Podcasts about Organizing

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  • 3,495PODCASTS
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  • May 27, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Organizing

Show all podcasts related to organizing

Latest podcast episodes about Organizing

Organize 365 Podcast
486 - Optional Organizing: Kids

Organize 365 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 36:50


We've been talking about essential organizing for the last several podcast episodes. Listen to the rest of the episodes in this series: Organizing Personal Spaces Organizing Family & Communal Spaces Organizing Storage Spaces Organizing Paper Management This week, we are transitioning to the first of two optional spaces to organize. The first space is kids. Organizing anything related to kids is optional! But, if you have kids, I really think you do need to organize the things and spaces related to them.  I've tried to organize my kids in a way that is Pinterest-worthy but let me tell you, it just doesn't work. It's not functional. I have three mindset shifts for you when it comes to organizing kids: It's good enough. Establish how long it takes to achieve good enough. Remember that organization is a learnable skill, even for your kids. In this episode, I go deeper into these three thoughts. I also break down the ages and stages of organizing kids and give you tips for each of those stages. Whether you have 0-5-year-olds, 6-12-year-olds, or teens, I have suggestions for not only organizing your kids but also teaching them how to organize themselves! What do you find hardest about organizing your kids? How are you teaching them to organize for themselves? Take the next step in organizing your kids with our Kids Program. For your teens and young adults heading out into the world, take a look at our Launching Life Skills Bundle or Launch Bundle. Also talked about in this episode:  Kids One Clip  

Luscious Hustle
420. Business & Burn out: The Energetics of Your Health and Wealth

Luscious Hustle

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 40:22


Are you lost in the day to day tasks of your business? Are your swirling in your dreams without the tangible results?  Do you have clarity on the best next action steps for your business? In this episode, Betsy details a holistic approach to business growth that honors both your masculine drive and your feminine intuition.  Luscious Hustle puts systems and strategies in place to support your business goals so you can receive and hold greater wealth (and health) without the burn out.  Organize yourself around the action you want to take.   Refining and redefining yourself as a boss. [2:20] How Betsy started out in fashion. [5:00] Business energetics and your ability to hold wealth. [6:25] Unemotional analysis of money and burnout. [8:45] Never say never…the Universe has other plans. [10:00] Growing into greater health and wealth in your business. [12:30] How divine feminine leadership changes how you show up. [15:55] The true cost of social media. [18:30] Organizing yourself for taking action in your business [21:30] How we ‘Luscious Hustled' our way to Six-figure success. [34:40]   PODCAST RESOURCES: Private Coaching with Betsy is for women who hold a big vision for their lives and business and are ready to experience true momentum & growth.  If you are ready to embrace the Divine Feminine that lives within and push your growth edges this high-touch coaching experience take you to your next income and impact goals.  CLICK HERE TO EXPLORE YOUR OPTIONS.    LUSCIOUS HUSTLE ACADEMY: The Human Design Reader Certification Course This 12-week live certification program will give you everything you need to integrate Human Design readings into your business.  Elevate your leadership, coaching, and business expertise with Human Design. Share Human Design with the highest standard of expertise. Impact in the lives of your clients, customers, team members, family and friends by understanding who they are and how they are meant to show up in the world. Monetize Human Design within your coaching offers as part of your existing or new business. Learn more about becoming a Human Design Reader HERE. 

ClutterBug Podcast - Organize, Clean and Transform your Home
Photo and Paper Organizing Advice with Darla DeMorrow

ClutterBug Podcast - Organize, Clean and Transform your Home

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 30:04


Discover the top photo and paper organizing tips and tricks from Professional Organizer and best-selling author Darla DeMorrow! 

A Slob Comes Clean
339: Breaking through the Overthinking About Your Clutter

A Slob Comes Clean

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 45:59


In today’s podcast, I answer several questions and (try to) help break through the overthinking that’s behind the questions. I’m an overthinker, too, so I get it. But breaking through my overthinking has been essential to making progress in my home. My new book: Organizing for the Rest of Us (get the flow chart here) […] The post 339: Breaking through the Overthinking About Your Clutter appeared first on Dana K. White: A Slob Comes Clean.

ProjectHR
The Golden Age of Union Organizing

ProjectHR

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 39:27


Unions are having a moment right now in the United States, a moment they haven't experienced in quite a while. Jon Hyman, an employment labor attorney, author, speaker, and blogger is here to discuss the "perfect storm" of union organizing caused by the pandemic.

Stacktrace
183: “Let's just call it MVC”

Stacktrace

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 75:31


Organizing workspaces and hobby projects, the pros and cons of view models and controllers, and rendering Core Animation layers within SwiftUI view hierarchies.

Jacobin Radio
Jacobin Radio: A Wave of Worker Organizing w/ Steven Greenhouse

Jacobin Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 61:31


Suzi talks to longtime labor reporter and author Steven Greenhouse about the exciting new moment for labor in the US. Steven says the unionizing victories at Amazon and now 81 Starbucks stores—as well as the spread of union drives to many other workplaces in retail, higher education, the media, and healthcare—signify a moment so promising for labor that we'd have to go back to the organizing in the 1930s to see anything comparable. Suzi and Ilya Matveev, of Openleft.ru and the Russian research group Public Sociology Laboratory, discuss Russia's war in Ukraine twelve weeks in. We get Ilya's analysis of the domestic situation at home, politically and economically, for the regime and for the population. While polls show widespread support for Putin's “military operation,” reports note that support for the war is tepid, not enthusiastic. Most analysts say the country is evenly divided between support and dissent regarding the war, though propaganda and penalties for speaking out influence that figure, as Putin has taken an increasingly hard line against dissent. Ilya Matveev unpacks what the polling does or doesn't show, and we get details of the impact of economic sanctions on the population, the state of industry and the economy, the divisions in the population and among the elite – and what losing the war might mean for Putin's hold on power. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Using the Whole Whale Podcast
988 National Suicide Prevention Hotline Launches This Summer (news)

Using the Whole Whale Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 19:53


NonprofitNewsFeed.com    988 National Suicide Prevention Hotline To Soon Go Live The U.S. Department of Health & Human Services is unveiling a new national emergency number for individuals experiencing a mental health crisis. The new 988 emergency number, akin to 911, will redirect to the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, which is managed by the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). The number goes live on July 16, 2022. The new number is part of a broader strategy to address the crisis of suicide in the United States. Suicide is the leading cause of death for Americans aged 10-34. The SAMHSA 988 FAQ page has important information for mental health partners including nonprofits that may publicly direct folks seeking help to this new number. Read more about how states are preparing. Read more ➝ Summary Qatar: Joint letter to Gianni Infantino regarding remedy for labour abuses | Amnesty International  ‘It's gotten even worse': Nonprofit's baby formula supply decimated by recall, shortage | KOIN.com  Vanguard Charitable Survey: More Than 1 in 3 Donors Contributed to Disaster Relief Efforts | NonProfit PRO Nonprofit opens ‘cat cafe' to highlight adoptable felines in Las Vegas           Rough Transcript [00:00:00] This week on the nonprofit news summary, we have got interesting news coming out about a new national suicide prevention hotline, 9, 8, 8, and some other summary news touching on Qatar, baby formula, and a lot more Nick. [00:00:16] It's going good, George. We had our first real summer weekend here in the city. It was 90 and sunny. [00:00:23] So we're in a, summer's almost here kind of mood, but also coming this summer is a new hotline for folks experiencing a mental health emergency. The us department of health and human services is unveiling a new national emergency number for individuals experiencing a mental health crisis. The new number will be 9, 8, 8, and justice like 9 1 1. [00:00:52] It's just those three numbers. And that 9, 8, 8 number will redirect to the national suicide prevention lifeline. That lifeline is managed by the substance abuse and mental health services administration. And the new number it goes live on July 16th, 2022. So this is happening within the next two months. [00:01:14] And the number is part of a broader strategy to address the crisis of suicide in the United States. According to the substance abuse and mental health services administration suicide is the leading cause of death for Americans, age 10 through 34. We recommend that if you're a non. That works in the mental health space or offer. [00:01:34] Beneficiaries, any kind of mental health support, or even has documentation about what number to call. It's important to note that the original national suicide prevention lifeline number will still work, but you may also want to take into account the new number that's being rolled out for organizations that might have it listed on their website and within the newsletter. [00:01:57] We've linked to the FAQ page that has some of the technical requirements, some of the branding requirements for this new rollout. But George, I think this is a really exciting move. It's a prioritization by our government and its partners to protect mental health in the United States. And what's been an extremely trying couple of years. [00:02:18] This is a cool, innovative approach, and I'm here for it. [00:02:20] It's so interesting because technically the line already existed, but I can't tell you it off the top of my head and actually in full disclosure, the national suicide prevention lifeline and the network was at former Holwell client. And with 9, 8, 8, we're talking about a larger conceptual branding, nine. [00:02:40] Everyone understands calling 9 1 1. And what that entails. There's an emergency call nine 11. The truth is the health outcomes for those suffering from mental illness. When the police are called without the proper training in hot moments, do not end well for outcomes, especially. Low-income communities and certainly with people of color, and this has been documented, unfortunately over a number of years. [00:03:07] And some of that information is also kind of in the background on this. And so I think a nationwide branding around 9, 8, 8, when it matters for a mental health related crisis. I will literally save lives. And it's interesting, you know, like it already existed, but getting that out there as wide far as possible, non-profits [00:03:27] are gonna play a huge role, a huge role in [00:03:30] making sure that all communities know what to call and why. [00:03:35] And that will ensure that people with the proper training are deployed in those moments of crisis. As opposed to showing up, you know, with a, I would say to be fair [00:03:47] to the police that do serve and protect [00:03:50] our nation and do amazing job, they can't be expected to serve in every single potential scenario to perfection. [00:03:59] So I think this is just a really great step toward how. How mental health in crisis can be, can be handled in the country. And there's a lot of work to do. And that's going live July 16th, 2022. [00:04:11] Yeah, George that's right. There is a lot of work to do. And one of the concerns is that the number actually might be overwhelmed on, on its roll out. [00:04:22] So different states are working to address this by increasing resources and leveling up those networks because the folks who respond. To those calls, it's a vast and kind of complicated network of, of people. So they're also in the article. It talks about how individual states are vamping up resources to be able to handle the new switch. [00:04:45] But I absolutely agree with you having this as a nine on 9 1, 1 outlet will be extremely important. [00:04:54] All right. I can take us into the summary. Our first story here is a press release from amnesty international, which has signed a joint letter along with other prominent human rights organizations, including human rights. Watch. The business and human rights resource center among others, which is calling on the FIFA president, Mr. [00:05:17] Gianni Infantino to work with the Qatar government trade unions, the international labor organization, the ILO and other intergovernmental actors to protect workers leading up to the Qatar FIFA world cup. This world cup has been. Shroud of controversy and accusations of human rights abuses since it was first announced under quite frankly, a cloud of a suspect of a lot of corruption. [00:05:48] Nearly 10 years ago that this would be the venue for the 2022 world cup. But this letter signed by amnesty and other NGOs is calling on FIFA to set aside nearly half a billion dollars in money to go to workers who have been exploited. And you read down the list of, of ways that these workers are exploited. [00:06:13] They're often. Kind of alert from developing countries, particularly in south and Southeast Asia. Their workers are they're held in the country without the ability to travel home. Their visas are. Taken from them by their employers. It's, it's practically indentured, indentured labor at a certain point. [00:06:36] So really, really serious human rights concerns not to mention the temperature in Qatar is astronomical during the summer. So. One of the reasons I wanted to highlight this is because I think that the international human rights community does a really good job of partnering to amplify their message. [00:06:56] And when I heard about this, I actually heard about it on all different channels. They all seem to actually post this on LinkedIn at the same time. And I saw it all at the same time. And I think it's just a cool way to leveraging partner, strip partnerships for strategic value. Here and whether FIFA will do this, who knows, probably not. [00:07:18] FIFA is notoriously one of the most corrupt international organizations that exists, but nonetheless still I think it's important to try and this is a cool cool approach here. [00:07:31] As you mentioned before, choosing Qatar, a place where it regularly hits over 120 Fahrenheit. During the summer is not a logical place for a massive world cup installation and athletes to be playing. [00:07:45] So clearly I think there's a true cost, a true cost associated with making these types of decisions. That it's great to see these non-profits calling out and saying, when you do these things, there have to be. Just fairness and consequences in the same balance here in 440 million. I know that's a, that's a lot to cover, but certainly to the scale, I'm sure that they have looked at that this second order effect of saying sure. [00:08:13] Guitar, a place that shouldn't be hosting. It doesn't have the infrastructure whatsoever. Yeah. Let's, let's host there because. That that makes sense for soccer should really receive this and a lot more scrutiny on it, especially if you're talking about these types and scales of labor abuses. [00:08:32] Absolutely. And I'll say that this community has been focusing on this issue for a long time and so much so that I wrote a capstone thesis on this very issue in college, which is quite a few years ago now. So it's horrible. You have recruiters going into small villages. In Nepal in Indonesia and other countries and offering salaries that never come to them, they get stranded in Qatar. [00:09:01] The idea is that these workers will travel abroad. They can send remittances back home. It's almost never what they're promised. Their visas are held from them. They're held there. It's, it's a disaster. And the Qatari government's done a little bit to address it, but the whole thing is a disaster. [00:09:19] And It'll be interesting to see how these narratives play out one. Everyone in the world watches the FIFA world cup. And we saw a similar kind of tension about human rights abuses and China with the Olympic games that were hosted this year. But we'll we'll, we'll see. We'll see what happens. [00:09:40] Yeah, the narrative of you're responsible for the second and third order effects. I think that touches on also, not just social justice, but environmental as well, where you have companies that have long profited off of the ability to dump excess carbon into, into the ecosystem and are, are more and more non-profits and organizations paying attention to this. [00:10:03] And I think the true cost of. Organizing and throwing an event like this on the global stage should come with a ticket and understanding that you are responsible, not for just the creation, but the second order impact of what you are, are running. But like you said, I I'm not sure how FIFA will, [00:10:23] will respond to that. [00:10:23] No, that's true. Did you know that New Jersey in New York who will be hosting the world cup in 2026? The next I'm not even [00:10:31] kidding. In 2026, that's like around the corner. [00:10:34] That's an yeah. Four years. Can you imagine New Jersey transit attempting to handle the world's cup? [00:10:41] I mean, I can't imagine guitar trying to handle the world cup and they have no infrastructure whatsoever, but I've been on Jersey transit and. [00:10:48] I love the path train as much as the next human, but I think it is, it is like one extra passenger away from breathing. So [00:10:55] not see, I don't think everyone in the tri-state area actually realizes this is happening, but that's an aside. [00:11:02] Anyway, our next story is also a little bit of a downer. This is about the shortage of baby formula. And this comes from K O I N, CBS six local affiliate out of Oregon. And it talks about how nonprofits that have worked to, to distribute BB form. In which we're in the midst of a massive shortage now are kind of stepping in to fill the gap. [00:11:29] And it talks about some rules that have been changed that allow folks, low income folks who are able to receive formula. Now, the type of formula they can receive has been broadened. And throughout this whole crisis, it turns out there's only like four or five companies that produce. The overwhelming majority of baby formula in the country and seems to just be this kind of. [00:11:53] Collection of mismanagement and miss regulation. That's made the industry so vulnerable to now a shortage of supply, but this is kind of crazy that there is a shortage of baby formula. And even throughout the pandemic, we've had, you know, people bought everything from grocery stores and toilet paper, but that wasn't really. [00:12:17] Like how serious a problem was that really this is a real problem and it disproportionately affects lower income folks. [00:12:24] Yeah. And the article goes on to say, you're trying to do your best. This is a quote, trying to do your best. And gas is also $5 a gallon. You have to drive to six stores to get formula. [00:12:33] And it is so hard. This is the executive director, Mara white of mother-in-law. If you're middle-class American, you can find formula, but when you are low income, you have significant barriers to get formula. And it's absolutely trying. And, you know, speaking as a parent, you know, when you're dealing with an infant, you'd be like there's. [00:12:48] And there's one thing that they can consume is calories like that is your entire life's mission to, to feed that child. So it is unbelievable that a country with our resources has allowed it to get to this level of desperation. I know we are always fighting on many fronts. Feeding infants in the most prosperous country in the world should not be something that has headlined and led by nonprofits to say, Hey, this is a [00:13:13] major. [00:13:14] I absolutely agree. All right. Our next story goes a little bit in a different turn. And this comes from nonprofit pro.com and it releases the results of a band guard, charitable survey, which says that more than one in three. Donor's contributed to disaster relief efforts. So the data here shows that one in three, approximately 37% of Americans who are donors who donated money to a charitable bowl organization did so to an organization that worked in disaster. [00:13:49] Whether that was an org helping out in Ukraine with the humanitarian crisis, there COVID-19 relief or relief in the wake of other natural disasters like wildfires and other crises. This is interesting and something we like to keep an eye on trends and giving and something. We talk about a lot on this podcast is surges of giving an attention around tent pole moments like Afghanistan like Ukraine. [00:14:20] But I think it shows here that those moments, even if they are brief, even if the attention runs out can still make up a very large percentage of. [00:14:30] Yeah, I am. I'm always trying to look at this. We make this point every time compassion is an unstable emotion that is able to be capitalized. That is a quote from Susan Sontag. And so those peaks happen incredibly quickly. Usually around you were to [00:14:45] receive [00:14:46] about three weeks from trough to trough, call it trough peak trough. [00:14:52] Interestingly in this report, though, one of my thoughts is like, oh, is this disaster style of giving actually reducing, overall giving or creating this sort of power law dynamic to an extreme where a handful of charities that happened to be in the line of a disaster, get the funding and the rest. [00:15:10] Yet very [00:15:12] little the quote here is donors who gave to disaster relief and other charities donated 48% more in the 12 trailing months. [00:15:21] Then those donors who did not give to a disaster relief effort, 1800 on average versus 1200 on average. So it's interesting that it seems to be when people are giving to disasters. It's in addition to a normal giving pattern instead, instead of. [00:15:37] Yeah, I agree. And I guess that's, that's a good thing. But yeah, we have this article linked from our newsletter which you can also find in the show notes of this podcast. And there's lots of interesting stats in here, so we recommend that you check it out. Alright, George, how about a feel? Good story. [00:15:55] All right. What do you have for us? This comes from Fox five vegas.com and it is about a nonprofit. That's opened a cat cafe to highlight adoptable felines in Las Vegas. So patrons campaign entry, donation of $15, which gives them the chance to enjoy the snacks, a beverage, and a cafe full of kittens for approximately an hour. [00:16:20] And the nonprofit hearts alive village. Says that the entry fee helps cover costs for a cat or kitten to receive a full set of vaccines and the microchip. And at the end of your experience, if you wants to donate a kitten, you have that opportunity [00:16:38] donate a kitten or donate to support a kitten. [00:16:41] You can, the donation goes to support a kitten. [00:16:44] You can adopt the kit. Yeah. I feel [00:16:47] like you want to take creating a bigger problem if it's like we're accepting kitten donations. [00:16:51] That's, that's a, that's a different kind of a different kind of program. You caught me there, but this is cool. Have you ever been to a cat cafe? I [00:17:00] have walked by a cat cafe and I've seen them. [00:17:04] I know they like launched as something curious, you know, I think over a decade ago at this point, I like this because it is clearly an organization that had a particular, you know, problem, social issue of trying to get more cats adopted and sort of the way they're going about it could be in a for-profit manner. [00:17:24] As in they have a revenue generating hypothetically, you know, opportunity to sell coffee and bring people in. And I think this type of solution makes me. Happy whenever I see it, even if it doesn't succeed, that it's being tried is very clever and can lead to a lot of other, you know, potentially good ideas for other local shelters that say, all right, we have, you know, these assets. [00:17:50] And then is there something adjacent to what we do that could bring in foot traffic driven, bring in revenue and, and serve our social impact [00:17:57] bottom line as well? Absolutely. Sounds all sorts of sustainable to me. [00:18:02] All right, Nick. Thanks for that. And see you next week. [00:18:06] See you next week. Thanks George.

The Neighbor Next Door
Lindsay Ford: The Efficacy of Relational Organizing

The Neighbor Next Door

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 24:50


"It's time to start thinking about the upcoming election season!" At least, that's what Lindsay Ford says, the guest on The Neighboring Movement Podcast for this week. Lindsay is a friend and the leader of an awesome organization that we partner with out of Kansas City, Kansas - The Voter Network. In this episode, Lindsay shares with us the deep power of doing voter engagement work through the lens of relational organizing."Relational organizing?", you might ask. Relational organizing! It's the amazing way in which the work of our nonprofits intersect. In short, relational organizing is a fancy term for getting things done through the power of your pre-existing network of relationships. In the voting world, this looks like encouraging your family, friends, and neighbors to vote - the idea being that they are way more likely to do so if someone they know is encouraging them to, rather than a complete stranger. This is the work of The Voter Network, an arm of The Mainstream Coalition, where Lindsay is Associate Director. Tune in to the episode to hear more about this work...and maybe get intrigued enough to take part in it!To learn more about the work of The Voter Network, visit their website here. And, for any Kansans out there listening, to join our Neighboring Movement team on Voter To Voter, click here!

Swine.It
#146 - Mindsets and preparation for entering the veterinary industry - an expert's perspective - Dr. Sue Burlatschenko

Swine.It

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 33:45


Any industry expert knows how nerve-racking it can be to start your first job after graduate school or veterinary school. Everyone expects you to be an expert and have all the answers, but there are some things you are definitely still learning. Dr. Sue Burlatschenko knows that feeling because she felt it herself when she first started out. Now after owning her own practice for several decades she reflects and shares her advice with Dr. Greiner about ways to overcome that stress and learn to be an industry leader yourself. "

Pulling Curls Podcast: Pregnancy & Parenting Untangled
Organizing For an Easy Summer with Julie from The Mom Survival Guide -- Episode 142

Pulling Curls Podcast: Pregnancy & Parenting Untangled

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 11:23


Let's get ORGANIZED to have a great summer. A bit of preparation in advance can totally set your family up for a fun stress-free summer! Today's guest is Julie from The Mom Survival Guide. Julie has been doing more than just "surviving" motherhood for the last 15 years, she has been thriving as a stay at home mom. So to help other moms bypass the learning curve, she created The Mom Survival Guide Website to share what she has learned with moms who are just starting out. Her main focus is home management because she believes that with less mess comes less stress and more freedom to do the fun things in life. Check out her Declutter Checklist - https://themomsurvivalguide.com/declutter-checklist/ Big thanks to our sponsor The Organized Home it's amazing how just some simple organizing systems can make life SO much easier. Get started today! In this episode Making a bucket list Switching out seasonal items Decluttering Switching out toys for younger children Other things that might interest you Julie's Post: Get out the door faster with kid, Julie's Post: 30 Ideas for a Staycation Julie's Post: 84 Free Kid Activities Previous episode on moms having fun for summer Summer reading bingo Producer: Drew Erickson

Straight White American Jesus
A Sex Educator and Abortion Care Provider on Organizing and Fighting Back

Straight White American Jesus

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 36:30


Brad speaks with sex educator Erica Smith about her experiences working in abortion care and what the overturning of Roe looks like on the ground for ordinary Americans. They discuss how and why abortion is healthcare and the health risks involved for pregnant people if abortions are not accessible. They also discuss how the misguided approaches to sex education in this country lead to reductive conversations about pregnancy, abortion, and reproductive rights. They finish by discussing ways to get involved in the fight for reproductive rights at a time when organizing and activism are as important as ever. National Network of Abortion Funds: https://abortionfunds.org/ For access to the full Orange Wave series, click here: https://irreverent.supportingcast.fm/products/the-orange-wave-a-history-of-the-religious-right-since-1960 Seminar: straightwhiteamericanjesus.com/seminars To Donate: https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/BradleyOnishi For an ad-free experience and to support SWAJ: https://irreverent.supportingcast.fm/straight-white-american-jesus-premium To become a patron: https://www.patreon.com/straightwhiteamericanjesus Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://swaj.supportingcast.fm

Extra Spicy
The Youth Movement Behind Starbucks Organizing

Extra Spicy

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 32:46


At Starbucks locations across the country, workers are unionizing. Dozens of stores have joined the union, and many more are scheduled to vote soon. One of those is in Mill Valley, California, where high school junior Ella Clark is leading the efforts to organize. Ella joins host Soleil Ho to talk about holding Starbucks accountable to its values, then UC Berkeley Center for Labor Research and Education chair Ken Jacobs explains why the wave of Starbucks unionization is spreading — and why it's unlikely to end anytime soon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Golden Hour Drip with Logan Lee Miller
Cereal Before Milk? | evening routine, organizing reset + focusing on daily self-care

Golden Hour Drip with Logan Lee Miller

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 59:56


Episode 169: YIKES. How the heck did I not realize I had posting troubles last week!! Lucky for you, it's now a double episode this week. My bad b, In this episode, you can expect a weekend catch-up, my self-care routine, and me crying in public. Enjoy. Don't Forget to Share & Give a 5 Star Rating!!LOGAN'S TIKTOK

School Sucks: Higher Education For Self-Liberation
5. How Schools Crush Creativity and Critical Thinking

School Sucks: Higher Education For Self-Liberation

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 66:59


The Essential School Sucks, #5 of 50 Theme One: The Real Problems With Public School Dr. Peter Gray was a research professor of psychology at Boston College, and author of Free to Learn: Why Unleashing the Instinct to Play Will Make Our Children Happier, More Self-Reliant, and Better Students for Life (https://amzn.to/3sJOtcu). Peter serves on the Organizing team for the Alliance of Self-Directed-Education. He also runs a blog on Psychology Today called Freedom to Learn, where he regularly explains and promotes self-directed education from a variety of angles. Today Peter and I discuss creativity and critical thinking - two skills we agree are left underdeveloped (or even damaged) by public school and college. On critical thinking, Peter has referenced studies and surveys that reveal about 50% of employers are dissatisfied with entry-level, college graduate employees (PayScale Inc.) and that college does little to improve higher level thinking (Academically Adrift: Limited Learning On College Campuses - 2011). On creativity, Peter wrote a piece called As Children's Freedom Has Declined, So Has Their Creativity. Peter informs us that there are actually quantitative studies, including the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking, that show a marked decline in children's creative capacity since the 1980s. We discuss the causes of this decline in detail. We finish with a friendly disagreement (then agreement) on the educational merits of video games. In part one we discussed the biological foundations of self-education. LISTEN HERE (https://www.patreon.com/posts/podcast-542-gray-16951940) In part three we'll talk about Peter's vision for self-directed education in the future. LISTEN HERE (https://www.podomatic.com/podcasts/schoolsucks/episodes/2018-02-16T07_45_51-08_00) Our Partners https://files.fireside.fm/file/fireside-uploads/images/b/b9f98e30-82d3-4781-8400-880c6dc8086f/2gtm0QVk.png Visit Praxis (https://discoverpraxis.com/schoolsuckspodcast/) Please Support School Sucks School Sucks was one of the longest running liberty-minded podcasts on the web, and the only one completely devoted to the issue of education (versus public school and college). Your support keeps the show alive, which keeps us at the top of the options for education podcasts and leads to new people discovering our work. Please help us continue to spread this important message further! One-Time Donation Options:Paypal/Venmo;Donate DASHDonate ETHEREUMDonate LITECOINDonate BITCOINDonate BITCOIN CASHDonate ZCASH Recurring Options: Support Us On PATREONYou support our mission, and you want to help us continue to reach new people with our message and media. Your contribution helps us maintain presence, and to further build the legacy of School Sucks Project. And please bookmark and use this link for your Amazon shopping: Shop With Us Our Private Community: https://files.fireside.fm/file/fireside-uploads/images/b/b9f98e30-82d3-4781-8400-880c6dc8086f/fNnDUPqb.png Visit The Uni-iversity (https://sspuniversity.com/) Originally Released February 13, 2018 As "[PODCAST #543] Peter Gray (Part Two) – School's Impact On Creativity and Critical Thinking"

The Doctor of Digital™ GMick Smith, PhD
How Do I Design Spice Catalyst? David Fradin Interview Episode #CCLV The Doctor of Digital™ GMick Smith, PhD

The Doctor of Digital™ GMick Smith, PhD

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 16:16


David Fradin Product Success Manager, President, Spice Catalyst, Distinguished ProfessorDavid has trained thousands of managers throughout the world. He infuses his workshops with insights and experiences gained as a product leader at companies like Apple & HP. He was classically trained as an HP Product Manager and was then recruited by Apple to bring the first hard disk drive on a PC to market. As a result of his leadership & management skills, Apple promoted him first to Apple /// Group Product Manager & later Business Unit Manager at the same organizational level at that time as Steve Jobs. Based upon his over 50 years of experience, Fradin is the author of the Wiley Book "Successful Product Design and Management Toolkit", "Building Insanely Great Products" and "Organizing and Managing Insanely Great Products" all available on Amazon worldwide.He is a Distinguished Professor of Practice and Advisor, Product Management Programs, WileyNXT, Faculty, IIML-Wiley Data-Driven Product Management Program. This Executive Education 7 month program has hundreds of students each year.His on-line courses & in-person boot camps are based on his Amazon book “Building Insanely Great Products” (Go to http://amzn.to/2gLxVcI). They cover the complete product management life cycle starting with the founding values, vision, product life cycle & management employed by Apple today.What students will learn from Mr. Fradin is exactly what has made Apple the most valuable company in the world. ⇒ Check out the product management and product marketing on-line courses & in-person workshops below.⇒ ⇒ I would love to connect with you here on LinkedIn, & am always just a phone call away if there's anything I can help. dave@spicecatalyst.comDavid Fradin has over 50 years of product management, product marketing management and senior management, experience. Over the years, he has been responsible for 75+ products representing over $250M in revenue (actual $).After founding the University of Michigan Flyers, a flying club that has trained over 4,000 pilots since 1969, he started the Federation of Americans Supporting Science and Technology (FASST) in 1970 which grew to over 15,000 student members on 40 campuses. One of the world's first environmental mediators, a White House Fellows finalist, he resolved major disputes and pioneered the concepts of total resource jobs just before Hewlett-Packard recruited him to handle their new facility sitings, energy policy and PR for HP co-founder and COB Board David Packard.Mick Smith, Consultant M: (619) 227.3118 E: mick.smith@wsiworld.com Commercials Voice Talent:https://www.spreaker.com/user/7768747/track-1-commercials Narratives Voice Talent:https://www.spreaker.com/user/7768747/track-2-narrativesDo you want a free competitive analysis? Let me know at:https://marketing.wsiworld.com/free-competitive-analysis?utm_campaign=Mick_Smith_Podcast&utm_source=SpreakerWebsite:https://www.wsiworld.com/mick-smithLinkedIn:https://www.linkedin.com/company/wsi-smith-consulting/Twitter:gmicksmithFacebook business page:The Doctor of Digital Podcast Instagram:mick_wsi_world & burningamericaMake an appointment:https://app.hubspot.com/meetings/mick-smithBe sure to subscribe, like, & review The Doctor of Digital™ Podcast:https://www.spreaker.com/show/g-mick-smith-phds-tracksSign up for the Doctor Up A Podcast course:https://doctor-up-a-podcast.thinkific.com/Fan of the show? Support the episodes here:https://podinbox.com/thedoctorofdigitalpodcastPatreon:https://www.patreon.com/SmithConsultingWSITheDoctorofDigitalPodcastMick Smith, Consultant M: (619) 227.3118Author of Burning America: In the Best Interest of the Children? burning-america.com burningamerica on Instagram

The Sherman & Tingle Show
Inna From "Rock of Love" is Organizing Relief for Ukraine

The Sherman & Tingle Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 5:22


The Sherman & Tingle Show - WDRV-FM Chicago

Tanked! with Roz & MF
37 War Stories

Tanked! with Roz & MF

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 26:16


Playwright Marthe Rachel Gold and director Christina Roussos join Johnny to discuss WAR STORIES, the final show of the Homecoming season. 

Organize 365 Podcast
485 - Organizing Paper Management

Organize 365 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 32:32


In this podcast series, we've been talking about essential organizing. You can catch up on this series by listening to these episodes: Organizing Personal Spaces Organizing Family & Communal Spaces Organizing Storage Spaces This week, we are moving to organizing your paper management in our quest for functional organization in your home. You know how much I love to talk about paper organization! People are FINALLY coming around to the fact that paper is not going away, and it needs to be organized. You could organize your paper first or last, and you could also choose to only organize portions of your paper.  We found in our research study that 54% of people have piles of paper everywhere. Only 18% of people have a system in place for organizing that paper. In addition, 70% of Millenials perceive a reduction in stress when their paper is organized. You see, we all have paper. You could have less paper, but you're never going to be paperless.  Paper is different than other areas of your home. It's different because 85% of what you store in your filing cabinet you will NEVER need again. The remaining 15% is paper that you do need and you need to be able to find it when you go looking for it. You only go looking for these important papers when there's a problem. Binders are the solution! Trust me, your future self in crisis will thank you when you have your paper organized and can find what you need. But here's the other problem you will run into with paper: Only about 20% of what I suggest that you put into your binders is actually in your filing cabinet or it is actually paper at all. The other 80% of what needs to be in your binders is either on the computer where only you know how to find it or it is stored in your brain. If something happens to you, how does anyone else take care of anything in your home or for your family? In this episode, you'll find encouragement for why and how to get your paper organized. Are your papers organized? What is keeping you from organizing your paper? Mentioned in this episode: Podcast #420 - The Weight of Paper Paper Organizing Retreats The Paper Solution® Binders

Central Coast Voices
Organizing family councils in long-term care facilities

Central Coast Voices

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 59:07


Join host Fred Munroe as he speaks with guests Linda Beck, Staff Ombudsman with the Long Term Care Ombudsman Services of San Luis Obispo County, Kathryn Cherkas, Director of Care & Support with the Alzheimer's Association, and Jenny Molinar, Geriatric Care Manager with Guided Aging. They will discuss their work to establish Family Councils for family and friends of long-term care residents.You are invited to listen, learn and participate in the conversation, between 1-2 pm. Call in and be part of the discussion at (805) 549-8855 or email questions to voices@kcbx.org.Broadcast date: 5/19/22Central Coast Voices is sponsored by ACTION for Healthy Communities in collaboration with KCBX and made possible through underwriting by Joan Gellert-Sargen.

Millennials Are Killing Capitalism
"The Research Arm of the Movement" - Abdul Alkalimat on The History of Black Studies

Millennials Are Killing Capitalism

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 114:55


Abdul Alkalimat is a founder of the field of Black Studies and Professor Emeritus at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign. A lifelong scholar-activist with a PhD from the University of Chicago, he has lectured, taught and directed academic programs across the US, the Caribbean, Africa, Europe and China. His activism extends from having been chair of the Chicago chapter of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) in the 1960s, to a co-founder of the Black Radical Congress in 1998. This conversation is framed around his recent book The History of Black Studies. Alkalimat shares some of his background, and his experiences with the struggles for Black Studies in the 1960's. We also talk about his role in the founding of the Institute of the Black World. In discussing Black Studies, we ask Dr. Alkalimat about the ideological strains that make it up, the origins of it as an academic discipline, and what Black Studies looked like before it was allowed into the academy and how it continues to look outside of the academy. A focus in this conversation is a discussion about social movements and the type of knowledge that is examined within them and the type of knowledge that is produced by them. Within this, we get into discussion about the role of cadre development and mass political education in social movements, and the role that Alkalimat thinks Black Studies can and should still play for these struggles.  We close with some discussion of the work Dr. Alkalimat is currently doing with the Southern Workers Assembly to organize the South.  In the show notes, we'll include links to several of the resources Abdul Alkalimat talks about in the episode. Thank you again to all of the folks who continue to support us on patreon. If you want to support our work our greatest need right now is for patrons who support on a monthly basis, you can do that for as little as $1 a month. And if you don't want the monthly payment, you can also make a yearly contribution. You can find our patreon at patreon.com/millennialsarekillingcapitalism. Now here is our conversation with Abdul Alkalimat on The History of Black Studies. Links: The History of Black Studies The Future of Black Studies (forthcoming) Abdul Alkalimat's website & weekly listserv Southern Workers Assembly The Wall of Respect New Philadelphia  The cited conversation with Africa World Now Project

Revolutions Per Minute - Radio from the New York City Democratic Socialists of America

Amazon Labor Union scored a big victory for the labor movement last month when organized workers overwhelmingly won an NLRB election at a Staten Island Amazon facility. Yet most of Amazon and the private sector in general remains unorganized. Despite a valiant effort, ALU's next attempt at a different Amazon facility failed. What is to be done? Brian, a former Amazon worker and member of DSA Labor's logistics committee, joins us to discuss organizing at Amazon and the state of the labor movement.

A Slob Comes Clean
338: Real Progress in a Hoarding Situation Podcast

A Slob Comes Clean

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 68:51


I love this episode and my guest’s incredible honesty. My guest today is a mental health professional and is working on her own home. I think you’ll find her insights to be incredibly helpful no matter your situation. My books Join us over on Patreon to support the show.    Sponsors: To get the Simply […] The post 338: Real Progress in a Hoarding Situation Podcast appeared first on Dana K. White: A Slob Comes Clean.

Objections: With Adam Klasfeld
Meet the Woman Organizing Nearly 70 AGs and DAs Who Won't Prosecute Abortion Cases if Roe Is Overturned (Feat. Miriam Krinsky)

Objections: With Adam Klasfeld

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 22:09


By the count of some advocacy groups, more than half of U.S. states will likely ban abortion if Roe v. Wade is stricken down, and 12 of those already have such laws on the books—just waiting for a Supreme Court ruling to activate them."If in fact we see our highest court in the land wipe away 50 years of settled precedent and deem Roe v. Wade to be 'egregiously wrong,' the balance is going to shift to the state courts," Miriam Krinsky, the executive director of the advocacy group Fair and Just Prosecution, observed on the latest episode of Law&Crime's podcast "Objections: with Adam Klasfeld."A longtime former prosecutor, Krinsky has been gathering dozens of elected district attorneys and attorneys general from coast to coast who have vowed not to enforce any laws criminalizing abortion. That list, by her organization's count, has grown to nearly 70 elected prosecutors to date."I think we're going to see elected local prosecutors become the last line of defense in many instances, and seeking to use their settled discretion to protect these kinds of decisions—and refuse to bring them into the criminal legal system," Krinsky said.In this episode, Krinsky describes organizing elected DAs and describes how state courts will become key battlegrounds if the leaked draft Supreme Court opinion overturn Roe resembles its final form.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

WLEI - Lean Enterprise Institute's Podcast
Handling the Heat of the Kitchen: A WLEI Podcast

WLEI - Lean Enterprise Institute's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 11:34


Organizing a restaurant kitchen is a daunting task to think about. Find and establish the problems at hand, implement an improved process to adhere to those problems. It all lends itself towards increased profitability, more respect for the workers with emphasis on value-creating work, increased tact-time; but its also much easier said than done. A flagship restaurant worked with LEI coaches and learned to increase their profitability through the lens of storytelling, where each piece is an innate - and respected - part of the whole. Listen in to hear how this all came together, and also check out the case study complementing this podcast. 

Dial H For Heroclix
Dial H for Heroclix - Organizing events with the Stadiums Alex Morse

Dial H For Heroclix

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 92:35


Welcome to Dial H for Heroclix! We are a podcast that covers news, figures, plays games and just jokes around within the world of Heroclix.  If this is your first episode or you are just getting into heroclix check out our new player episode: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Se_hS5XiPpU Join Kalder and Simeon this week as we:  1. Talk news: Nats, Avengers Forever! 2. Talk with Alex about his stores events starting in June 3. Play Bad Samaritan Don't forget to tweet in, email us or just message us on Facebook any time you have a question. We love to hear from you guys. Follow the links Below!  Links: Podbean: https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-haeyb-728a02/  Twitter: @DialH4Heroclix  Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/dialhforheroclix/  iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/dial-h-for-heroclix/id674235883?mt=2&ign-mpt=uo%3d2  Email: dialHforHeroclix@gmail.com   Red Bubble: https://www.redbubble.com/people/DialH4Heroclix/shop?asc=u&ref=account-nav-dropdown  Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRFVQVhJX6evub-SvQyLtMg   Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=9331164 Sponsor: https://www.coolstuffinc.com

The Real News Podcast
‘Twerking-class heroes': LA strippers are fighting for a union

The Real News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 55:09


On March 18, dancers working at the Star Garden Topless Dive Bar in North Hollywood, California, presented a petition to the owners of the club “demanding an end to retaliatory firings and bad club policies that put their safety at risk.” The next day, dancers were locked out of their jobs and told they could only meet with management individually, not as a group. In response, the workers have turned the lockout into a picket and a unionization drive that could have major implications for workers in strip clubs around the country. TRNN Editor-in-Chief Maximillian Alvarez speaks with Reagan, one of the dancers at Star Garden who was unjustly fired and who is fighting alongside her coworkers to unionize with Strippers United.Read the transcript of this interview: https://therealnews.com/twerking-class-heroes-la-strippers-are-fighting-for-a-unionPre-Production/Studio: Maximillian AlvarezPost-Production: Cameron GranadinoHelp us continue producing radically independent news and in-depth analysis by following us and becoming a monthly sustainer: Donate: https://therealnews.com/donate-podSign up for our newsletter: https://therealnews.com/newsletter-podLike us on Facebook: https://facebook.com/therealnewsFollow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/therealnews

WOMANIFESTER
#103 Money Magic - How to raise your vibe around money

WOMANIFESTER

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 23:27


Money is energy. How you relate to money determines your experience with it. How you feel about money & what you believe about money will create your human experience around money. So often I see that money is one thing that will prevent lightworkers, healers, coaches, mentors, teachers, yoga instructors and reiki healers from going full time in their business. Their money blocks are preventing them from shining their light into the world and holding them back from living the life of freedom that they desire. In this episode, I share 5 juicy tips on how to raise your vibe around money and heal your relationship with money. P.S. Applications for my signature group mentorship program, Full-Time Healer, are NOW OPEN! You can apply >HERE< When you apply, you will receive a gift from me in your inbox that includes a downloadable audio file of my Manifestation Mantras for Full-Time Healers. Send me a DM on IG or send an email to katie@womanifester.com with any questions you have. P.S.S. I am hosting 1 more Somatic Healing Journeys this month (May 2022)! These Journeys are exclusively for people on my email list. Click >HERE< to find the dates for upcoming Journeys and join the email list to get your invite to register! Inside This Episode: 01:55 My relationship with money before I became an entrepreneur 02:47 The action steps that I took to begin healing my relationship with money 03:33 Tip #1: Start tracking where you're spending your money 05:01 How I track my spending 06:03 Tip #2: Start organizing your money 07:04 Organizing your money tells your subconscious mind what is important to you and your money 08:02 How I organize my money with savings buckets 10:09 Tip #3: Keep your energy and your vibe around your wallet clear 12:05 Tip #4: Practice a word diet 12:54 3 words you need to cut out of your vocabulary right now 15:26 Tip #5: Schedule “money dates” on a regular basis 16:11 How I make my money dates exciting and rewarding Resources: Learn more about my financial coach - Mandyy Thomas https://mandyythomas.com/ Join my Trauma-Informed Breathwork Facilitator Waitlist www.womanifester.com/healer Find out more about Full-Time Healer and apply! www.womanifester.com/full-time-healer Join my email list where you will never miss an episode and be invited to join my Somatic Healing Journeys! https://womanifester.kartra.com/page/womanifester-optin Missed my last episode? Listen here: How to Use Manifestation Mantras to Call In Your Desires with Ease https://womanifester.com/podcast/episode-102-manifestation-mantras

PRIMO NUTMEG
#270: Organizing Against the Student Loan Crisis w/ Luci & the Banks Sisters

PRIMO NUTMEG

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 65:08


In this hour-long discussion, I am joined by Luci of Blue Moon Red Wine, as well as Courtney & Keisha Banks to discuss the student loan debt crisis, whether or not President Joe Biden refusing to forgive all student loan debt may crash the economy, why student loans should be discharged in bankruptcy proceedings, the cooptation of student debt organizations, and how they plan to use a campout event this Labor Day to bring grassroots activists together.If you have action ideas regarding the student debt crisis or anything else, tweet at us: @bmrwshow @oneofthesekeis1 or @courtneybanksor email  infochangecamp@gmail.comStudent Debt Boycott Marathon on Indie News Network:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9d5aRjsn1xQCamp Dada:https://twitter.com/infochangecampinfochangecamp@gmail.comhttps://givebutter.com/campdadafundHow Chile Overcame the Student Debt Crisis:https://bmrw.substack.com/p/coming-soon?s=wCheck out the Bank Sisters for Future Actions:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQKe2zhkBMoLYVC6UIeRj7gFor Daily Actions on Student Debt, including calling your reps for the return of bankruptcy rights:https://studentloanjustice.org/index.htmlSupport the show

PetiteStacy ASMR
ASMR Organizing My Work Bag

PetiteStacy ASMR

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 23:18


Let's organize my work bag together.

The Common Justice Podcast
Solutions to Violence with Jason Davis

The Common Justice Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 38:15


On this very special episode of the Common Justice podcast, our VP of Policy and Organizing, Kira Shepherd interviews Jason Davis of Reimagining Justice in a series called Solutions to Violence, based off of our report, "Solutions to Violence: Creating Safety without Prisons or Police." Born and raised in Harlem, Jason Davis is an African American Author, Poet, Inspirational Speaker, and Parent Consultant on youth self-inflicted injuries. Jason is the co-founder of Reimagining Justice. Located in Paterson, New Jersey, Reimagining Justice engages in transformative mentoring throughout the country by speaking with youth and other community stakeholders to help them learn the empathy and understanding needed to navigate conflict in healthy ways, as well as to help youth heal from the mental and physical impacts of gun violence.

The Conservative Circus w/ James T. Harris
Merissa Hamilton from Freedom Works discusses the new organizing center in AZ and the ongoing fight for the return to freedom.

The Conservative Circus w/ James T. Harris

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 4:47


Freedom Works has a new organizing center in Arizona and they are here to help restore freedom to the citizens of Arizona.

The Great Battlefield
Building a New Software and Data Hub for Organizing with Evan Burfield of Helm

The Great Battlefield

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 97:22


Evan Burfield joins The Great Battlefield podcast to talk about his career as an entrepreneur, investor and author. And his work co-founding Helm, where with co-founder Emma Bloomberg, he has 90 people working to provide pro-democracy organizers and education and other advocates and activists with data, tools and software.

Union City Radio
Union City Radio Organizing Starbucks joyfully

Union City Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 2:14


Longtime organizer Richard Bensinger learns from young workers organizing at Starbucks.    Today's labor quote: Buffalo barista Lexie. Today's labor history: A. Philip Randolph dies.     @wpfwdc #1u #unions #LaborRadioPod @AFLCIO #UnionsWork #1u #UnionStrong #Solidarity @va_labor @starbucksunion @Starbucks Proud founding member of the Labor Radio Podcast Network.

Modern Day Marketer
Organizing around board meetings and how to sort through stakeholder feedback

Modern Day Marketer

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 23:42


After a recent board meeting, Jonathan sorts through feedback from stakeholders and explains how he plans and organizes for these important meetings. Jonathan tells Brett that that receiving, filtering, and incorporating feedback is an essential part of being a CEO. It's not always easy, but a great leader makes their team feel heard and is able to clearly communicate priorities. 0:00 Intro 0:54 Conversation with JG 2:42 Board meeting 5:40 Managing and filtering feedback 8:56 Prioritizing feedback 12:00 Communicating 16:11 Exploring ideas that aren't action items 17:42 Fundraising 20:45 Communicating back to team 23:10 Outro Join the Creator Pages waitlistJoin The JuiceSign up for The Blend (weekly newsletter from The Juice)Follow The Juice:| Website | Blog | Twitter | LinkedInFollow Jonathan:| Twitter | LinkedInFollow Brett:| Twitter | LinkedIn  

Coco Caliente
EP141: Favorite Numbers, Groceries & Budgeting

Coco Caliente

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 44:40


A mother & daughter production! Today we discuss how many meatballs we take when we make our plate (LOL), grocery prices, grocery shopping, and budgeting! Enjoy this sporadic episode of Coco Caliente! Get 15% off plus free shipping on your first order at https://gladskin.com/coco More podcasts at WAVE: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/artist/wave-podcast-network/1437831426

Clean With Me
Season 2 Episode 58 Clean your whole house while we talk about organizing

Clean With Me

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 53:34


I walk you through cleaning your house step-by-step while we talk about organizing our house and the struggles of keeping your house clean With a busy lifestyle https://www.patreon.com/join/Cleanwithme?

Labor History Today
Blood, guts, and organizing

Labor History Today

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 61:16


On the brand-new Ironworkers Rising podcast, hosts Anna Woodbury and Ron Gray talk with Rich Rowe and Charlie McCollester, iron workers who got bitten by the labor history bug. Drawing on Rich and Charlie's extensive experience and knowledge as educators, historians and activists, they discuss historical events such as the Haymarket Square Massacre, the Homestead Strike and more. On Labor History in 2:00: The year was 1942. The labor movement lost one of its prolific voices. T Bone Slim was born Matti Valentinpoika Huhta in Ashtabula Ohio. Questions, comments or suggestions welcome, and to find out how you can be a part of Labor History Today, email us at LaborHistoryToday@gmail.com Labor History Today is produced by Union City Radio and the Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and the Working Poor. Hosted and produced by Chris Garlock.  #LaborRadioPod #History #WorkingClass #ClassStruggle @GeorgetownKILWP #LaborHistory @UMDMLA @ILLaborHistory @AFLCIO @StrikeHistory #LaborHistory @IWOrganizing

MBCC Sermons
Equipped Episode 34 - Organizing One Drawer at a Time with Ashley Murray & Meredith Telfair - Equipped Podcast

MBCC Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 36:59


Message from MBCC Women on May 15, 2022

Redeye
San Francisco passes legislation giving tenants right to organize

Redeye

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 12:09


San Francisco has passed a law that requires landlords to bargain with renters who want to organize. The Veritas Tenants Association, whose members live in housing owned by one of the biggest private residential landlords in the city, started a rent strike in Sept 2021. The law was passed after the landlord refused to meet and negotiate with the tenants association. Lenea Maibaum is an organizer at Housing Rights Committee of San Francisco and a member of the Veritas Tenants Association.

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast
The Smart Warehouse With Dan Gilmore

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 64:35


Want to know how you can deploy a smart warehouse for your business? Today's guest is Dan Gilmore of Softeon, a company that provides a full suite of flexible and robust end-to-end supply chain software solutions to deliver success. He joins Joe Lynch to talk about the idea and technology behind their system. They discuss some of the big trends impacting warehouses, e-commerce, and retail. From labor shortages to automation, Dan enlightens on the benefits of WMS and WES for any business. Tune in to better understand the perks of this new smart technology for optimizing your business! The Smart Warehouse With Dan Gilmore Our topic is the smart warehouse with my friend Dan Gilmore. How's it going, Dan? It's great. I'm happy to be here. I'm glad I'm finally getting to interview you. Please introduce yourself, your company, and where you are calling from. I'm a Chief Marketing Officer of a supply chain software company called Softeon. Our company is headquartered in Reston, Virginia, outside of Dallas Airport. I happen to be in the Dayton/Cincinnati, Ohio area. What does Softeon do? It's a supply chain software company, primarily a supply chain execution. The company was founded in 1999. Our first customer all the way back then was the L'Oreal, and we proceeded to build out a suite of solutions that were brought in deep capability. That includes warehouse management systems, and all the stuff that goes around warehouse management systems including labor and resource management, slotting optimization, and yard management. A newer thing which we will get into because it's critical to what's happening in terms of the smart warehouse is something called warehouse execution systems, which have been around for a while but gained prominence in the last couple of years as a way to optimize and orchestrate order fulfillment level at a capability that's beyond even very good tier ones. This category of stuff is called distributed order management, which has to do with the optimal sourcing of products based on customer commitments as well as network capacities constraints in how do I get the lowest cost alternative that meets the customer needs? It's a very prominent in omnichannel commerce. It is almost essential in retail but we are having a lot of B2B type of successes in distributed order management as well. There are some other things that could give a flavor to what we do. You started well before eCommerce was a thing. Do you still support stores and that kind of warehousing? Traditional WMS type of capabilities for retailers, would largely be store replenishment. Now, we are moving into eCommerce fulfillment. Many retailers are also looking to have a lot of activity at the store level, whether that's buying online, pick up in-store, curbside pickup or store fulfillment. We've got some solutions there, both in terms of the distributed order management that I referenced. It is the tool going that says, “The best place to fulfill this order from based on the time commitments as well as inventory availability, labor availability, etc. is store 3, 4, 5, 6, 7,” and then have the ability to first identify where it's the right location. That could be obviously a DC, a third-party facility or something like that. The first word is the best place to source it from, and if it's a store, we have a store module that facilitates the inventory transactions, picking transactions, and shipping at a store level. That became a thing. Target is one of those companies that if you buy something online from them, they are more likely to ship from their stores these days. I have seen and the figure keeps rising. The whole market has changed. The more high-tech feel and touch, the less back-breaking work and less bending over and lifting heavy cases. It's like 80% or 90%. Let's say 90%. That's the number I had in my mind too. They are doing them from the store, which is incredible. Before we get into all that, tell us a little bit about you. Where did you grow up and go to school? Give us some career highlights and bullet points before you join Softeon. I'm an Ohio guy. My whole life, I grew up in Akron, Cleveland area, and then got a job with NCR after grad school. I got an MBA from the University of Akron. I got a job at NCR that was here in Dayton. I was a Product Manager in charge of barcode and data collection. The way serendipity works, I moved from barcode data collection systems to wireless systems and then got into WMS. I was into consulting for a while. I have done a lot of marketing in the space. I was also Chief Marketing Officer at the Red Prairie before it got acquired by JDA and became ultimately Blue Yonder. Earlier in my life, I spent a couple of years implementing WMS, a couple of major projects down here in the Cincinnati area that helped me learn a lot about how the technology works and what's good and less good. Notably, in 2003, I started a publication called Supply Chain Digest, which changed the face of online supply chain and logistics, news, and coverage. I still keep a light hand on it. I still write a column once a week still for Supply Chain Digest. I have read that. I wrote a lot of blog posts in the past. When you are a writer, I have joked that “My research is a little different than a professor's research, I Google.” You start to realize which publications have good content when you are a blogger. The bar is a little lower for a blogger than it is for somebody who is writing in a publication. I would say, “Supply Chain Digest always had good stuff.” When and why did you join Softeon? It has been a few years now. I had done a little bit of side consulting with Softeon before joining, and I was impressed with the breadth and depth of the software and the number of innovative capabilities, but as important as that is, lots of companies have good software. We think we've got leading-edge software but the approach to customers and success - I have never seen a company that consistently puts its own interests behind its customers on a regular basis. We are not going to let anything get in the way of a successful implementation. That's a direct record that's unequal in the marketplace. It's the care and concern for success at the customer level and not looking at everything through a lens of only professional services hours if I can sell or something like that. It was a different attitude. It intrigued me, and plus, the company needed some help in the marketing area to get that message out. The combination of those factors led me to join Softeon. Our topic is the smart warehouse. Obviously, things have changed quite a bit in this business. Talk about some of the big trends that are out there that are impacting warehousing, eCommerce, and retail. It impacts everybody. Most of the audience is going to say they are living this or these are big surprises but it's nice to still put it all in context, the growing distribution labor shortage and there's a shortage of manufacturing. It's very acute. Everywhere you go, that's what you hear about the turnover levels, retention, and even with the greatest rising substantially. That's everyone's concern. After about a decade of very flat wage growth in warehousing and distribution until a few years ago, now, all of a sudden, the costs are taken off. Amazon has over $20 an hour with attractive signing bonuses in many parts of the country. They now offer parental leave for twenty weeks. I saw it on TV. That would be a very attractive benefit. That's the advantage. Target announced that they were raising their wage in both stores and distribution centers, not all markets but in some markets, by $24 an hour. That's $48,000 a year, and assume there's probably some overtime in there, whatever husband and wife are making up, for example. They are working at a Target DC in those markets, you could be pulling in $100,000 a year for a family, which is not bad money. [caption id="attachment_7940" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: With the e-commerce-driven cycle time pressure, it's unbelievable how fast you can get products these days.[/caption]   This has come up on my show a few times. I'm getting too old for that kind of work, and I can't walk 10 miles a day but if I had a choice, we need to make that job easier. We are going to get to that because this is what technology does. It also makes the job more attractive when they can say, “I go to that job, and I'm learning all this cool technology.” If you can bring somebody in, there's a different feeling when I get to wear all that high-tech gear and use high-tech systems and say, “I'm part of the supply chain,” as opposed to, “I'm a strong back, walk 5 miles a day and nobody gives a crap about me.” There are no questions about that. It's going to be both in terms of the shortage of labor and, second, building to attract people into this career. Now the whole market has changed, that more high-tech feel and touch, less back-breaking work, less bending over and lifting heavy cases, and all the kinds of things to go on and work for a long time. You are spot-on on that dynamic. If we have a shortage, that means the people we do have to be more efficient. The way they can be more efficient is with tech. That's one big trend going on. What's another big trend? There's a bunch in there that interrelated as well. Obviously, the eCommerce-driven cycle time pressure. If you look ay Amazon over your tablet, it's unbelievable how fast you can get products these days, even somewhat obscure products not that long ago, I need a new power cord for my HP computer. Somehow Amazon was able to deliver that the next day. I'm like, “Probably, they have this cable in someplace that they can get it to me one day.” Think of all the thousands of cables that are out there, and they've got mine. The cycle time pressure in that both are in terms of getting the order process from when it drops into the DC and out the door. Obviously, companies are also moving distribution facilities closer to the customer, so the transportation part of the journey is cut down as well. They will remember the specific numbers. It's Home Depot that is building 170 or 180 different local fulfillment centers that are being the largely cross-dock type of facilities that bring bulky items in and get them right to the customer in addition to the big giant warehouses that they already have. It's a fact of life. Eventually, we will teleport or whatever the product from the warehouse because it seems like we are reaching the Laws of Physics there that it can't be here any faster but maybe we will find a way. I remember, many years ago, I was working on a digital marketing project. I was helping this distribution center, nice, concise in Chicago land Peoria. They said we are one-day shipping to 65% of the population of the US. That was always what Indiana, Illinois, and there are so many DCs down in Ohio can always make that claim, and that was good enough. If you said, “I have a DC in the Midwest that can get me to the Eastern Coast, and I have one out West, that was good enough.” We are not seeing that anymore. We are going to get increasingly where same-day delivery becomes a fact of life rather incredible. Amazon and others talk about getting it down to 2 hours or 30 minutes. That's what Target is doing, not with those DCs. We think we will get to Walmart doing some of the same. What's another trend? Obviously, because we are calling the session, we are going to talk about the smart and also the future but it's largely here nowadays. We've got smart everything. We've got smart houses, cars, refrigerators, and toothbrushes even. I saw that a couple of years ago. I'm not sure if it's exactly taken off the map but to monitor how often you brush your teeth. What does it mean? Primarily, it's talked about internet connectivity and some analytics around that. The least examples are John Deere, Caterpillar or companies of that kind, putting sensors and other IoT types of devices on their equipment out in the field so they can get a sense of how people are actually using it. They can do predictive maintenance on it. They could say, “Your guys aren't using the equipment as effectively as they could if they changed their techniques.” It's certainly timely. If we are going to almost start things where it's time for the smart warehouse too but we will get into for the rest of the broadcast era left different than more internet connectivity, sensors, and things like that. That can be part of it but it is a small part of it. The bottom line of it is we are entering a new era of where all soccer technologies that are, in fact, much smarter than we have ever had before. I have argued publicly for a couple of years now that we had about twenty years of relatively incremental progress in WMS technology. I used this in speeches before but a few years ago, I was cleaning up my office and running the holidays as I often do when I found an RFP from a major food company for a WMS circuit in 2003. I looked through that and I thought, “This doesn't look all that different than the RFPs we are seeing in 2019, 2020 or whatever year we are looking at that.” I looked at it and said, “The big difference is not in the functionality being asked for. It's that now, a lot of that functionality is, in fact, core product, configurable product than maybe a lot of it had to be achieved through customizations.” That's probably true. Same-day delivery has just become a fact of life. The fundamental way of where WMS operates didn't change all that much give or take from 2000 to 2020 or somewhere in that range. Now, with the smart technologies that we are talking about, they are brought by the world's execution systems in working with WMS, I talked about before. This is a new ball game, and it was going to be fun for the rest of the people here to talk about this. You throw in a new term there. You said warehouse execution system. Those have been around for a while but they are now becoming the norm. It's becoming very prominent, and then the value is starting to be recognized. What is it? A couple of three companies had the belief and correctly, for most of the WMS systems did not care enough about equipment throughput and utilization. We wound up with big peaks and valleys, and anybody have been in a district distribution center, even a busy one. You have seen it where there are all kinds of activity at the beginning and the middle of the wave, then as the wave starts to dissipate even on a big, expensive, huge sortation system, you've got a relatively small number of boxes moving around, waiting for that wave and everything to close out. You said wave. Does that mean the orders come in waves? Yeah. The work is released in what is called pick waves. That's based on any number of different attributes. It could be the carrier schedule, value-added processing that needs to be done or workload balancing across the different pick areas of the company. You organize the work against various attributes that constitute a block of work that's typically referred to as a wave. I know I've got all these trucks that are going to show up and they are taking different orders, so maybe I'm working to that order that's going to fill up that truck. The problem, to your point, is we've got already may be a shortage of headcount in there. Now when we have waves, I'm not being efficient because I've got too much work at one moment and then not enough at another. The whole goal of WMS of what we're talking about with the smart warehouse is overcoming, I mean, obviously, you've got to plan and execute based on the workforce that you have here, and we will talk about that. Having a warehouse management system that gives me stuff was great in the past but you are saying, “I will help you with a WES or Warehouse Execution System. I'm going to help you manage the flow.” Manage the flow work and the resource utilization, and then new ways. Part of that still ties into that interest in level loading or making the flow of goods across an automation system more smooth and consistent because if you can do that, there are a couple of things. First off, the total throughput of the system is likely to be better. Second, if it's a new facility, you could probably get by with a smaller sorter because you are going to be able to utilize it more consistently over a block of time, a shift or over what you want to look at it there. The other breakthrough that Softeon said is that the WES tends its roots and level loading of the automation and better utilization there. The WES works extremely well, even in non-automated facilities or lightly automated facilities. [caption id="attachment_7941" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: The fundamental way a warehouse operates didn't change all that much from 2000 to 2020. But now, with smart technologies, this is a new ball game.[/caption]   As a matter of fact, one of our leading customers did a press release a couple of years back that talked about 50% productivity gain from implementing WES or Warehouse Execution Systems on top of existing Softeon WMS, and doing that in a totally manual environment. Everything is part of a system. You can have a sortation system, goods to person system or put wall system or whatever. It's got a certain capacity, throughputs, inputs, and outputs. Twenty workers walked around on a three-level case pick module. There are systems too. They have inputs, outputs, throughput, and expectations. The one big difference is that with a more manual system, you can throw more bodies at it up to the point of diminishing returns and gain through the port from that area, whereas a heavily automated system is rate as its rating. You are not going to do a whole lot to affect that. Throughput is everything, whether you are a plant, a freight broker or a warehouse. The stuff that goes out the door and that we can charge for is what we want to do. Having a warehouse management system is great. I know there are certain warehouses. Probably the old ones still don't even have that. You are saying to be as efficient and effective as you need to be in the market, you need a warehouse execution system that gets me the flow and that throughput. It may not be for everybody, and there are certain things you can do. We could take your core WMS and add some select capabilities from a full-blown WES if a modest level of that kind of automation is necessary. It's not necessarily for one, and I don't want to position it that way but it's certainly something that you want to take a look at as you get to where you've got a significant number of workers. Even smaller operations, things like the automated release of work to the floor without the human being need needing to be involved, that's going to be attractive even for a mid-size operation. The first thing we need is we need to get into this. WMS is given. You said that there was an incremental improvement for many years. Now, you are starting to see big improvements that may be driven by the market that needed big improvements in recent years. Part of that is this WES. What else is there that's part of that smart warehouse? There's a whole bunch of stuff. First, as a reminder, the automation because automation is tied to the labor shortage. Even a couple of years ago, it was very common to talk to DC managers or logistics executives, and automation wasn't necessarily very high on the radar. Nowadays, almost close to 100% of the companies we talked to, even smaller companies, are looking at automation of some kind. That could be big automation where you've got traditional sortation systems but can be very large, goods to person systems, those kinds of things. There's also a lot of interest in lighter, more flexible, and less expensive technology things like what are called put walls. What's a put wall? In great simplicity, it is a technique or a structure, which is a module with a series of cubby holes or slots. In one of these modules, we have 1 customer that has 80 of these modules. What you do is you pick the orders, then when you come to the put wall, you distribute the order to the different orders that need that product. I batch pick the product. I bring it either mechanically or manually to the put wall. Typically, a series of lights says, “This company wall number 3 here and needs 1 of the skews. Put wall in. This one needs 2 that skew you put two in. This one needs 1 put 1 in.” That process repeats itself until all of the items for a given order are complete within that cubbyhole. That's called putting. That's why it's called a put wall because you are taking the order in back, and then you are putting it into the put wall. Around the backside, lights will turn on that indicate, “This cubbyhole is now complete.” The operator comes up and touches a button typically. That starts the printing of the label in any shipping documentation that's required in the orders packed, shipped, and off you go. It provides a tremendous amount of productivity. It's very flexible. You can start small. We had one customer that started with a 1-foot wall module, then added 8 or 9 more because they liked it, then they added 20 more because they really liked it, and did this all over a couple of three-year types of the period there. For any kind of piece picking, especially of soft goods but other types of products as well but often driven not only by eCommerce with any kind of heavy piece picking operation can be a great solution but you've got to have the right software to do it. You've got that big like almost a shelf you said like cubbies on that I'm putting a product through it. Maybe I walked over, and I got 10 different sweaters, 10 sweaters that are all the same, and this cubby gets one. As I do that, I'm scanning it or it recognizes that it's in there. It's informing the other side of the cubby when the order is complete. It needs two sweaters and a pair of shoes. That's just one more way. What do you call this? Technology is only part of it. The other piece of the cubby that walking up to that, I could be putting those in bins in the old days but this is putting that on steroids. The bottom line is we are entering a new era where all technologies are, in fact, much smarter than we've ever had before. It was just a new way of doing it. There are a lot of people who talk about this in terms of optimizing materials and handling systems because getting this right is not a trivial task. I don't want to steal all my thunder from later on but the ability to rapidly turn these put walls and cubbyholes are the whole key to the success. If it's taking you a long time to do that, you are not getting the throughput that you required and probably wasting your time and money but if you can rapidly turn those by making sure the inventory gets there on time and efficient execution on both sides of the wall, then you've got something that can drive a lot of productivity. I don't know what the number is. There are quite a few customers now that are using put walls. When we would go out to some new customers, we've got some videos to show them an operation, and they are interested in seeing how this works. It's the technology along with mobile robots that you are going to see, any eCommerce but any kind of piece picking as well, you are going to see a lot of adoption. I'm an automotive guy originally. When you used to go through a plant, you would see people doing lifting heavy things when I first started, crouching down and doing functions that were hard on the body. Maybe it's not hard on 1 day, 1 week or 1 month but over 1 year, you are going to have a bad back, shoulders or knees. The same thing happens in these DCS or the warehousing. This automation you are talking about is making it easier on the workers, which means, “Hopefully, I will be able to keep my workers healthy and make that job again more attractive.” One time, I talked to a VP of logistics at Sherwin-Williams, the paint company. He noted that on the manufacturing side of the operation, they were always having people retire, and during retirement, little parties were almost taken. He said, “There was no one that ever retired from the distribution side.” That's because the heavy worker is picking cases of paint as a young man's job. As people got older, they couldn't do that work anymore. People are obviously rethinking that for the aging factor, and then there's another factor, “How do I make the work easier so I can have somebody in their 50s and 60s continuing to do this at distribution center job?” If you gave me a choice to go work in an old school warehouse, go deliver food or deliver groceries, I'm going to do the grocery delivery. I can make decent money, sit in my car, and I don't have to hurt my back, or knees or walk 5 miles a day. We have to make these jobs more attractive or we are not going to be able to keep and get good people. This automation is of such interest to the jobs now that we become more technicians and less of an order pickers. Besides a put wall, what's some other automation you are seeing out there? The automated mobile robots, economists mobile robots or AMRs. There's a huge interest in that. One of the interesting things is that in both put walls and mobile robots, you are seeing a lot of adoption and interest by a third-party logistics companies. This makes the point. In the past, 3PLs were very reluctant to do any kind of heavy automation because they couldn't sync the return on investment with the contracts that they had from the shipper. If the shipper can pay off that equipment, it's going to take 5, 7 or whatever years, and the shippers only keep you where 2 or 3-year contract, the risk of automation is too great in these other kinds of systems. It includes things like voice, picks the lights, and smart cards. They are all connected in some ways. Those kinds of systems can be put in for much less expense, much lower risk, and be incrementally adapted. You can start with three mobile robots and see how you like it, then we have seven more later on or whatever until you get to the optimal point for your operation. The fact that 3PLs are making this kind of investment as a whole new phenomenon and it speaks to the way you can incrementally get into the technology and the high level of payback that they are seeing because we were very strong in the third-party logistics arena, as an aside, so we are seeing it very closely. The number of 3PLs that are interested in this mid-range of lighter picking systems, not heavy automation but it's often somewhat newer technologies. It speaks to the changes we are seeing out there in the marketplace. Those are robots. Depending on the facility, they are not necessarily always replacing people. I talked to the CEO or president of DHL. He says, “We thought we would be replacing people with robots. The more robots we add to a facility, the more work we end up getting for that facility. We ended up hiring more people.” Everyone has a shortage. Job is going unfilled. If the robots are taking some of that slack but very few case studies of people that are adopting these technologies, they are still looking for people who have been able to be on. [caption id="attachment_7942" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: WES (Warehouse Execution System) will help manage the flow of work and resource utilization.[/caption]   What's another thing we need for that smart warehouse? Let's get into it in some more detail. We talked about some of the core software components, things like warehouse management systems and warehouse execution systems. A platform for integrating this automation with both heavy and/or traditional and newer age capabilities. There are some enabling technologies, things like rules engines, simulation and some other things. The core world's operations excellence is still the foundation. How do I get that right? That typically involves traditional WMS-type capabilities. What does that mean? What defines a warehouse management system versus an inventory system is the pervasive use of mobile terminals, barcode scanning, wireless RF devices or whatever term you want to use there, and then a lot of system directed activity, this whole notion of task management and task monitoring, where the system is orchestrating the different traditional paths of put away, receiving put away, picking replenishment, etc., and support for multiple strategies around that. We have lots of different picking method options, different replenishment strategies that I can use, and things that have been around for a while like slotting optimization, detailed labor management, labor reporting, and things like that. The foundation is core operations excellence. That's what everyone should strive to get to but nowadays, there's no ability to take that even further in terms of different types of capabilities that we think are defining what we are calling the smart warehouse. You used a term there that was an integration platform. What am I integrating? You were integrating primarily different materials handling technologies. That can be things we have had for a wall that conveyor transport and sortation. It can be some of these newer technologies like robots and put walls. The key is, “How do I optimize the flow so I don't have these islands of automation that are all doing their own thing.” I talked to somebody in the apparel industry. They have a very large and highly automated facility somewhere down in the Atlanta area. It's 1 million or 2 million square feet. They are seeing their throughput from that building after huge investments over the years and over time. They are seeing the throughput decline. What's happening, he believed, is that the business keeps changing. They keep having all these new requirements in terms of how an order needs to be processed. What they do is they keep building new wave types. We talked about wave planning before. Now they are up to like 70 or 80 different wave types. Every time there's another problem, wave fight number 82 if that solves our problem, it's not solving the problem. Part of the reason is that the system is not looking holistically across the facility and seeing how I can optimize the flow of work as a whole, not as an individual subsystem. That's part of what we are talking about here with the smart warehouse. That's the thing that traditional WMS has not done. That integration platform means I can connect all the tools and all the different systems I'm using all connect easily through that integration as opposed to the old way, which is a standalone $100,000 integration with expensive people who have to code. That's certainly part of it. It's managing the flow of work across that. I'm getting hit myself again but for example, you can have some scenarios where I have different paths for an order to be fulfilled. One of the paths and the most efficient for certain orders is maybe a group of put wall models. Let's say put wall area, for whatever reason, starts to be congested. All of a sudden, there's a big backup on the conveyor feeding into the put wall area. The system is going to automatically recognize that. For some time, route orders away from the put wall into manual cart picking, which takes them to the packing station, the same packing area where the put wall automotive leads. When the congestion is clear, then the system automatically reroutes that work back to the put walls again. Now you are looking at only the plain integration but in monitoring the flow of work that's happening and making real-time decisions accordingly. I'm an automotive guy, and we had all of those years. We used the term smart factories, and it was the same thing. How do we increase throughput? What can happen is you can end up with a local optimum where some guys are building a big stack of inventory and does nobody any good? What does all that excess inventory doing for me? What makes more sense is to say, “We are going to get this, so there's a flow to it. We are not building up too much inventory. There are no bottlenecks.” This is the same thing. What you are talking about here is, “How do I arrange my people so I don't have these guys sitting around because they already finished while these guys are in a congested area?” The core world's operations excellence is still the foundation. The term flow manufacturing came out of exactly what you are talking about there and was largely developed initially in the automotive industry. We are talking about the same thing. Now we are talking about flow distribution instead of flow manufacturing but the fundamental concepts, more of a pull-based system were being worked on capacities and constraints, more concerned with the total flow of goods and not what's happening in one individual area. All those are very consistent, whether you're looking at the principles that were established earlier in manufacturing or what's being applied here in distribution. I'm going to assume that at one time, the WMS, a big selling point would be, “We will tell you where your inventory is at,” That was probably a big step up. You go, “It does that. Now I'm going to tell you how that inventory moves off of your shelves and out the door and how you bring new inventory.” It's amazing. We still see quite a few every week, we see somebody that's a calling or emailing in, and then we talked to him. It turns out they don't have that real-time visibility of the inventory because they are using some kind of paper-based system or something, and sometimes these are even good size companies. In general, anybody that's implemented a tier-1 or tier-2 level, even WMS shouldn't have that real-time inventory visibility in doing that. It gets into that operations excellence and problem but that's the foundation, “I got to know what I got and where it is by lot, batch, serial number or whatever attribute is important for your operation or combination of attributes.” That's the foundation, but now, we are saying, “How do we optimize on top of that and get more product out the door and lower cost?” It requires investment. Having a WMS tell me, “Here is the information but it's not enough anymore.” To your point, we need all of this to get there. You asked me about some of the components of the smart warehouse, and I talked about it from a product category perspective, but now, I'm talking about it more from a philosophical or a functional view. One of the key foundations is constraining condition awareness, “What's happening in my building? What's happening with the flow of goods?” One of the things that first got me to understand WES in a deeper way is this notion that it's always-on listening and monitoring the environment. If you think about a traditional WMS, it's more sequential-oriented, “I receive the product. I put it away. I replenished pick sites. I do the picking. I take it to pack or evaluated services. I put it in this receiving staging. I get it shipping staging. I get it out the door all very good then the delivered.” A lot of companies don't have that. Organizing and automating all of that are big steps forward but we need to take it to the next level. If you think about this notion, the system is always on monitoring throughput and flow. There are certain rates and throughput that I'm expecting. I need to be able to have a flexible set of dashboards supported by event alerts and notifications. If there's a problem that says, “Here's what's happening across.” However, I wanted to find it in the area, I can define an area as a case picking module or as a whole three-level case pick module. I see that as one unit, and I want to know what the throughput is there. Maybe I want to see it at each level of that pick module. I can see it more gradually. What's nifty about this is that new level of visibility, the activity, throughput, bottlenecks, alerts, and corrective action automated, increasingly automated, if there are bottlenecks. That provides a nice set of real-time dashboards of looking stuff where people can see what's happening, “I have these many orders pending here that's already been completed. Here's how many are in picking,” or all of that level of detail. To understand what's going on here with the smart warehouse is, the system is using that same data that's being exposed to managers and supervisors that's what it's using to make decisions as well. I decided that example of being aware of the backup that's happening in the put wall and automatically, for some time, routing work around that until the congestion is cleared. That's what's different now about this visibility and activity monitoring. Being able to flexibly do that however you want to define a processing area could be evaluated services. It could be peace picking and all these things. Obviously, now the design is at these different flows throughout the facility are in sync. I'm not getting old backed up and packing, which is causing problems way back, picking and replenishment because I haven't automated the visibility and the flow, release in a way that's going to be cognizant and aware that I've got a problem here and, “Here's what I need to do about it for some time until we are adjusting. We are just taking action to solve the problem.” You sent me a PowerPoint and I have this here. It's got that real-time configurable dashboard. It's been a while since I have seen somebody had me a piece of paper but somebody handed me a piece of paper that had 40 columns. It was like an Excel spreadsheet or something, maybe a spin out of a system. It had so much, I looked at it and I was like, “What am I supposed to do with this?” I liked the idea of being able to configure it for those KPIs that I care about. [caption id="attachment_7943" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: One of the things that got me to understand WES in a deeper way is this notion that it's always on, listening and monitoring the environment.[/caption]   I don't want to measure everything. That's just me. Tell me the 4, 5 or 7 things that matter that tells me my warehouse is moving in the right direction, and that things are working well. It says, “Orders with issues.” I also love the idea that I don't find out about the issues in next week's report. I find out about them in real-time. The point that you made is a nice transition to this notion of another component. We talked about the real-time visibility of capacities, constraints, the conditions up there, and the always-on nature of the WES. Now, we have talked about looking at a table of 40 rows of information or whatever. It's all in the past. It brings up a point there, which is even with higher-end WMS, this is one of the learnings and insights that we have. There's still a tremendous amount of decision-making that is being done by human beings. As the manager, whoever you were talking about there in your example, staring at a 40-row spreadsheet or whatever, you see the same thing nowadays of managers and supervisors staring at computer screens, trying to figure out what the right thing to do next. Here's the reality. Every time you do that, first off, you introduce some latency into the system because it takes time to look at those different screens, think about it, make decisions, and scribble some things down on a piece of paper to remind you this needs to be taken care of or whatever. In most cases, there's no way a human being can make the optimal decision in the same way that a computer can. Even if you are a smart guy or girl, there's just too much data and too much to try to process at one time. Part of the capabilities of the smart WMS is the much more advanced software-based decision-making. Things like order batch optimization, given block of orders, “What's the best way to most effectively execute that on the software floor?” What we think is absolutely huge is this notion of the autonomous warehouse, as a term of Gartner is used, and others have used it as well but it talks about being able to automatically release work without the need for a wave planner, inventory expediters or all the kind of people that you see often involved in these decisions about what work to do when. Work relation on a variety of attributes, things like the order of priority, the inventory and resource availability, what kind of optimization opportunities are there? The bigger the order pool and more optimization opportunities you have because they are more data or conditions to be optimized but you can't hold on so long. You are not getting the throughput out through your cutoff time. This is a huge one. It's sophisticated. Whereas now, at 4:00 or 5:00, when the UPS, FedEx or whatever truck is leaving, you often see, and we have made commitments to the eCommerce is going to ship, you see a certain amount of chaos going around, trying to figure out all the orders that need to go on that truck, have been on the trucking and what to do about it. What we are talking about here is we are saying, “This is the work. We know how long it's going to take to pick and transport those orders to the shipping dock.” The work is going to automatically release itself. At the beginning of the day, we are more concerned about optimization. We still got a lot of decent amount of time, so we can focus on doing it the most efficient we can but as you go throughout the day, that needle starts to change from the focus on efficiency and cost to efficiency on customer service and making sure that those items are on there. The system does that automatically. It's configured to take those into consideration. Now those orders are getting on the trucks automatically without the chaos and the difficulty that's going on out there. This is a step-change capability here. We are talking about a system that is self-learning and in optimal how releases work. This is another concept we have had in distribution software before, and this is what defines what works on the smart warehouse. I had a boss in the past when I was young, I remember I sent an Excel spreadsheet to him, and it told a story. He's pulled me into his office and said, “This is a great Excel spreadsheet. I have to go through here and come to the same conclusion you did.” I go, “It's easy.” He goes, “No. When you send me this Excel spreadsheet, send me a recommendation. I don't want to have to come to a conclusion. That's your job. Show me that you attach the data back up but give me a recommendation.” I feel the same take way about running a warehouse, “Don't make me figure it out myself. Give me an alert that says, ‘This is a problem. This is how many orders are at risk. This is how many orders need to get on that truck that isn't done yet.'” To show you a simple example. Still, a lot of people, especially for eCommerce, are doing manual cart picking. I may have a cart that's got a certain configuration 3x3 or 4x4. What I mean by a 3x3 would be 3 shelves that each have room for 3 cartons each. I have nine total orders that I'm working on there. Most companies that we see do that are doing it with paper picking or pick by label or something. There's some attempt to do that more efficiently but something as simple as cart picking. The smart warehouse can take it to a whole new level. First off, you've got to get this order pool that's out there and at any one period. I'm probably going to have done some cartonization logic there to determine what should go in what box, especially with a multi carton order. In most cases, there's no way a human being can make the optimal decision in the same way that a computer can. Even if you're really smart, there's just too much data to process at one time. If you are shipping, for example, you don't want to put perfume in the same carton as payroll because of the obvious contamination that can happen there. When a picker comes up and scans a barcode on that cart, the system is going to automatically know it's this configuration, 3x3, 4x4 or whatever. It will have done some optimization typically in terms of what's called cluster picking were, “I'm going to take that cart to one location. I will put as many orders as I can on the cart that is signed to that cart that has the same set of skews so I can minimize my travel distance. Hopefully, I'm being clear on what that means.” Now I get to that location that can be done with lights or it can be done with barcode scanning. It says, “Take one of these from this location, put it in the carton slot 3'1, which is the 3rd shelf and the first location. The next one is 3'2. 2'3, 2'1 or whatever that sequence. I'm doing that in a way that makes it very efficient but we can take it even still beyond that. What if a high-priority order comes on? The pickers walk along as long as there's a location on that cart, whether it's a carton or a tote they are picking into. If it hasn't been started, we can remove automatically a lower priority order and insert a higher priority order that has come down onto that card as long as we would typically do it. The picker doesn't have to turn around and go backward as long as it picks for the new order or ahead of that picker. We do that without the picker, even being aware that it happened. You can expedite automatically like, “I got a truck that's going to be here one hour. We haven't even started yet. Let's get this going.” We say, “If you get an order in by 2:00, we will ship it that day. If it's 1: 58, all of a sudden, an order drops. I got two minutes.” This isn't going to automatically insert a higher priority order possible. I like something you said in there that we talked about the labor problem with these guys walking around maybe 5 or 10 miles in a day. One of the reasons we are going to quit, especially if you are me, is I don't want that many steps. When I walk over there, all my orders are in the same area, then I walk over here, and all my orders are there, as opposed to one side of the warehouse, and another order on the other side or I'm walking and go, “What has my life become where I walk back and like this?” Order pool optimization as well because the bigger the batch that I'm working with, the more opportunities I have to gain those picks together. On a given card, I'm maybe walking a very few feet. To your point, and this is where you get into the whole notion of mobile robots because now, perhaps that, “I go to the pick location, I pick the order but I'm putting it on a pick card. I'm putting it on a mobile robot, and the mobile robots can move on to the next location or on the packing of the orders completed. I'm walking very little at that point or comparatively little, which is one of the attractiveness of mobile robot technology.” Hopefully, it's becoming clearer. The nature of the warehouse is changing, and a part of that's going to have to be to not only be more cost-efficient and get more out the door with the staff that I've got but it's making sure that people have a less miserable work experience and hence hopefully going to stay with this a lot longer. This is not your grandpa's warehouse anymore. To be competitive, it used to be like, “These guys are high tech because they have a WMS.” Now we are starting to spin out the automation, the warehouse execution, and the integration platform. This is all getting really high-tech. Do you think this is probably the lowest-tech business there was many years ago? House is all going to play out. It's going to be interesting to see but the lighter automation techniques, including the robots and the put walls, are so attractive in terms of their flexibility and expandability. There are machine learning, artificial intelligence, and all kinds of things going to be involved here. The warehouses are becoming technology centers. If you see the private equity money that's flowing into robotics firms, AI firms, and others, in a lot of the smart money, it's the work that they do. Companies, retailers, and other eCommerce companies are starting to realize the importance of a well-run warehouse. Was this guy's quiet logistics? They've got bought by American Eagle. That was American Eagle recognizing the traditional retailer, the same thing we're going to buy ourselves a warehousing company because that's how important this business is. The force behind what has become locus robots. We will move our vendors that happened because Amazon had bought key assist systems right before that and left a quiet without a partner for automation they were building the business on. They invented their own robot. [caption id="attachment_7944" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: What's really different now about this kind of visibility and activity monitoring is being able to flexibly do that however you want to define a processing area.[/caption]   Bruce Welty was at my show. He's the Founder of Quiet. He said he got a phone call saying, “Are you guys using those Locus robots?” He says, “Yeah, how do you like them?” “We like them a lot. Can we come to visit?” “Sure.” It was Amazon. Amazon looked around and said, “We love this.” They bought Locus. A couple of other things I would like to bring up. First, broader use of some automation ideas or IoT type devices. RFID is starting to make something of a comeback years after Walmart tried back in 2003 or 2004. Generally, you are going to see many manual scanning activities that are going to disappear or if I need to move this way back now from being implemented at the store level by customers concerned with the eCommerce fulfillment for inventory equity purposes, you are going to see a move back up into the distribution operations. That will certainly be a big part of it. We were already doing things like, for example, we are a broker with a pick cart. Picker with a pick cart can walk up to a fixed zone. The IoT automatically recognizes that this person is on. It automatically turns on the pick lights that are on those four pick locations. It's a minor thing there but that's an advancement we are going to see. We have even done some stuff with congestion management and COVID, where we can tell exactly where somebody is in the I or using IoT and being able to assign work based on real-time visibility to who's closest to that work, but also when the COVID area being able to space people apart so that they don't get to say within 8 feet of each other, whatever that happens to be, whatever your metric you want to use, therefore that group constraint. There are some various things that can happen there. This is still slow going. It hasn't taken off as fast as many people think but you are going to see RFID and IoT start to make some mural inroads over the next years. We have this follow the notion of Gartner and what's considered to be called a conversational voice. The transactional voice is doing the picking, pallet build or something using voice technologies. Typically, reading in a location check digit and doing a hands-free pick, replenishment or whatever the task might be but we're starting to get now into more of a dialogue. We are all ready to the point now where we can have a supervisor take a smartphone and say, “Show me how I'm doing on wave number 235,” over a smartphone. That's going to bring back exactly what's happening now or, “Where's the replenishment for location on 3652?” We are still early in this game here but certainly, we will move to more of a dialogue going on with the WMS and WES than just playing transactional voice-type of technology. We ended with a very exciting where the future interface of the software is going to had. This is where that integration platform you talked about comes in handy. I can connect to all this stuff. The new killer app that comes out, I can get it. We have been left there. Automation and optimization of materials handling systems is certainly a key part of this. We refer to it, not just as a smart warehouse's the future but as the smart automated across to the future due to the interest in the technologies we have talked about several times already. We can directly connect with these picking assistance, like walls, pick the light or voice without the need for third-party software. Everyone else uses some kind of software from the put wall vendor, pixelate vendor or voice vendor, which adds another layer of integration and costs. It often results in people operating silos. We can directly control a lot of these materials handling technologies. It allows you to operate and optimize those in the context of everything that's happening in the world and all the information that's available, which provides you a lot of benefits over time because you are not just trying to operate in silos. I talked to somebody that was using a pick-to-light system. They talked about how at the end of every week, they've got to go in and clean up all these pics that some of them never were executed in the pick-to-light system. I'm not quite sure why that is but it wouldn't happen with the way we are approaching things because we would be aware of that. It probably has to wait on a real punishment. The problem is the pixelate vendor doesn't do replenishment the documents. You've got these silos going on here and there are a lot of opportunities. In terms of that integration platform, we think this is especially true for mobile robots, people are using the mobile software of the mobile robots. What that does is it limits the total optimization that can be achieved but more importantly, you are now totally dependent on that robot software. What if you want to add different robots or change horses three years from now? There's a better mousetrap that works faster or whatever that happens to be. Now you have become locked in. We refer to it not just as smart but the smart automated across to the future. We think the market needs a mobile robot and a broader automation integration platform. It's almost like an operating system for automation in the warehouse that's going to allow you to have visibility to optimization of robots of different kinds from the same manufacturer of different types for different manufacturers. You are not locked in. It's like a plug-and-play type of environment here three years from now. You can keep the robots or keep dependent you bought, but now, you want to add five more from a different vendor, plug them into this operating system, and have instant connectivity and the ability to optimize the performance. We think that's a much more low-risk approach going forward than locking yourself into a vendor that's coming to the software that's coming from the robot vendor. Get back to the idea of a smart warehouse. It's all about throughput. If I have different systems that are connecting, that are doing local optimums, that's a problem because it's not supporting throughput. I always need that one source of truth. That's the main system that says, “This is all about getting stuff out the door here.” I wanted to bring up one. Earlier, I talked about wanting to give an example of what the put wall. I referenced that as the cubbyholes in put walls. Here's the scenario we are seeing. Let's say there are three line items eCommerce order. Two of those line items in the order come from a carton flow rec area, that's very close to packing. I mean those orders are efficient to pick, in short distance to transport. The third line item is actually coming from a slow-moving mezzanine pick area that's farther away and is less efficient to pick. If you don't do anything, otherwise what's going to happen in those first two items from that order are going to show up rather quickly, then they are going to sit and wait for 10, 15, 20, 45 minutes or whatever it happens to be for that third item on the pick, the order to finally show up. The cubbyhole has been tied up that entire time. What's the smarter warehouse way of doing it? What's the WES way of doing it? Let's say it's 25% slower to go through the mezzanine or whatever the number you want to use it. We would release that third line item in effect 25% or 30% earlier. After the time it takes to pick and transport that as it's on its way to the pack station, now we release the other two orders line items in the carton flow rack. They show up at the put wall for processing at relatively the same time, and now I'm able to turn that wall without the latency that would occur if you didn't have smart software to do that. Hopefully, that's an example that makes it somewhat clearer as to how the optimization can affect operational performance. You would never be able to get that done manually. It doesn't happen. This is like drinking from a fire hose. There is so much going on in this. Put a bow on this. Give us your final thoughts on this. What do I need to get to have that smart warehouse? First of all, the benefit is it is going to reduce labor costs, have higher and more consistent DC throughput, you are going to reduce your need for automation in terms of things like the number of diverse or get more throughput out of the automation you have there. We didn't talk much about labor planning but that's a big part of it. We can dynamically assign workers throughout the course of a shift from 1 to 8 to 9, 9 to 10, or 10 to 11 hours where are they needed motion and in what quantities, improved automated decision-making. It's an assessment. Certainly, if you are heavily automated, there are a lot of opportunities for you. As I tried to make the point earlier, even if you're only modestly automated or not automated at all, these capabilities can have some real benefit for your operations there. The important thing to note with Softeon is these can be implemented very incrementally. I could implement a traditional WMS. Let's say I want the labor planning and allocation part of it. We can take that capability from WES and attach it to the WMS. To give you a solution, conversely, if you want to implement WES and leave your existing WMS in place, we didn't talk too much about that but that's a key dynamic. You need cartonization, which is a warehouse management function and even attach cartonization to that WES implementation. Flexibility is key. That's what we try to design. We call it a shirt component library, where the applications can borrow components, functionality, and services from each other. We are pretty confident that it gives us a chance to understand what you are trying to accomplish, what your operations are like or whatever that some combination of these technologies is going to have a pretty good fit and take your world to a whole new level than we have seen over the last many years. What's new over at Softeon?. What conferences do you go into? We have done with the motor show, and it was a big success for us. We not only showed the smart warehouse, we presented the smart warehouse capabilities. We had a lot of equipment pick the light, other packing stations, etc., right on our routes. At the bottom of every hour, we did a presentation. We had consistently good traffic the whole time. We did a bit of an educational track and a session on the smart warehouse of the future available on Softeon. It was very well attended. That was good. We will be at the Gartner Supply Chain Symposium down in Orlando and then break after that. [caption id="attachment_7945" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: Even if you're just modestly automated, these capabilities can have some real benefits on your operations. These can be implemented very incrementally.[/caption]   We finished up a series of educational broadcasts called the WMS Bootcamp, six different sessions on everything from building the business case to how to implement it successfully. It was a huge success, but all of that's now available on-demand. If they go up to Softeon.com. You will be able to find some links to that. If you have any interest in WMS, they're not commercial, educational sessions. You will find they have a lot of value. The feedback we got on it was outstanding. I would like to watch myself because we went over this and it is gone from simple to more complex over time. I know you are simplifying it but to understand what's required requires a Bootcamp. We learned a lot of lessons. I brought in some consultants and people that I knew and knew what they were talking about in terms of building the business case. We had some folks from Invista that came on and did that. I had some experience or exposure. I knew they knew what they were talking about. Some of that applies to some other consultants as well. It's a real nice series. It's non-commercial. If you want to learn some tips about how to get WMS selection and implementation, you'll find the Bootcamp serves you well. How do we reach out and talk to you over at Softeon? The way to get me is via email. My email address is DGilmore@TheSofteon.com. You can also use Contact@Softeon.com for the general inquiry box. I love to hear from you. Hopefully, we came across, so at least you know a little bit about what I'm talking about and discuss your problems as well. Anyone who wants to reach out can reach out and talk to you about the smart warehouse. Thanks, Joe. I enjoyed it. It was a great conversation. Thank you so much, Dan. Thank all of you for reading. Your supports are very much appreciated, until next time and more network.   Important Links Softeon Supply Chain Digest WMS Bootcamp DGilmore@TheSofteon.com Contact@Softeon.com https://www.linkedin.com/company/softeon The Logistics of Logistics Podcast If you enjoy the podcast, please leave a positive review, subscribe, and share it with your friends and colleagues. The Logistics of Logistics Podcast: Google, Apple, Castbox, Spotify, Stitcher, PlayerFM, Tunein, Podbean, Owltail, Libsyn, Overcast Check out The Logistics of Logistics on Youtube

Organize 365 Podcast
484 - Organizing Storage Spaces

Organize 365 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 41:12


In this podcast series, I have talked with you about organizing your personal spaces and then about organizing your family and communal spaces. Now, we're ready to move into your storage spaces. Storage spaces are not easy to organize, but once you set your mind to it, they can be maintained for the rest of your life! Really, they can! Whether it is your attic, basement, or an off-site storage unit, once you have a system in place, this storage space can stay organized for decades. With the exception of some transient storage spaces, your storage space is generally a hidden area of organization. People don't see these spaces so we tend to put off organizing them.  What I want you to understand is the mindset of organizing a storage space. You must start thinking of it as a store. It is your on-demand, already paid-for store, where you're storing things for when you need them. In this episode, I share with you about creating a storage mindset, what kinds of things you might find in your storage space, and how to group those items. I also talk about why you might consider tackling your storage space BEFORE the rest of your home. Ready to organize your storage space? You'll find more detailed guidance for organizing your storage space in  The Productive Home Solution™. What do you keep in your storage spaces? What have you been holding onto in your storage space that really needs to go? 

Simple Saturdays
165. Spring cleaning urgency + organization tips and inventory strategies that save you money and reduce clutter

Simple Saturdays

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 17:03


Spring cleaning had me feeling a mental urgency at ALL THE THINGS I needed to get cleaned in my home. I am sharing how I am approaching that overwhelm. Also sharing how organization and inventory of your stuff can save you money and reduce clutter (starting with the freezer!)     Products recommended here may include referral links to Amazon. If you click through and buy something I may earn a commission, at no cost to you.  The main points covered in this episode My cleaning goals for last weekend and how I was derailed by spring cleaning mental drama My spring cleaning list and closet jenga Operating from a sense of urgency and how it can lead to shame/resent Paying attention to our thoughts and which thoughts we will 'hop on and run off with' Cleaning out the freezer The hidden costs of stockpiling and having all of the options on hand, scarcity  minset  How to do a food inventory (and save money on groceries!) Organizing things in a way that makes them accessible and visible  Doing an inventory of things to prevent you from doubling up by buying more because you don't realize you have it at home   All the fun links you might like 61. How we introduced chores to our kids (Saturday Morning Chores) 60. Doing Chores You Want to Avoid (how I life coached myself to do the dishes) @GOCLEANCO on Instagram A quick video about thought trains by Russ Harris  154. What to do now that you are motivated (simplify getting started) 15 Practical Tips for Moms to GET STUFF DONE 78. Small things that can change your whole life (the compound effect) A post I shared on IG, four years go, about using the notes app to do storage inventory Bitters, I like this peach one by Dillons, the next one I want to try is the Alcohol-Free digestive bitters by Flora   FULL TRANSCRIPT (unedited) Welcome to the simple purpose podcast. Around here, we talk about ways that you can simplify your home, your heaart your life. So you can show up right now in whatever season you're in and show up for it on purpose with intention about what you want, and how you want to act and what you want more of and what you want less of. Today, I want to talk about some recent decluttering and cleaning that I was doing the other weekend. And some realizations I came to while I was doing it. And I share this stuff not because I think it's something you've never heard, or maybe don't even know because often, I think I share things that we do know deep down inside, but I share it because it's a good reminder, it was a good reminder to me and so I want to share it with here here with you. And maybe you will find something from it. So Spring is here, spring is here in Canada. And I don't know about you, but I've noticed as my kids are getting older, and we're like in this family home, that wshen spring comes along, I kind of lose my blinders. I've got blinders on either side of my head, of all of the areas of my home that have built up with grime and clutter over the winter months. And I started also thinking that maybe spring cleaning was invented by Canadian parents who had paid very little attention to their homes for the hockey season. And now they're just faced with realities of unmapped floors and chaotic mushrooms. So Saturday is our joy morning here. It's a routine that we have so that rooms are just getting picked up for the most part on a regular basis. I'm going to link an episode where I talk about Saturday morning chores, how we started our kids doing it and also an episode about me, life coaching myself to doing the dishes. It's a very underrated episode. So I think it's worth sharing. So I was rolling into the Saturday and I felt this freedom that you have when you don't have any plans, no hockey, no plans, I put on my sneakers, I put on a good playlist and I was ready to get some cleaning done. The other weekend I intended to break up them up and also help at least one kid dredge under ...

A Slob Comes Clean
337: Discussion with a Hoarding Cleanout Expert: What is the Process?

A Slob Comes Clean

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 54:18


I enjoyed this conversation with Greg so much! His job is to clean up hard-to-clean things, and part of that is helping out in hoarding situations. I think you’ll find it encouraging and helpful!   Organizing for the Rest of Us   My books Join us over on Patreon to support the show.      […] The post 337: Discussion with a Hoarding Cleanout Expert: What is the Process? appeared first on Dana K. White: A Slob Comes Clean.

Intuition: Your First Sense
The Joy of Organizing Life

Intuition: Your First Sense

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 47:52


Want your energy to align? Get your life organized then. It relates so directly and many people avoid it and attend to it last. That's a mistake so listen to this episode for why and how to get the physical aligned with the nonphysical.

Our America with Julián Castro
Shifting Political Power Through Organizing

Our America with Julián Castro

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 44:15


Julián and Sawyer ask Marguerite Casey Foundation President Dr. Carmen Rojas about her thoughts on how the leaked Supreme Court decision seemingly invalidating abortion rights will impact the state of organizing in the months to come. They also welcome MCF Freedom Scholar Dr. Alisa Bierria of UCLA's Gender Studies Program to talk about the potential for mass criminalization following the end of Roe.    Follow Dr. Rojas online at @crojasphd and the Marguerite Casey Foundation at @caseygrants. Find out more about Dr. Alisa's work here. Keep up with Julián on Twitter at @JulianCastro and Instagram at @JulianCastroTX. Sawyer can be found on Twitter and Instagram at @SawyerHackett. And stay up to date with us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram at @LemonadaMedia.    Leave us a voicemail at 833-453-6662.    ‘Our America' is presented in part by the Marguerite Casey Foundation.    Click this link for a list of current sponsors and discount codes for this show and all Lemonada shows go to lemonadamedia.com/sponsors. Joining Lemonada Premium is a great way to support our show and get bonus content. Subscribe today at bit.ly/lemonadapremium. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness
What's The Power Of Labor Organizing? with Kim Kelly

Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 61:09


This fall, pro-union sentiment in the US rose to 68 percent—the highest it's been since 1965. We're living through a major moment for labor organizing, and we have so many questions! How did we get here? Who got us here? And what's at stake for workers across the country today? Kim Kelly joins Jonathan to discuss the power of collective bargaining, worker solidarity, and her new book FIGHT LIKE HELL, an intersectional history of labor movements in the US.Kim Kelly is an independent journalist, author of FIGHT LIKE HELL: The Untold History of American Labor. She has been a regular labor columnist for Teen Vogue since 2018, and her writing on labor, class, politics, and culture has appeared in The New Republic, The Washington Post, The New York Times, The Baffler, The Nation, and many others. Previously, she was the heavy metal editor at “Noisey,” VICE's music vertical, and was an original member of the VICE Union. A third-generation union member, she was born in the heart of the South Jersey Pine Barrens, and currently lives in Philadelphia with a hard-workin' man, a couple of taxidermied bears, and way too many books.Want to learn even more about the US labor movement? Follow Kim on Twitter @grimkim and on Instagram @kimkellywriter. Pick up a copy of FIGHT LIKE HELL, out now!And check out Kim's FIGHT LIKE HELL reading list, which you can access for free on her Patreon.Join the conversation, and find out what former guests are up to, by following us on Instagram and Twitter @CuriousWithJVN.  Jonathan is on Instagram and Twitter @JVN and @Jonathan.Vanness on Facebook. Transcripts for each episode are available at JonathanVanNess.com. Love listening to Getting Curious? Now, you can also watch Getting Curious—on Netflix! Head to netflix.com/gettingcurious to dive in. Our executive producer is Erica Getto. Our associate producer is Zahra Crim. Our editor is Andrew Carson. Our socials are run and curated by Middle Seat Digital. Our theme music is “Freak” by QUIÑ; for more, head to TheQuinCat.com. Getting Curious merch is available on PodSwag.com.Headshot Credit for Kim Kelly: Elizabeth Kreitschman

Appodlachia
#130: JD Vance oppo dump and Rural Organizing (w/Anderson Clayton)

Appodlachia

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 83:44


We have your first look at our NEW SEGMENTS on this episode as well as an incredible interview with Anderson Clayton - a seasoned veteran of campaign politics and rural organizing pro who recently helped flip the Roxboro, NC city council into democratic hands and has some great lessons for folks organizing in rural areas. HELP SUPPORT APPODLACHIA!Join our Patreon, for whatever you want to pay, and access live events, weekly exclusives, bonus series, and more http://www.patreon.com/appodlachiaTimestamps01:33 - Intro: Blue checkmark lib misinformation on Plan B10:45 - Campaign Check-in: JD Vance25:40 - Announcements (Patreon, ads, etc.)33:08 - Interview with Anderson Clayton 01:14:22 - Under the Radar in Appalachia: WV Miner suspended for CBD use-----------------------------------------------Link to article about miner suspension: https://www.wvpublic.org/energy-environment/2022-05-04/state-supreme-court-upholds-suspension-of-miner-who-took-cbd-product-----------------------------------------------Check out our wonderful sponsors!CBD and THC gummies & more: (use code "APPODLACHIA" for 25% off) http://www.cornbreadhemp.com/Delicious organic kombucha shipped right to your door (use code "APPODLACHIA" for 20% off ) https://skinnypiggykombucha.com/Our website is great, and it's because Starry Eyes Media built it.  Yours can be too! https://www.starryeyes.media/Appalachian Mysteria: A true-crime podcast you should definitely check out! http://jaml.ink/AppalachianMysteriaCheck out our friends at Westside Fairytales - who have a NEW BOOK out now! https://westsidefairytales.com/books-----------------------------------------------Follow us!-Instagram http://instagram.com/appodlachia-Twitter http://twitter.com/appodlachia-Facebook http://facebook.com/appodlachia-TikTok http://tiktok.com/appodlachia-Discord https://discord.gg/czgUeWzvhT-----------------------------------------------None of the views expressed on this show represent the views of either Chuck, John, or Callie's employers

Taking Control: The ADHD Podcast
From Healing to Helping with Matt Raekelboom

Taking Control: The ADHD Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 55:30


For the next few weeks, we'll be talking with ADHD influencers. You might have seen them on YouTube or TikTok or Instagram talking about their experiences with ADHD — we want to talk with them about their experience leading them to become creators. Kicking off this series we welcome Matt Raekelboom. Matt's a Toronto-based influencer predominantly on TikTok and Instagram sharing his tools and strategies around ADHD, fitness, and healthy living with his 300,000 followers. What you don't get if you just stumble across Matt's one-minute videos, though, is any taste of the long road he had to take to get it posted. He was an ADHD kid of the 80s, when we were wandering the wilderness of ADHD and medication, and ended up over-medicated and misunderstood. He battled substance abuse and homelessness, but regained his footing with an explosive passion for discovery of how his ADHD had played a part in all his troubles, and how it would play a part in his future successes, too. You can find Matt on Instagram and TikTok, naturally, and check out his community at Journey2ADHD.

A Slob Comes Clean
336: Adjusting Your Home Routines for Health Changes Podcast

A Slob Comes Clean

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 62:12


I’ve known Amy for ten years, and I’ve watched as she has had to adjust to changes in her health. I asked her to come on the podcast and share the ways she has changed her strategies in her home and in her thinking. My new book: Organizing for the Rest of Us Patreon Sponsors: […] The post 336: Adjusting Your Home Routines for Health Changes Podcast appeared first on Dana K. White: A Slob Comes Clean.