www.thefight-site.com/home/reader-notice-fight-site-staff-member-needs-help-urgently https://www.thefight-site.com/home/reader-notice-fundraiser-update Support Iggy on Ko-Fi: https://ko-fi.com/iggytfs

The Laura Flanders Show
BIPOC Media: Amplifying Black and Indigenous Collaborations

The Laura Flanders Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 30:31


How do Black and Indigenous communities intersect? This special feature for Indigenous People's day explores the forces that have both facilitated and thwarted collaboration and movement-making among Black and Indigenous people in the United States. Exploitation of Black and Indigenous people was integral to the founding of this country, but the nature of that exploitation wasn't exactly the same. Mitra Kalita and Sara Lomax Reese of URL Media return for this month's “Meet the BIPOC Press”. Their guests are Levi Rickert, a citizen of the Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation, founder and publisher, Native News Online and Dr. Kyle T. Mays from the Saginaw Chippewa Nations, Afro-Indigenous scholar and author of An Afro-Indigenous History of the United States. Mays asks: “How can we imagine and put into praxis a world in the aftermath of settler colonialism and white supremacy?”“It's imperative to not only center blackness, but also to center Indigenous peoples because upon whose land were African Americans exploited? This is Indigenous land.” - Dr. Kyle T. Mays“We need to keep the gas pedal on getting Congress to appropriate the proper level of funding. We still have some of the highest levels of disparity when it comes to health disparity and lack of housing. A third of the people on the Navajo nation do not have running water or electricity. These are Third World living conditions, and this is what our native people are still living with.” - Levi RickertGuests:Levi Rickert (Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation) Publisher & Editor, Native News Online;  Author of Visions for a Better Indian Country: One Potawatomi Editor's OpinionsKyle T. Mays, Ph.D. (Saginaw Chippewa Nation) Associate Professor UCLA,  Departments of African American Studies, American Indian Studies & History;  Author, An Afro-Indigenous History of the United StatesS. Mitra Kalita (Co-Host): Co-Founder, URL MediaSara Lomax-Reese (Co-Host): Co-Founder, URL MediaTickets are on sale now for our first in-person fundraiser! Show your support for the LF Show in Sullivan County, NY, where the show is produced. Plus, environmentalist Bill McKibben will be there for a live Q&A and book signing! Find more information and tickets here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/419711015947 

The Suno India Show
Why are Naga remains in a UK museum?

The Suno India Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 37:40


The Pitt Rivers Museum in Oxford, England, has the largest collection of Naga material culture in the world (around 6466 items), including the human remains of Naga ancestors. Anthropologists Dolly Kikon and Arkotong Longkumer have been working as part of a community-led initiative to ensure the return of the Naga ancestral remains to their rightful home in Nagaland. Through this project, Dolly and Arkotong say they are discovering how Indian mainland scholars have also used and abused Naga ancestral remains in similar ways and that some Indian museums continue to store them. In this episode of The Suno India Show, host Suryatapa Mukherjee spoke to Dolly and Arkotong to learn more about this path-breaking work. This is the first time that repatriation of ancestral human remains have been initiated in India and even Asia, for indigenous people. Dolly Kikon is a Senior Lecturer in the Anthropology and Development Studies Program at Melbourne University, and a Senior Research Associate at the Australia India Institute. Arkotong Longkumer is Senior Lecturer in Modern Asia at the University of Edinburgh, and Senior Research Fellow at the Kohima Institute in Nagaland. Morung Lecture XIV: Naga Ancestral Remains, Repatriation and Healing of the LandThe Unfinished Business of Colonialism: Naga Ancestral Remains and the Healing of the Land | MorungExpressCritical Changes | Pitt Rivers MuseumPitt Rivers Museum | Oxford and Colonialism  Working Towards Return with the Pitt Rivers Museum Return Reconcile Renew See sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.

Multipolarista
In fiery UN speech, Honduras condemns colonialism, neoliberalism, coups, corporate exploitation

Multipolarista

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 33:57


Journalist Ben Norton analyzes the UN speech of Honduras' new left-wing President Xiomara Castro. She denounced colonialism, “neoliberal injustice,” and corporate exploitation while calling for multipolarity. VIDEO: https://youtube.com/watch?v=udvjVaxP96s Read more here: https://multipolarista.com/2022/09/22/un-speech-honduras-xiomara-castro Report on Honduras' unpayable odious debt: https://multipolarista.com/2022/01/31/coup-honduras-unpayable-odious-debt

The Magnificast
Climate, Colonialism, and Solidarity

The Magnificast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 59:49


We all know that humans are causing climate change, but in this episode, we're talking about which humans are responsible specifically! throughout this episode, we talk about climate change, colonialism, and solidarity.Here are some articles we referenced in the episode! Jason Hickel - Quantifying national responsibility for climate breakdown Will the People with Guns Allow Our Planet to BreatheClimate Change: Atmospheric Carbon DioxideChina's Emissions Are Made in AmericaIntro Music by Amaryah Armstrong Outro music by theillogicalspoonhttps://theillalogicalspoon.bandcamp.com/track/hoods-up-the-low-down-technified-blues*Get Magnificast Merch* https://www.redbubble.com

RevDem Podcast
Andreas Eckert: Down-to-Earth Machines of Exploitation. Colonialism, Slavery, and Current Debates

RevDem Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 59:07


In this conversation with RevDem guest contributor Norman Aselmeyer, Andreas Eckert – author of German-language overviews of the history of colonialism and of slavery – presents his approach to the history of colonialism and how the study of this subject has evolved in the early 21st century; reflects on the special challenges of composing a global history of slavery; shares his views on the ongoing German debates regarding colonial crimes; and discusses the current state and special pitfalls of global history writing. Andreas Eckert, historian of modern Africa at Humboldt University in Berlin, is one of Germany's leading scholars of African history. Since 2009, he has been the director of the international research centre Work and Human Lifecycle in Global History. Throughout his career, he has held fellowships and guest professorships all over the world. He taught and researched at institutions such as Princeton, Harvard, Stanford, the Swedisch Collegium in Uppsala, SOAS, and others. Andreas Eckert has published numerous books and articles on the history of labour, colonialism, global history, and the historiography of African history. Today, we will speak about two of his latest books on the history of colonialism and slavery: Kolonialismus (S. Fischer, 2006) and Geschichte der Sklaverei: Von der Antike bis ins 21. Jahrhundert [History of Slavery. From Ancient Times to the 21st Century](C.H. Beck, 2021). Norman Aselmeyer, PhD, is a lecturer of modern history at the University of Bremen. His research interests lie at the intersection of African and global history.

Haymarket Books Live
Community as Rebellion: Surviving Academia as a Woman of Color w/ Angela Davis, Lorgia García Peña

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 87:22


Lorgia García Peña, Angela Y. Davis and Chandra Talpade Mohanty discuss freedom making in the academy for women scholars of color. ***Please note: This discussion was recorded on May 25, 2022. We are releasing it now because the discussion remains highly relevant and valuable.*** Join us for the launch of a Community as Rebellion: A Syllabus for Surviving Academia as a Woman of Color, a new book by Latinx Studies scholar Lorgia García Peña in conversation with Angela Y. Davis and Chandra Talpade Mohanty. Weaving personal narrative with political analysis, Community as Rebellion offers a meditation on creating liberatory spaces for students and faculty of color within academia. Much like other women scholars of color, Lorgia García Peña has struggled against the colonizing, racializing, classist, and unequal structures that perpetuate systemic violence within universities. Angela Y. Davis regards Community as Rebellion as “a life-saving and life-affirming text, it offers us the trenchant analysis and fearless strategy radical scholar-activists have long needed.” You can order a copy of Community as Rebellion here: https://www.haymarketbooks.org/books/1870-community-as-rebellion ----------------------------------------------------------------------- Speakers: Lorgia García Peña is the author of Community as Rebellion: A Syllabus for Surviving Academia as a Woman of Color and is a first generation Latinx Studies scholar. Dr. García Peña is the Mellon Associate Professor of Race, Colonialism and Diaspora Studies at Tufts University and a Casey Foundation 2021 Freedom Scholar. She studies global Blackness, colonialism, migration and diaspora with a special focus on Black Latinidad. Dr. García Peña is the co-founder of Freedom University Georgia and of Archives of Justice (Milan-Boston). Angela Y. Davis is Professor Emerita of History of Consciousness and Feminist Studies at UC Santa Cruz. An activist, writer, and lecturer, her work focuses on prisons, police, abolition, and the related intersections of race, gender, and class. She is the author of many books, from Angela Davis: An Autobiography (now available in a new edition from Haymarket Books) to Freedom Is a Constant Struggle. Chandra Talpade Mohanty is a feminist scholar-activist and educator in the women's and gender studies department at Syracuse University. Chandra's activism, scholarship, and teaching focus on transnational feminist theory, anticapitalist feminist praxis, antiracist education, and the politics of knowledge. She is author of Freedom Feminist Warriors, Feminism without Borders and coeditor of Third World Women and the Politics of Feminism, Feminist Genealogies, Colonial Legacies, Democratic Futures; Feminism and War and Sage Handbook of Identities. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/A38JKBBK2RU Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Day 6 from CBC Radio
Episode 617: Navigating daily life in Russia; Italy's far-right; challenging colonialism in names; Georgie Stone and more

Day 6 from CBC Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 54:09


How a YouTuber chronicling everyday Russian life adjusts to life during wartime; Italy seems poised to elect a Prime Minister with neo-fascist roots; how Canadians are challenging colonial naming conventions by changing their own names; The Dreamlife of Georgie Stone documents a transgender teen who challenged Australia's laws so she could affirm her gender; and more.

Postcards From Nowhere
The X Club, Colonialism and Foghorns as Music

Postcards From Nowhere

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 9:49


In 1864, London saw the formation of a club consisting of nine members. It was called the X Club, since it committed its members to nothing. In fact, the only rule of the club was to have no rules. But this wasn't a bunch of rag-tag individuals. These nine members were some of the most influential voices of their generation. One of these men went on to do pioneering research which changed travel over the oceans. But his invention also had sinister outcomes for over a billion people. This week, in the thirteenth episode of the series Ireland Untravelled, we discover the story of a relic of the past - Foghorns, their colonial connection, and a not so secret scientific body, The X Club. Tune in, and discover how we should think about the colonial relics of the past. Till then Check out the other episodes of "Ireland Untravelled"Lost Treasures, Dynamite and the Irish Nation : https://ivm.today/3okwxm5Gaelic and the stunning decline of the Irish Language : https://ivm.today/3zmhE9iTrinity Long Room and the Soul of the Irish Nation : https://ivm.today/3PnZkSEU2, Body Snatching and the Irish Way of Death : https://ivm.today/3IQ6fl3Bombay, Paris and the improbable victory for LGBTQ+ rights in Ireland : https://ivm.today/3AJLa9BIrish roads that go nowhere, Houses no one lives in : https://ivm.today/3PGG95XTitanic, Mosul and the Global shame of Western Museums : https://ivm.today/3R9uBceThree Irish Women, Emigration and India's National Anthem : https://ivm.today/3KfZdqzYou can check previous episodes of 'Podcasts from Nowhere' on IVM Podcasts websitehttps://ivm.today/3xuayw9You can reach out to our host Utsav on Instagram: @whywetravel42(https://www.instagram.com/whywetravel42)You can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the IVM Podcasts app on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/ios, or any other podcast app.

Don’t Call Me Resilient
About the Queen, the Crown's crimes and how to talk about the unmourned

Don’t Call Me Resilient

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 30:05


At Don't Call Me Resilient, we've been busy planning season 4 of the podcast, which starts to roll out in November. We're even starting to think about season 5. But we decided to stop production to talk about something we felt we couldn't ignore.We've watched this incredible spectacle around the Queen's death and public outpouring of support and love for the British monarchy.Here in Canada, Queen Elizabeth was the official head of state and her funeral this week was made a federal holiday. In Ontario, the Minister of Education directed schools to conduct a moment of silence “to recognize the profound impact of Queen Elizabeth II's lifelong and unwavering devotion to public service.”And yet next week, those same children will be exploring the history of Indian Residential Schools and the immense ongoing damage of that system — started and long supported by the Crown.In the middle of this outpouring of love and grief for the Queen — and the monarchy she represented — not everyone is feeling it. Not everyone wants to mourn or honour her or what she represents.And there are a lot of reasons why.For example, the head of the Assembly of First Nations, RoseAnne Archibald told CTV News that the Royal Family should apologize for the failures of the Crown …“particularly for the destructiveness of colonization on First Nations people.”Another example came from Uju Anya, professor at Carnegie Mellon University, who posted a tweet in which she identified the Queen as overseeing a “thieving raping genocidal empire.”To explore these ideas further, we reached out to two scholars who are regular contributors to Don't Call Me Resilient. Both say that the Queen's death could be a uniting moment of dissent for people from current and former colonies.Veldon Coburn is Assistant Professor at the Institute of Indigenous Research and Studies at the University of Ottawa where he teaches a class called Colonialism, Territory & Treaties. He is Anishinaabe, Algonquin from Pikwàkanagàn First Nation and the co-editor of Capitalism and Dispossession.Cheryl Thompson is Assistant Professor of media and culture at the School of Performance and the Director of the Laboratory for Black Creativity at Toronto Metropolitan University. She is the author of Uncle: Race, Nostalgia, and the Politics of Loyalty.

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show
The Great Star of Africa/Legally Cleared

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 6:50


The Queen's scepter is called into question.  Colonialism was also mentioned.  Jane Doe has dismissed the case against Tiffany Haddish and Aries Spears. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

UNDISTRACTED with Brittany Packnett Cunningham
The Queen Died. Now What? Three Brilliant Women on Colonialism and the Future

UNDISTRACTED with Brittany Packnett Cunningham

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 52:43


The funeral is over. The pomp has died down. But the conversations—not just around the monarchy, but around the legacy of imperialism—continue around the world. So host Brittany Packnett Cunningham sits down with three women with different perspectives on the empire: writer Luvvie Ajayi, professor and scholar Caroline Elkins, and the Meteor's Shannon Melero. Together they get into what the queen represented, what people still don't understand about colonialism, and their own families and experiences. But first, this week's UNtrending news.  To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Bad Takes
Tucker Carlson's case for the British Empire

Bad Takes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 42:10


Fox News host Tucker Carlson's glowing review of Queen Elizabeth II's legacy divides Matthew Yglesias and Laura McGann this week. Matt gives credence to some of Carlson's points and makes the case that the British were comparatively “better” than other brutal imperialist powers. Laura points out that the British Empire was built on violence and slavery, and she questions Elizabeth's record.Suggested reads:Queen Elizabeth II is being attacked by some because she lived in a better time, Tucker Carlson @ Fox News How the World Became Rich: The Historical Origins of Economic Growth, Mark Jared Rubin and Mark Koyama Colonialism and Modern Income: Islands as Natural Experiments, James Feyrer and Bruce Sacerdote Republic, U.K. movement to replace the monarchy with an elected head of state (note: this is what Matt is referencing when he calls Laura a ‘republican;' it's in opposition to monarchists not Democrats)   Send us a bad take to review at badtakes@grid.news.For a transcript of an episode of Bad Takes, please email transcripts@grid.news.

Black in The Maritimes
Let’s Talk About Colonialism

Black in The Maritimes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 36:44


In this episode, we talk about queen Elizabeth II death and the effects of Colonialism. The post Let's Talk About Colonialism appeared first on Black In The Maritimes.

The Fake Ass Book Club
Episode 72: A review of Sex and Love Around the World

The Fake Ass Book Club

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 94:49


Happy Humpday F.A.B. Fam!! Speaking of hump day, your F.A.B. hosts are reviewing the 2018 documentary "Sex and Love Around the World" by Christine Amanpour. Christine travels around the world (Tokyo, Delhi, Beirut, Berlin, and Accra (Ghana) to talk to women about the rules of engagement in relationships and intimacy. It's a six part documentary directed by women. The topics cover everything from the idea of modern love to roles men and women play in sex, love, marriage family and even divorce. Tune in for a conversation on some of the hottest topics on the planet since the beginning of time! Cheers!! Warning: Adult Content & Language, please be advised this show is for adults 18 and up and the open minded. No disrespect to any culture or religion is intended. We are privileged, especially as women, to have the ability to partake in honest conversation which sometimes contain controversial topics & views. Please understand it is all love. "It the only thing there's just to little of!!" **Dedication: To our listeners who keep us going, to the human spirit and wordle & of course nerds. Please be on the lookout for our Patreon...your support will help us upgrade our audio visual content. About the Series: :https://youtu.be/NknJursyfOg About the Author:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christiane_Amanpour Show Notes: _ *Delhi: *When the British saw hijra for the first time they were not feeling it and passed the Tribal Act: Their status came down with Colonization by the British empire (https://www.himalmag.com/long-history-criminalising-hijras-india-jessica-hinchy-2019/) khajuraho sculptures: https://www.indianeagle.com/travelbeats/khajuraho-temple-history-and-art/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KhajurahoGroupofMonuments Beirut: Muslim erotic text from the 1500's: The perfumed garden of Sexual delight: book starts with an orgasm between man and woman in front of God https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ThePerfumedGarden *Voudon: https://www.britannica.com/topic/Vodou https://www.livescience.com/40803-voodoo-facts.html African traditional religions /ATR: https://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/african-traditional-religions *Big mouth 'Life is a big fat mess" song: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wZBninmxjrU *Malala Yousafzai: Activist https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malala_Yousafzai *72 virgins or raisins? Do your own research on this topic, but here is what we found online: https://globalnation.inquirer.net/163694/raisins-not-virgins-quran-scholars-say https://www.indiatimes.com/news/india/islamic-scholar-punctures-72-virgins-theory-says-martyrs-will-only-get-raisins-in-heaven-340579.html https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VTIZezQEZcQ *Stranger than Fiction: *BBC: Sir Salman Rushdie published his famous and controversial novel The Satanic Verses in 1988, sparking outrage among some Muslims, who considered its content to be blasphemous.The book's release prompted the Iranian leader Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini to issue a fatwa calling for the writer's death in 1989. Mr Matar told the New York Post he had only read "a couple of pages" of the book and did not say whether the fatwa had inspired him. https://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-62588666 Please email thefabpodcast@gmail.com with your book suggestions and "Stranger Than Fiction" stories so we can share them on the show!! Please reach out and let us how we are doing!! You can find us online by clicking our Link tree https://linktr.ee/Fabpod Don't forget to follow, rate, review, and SHARE our podcast! Thank you!

The Brian Lehrer Show
Colonialism and The Commonwealth of Nations

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 16:06


Ishaan Tharoor, foreign affairs columnist at The Washington Post, discusses the history of colonization and the Commonwealth of Nations and what the Commonwealth's future might hold.

The Religion and Ethics Report - Separate stories podcast
Charles III's green politics, and confronting a colonial legacy

The Religion and Ethics Report - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 15:40


Charles believes nature and the environment are the best expressions of God and religion. And to the extent that any monarch is allowed to have a political worldview, this is his. But now as King, he must also deal with the violent history of Britain's imperial era. 

History As It Happens
The Queen's Empire

History As It Happens

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 38:57


The death of Queen Elizabeth II provoked in her home country an outpouring of grief and pride while in other parts of the world – the independent nations of the former British Empire – her passing prompted a more ambivalent reflection on the imperial aspects of her legacy. That is because the queen was a symbol not only of stability and monarchical grace. Elizabeth II was also a symbol of empire and colonialism, and a reluctance on the part of some of her subjects to fully reckon with that bloody, rapacious history. In this episode, historian Dane Kennedy discusses the reasons for the mixed reactions to the death of the United Kingdom's longest-serving monarch. Not everyone is feeling nostalgic for the world in which Elizabeth became monarch, which was in the throes of violent struggles for national liberation.

Firing Line 2
Ep. 74 Colonialism 101

Firing Line 2

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 89:27


its been two years everyone

New Books in Genocide Studies
Adam A. Blackler, "An Imperial Homeland: Forging German Identity in Southwest Africa" (Pennsylvania State UP, 2022)

New Books in Genocide Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 59:55


At the turn of the twentieth century, depictions of the colonized world were prevalent throughout the German metropole. Tobacco advertisements catered to the erotic gaze of imperial enthusiasts with images of Ovaherero girls, and youth magazines allowed children to escape into "exotic domains" where their imaginations could wander freely. While racist beliefs framed such narratives, the abundance of colonial imaginaries nevertheless compelled German citizens and settlers to contemplate the world beyond Europe as a part of their daily lives. An Imperial Homeland: Forging German Identity in Southwest Africa (Pennsylvania State University Press, 2022) reorients our understanding of the relationship between imperial Germany and its empire in Southwest Africa (present-day Namibia). Colonialism had an especially significant effect on shared interpretations of the Heimat (home/homeland) ideal, a historically elusive perception that conveyed among Germans a sense of place through national peculiarities and local landmarks. Focusing on colonial encounters that took place between 1842 and 1915, Adam A. Blackler reveals how Africans confronted foreign rule and altered German national identity. As Blackler shows, once the façade of imperial fantasy gave way to colonial reality, German metropolitans and white settlers increasingly sought to fortify their presence in Africa using juridical and physical acts of violence, culminating in the first genocide of the twentieth century. Grounded in extensive archival research, An Imperial Homeland enriches our understanding of German identity, allowing us to see how a distant colony with diverse ecologies, peoples, and social dynamics grew into an extension of German memory and tradition. It will be of interest to German Studies scholars, particularly those interested in colonial Africa. Dr. Adam A. Blackler is an assistant professor of history at the University of Wyoming. He is a historian of modern Germany and southern Africa, whose research emphasizes the transnational dimensions of imperial occupation and settler-colonial violence in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Steven Seegel is Professor of Slavic and Eurasian Studies at The University of Texas at Austin. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/genocide-studies

Meat + Three
Unmuddling the Mojito

Meat + Three

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 27:15


In need of an end of summer refresh? Us too. Join us as we dive into the cool waters of history, which we've spiked with rum for the occasion. We'll explore the surprising chronicle of the Mojito through the past lives of its ingredients and their vital mixture. Cheers!Further Reading:Discover Rob's comprehensive guide to rum at Rob's Rum Guide.Learn about Tristan Donovan's work on Fizz and more here. Find Ian Williams's book, Rum: A Social and Sociable History of the Real Spirit of 1776 here.For more cocktail content check out Greg Benson on Back Bar or The Speakeasy.Keep Meat and Three on the air: become an HRN Member today! Go to heritageradionetwork.org/donate. Meat and Three is powered by Simplecast.

New Books in History
Adam A. Blackler, "An Imperial Homeland: Forging German Identity in Southwest Africa" (Pennsylvania State UP, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 59:55


At the turn of the twentieth century, depictions of the colonized world were prevalent throughout the German metropole. Tobacco advertisements catered to the erotic gaze of imperial enthusiasts with images of Ovaherero girls, and youth magazines allowed children to escape into "exotic domains" where their imaginations could wander freely. While racist beliefs framed such narratives, the abundance of colonial imaginaries nevertheless compelled German citizens and settlers to contemplate the world beyond Europe as a part of their daily lives. An Imperial Homeland: Forging German Identity in Southwest Africa (Pennsylvania State University Press, 2022) reorients our understanding of the relationship between imperial Germany and its empire in Southwest Africa (present-day Namibia). Colonialism had an especially significant effect on shared interpretations of the Heimat (home/homeland) ideal, a historically elusive perception that conveyed among Germans a sense of place through national peculiarities and local landmarks. Focusing on colonial encounters that took place between 1842 and 1915, Adam A. Blackler reveals how Africans confronted foreign rule and altered German national identity. As Blackler shows, once the façade of imperial fantasy gave way to colonial reality, German metropolitans and white settlers increasingly sought to fortify their presence in Africa using juridical and physical acts of violence, culminating in the first genocide of the twentieth century. Grounded in extensive archival research, An Imperial Homeland enriches our understanding of German identity, allowing us to see how a distant colony with diverse ecologies, peoples, and social dynamics grew into an extension of German memory and tradition. It will be of interest to German Studies scholars, particularly those interested in colonial Africa. Dr. Adam A. Blackler is an assistant professor of history at the University of Wyoming. He is a historian of modern Germany and southern Africa, whose research emphasizes the transnational dimensions of imperial occupation and settler-colonial violence in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Steven Seegel is Professor of Slavic and Eurasian Studies at The University of Texas at Austin. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in German Studies
Adam A. Blackler, "An Imperial Homeland: Forging German Identity in Southwest Africa" (Pennsylvania State UP, 2022)

New Books in German Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 59:55


At the turn of the twentieth century, depictions of the colonized world were prevalent throughout the German metropole. Tobacco advertisements catered to the erotic gaze of imperial enthusiasts with images of Ovaherero girls, and youth magazines allowed children to escape into "exotic domains" where their imaginations could wander freely. While racist beliefs framed such narratives, the abundance of colonial imaginaries nevertheless compelled German citizens and settlers to contemplate the world beyond Europe as a part of their daily lives. An Imperial Homeland: Forging German Identity in Southwest Africa (Pennsylvania State University Press, 2022) reorients our understanding of the relationship between imperial Germany and its empire in Southwest Africa (present-day Namibia). Colonialism had an especially significant effect on shared interpretations of the Heimat (home/homeland) ideal, a historically elusive perception that conveyed among Germans a sense of place through national peculiarities and local landmarks. Focusing on colonial encounters that took place between 1842 and 1915, Adam A. Blackler reveals how Africans confronted foreign rule and altered German national identity. As Blackler shows, once the façade of imperial fantasy gave way to colonial reality, German metropolitans and white settlers increasingly sought to fortify their presence in Africa using juridical and physical acts of violence, culminating in the first genocide of the twentieth century. Grounded in extensive archival research, An Imperial Homeland enriches our understanding of German identity, allowing us to see how a distant colony with diverse ecologies, peoples, and social dynamics grew into an extension of German memory and tradition. It will be of interest to German Studies scholars, particularly those interested in colonial Africa. Dr. Adam A. Blackler is an assistant professor of history at the University of Wyoming. He is a historian of modern Germany and southern Africa, whose research emphasizes the transnational dimensions of imperial occupation and settler-colonial violence in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Steven Seegel is Professor of Slavic and Eurasian Studies at The University of Texas at Austin. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/german-studies

New Books in African Studies
Adam A. Blackler, "An Imperial Homeland: Forging German Identity in Southwest Africa" (Pennsylvania State UP, 2022)

New Books in African Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 59:55


At the turn of the twentieth century, depictions of the colonized world were prevalent throughout the German metropole. Tobacco advertisements catered to the erotic gaze of imperial enthusiasts with images of Ovaherero girls, and youth magazines allowed children to escape into "exotic domains" where their imaginations could wander freely. While racist beliefs framed such narratives, the abundance of colonial imaginaries nevertheless compelled German citizens and settlers to contemplate the world beyond Europe as a part of their daily lives. An Imperial Homeland: Forging German Identity in Southwest Africa (Pennsylvania State University Press, 2022) reorients our understanding of the relationship between imperial Germany and its empire in Southwest Africa (present-day Namibia). Colonialism had an especially significant effect on shared interpretations of the Heimat (home/homeland) ideal, a historically elusive perception that conveyed among Germans a sense of place through national peculiarities and local landmarks. Focusing on colonial encounters that took place between 1842 and 1915, Adam A. Blackler reveals how Africans confronted foreign rule and altered German national identity. As Blackler shows, once the façade of imperial fantasy gave way to colonial reality, German metropolitans and white settlers increasingly sought to fortify their presence in Africa using juridical and physical acts of violence, culminating in the first genocide of the twentieth century. Grounded in extensive archival research, An Imperial Homeland enriches our understanding of German identity, allowing us to see how a distant colony with diverse ecologies, peoples, and social dynamics grew into an extension of German memory and tradition. It will be of interest to German Studies scholars, particularly those interested in colonial Africa. Dr. Adam A. Blackler is an assistant professor of history at the University of Wyoming. He is a historian of modern Germany and southern Africa, whose research emphasizes the transnational dimensions of imperial occupation and settler-colonial violence in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Steven Seegel is Professor of Slavic and Eurasian Studies at The University of Texas at Austin. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-studies

New Books Network
Adam A. Blackler, "An Imperial Homeland: Forging German Identity in Southwest Africa" (Pennsylvania State UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 59:55


At the turn of the twentieth century, depictions of the colonized world were prevalent throughout the German metropole. Tobacco advertisements catered to the erotic gaze of imperial enthusiasts with images of Ovaherero girls, and youth magazines allowed children to escape into "exotic domains" where their imaginations could wander freely. While racist beliefs framed such narratives, the abundance of colonial imaginaries nevertheless compelled German citizens and settlers to contemplate the world beyond Europe as a part of their daily lives. An Imperial Homeland: Forging German Identity in Southwest Africa (Pennsylvania State University Press, 2022) reorients our understanding of the relationship between imperial Germany and its empire in Southwest Africa (present-day Namibia). Colonialism had an especially significant effect on shared interpretations of the Heimat (home/homeland) ideal, a historically elusive perception that conveyed among Germans a sense of place through national peculiarities and local landmarks. Focusing on colonial encounters that took place between 1842 and 1915, Adam A. Blackler reveals how Africans confronted foreign rule and altered German national identity. As Blackler shows, once the façade of imperial fantasy gave way to colonial reality, German metropolitans and white settlers increasingly sought to fortify their presence in Africa using juridical and physical acts of violence, culminating in the first genocide of the twentieth century. Grounded in extensive archival research, An Imperial Homeland enriches our understanding of German identity, allowing us to see how a distant colony with diverse ecologies, peoples, and social dynamics grew into an extension of German memory and tradition. It will be of interest to German Studies scholars, particularly those interested in colonial Africa. Dr. Adam A. Blackler is an assistant professor of history at the University of Wyoming. He is a historian of modern Germany and southern Africa, whose research emphasizes the transnational dimensions of imperial occupation and settler-colonial violence in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Steven Seegel is Professor of Slavic and Eurasian Studies at The University of Texas at Austin. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Holistic Wealth With Keisha Blair
The Racial Wealth Gap and The Legacy of Colonialism

Holistic Wealth With Keisha Blair

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 38:58


In this exciting episode of the Holistic Wealth podcast with Keisha Blair, our special guest is Danté Stewart, we discussed the racial wealth gap and the legacy of colonialism in light of recent events such as the death of Queen Elizabeth II. We also discussed the issue of reparations (what is needed and why) and the Black Maternal Health crisis. Danté Stewart is an award-winning writer, speaker and author of Shoutin' In The Fire: An American Epistle. The Georgia Writers Association named Danté as "Georgia Writer of the Year” 2022 (Memoir); The Center for American Progress as one of "22 Faith Leaders to Watch in 2022"; and Religion News Service as one of "Ten Up-And-Coming Faith Influencers," his work has appeared in The Atlantic, New York Times, the Washington Post, TIME, ESPN's Andscape, Oxford American, Sojourners, NPR, CNN, Parents, and more. Today, Black Americans make up roughly 13% of the U.S. population but hold just 3% of the country's wealth. The median net worth of a White family in the United States in 2019 was $188,200, as compared with $24,100 for a Black family. The racial wealth gap is large, persists across income groups, and has not changed in over a century. We discussed issues such as reparations, the breadth and scope needed to really affect change as well as the history of financial barriers faced by Black people in securing vital loans. Wealth matters because it is a fundamental determinant of health. Health equity strategies that fail to address the racial wealth gap will be ineffective. In particular Black Maternal health crisis continues to persist. Tune in to listen to this episode of the Holistic Wealth podcast with Keisha Blair and special guest, Danté Stewart. Resources Mentioned In This Episode: Shoutin In The Fire: An American Epistle Holistic Wealth Expanded and Updated: 36 Life Lessons To Help You Recover From Disruption, Find Your Life Purpose and Achieve Financial Freedom. What You'll Learn in This Episode: Danté's amazing journey, as a writer, minister and Faith Leader and how spiritual self-renewal intersects with oppression and racism. The racial wealth gap and the legacy of colonialism (especially in light of the recent passing of Queen Elizabeth II). Reparations – why they are important and why they need to be holistic in nature to cater to all needs in order to properly address trauma and oppressive systems. Danté's personal story and moving essay on Parents.com on Black Maternal Health. Danté's thoughts on thriving in oppressive systems and advice on how to take care of your mental well-being. Listen to the Full Episode: --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/keisha-blair/support

Holistic Wealth Podcast With Keisha Blair
The Racial Wealth Gap and The Legacy of Colonialism

Holistic Wealth Podcast With Keisha Blair

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 38:59


Meet Our Holistic Wealth Trailblazers​ About Us Global Holistic Wealth Day Podcast Take The Quiz Behind the Consultant Program Meet … The Racial Wealth Gap and The Legacy of Colonialism Read More » The post The Racial Wealth Gap and The Legacy of Colonialism appeared first on Institute On Holistic Wealth.

Ethnically Ambiguous
We Are Never Going to Heathrow Airport

Ethnically Ambiguous

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 56:17


In episode 269, the girls are solo and recap their adventures abroad. Anna doesn't care for Heathrow Airport and talks ALL ABOUT IT. Shereen had a nice time in Vancouver but brings back all the Arab community tea. This was recorded before the Queen died so no mention of her while talking about the UK. GET INTO IT! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

CitizenCast
Ali Velshi | Don't forget: the British Empire was brutal

CitizenCast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 5:09


Citizen Board Member and MSNBC host Ali Velshi reminds us that despite the lavish trappings of the British Empire (on full display this week), we cannot forget the inhumanity it promoted around the world.

Prison Radio Audio Feed
Queen Elizabeth II and Colonialism

Prison Radio Audio Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 4:16


Schwartzy The Podcast
EP132 - The Last Of The Mohicans

Schwartzy The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 112:47


Last of the Mohicans is a classic movie. Daniel Day Lewis, Madeline Stowe, Wes Studi and Russel Means all give iconic performances along with a stellar cast, score and direction. A 1992 epic romantic drama set against the backdrop of colonial America in the 1700's with Britain and France warring in what is now known as upstate NY. As you can probably imagine it has a lot of problematic elements given the subject matter of the film and the fact that it was made in the 90s. However it is really compellingly shot and has a great deal of emotional resonance with the development of the characters and an iconic score with an excellent theme that follows the story throughout. Notably absent from the show is host and brother: Aleks who is on vacation. Instead the episode features: Milenko, Leila and Ana. Enjoy!

Today in Focus
Can the commonwealth survive the death of the queen?

Today in Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 37:43 Very Popular


The Queen's death has been marked throughout the Commonwealth with a period of official mourning. But not far below the surface lies a simmering anger among those grappling with the legacy of colonialism. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus

Interfaith Voices Podcast (hour-long version)
"Missionaries were often a part of the colonial enterprize”

Interfaith Voices Podcast (hour-long version)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 34:50


As the United Kingdom mourns the death of Queen Elizabeth II, around the globe a new generation is calling for a reckoning.

This Matters
Indigenous women reflect on the Queen and the monarchy

This Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 23:47


Guests: Angela Mashford-Pringle and Courtney Skye The death of Queen Elizabeth II last week fuelled a wave of global grief, but also reawakened memories and ignited conversation of a brutal colonial legacy and the future of the British monarchy. The monarch's 70 years on the throne have been both celebrated and questioned. Her reign included seven decades of silence for Indigenous peoples of Canada who faced treaty violations, residential schools and countless missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls. As King Charles III ascends to the throne, we speak with two Indigenous women about why the monarchy does not represent the same thing to everyone. Joining “This Matters” is Angela Mashford-Pringle, an Algonquin woman from Timiskaming First Nation, who is assistant professor and associate director at the Waakebiness-Bryce Institute for Indigenous Health, as well as Courtney Skye, a Mohawk woman (Turtle Clan) from Six Nations of the Grand River Territory who is a research fellow at Yellowhead Institute. This episode was produced by Saba Eitizaz, Paulo Marques and Brian Bradley.

Breaking the Sound Barrier by Amy Goodman
The Impacts of Colonialism Outlive the British Queen

Breaking the Sound Barrier by Amy Goodman

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022


By Amy Goodman & Denis Moynihan It has long been said that “the sun never sets on the British Empire,” referring to the United Kingdom's colonies around the globe. Will the death of Queen Elizabeth II trigger further shrinking of the empire, as former colonies now in the British Commonwealth debate whether to permanently sever ties?