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What Next | Daily News and Analysis
Who Doesn't Have Classified Documents?

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2023 31:13


At this point, classified documents have been uncovered in the homes of former President Trump, former Vice President Mike Pence, and President Biden. But there are more practical issues with how the government treats classified documents than just whose garage they're sitting in. Guest: Elizabeth Goitein, co-director of the Liberty and National Security Program at the Brennan Center for Justice If you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Amicus—and you'll be supporting the work we do here on What Next. Sign up now at slate.com/whatnextplus to help support our work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Trumpcast
What Next: Who Doesn't Have Classified Documents?

Trumpcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2023 31:13


At this point, classified documents have been uncovered in the homes of former President Trump, former Vice President Mike Pence, and President Biden. But there are more practical issues with how the government treats classified documents than just whose garage they're sitting in. Guest: Elizabeth Goitein, co-director of the Liberty and National Security Program at the Brennan Center for Justice If you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Amicus—and you'll be supporting the work we do here on What Next. Sign up now at slate.com/whatnextplus to help support our work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Marketplace All-in-One
Why this debt ceiling fight is already different

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2023 13:57


The U.S. has hit the debt limit 78 times since the 1960s, but for the first time in history, five women are responsible for shaping U.S. fiscal policy. Their experience and perspectives, could change how the country deals with the debt limit. And they might be able to do what other politicians cannot: get along. Plus, how did George Santos fund his campaign? Kimberly is back from vacation and joins Kai to talk all things Washington, and shares what made her smile while she was gone. Here’s everything we talked about today: “Mint the coin? Buy back bonds? 7 ‘gimmicks’ for dodging the debt limit.” from The Washington Post “Ford Cuts Prices of EV Mustang Mach-E” from The Wall Street Journal “5 women, immense power: Can they keep US from fiscal brink?” from The Associated Press “George Santos, Sam Bankman-Fried, and Citizens United” from the Brennan Center for Justice “Watch the moon eclipse Mars tonight” from Space Have any thoughts, or questions that you want to share with us? You can write to makemesmart@marketplace.org or leave a voice message at 508-U-B-SMART.

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly
Why this debt ceiling fight is already different

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2023 13:57


The U.S. has hit the debt limit 78 times since the 1960s, but for the first time in history, five women are responsible for shaping U.S. fiscal policy. Their experience and perspectives, could change how the country deals with the debt limit. And they might be able to do what other politicians cannot: get along. Plus, how did George Santos fund his campaign? Kimberly is back from vacation and joins Kai to talk all things Washington, and shares what made her smile while she was gone. Here’s everything we talked about today: “Mint the coin? Buy back bonds? 7 ‘gimmicks’ for dodging the debt limit.” from The Washington Post “Ford Cuts Prices of EV Mustang Mach-E” from The Wall Street Journal “5 women, immense power: Can they keep US from fiscal brink?” from The Associated Press “George Santos, Sam Bankman-Fried, and Citizens United” from the Brennan Center for Justice “Watch the moon eclipse Mars tonight” from Space Have any thoughts, or questions that you want to share with us? You can write to makemesmart@marketplace.org or leave a voice message at 508-U-B-SMART.

Slate Daily Feed
What Next: Who Doesn't Have Classified Documents?

Slate Daily Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2023 31:13


At this point, classified documents have been uncovered in the homes of former President Trump, former Vice President Mike Pence, and President Biden. But there are more practical issues with how the government treats classified documents than just whose garage they're sitting in. Guest: Elizabeth Goitein, co-director of the Liberty and National Security Program at the Brennan Center for Justice If you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Amicus—and you'll be supporting the work we do here on What Next. Sign up now at slate.com/whatnextplus to help support our work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Re-Education with Eli Lake
Ep. 62: Unnecessary Secrets 

The Re-Education with Eli Lake

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 58:32


In this episode Eli examines why the government purports to protect so many secrets and how overclassification erodes democratic accountability. His guest is Elizabeth Goitein, senior director of the Brennan Center's Liberty & National Security Program Time Stamps:  00:21 Monologue  17:10 Interview with Elizabeth Goitein Questions? Comments? Email us at eli@nebulouspodasts.com

Actual Justice Warrior
The Serfs Pathetically Tries To DENY Crime

Actual Justice Warrior

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2023 17:39


In this video I respond to a short from Lance of the Serfs where he goes full crime denial. I look up & refute each and every one of his points using his own sources & I show how thin his arguments are Website: https://www.actualjusticewarrior.com/ https://linktr.ee/ActualJustice Odysee: https://odysee.com/@actualjusticewarr... Rumble: https://rumble.com/ActualJusticeWarrior Instagram NEW: https://www.instagram.com/actualjustice/ Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/actualjusticewa... Utreon: https://utreon.com/c/ActualJusticeWar... 2nd Channel: https://www.youtube.com/ajw2dreamscom... TeeSpring Store: https://teespring.com/stores/actualju... New Store: https://actualjusticewarrior.myspread... Gettr: https://gettr.com/user/iamsean90 Parler: https://parler.com/profile/Actualjust... https://www.minds.com/actualjusticewa... Support me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/SeanFitzgerald Paypal: https://www.paypal.me/Iamsean90 Venmo: https://venmo.com/iamsean90 Support me on Subscribe Star: https://www.subscribestar.com/seanfit... Gab: https://gab.com/Iamsean90 Twitter https://twitter.com/iamsean90 Backup Twitter https://twitter.com/AJWSean Bitchute: https://www.bitchute.com/actualjustic... Discord: https://discord.gg/c7PGFFp 3rd: https://www.youtube.com/user/DudeMonk... Get Storable Food: https://www.preparewithajw.com Get Pocketnet: https://pocketnet.app/actualjusticewa... Podcast Links: Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/1o0q86A... Apple: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast... Sources: Original Short: https://youtube.com/shorts/cSbhWmfTC-... Largest Hom Increase Ever Recorded: https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank... Brennan Center 2020 Crime: https://www.brennancenter.org/our-wor... Lance's Source For "disparity in crime coverage NYC: https://www.bloomberg.com/graphics/20... Doubling source: https://johnjayrec.nyc/2022/04/26/atr... 46% Hom Increase NYC: https://www.criminaljustice.ny.gov/cr... NYC Crime Jump: https://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/... Anti Crime Unit Disbanded: https://nypost.com/2020/07/04/shootin... Adams January 2022 Announcement: https://www.nyc.gov/office-of-the-may... EPI chart wage theft vs property theft source: https://www.epi.org/publication/wage-... Updated EPI Numbers: https://www.epi.org/publication/emplo... Commerce Dept $50 Billion Employee Theft: https://yourcounterpart.com/blog/the-... $50 Billion In Employee Theft: https://www.cnbc.com/2017/09/12/workp... #SerfsFAIL #Crime #IamSean90 FAIR USE NOTICE This video may contain copyrighted material; the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available for the purposes of criticism, comment, review and news reporting which constitute the 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. Not withstanding the provisions of sections 106 and 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work for purposes such as criticism, comment, review and news reporting is not an infringement of copyright.

The Lawfare Podcast
Lifting the Veil on Fusion Centers

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 68:49


In the wake of September 11, 2001, federal law enforcement agencies were caught flatfooted when they realized that they'd had the intel to prevent the attack on the homeland, but they'd failed to connect those dots. Fusion centers were born out of an abundance of caution to share and streamline counterterrorism information between the federal level and state and local levels. Since then, the Department of Homeland Security has supported the development of a national network of 80 fusion centers across the United States. And while its principle goal initially was to disseminate counterterrorism intel from the state and local levels, it's now expanded to include the sharing of intelligence regarding crimes or hazards more broadly. Last month, the Brennan Center released a report entitled, “Ending Fusion Center Abuses,” explaining how fusion centers' domestic intelligence model has undermined American's privacy, civil rights, and civil liberties. Lawfare legal fellow Saraphin Dhanani sat down with Michael German, a fellow with the Brennan Center for Justice's Liberty and National Security Program, who co-authored the report, as well as Thomas Warrick, a non-resident senior fellow at the Scowcroft Center for Strategy and Security Forward Defense Practice at the Atlantic Council. They discussed how fusion centers were conceived, where they've excelled as intelligence centers, and where they've abused their powers.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Source
Fusion centers often abuse their authority and surveil innocent citizens

The Source

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 338:31


Fusion centers are meant to serve as hubs of intelligence to flow between federal government, private sector, state, local, tribal and territorial partners. However, in a recent investigation, the Brennan Center for Justice uncovered not only flawed analyses from the centers but also abuses of their authority and instances of the surveillance of people engaged in First Amendment-protected activities. Under the guise of counterterrorism, they have historically targeted American Muslims and claimed that activists are threats.

Unregistered with Thaddeus Russell
Unregistered 238: Katherine Ebright

Unregistered with Thaddeus Russell

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 78:39


Katherine Yon Ebright of the Brennan Center for Justice joined me to discuss her shocking report on the extensive secret military operations being conducted by the United States across the globe.   Katherin Yon Ebright's report, Secret War: https://www.brennancenter.org/our-work/research-reports/secret-war   Go to https://www.magicmind.co/unregistered and get 40% off your MAGIC MIND subscription for the next 10 days with my code UNREGISTERED20    Become a PATRON OF UNREGISTERED at www.patreon.com and get:    Access to Unregistered Live, the weekly live Zoom meeting with Thad and patrons of Unregistered.  Bonus episodes featuring interviews with Curtis Yarvin, Ben Burgis, Michael Malice, Cody Wilson, Batya Ungar-Sargon, Hotep Jesus, and many others.    BECOME A MEMBER OF THE UNREGISTERED ACADEMY   Go to https://www.unregisteredacademy.com/ for courses you won't find in college:    American Slavery with Thaddeus Russell and Adam Rothman History of NATO with Scott Ritter and James Carden  Malcolm X with Thaddeus Russell  The Religious Right with Neil Young and Gio Pennacchietti  World War II: The Great Blowback with Thaddeus Russell  The JFK Assassination with Larry Hancock  History of the CIA with Thaddeus Russell  Reading The Unabomber Manifesto

Legal Talk Network - Law News and Legal Topics
America's Prisons – Mass Incarceration, Violence, and Fight for Prisoners' Rights

Legal Talk Network - Law News and Legal Topics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 40:38


According to studies, the US criminal justice system currently holds almost 2 million people—a 500% increase over the last 40 years; with most of those people in jail awaiting trial. Unfortunately, American prisons and jails can be dangerous. Several of our nation's prisons and jails can be understaffed and over populated. And because of inadequate supervision, people in our prisons and jails are exposed to violence, including sexual violence. To discuss what can be done about prison reform and about prisoners' rights, generally, host Dave Scriven-Young welcomes Hernandez Stroud. Hernandez Stroud is a counsel in the Justice Program of the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University School of Law. An authority on prisons and jails, correctional oversight, and constitutional law, he researches the scope of the federal government's power to fashion structural and systemic reforms that prevent and remedy the failure of state and local criminal justice institutions in observing the rights of the incarcerated under the U.S. Constitution.

Litigation Radio
America's Prisons – Mass Incarceration, Violence, and the Fight for Prisoners' Rights

Litigation Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 40:38


According to studies, the US criminal justice system currently holds almost 2 million people—a 500% increase over the last 40 years; with most of those people in jail awaiting trial. Unfortunately, American prisons and jails can be dangerous. Several of our nation's prisons and jails can be understaffed and over populated. And because of inadequate supervision, people in our prisons and jails are exposed to violence, including sexual violence. To discuss what can be done about prison reform and about prisoners' rights, generally, host Dave Scriven-Young welcomes Hernandez Stroud. Hernandez Stroud is a counsel in the Justice Program of the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University School of Law. An authority on prisons and jails, correctional oversight, and constitutional law, he researches the scope of the federal government's power to fashion structural and systemic reforms that prevent and remedy the failure of state and local criminal justice institutions in observing the rights of the incarcerated under the U.S. Constitution.

The Tent
Michael Waldman on Fighting for Our Votes

The Tent

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 32:39


Michael Waldman from the Brennan Center for Justice joins Daniella to discuss the threats election denial poses to U.S. democracy and the need to pass voting rights reform in 2023. Daniella also celebrates the signing of the Respect for Marriage Act into law, and positive indicators for U.S. economic recovery.

Out d'Coup Podcast
Out d'Coup LIVE | Garen Meguerian, Civil Rights and Free Speech Lawyer, on Moore v. Harper

Out d'Coup Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 50:54


On this week's show, I welcome Garen Meguerian back to the show. We'll be digging into Moore v. Harper, the Supreme Court case that could upend American democracy as we know it. In the Bucks County Beacon, Meguerian warned that the fringe constitutional argument at the heart of this case known as the independent state legislature theory paves the way for single-party rule and disenfranchisement of voters. Meguerian is an experienced litigator and trial lawyer licensed in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the State of New Jersey. He has represented clients in both state and federal courts. He is AV peer review rated from Martindale-Hubbell reflecting achievement at the height of professional excellence and integrity. Meguerian received his law degree from the Georgetown University Law Center in 1995, where he served as an Associate Editor of the American Criminal Law Review. He earned his Bachelor of Arts in Honors Philosophy from Villanova University in 1992, where he was awarded the University's Valedictory Medallion. Meguerian is a member of the National Employment Lawyers Association, and the Chester County Bar Association. LINKS: "The US Supreme Court Intends To Dismantle Democracy," Garen Meguerian. Bucks County Beacon https://bit.ly/3VWHzwo "Moore v. Harper, Explained," Eliza Sweren-Becker & Ethan Herenstein. The Brennan Center for Justice https://bit.ly/3Hm8JJi "Explaining Moore v. Harper, the Supreme Court Case That Could Upend Democracy," Ari Savitzky & Kristi Graunke. ACLU https://bit.ly/3VStRea You can support this show by becoming a patron for as little as $5/month at https://www.patreon.com/rcpress. Don't Let Paul Martino & Friends Buy Our Schools and push extremist politics in our community. Raging Chicken has teamed up with LevelField to launch a truly community-rooted PAC to invest in organizing, support local and state-wide progressive candidates, and unmask the toxic organizations injecting our communities with right-wing extremism. We're putting small-dollar donations to work to beat back the power of Big Money.  You can get more information and drop your donation at  https://ragingchicken.levelfield.net/. Join our Discord to continue the conversation all week long: https://discord.gg/BnjRNz3u  

C-SPAN Radio - Washington Today
Weekend Edition: Aftermath of the Midterms

C-SPAN Radio - Washington Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 27:44


In this episode, three segments from C-SPAN's Washington Journal program – on the aftermath of this week's midterm elections. First – on this Veterans' Day weekend – Leo Shane, deputy editor of the Military Times, discusses how veterans running for office this cycle fared -and key military and veterans' issues in Congress. Then, Stephen Fowler -- political reporter for Georgia Public Broadcasting -- previews the December 6th runoff election in the senate race there between incumbent Senator, Democrat Raphael Warnock and his Republican challenger Herschel Walker. Plus, Heritage Foundation's Hans von Spakovsky and Sean Morales-Doyle of the Brennan Center for Justice – on how the midterm elections were conducted - the first since January 6th – and if Americans' confidence in elections has been restored. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Tavis Smiley
Ted Johnson on "Tavis Smiley"

Tavis Smiley

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 17:36


Ted Johnson - a senior director at the Brennan Center for Justice – joins Tavis to discuss why Black men feel ignored by politicians and why he believes that Black men find Republicans more attractive.

Lock and Code
How student surveillance fails everyone

Lock and Code

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 44:26


Last month, when Malwarebytes published joint research with 1Password about the online habits of parents and teenagers today, we spoke with a Bay Area high school graduate on the Lock and Code podcast about how she spends her days online and what she thinks are the hardest parts about growing up with the Internet. And while we learned a lot in that episode—about time management, about comparing one's self to others, and about what gets lost when kids swap in-person time with online time—we didn't touch on an increasingly concerning issue affecting millions of children and teenagers today: Student surveillance. Nailing down the numbers on the use of surveillance technologies in schools today is nearly impossible, as the types and the capabilities of student surveillance software are many.  There's the surveillance of students' messages to one another in things like emails or chats. There's the surveillance of their public posts, on platforms like Twitter or Instagram. There are even tools that claim they can integrate directly with Google products, like Google Docs, to try to scan for worrying language about self-harm, or harm towards others, or drug use. There's also surveillance that requires hardware. Facial recognition technology, paired with high-resolution cameras, is often sold with the promise that it can screen school staff and visitors when they approach a building. Some products even claim to detect emotion in a person's face. Other software, when paired with microphones that are placed within classrooms, claims to detect “aggression.” A shout or a yelp or a belting of anger would, in theory, trigger a warning from these types of monitoring applications, maybe alerting a school administrator to a problem as it is happening. All of these tools count when we talk about student surveillance, and, at least from what has been publicly reported, many forms are growing.  In 2021, the Center for Democracy and Technology surveyed teachers in K through 12 schools and simply asked if their schools used monitoring software: 81 percent said yes.  With numbers like that, it'd be normal to assume that these tools also work. But a wealth of investigative reporting—upon which today's episode is based—reveals that these tools often vastly over-promise their own results. If those promises only concerned, say, drug use, or bullying, or students ditching classes, these failures would already cause concern. But as we explore in today's episode, too many of schools buy and use this software because they think it will help solve a uniquely American problem: School shootings. Today's episode does not contain any graphic depictions of school shootings, but it does discuss details and the topic itself. Sources: School Surveillance Zone, The Brennan Center for Justice at NYU Student Activity Monitoring Software Research Insights and Recommendations, Center for Democracy and Technology With Safety in Mind, Schools Turn to Facial Recognition Technology. But at What Cost?,  EdSurge RealNetworks Provides SAFR Facial Recognition Solution for Free to Every K-12 School in the U.S. and Canada, RealNetworks Under digital surveillance: how American schools spy on millions of kids, The Guardian Facial recognition in schools: Even supporters say it won't stop shootings, CNET Aggression Detectors: The Unproven, Invasive Surveillance Technology Schools Are Using to Monitor Students, ProPublica Why Expensive Social Media Monitoring Has Failed to Protect Schools, Slate Tracked: How colleges use AI to monitor student protests, The Dallas Morning News Demonstrations and Protests: Using Social Media to Gather Intelligence and Respond to Campus Crowds, Social Sentinel New N.C. A&T committee will address sexual assault, Winston-Salem Journal BYU students hold ‘I Can't Breathe' protest on campus, Daily Herald Thrown bagels during MSU celebration lead to arrests, Detroit Free Press Show notes and credits: Intro Music: “Spellbound” by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ Outro Music: “Good God” by Wowa (unminus.com)

Into America
The Ghosts of Midterms Past

Into America

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 32:54 Very Popular


Midterm elections are critical junctures for Black America, moments in time that have transformed the wellbeing of the community — for better or worse.In 1962, the Democrats' strong showing helped pave the way for the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Backlash to President Clinton brought the Republican Revolution of 1994, which led to the Welfare Reform Act of 1996. And in 2010, President Obama lost control of Congress, essentially halting major legislative progress for the rest of his presidency. On this episode of Into America, Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee, a Democrat from Texas, recounts what it was like being elected in 1994, and surviving the red wave of 2010 — two elections she says had disastrous consequences for her Black constituents. And according to Ted Johnson, an expert in the Black electorate at the Brennan Center for Justice, 2022 is shaping up to be another crucial year. Columbia University professor Fredrick Harris put it this way: “History does not repeat itself,” he told us, “but it sure does rhyme.”For a transcript, please visit msnbc.com/intoamerica. Follow and share the show on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram, using the handle @intoamericapod.Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com.For More:NBC: Plan Your Vote 2022 Midterm ElectionsThe Power of the Black Vote: Creating a New SouthThe Gen Z Midterm Test

The Brian Lehrer Show
Court Rulings on Midterm Voting

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 43:41


Wendy Weiser, vice president of Democracy at the Brennan Center for Justice at NYU School of Law, talks about recent court rulings affecting voting in Arizona and Pennsylvania.

The Takeaway
Georgia at the Intersections: Voting Rights

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 20:21


Since 2020, election officials are “leaving in droves,” in many cases due to the misinformation campaigns and the subsequent threats made against them. In fact, the FBI issued a warning a few weeks ago that in seven states, including Arizona, Colorado, Georgia, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Nevada, and Wisconsin, there have been an unusual level of threats continuing against election officials. In states like Arizona and Georgia, we've also seen how voter intimidation and suppression tactics are being used with baseless claims of voter fraud used as justification.  In Georgia, Joe Biden became the first Democratic president to win Georgia in nearly three decades in 2020, and a strong voter turnout helped send two Democrats to the US Senate, flipping control of the chamber to the Democratic party and making the state of Georgia a swing state.  But even as Democrats where celebrating their wins, Republican lawmakers in Georgia, were seizing on the potential political gains from Trump's, ‘Big Lie.' And through that traction of disinformation passed the controversial Georgia Senate Bill SB 202. Which restricts almost all aspects of voting, including a provision that has made it easier for regular citizens to challenge the eligibility of other voters in their county.  We speak with Lawrence Norden, senior director of the Elections and Government Program for the Brennan Center for Justice, to hear about how political violence and threats of violence are playing out for the Midterms, and what it means for our democracy and free and fair elections. On The Media reporter, Micah Loewinger also joins The Takeaway to talk about how this is affecting voters, in the latest installment of our occasional series, Georgia at the Intersections.

The Takeaway
Georgia at the Intersections: Voting Rights

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 20:21


Since 2020, election officials are “leaving in droves,” in many cases due to the misinformation campaigns and the subsequent threats made against them. In fact, the FBI issued a warning a few weeks ago that in seven states, including Arizona, Colorado, Georgia, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Nevada, and Wisconsin, there have been an unusual level of threats continuing against election officials. In states like Arizona and Georgia, we've also seen how voter intimidation and suppression tactics are being used with baseless claims of voter fraud used as justification.  In Georgia, Joe Biden became the first Democratic president to win Georgia in nearly three decades in 2020, and a strong voter turnout helped send two Democrats to the US Senate, flipping control of the chamber to the Democratic party and making the state of Georgia a swing state.  But even as Democrats where celebrating their wins, Republican lawmakers in Georgia, were seizing on the potential political gains from Trump's, ‘Big Lie.' And through that traction of disinformation passed the controversial Georgia Senate Bill SB 202. Which restricts almost all aspects of voting, including a provision that has made it easier for regular citizens to challenge the eligibility of other voters in their county.  We speak with Lawrence Norden, senior director of the Elections and Government Program for the Brennan Center for Justice, to hear about how political violence and threats of violence are playing out for the Midterms, and what it means for our democracy and free and fair elections. On The Media reporter, Micah Loewinger also joins The Takeaway to talk about how this is affecting voters, in the latest installment of our occasional series, Georgia at the Intersections.

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly
With less than a week until Election Day, do political donations still matter?

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 16:55 Very Popular


Political candidates are always asking for money. A listener called in to ask if donating actually makes a difference so close to Election Day and what happens to donations that go unspent after Tuesday. We'll get into it and answer more of your questions about the Strategic Petroleum Reserve and why fines might not keep Meta from breaking campaign finance laws. Plus, Kai and Kimberly fill us in on what they look for when they’re car (or motorcycle) shopping. Here’s everything we talked about today: “Did Money Win?” from OpenSecrets “The 2018 Small Donor Boom Was Drowned Out by Big Donors, Thanks to Citizens United” from the Brennan Center for Justice “Republicans Confront Unexpected Online Money Slowdown” from The New York Times “Supreme Court overturns law that barred Ted Cruz from fully recouping a personal loan he made to his campaign” from The Texas Tribune “Money isn’t leaving politics any time soon” from Marketplace “When a political campaign ends, where does all the extra money go?” from CBS News Strategic Petroleum Reserve from the Department of Energy “What is the Strategic Petroleum Reserve?” from PBS NewsHour “Selling the government’s oil stockpile while prices are low seems ridiculous … is it?” from Vox “Strategic oil release comes with guaranteed buybacks, but will anyone do the drilling?” from Marketplace “Meta fined $24.7M for campaign finance disclosure violations” from AP News If you've got a question about the economy, business or technology, let us know. We're at makemesmart@marketplace.org or leave us a message at 508-U-B-SMART.

Rules of the Game: The Bolder Advocacy Podcast
Post-Election Advocacy 2022

Rules of the Game: The Bolder Advocacy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 18:29


On this edition of the pod, we conclude our three-part series on nonprofit election advocacy and focus on post-election advocacy activities. After election day there are a wide array of opportunities to protect voters and the election itself. Whether it's working with state and local officials to ensure that all ballots are counted or litigating potential violations of state or federal election-related laws, nonprofits have a big role to play in the days following November 8, 2022.   Our attorneys for this episode   Leslie Barnes Tim Mooney Natalie Ossenfort   Shownotes   Reminder: 501(c)(3)s cannot support or oppose candidates Nonpartisan motivations to advocate in contested elections Proper administration of the election under the law Ensuring all legal votes are counted Protecting the will of the electorate/upholding democratic principles No IRS guidance on this, but it's consistent with approved pre-election and election days advocacy Example: Litigation Brennan Center's work in 2000 Amicus brief in Bush v. Gore Partisan and nonpartisan interests can legally coexist While the Brennan Center argued for the same thing as the Gore campaign, its work was still nonpartisan because the arguments were centered on voters' fundamental constitutional rights and not the partisan interests of the campaign. Other examples 2020 example Common Cause's work in the Georgia gubernatorial election in 2018 Michigan Welfare Rights Organization v. Donald Trump in 2020 - filed by NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund (c3) and NAACP (c4) for violating the Voting Rights Act and the Ku Klux Klan Act What kinds of advocacy are available to nonprofits following election day? Administrative advocacy, including advocacy around secretary of state certifications of the winners, and the process of counting of ballot (depending on state, may qualify as lobbying that triggers registration) Ballot chasing and curing. If a voter submits a ballot that fails to meet requirements under state law (i.e. stray marks, wrong envelopes, their signature doesn't match the one on file, etc.), there may be a role that nonprofits can play to help those voters fix the problem within the time limits set by state law (check out practical guidance voter assistance series for additional details about state laws related to ballot chasing and curing activities) - educate voters on how to track their own ballots Protests and other public gatherings, demanding proper administration of all ballot counts and fidelity to election procedures under the law.  Direct advocacy to members of legislative bodies or governors when they are making decisions that are critical to the disposition of an election. This includes lobbying for emergency legislation to keep polls open or allow absentee voting to be extended, calls for oversight, in the event of natural disaster, following Ian and Fiona. Superstorm Sandy Impacted the 2012 Presidential election. 501(c)(3)s can do any of these things for nonpartisan motivations 501(c)(4)s and other nonprofits can do these things with nonpartisan motivations, or with partisan reasons (tax law limits how much). Election laws dictate the rest. 501(c)(3)s can work in coalitions with other nonprofits that are doing nonpartisan motivated work Each state will have different deadlines for election certification – remember that calls to “stop the count” or anything else to hinder the proper administration of the vote prior to that date are anti-democratic acts and nonprofits can take a role in defending against these cynical tactics.     Resources What Nonprofits Can Do in a Contested Election The Connection Accountability Advocacy for 501(c)(3)s 501(c)(3) Contact with Parties and Candidates Concerning Election Protection Efforts Practical Guidance: Voter Assistance and Lobbying Series Bolder Advocacy's technical assistance: 866-NP-LOBBY or email us at advocacy@afj.org

Marketplace All-in-One
With less than a week until Election Day, do political donations still matter?

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 16:55


Political candidates are always asking for money. A listener called in to ask if donating actually makes a difference so close to Election Day and what happens to donations that go unspent after Tuesday. We'll get into it and answer more of your questions about the Strategic Petroleum Reserve and why fines might not keep Meta from breaking campaign finance laws. Plus, Kai and Kimberly fill us in on what they look for when they’re car (or motorcycle) shopping. Here’s everything we talked about today: “Did Money Win?” from OpenSecrets “The 2018 Small Donor Boom Was Drowned Out by Big Donors, Thanks to Citizens United” from the Brennan Center for Justice “Republicans Confront Unexpected Online Money Slowdown” from The New York Times “Supreme Court overturns law that barred Ted Cruz from fully recouping a personal loan he made to his campaign” from The Texas Tribune “Money isn’t leaving politics any time soon” from Marketplace “When a political campaign ends, where does all the extra money go?” from CBS News Strategic Petroleum Reserve from the Department of Energy “What is the Strategic Petroleum Reserve?” from PBS NewsHour “Selling the government’s oil stockpile while prices are low seems ridiculous … is it?” from Vox “Strategic oil release comes with guaranteed buybacks, but will anyone do the drilling?” from Marketplace “Meta fined $24.7M for campaign finance disclosure violations” from AP News If you've got a question about the economy, business or technology, let us know. We're at makemesmart@marketplace.org or leave us a message at 508-U-B-SMART.

Teleforum
What Are the Limits of Emergency Executive Powers?

Teleforum

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 64:33


The use of presidential emergency powers has raised controversy under administrations of both parties. President Trump's attempt to transfer funds to build his border wall, the CDC's eviction moratorium and OSHA vaccine mandate, Title 42 border expulsions, and President Biden's student loan forgiveness plan have all raised questions of overreach. This panel explored the pros and cons of executive emergency powers and whether or not there should be tighter constraints on their use.Featuring:- Daniel J. Dew, Legal Policy Director, Pacific Legal Foundation- Elizabeth Goitein, Senior Director, Liberty & National Security Program, Brennan Center for Justice at New York University Law School- Ilya Somin, Professor of Law, Antonin Scalia Law School, George Mason University- Moderator: Ilya Shapiro, Senior Fellow and Director of Constitutional Studies, Manhattan Institute

In The Thick
ITT Sound Off: Legacy Media Problems

In The Thick

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 21:07


Maria and Julio get into the latest with the midterms, including the Pennsylvania Senate debate between Republican candidate Mehmet Oz and Democratic candidate John Fetterman. They also talk about the mainstream media's coverage of the election, the consequences of Kanye West's antisemitic and anti-Black comments and voter intimidation efforts in Arizona. ITT Staff Picks: “It's a reflection of a larger issue: our country's persisting discomfort around disabled bodies and minds. In some ways, it's not surprising, given the fact that we continue to see so few visible examples of people with disabilities integrated into everyday life,” writes Mihir Kakara about the discourse around Democrat John Fetterman in this opinion piece for The Philadelphia Inquirer. “After years of trafficking in bigotry, Kanye West has finally been kan-celed. But at second glance, the consequences for West might be less a victory for social justice than a sign of its current limits,” writes Karen Attiah in her analysis for The Washington Post. Katie Friel and Jasleen Singh of the Brennan Center for Justice share this guide on federal and state laws addressing voter intimidation as we head into the midterm elections. Photo credit: AP Photo/Ryan Collerd, File

Best of the Left - Progressive Politics and Culture, Curated by a Human
#1521 The election of a lifetime for this year

Best of the Left - Progressive Politics and Culture, Curated by a Human

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 67:47


Air Date 10/26/2022 Today, we take a look at the 2022 election and the political dynamics at play as the GOP continues on its path of ideological anti-democracy and Democrats work to register new voters and get out the vote. Be part of the show! Leave us a message at 202-999-3991 or email Jay@BestOfTheLeft.com  Transcript BestOfTheLeft.com/Support (Get AD FREE Shows and Bonus Content) Join our Discord community! OUR AFFILIATE LINKS: ExpressVPN.com/BestOfTheLeft GET INTERNET PRIVACY WITH EXPRESS VPN! BestOfTheLeft.com/Libro SUPPORT INDIE BOOKSHOPS, GET YOUR AUDIOBOOK FROM LIBRO! BestOfTheLeft.com/Bookshop BotL BOOKSTORE SHOW NOTES Ch. 1: "Democracy Demands We Participate": Black Voters Mobilize for Midterms Amid GOP Voter Suppression Part 1 - Democracy Now! - Air Date 10-21-22 We speak to law professor Kimberlé Crenshaw and civil rights attorney Barbara Arnwine, who are on an Arc of Voter Justice bus tour of 26 cities across the country to increase Black voter turnout at critical midterm elections in November. Ch. 2: Battling the Big Liars with Dan Pfeiffer - How We Win - Air Date 10-19-22 Biden is making it clear that abortion rights are on the ballot, as early voting kicks off in many states. New polls are worrying Democrats, but don't worry… keep working! Ch. 3: Bernie Sanders Knows How Democrats Can Win Featuring Bernie Sanders - Thom Hartmann Program - Air Date 10-13-22 Democrats need a strategy to win the upcoming midterm election and Senator Bernie Sanders has a strategy to win. Ch. 4: Battling the Big Liars with Dan Pfeiffer Part 2 - How We Win - Air Date 10-19-22 Ch. 5: Senate Races That Could Tip The Balance - Deconstructed - Air Date 10-14-22 Journalists Jon Ralston and George Chidi join Ryan Grim to discuss two potentially pivotal states, Nevada and Georgia, where tight races for the Senate are underway. Ch. 6: "Democracy Demands We Participate": Black Voters Mobilize for Midterms Amid GOP Voter Suppression Part 2 - Democracy Now! - Air Date 10-21-22 Ch. 7: How We Vote! with Andrea Hailey - How We Win - Air Date 9-21-22 A conversation with the woman who is leading the charge for the largest nonprofit, nonpartisan voting registration and get-out-the-vote technology platform in America, the CEO of Vote.org, Andrea Hailey! Ch. 8: Julie Hollar and Jim Naureckas on 2022 Midterms - CounterSpin - Air Date 10-21-22 This midterm is a big-picture election. MEMBERS-ONLY BONUS CLIP(S) Ch. 9: How Midterm Campaigns are Framing Crime - The Takeaway - Air Date 10-20-22 We're joined by Rena Karefa-Johnson, Director of National programming at FWD.us, and Ames Grawert, Senior Counsel at the Justice Program at the Brennan Center for Justice at NYU. Ch. 10: Julie Hollar and Jim Naureckas on 2022 Midterms Part 2 - CounterSpin - Air Date 10-21-22 VOICEMAILS Ch. 10: The prolonged fight - V from Central New York Ch. 11: Doing the work - Wendy FINAL COMMENTS Ch. 12: Final comments on doing the work to normalize all humans TAKE ACTION! MIDTERMS MINUTE 2022: Short on time? Donate once... - Secretary of State Races: MoveOn.org's "America for All" midterm election campaign - Senate Races: SwingLeft Hold the Senate Fund, or SwingLeft Immediate Impact Fund (Senate & House) - House races: SwingLeft Hold the House Fund, or the SwingLeft Immediate Impact Fund (House & Senate)  - Governors: SwingLeft Governor Fund - State Legislative Races: SwingLeft Legislative Fund MIDTERMS MINUTE Segments: Installment #1 , Installment #2 , Installment #3 Researched and written by BOTL Communications Director Amanda Hoffman  MUSIC (Blue Dot Sessions) SHOW IMAGE:  Description: Photo of a yellow sticker with black writing that says “Resist the NAZI-GOP Coalition” on a cross walk sign. The red hand “stop” symbol on the sign is visible below the sticker. Credit: “Resist the NAZI-GOP Coalition Sticker” by Amanda Hoffman | License: CC BY 2.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/   Produced by Jay! Tomlinson

The Great Battlefield
Election Workers with Margo, Sara and Liz about the Film No Time To Fail

The Great Battlefield

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 51:39


Documentary Filmmakers Margo Guernsey and Sara Archambault and Liz Howard of the Brennan Center for Justice join The Great Battlefield podcast to talk about the film "No Time To Fail" which documents election workers in Rhode Island during the 2020 Presidential Election.

Marketplace Tech
Voting security still depends on low-tech paper trails

Marketplace Tech

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 7:37 Very Popular


Since the 2020 election, there's been a lot of attention on, misinformation about and lawsuits over the technology many jurisdictions use in voting. It's rare for a voting system in the U.S. to be “paperless.” Typically, these systems use a combination of high-tech and low-tech, like a voting machine that prints out a paper ballot with your electronic choices. Marketplace’s Kimberly Adams recently discussed the shift away from paperless systems with Lawrence Norden, senior director of the Elections and Government Program at the Brennan Center for Justice, a nonprofit law and policy institute.

Marketplace All-in-One
Voting security still depends on low-tech paper trails

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 7:37


Since the 2020 election, there's been a lot of attention on, misinformation about and lawsuits over the technology many jurisdictions use in voting. It's rare for a voting system in the U.S. to be “paperless.” Typically, these systems use a combination of high-tech and low-tech, like a voting machine that prints out a paper ballot with your electronic choices. Marketplace’s Kimberly Adams recently discussed the shift away from paperless systems with Lawrence Norden, senior director of the Elections and Government Program at the Brennan Center for Justice, a nonprofit law and policy institute.

Texas Tribune Brief
Voters of color had mail-in ballots rejected at higher rates than white voters in Texas' March primary

Texas Tribune Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 5:05


Asian voters were most disproportionately affected by the new ID requirements included in voting restrictions passed by the 2021 Legislature, a Brennan Center for Justice analysis found.

The Brian Lehrer Show
30 Issues: Gerrymandering …or… Is There Any Way To Draw Fair District Lines?

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 19:51


For today's issue, Michael Li, senior counsel for the Brennan Center's Democracy Program, talks about the process of redrawing district lines after the census every 10 years and how that process can favor parties and incumbency, or voters.

The Takeaway
How Midterm Campaigns are Framing Crime

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 21:04


According to data from AdImpact, Republican candidates nationwide have recently increased their spending on ads attacking Democrats' approaches to crime and public safety. We look at how these narratives might impact voters' perception of their own safety and dig deeper into the data available on crimes rates — and what it can tell us about both causes and solutions to crime. We're joined by Rena Karefa-Johnson, Director of National programming at FWD.us, and Ames Grawert, Senior Counsel at the Justice Program at the Brennan Center for Justice at NYU.  

Brian Lehrer: A Daily Politics Podcast
Why The Party With The Most Votes Won't Necessarily Control Congress

Brian Lehrer: A Daily Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 18:50


With election districts being redrawn around the country, how do changing electoral boundaries change the politics that come out of those elections?  On Today's Show:Michael Li, senior counsel for the Brennan Center's Democracy Program, talks about the process of redrawing district lines after the census every 10 years and how that process can favor parties and incumbency, or voters.

Go Behind The Ballot
What ‘On the Ballot' at TribFest22 Taught Us About Voter Suppression Today (Elections Mini)

Go Behind The Ballot

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 37:45


Representative Colin Allred and Michael Li from the Brennan Center's Democracy Program spoke of their concerns about the current state of voting on a panel called ‘On the Ballot.' They offered anecdotes and real life examples to educate the audience. For example, they debunked illusory claims like ‘widespread voter fraud' by pointing out the lack of evidence after 22,000 hours of investigation by Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton.TribFest is the annual festival sponsored by the Texas Tribune designed to bring people from all walks of life together to talk politics from big names to small names. We attended and learned so much.

Lawyer 2 Lawyer -  Law News and Legal Topics
The Legitimacy of SCOTUS

Lawyer 2 Lawyer - Law News and Legal Topics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 35:29


Last month at a judicial conference in Colorado Springs, two judges from the Denver-based 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals interviewed Chief Justice John Roberts on all things SCOTUS, in which he decried attacks on the court's legitimacy following the Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health ruling. Roberts said "If the court doesn't retain its legitimate function of interpreting the constitution, I'm not sure who would take up that mantle. You don't want the political branches telling you what the law is, and you don't want public opinion to be the guide about what the appropriate decision is…” In a later response to Roberts comments, Justice Elena Kagan declared “Judges create legitimacy problems for themselves when they don't act like courts” and “when they instead stray into places that look like politics.” So does the Supreme Court of the United States have a legitimacy problem? In this episode, host Craig Williams joins guest Douglas Keith, counsel in the Brennan Center's Democracy Program, as they spotlight the legitimacy of the Supreme Court. Craig and Doug take a look at the public's reaction to recent SCOTUS decisions, the justices reaction to a legitimacy problem in the High Court, and what the new term will bring.

Legal Talk Network - Law News and Legal Topics

Last month at a judicial conference in Colorado Springs, two judges from the Denver-based 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals interviewed Chief Justice John Roberts on all things SCOTUS, in which he decried attacks on the court's legitimacy following the Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health ruling. Roberts said "If the court doesn't retain its legitimate function of interpreting the constitution, I'm not sure who would take up that mantle. You don't want the political branches telling you what the law is, and you don't want public opinion to be the guide about what the appropriate decision is…” In a later response to Roberts comments, Justice Elena Kagan declared “Judges create legitimacy problems for themselves when they don't act like courts” and “when they instead stray into places that look like politics.” So does the Supreme Court of the United States have a legitimacy problem? In this episode, host Craig Williams joins guest Douglas Keith, counsel in the Brennan Center's Democracy Program, as they spotlight the legitimacy of the Supreme Court. Craig and Doug take a look at the public's reaction to recent SCOTUS decisions, the justices reaction to a legitimacy problem in the High Court, and what the new term will bring.

Conspiracy Clearinghouse
Electoral Collage – Voter Fraud, Election Interference & Other Shenanigans

Conspiracy Clearinghouse

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 55:02


EPISODE 69 | Electoral Collage – Voter Fraud, Election Interference & Other Shenanigans (The World Is Weird 6) The US midterms are coming up and there's lots of chatter about fraud. Are they legit? Has there been fraud and interference in the past? Yes, but not every time foul has been cried. A look at claims and scandals 1792-1982, plus a thumbnail history of American political parties. Like what we do? Then buy us a beer or three via our page on Buy Me a Coffee. #ConspiracyClearinghouse #sharingiscaring #donations #support #buymeacoffee You can also SUBSCRIBE to this podcast. Review us here or on IMDb! SECTIONS 03:18 - Hail to the Thief - intro 05:14 - 1792 New York Governor's Race 07:47 - 1824 Presdiential Election ("Corrupt Bargain") 10:33 - Nullifiers & Anti-Masons in the 1820s & 30s 13:50 - 1838 – The New Jersey Broad Seal War & Cooping (plus Edgar Allen Poe) 18:17 - 1855 – Bleeding Kansas 24:57 - 1860 Presidential Election - A Nation Divides 27:38 - White League, Red Shirts and the Compromise of 1877 36:18 - 1888 Presidential Election (Packs of Five, the Murchison Letter & the Lodge Bill) 42:12 - 1948 Senate Elections in Texas 44:20 - 1960 Presidential Election 47:15 - Unpledged & faithless electors 49:20 - Illinois in 1982 Music by Fanette Ronjat MORE INFO: October Surprise: Fact or Fiction? Compulsory Voting on IDEA 8 Most Contentious US Presidential Elections Voter Fraud on the Heritage Foundation Voter fraud used to be rampant. Now it's an anomaly. Claims of 'voter fraud' have a long history in America. And they are false Debunking the Voter Fraud Myth paper from the Brennan Center for Justice The 1824 Presidential Election and the “Corrupt Bargain” The Nullifiers on Amercian Heritage Want to find real election fraud? Look at the history of Kansas, United States in 1800s Bleeding Kansas at Khan Academy Compromise of 1877 Why Democrats are donkeys and Republicans are elephants Election fraud Chicago style: Illinois' decades-old notoriety for election corruption is legendary The presidential penalty: Why voters so often punish the president in midterm elections. Follow us on social for extra goodies: Facebook (including upcoming conspiracy-themed events) Twitter YouTube (extra videos on the topic, Old Time Radio shows, music playlists and more) Other Podcasts by Derek DeWitt DIGITAL SIGNAGE DONE RIGHT - Winner of a 2022 Gold Quill Award, the 2021 AVA Digital Award Gold, 2021 Silver Davey Award & 2020 Communicator Award of Excellence, and on numerous top 10 podcast lists.  PRAGUE TIMES - A city is more than just a location - it's a kaleidoscope of history, places, people and trends. This podcast looks at Prague, in the center of Europe, from a number of perspectives, including what it is now, what is has been and where it's going. It's Prague THEN, Prague NOW, Prague LATER

Daily News Brief
Daily News Brief for Wednesday, October 12th, 2022

Daily News Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 16:39


This is Garrison Hardie with your CrossPolitic Daily News Brief for Wednesday, October 12th, 2022. I just got back from our Fight Laugh Feast Conference in Knoxville TN, and we announced while we were out there, where our next conference will be at the Ark Encounter next year! So stay tuned for when registration will open up, and we hope to see you and your family out in Kentucky, October of next year. Also, FLF Magazine: We are on a mission to make magazines great again. So, subscribe to our Fight Laugh Feast magazine. This is a quarterly mini-book like experience, packed full of a variety of authors that includes theologically-driven cultural commentary, a Psalm of the quarter, recipes for feasting, laughter sprinkled throughout the glossy pages, and more. Sign your church up, sign your grumpy uncle up, and while you are at it…sign up the Pope, Elon Musks, and Russel Moore. Disclaimer: This magazine will guarantee various responses and CrossPolitic is not held liable for any of them. Reading the whole magazine may cause theological maturation, possibly encourage your kids to take the Lord’s Supper with you, and will likely cause you to randomly chuckle in joy at God’s wondrous world. Sign up today! Four issues and $60 per year, that is it. Go to fightlaughfeast.com right now to sign up!. Now, here’s what you may have missed over the weekend. https://www.dailywire.com/news/colorado-officials-incorrectly-sent-out-30000-voter-registration-postcards-to-noncitizens Colorado Officials ‘Incorrectly’ Sent Out 30,000 Voter Registration Postcards To Noncitizens Colorado officials claim they accidentally sent approximately 30,000 postcards last month to noncitizens instructing them how they could register to vote. First reported by Colorado Public Radio News, Democratic Secretary of State Jena Griswold’s office said department employees had sent the postcards on Sept. 27 after comparing a list of 102,000 names provided by the Electronic Registration Information Center, a nonprofit organization aiming to improve U.S. voter rolls and advocating residents to vote. “The Department has become aware that approximately 30,000 EBU [Eligible But Unregistered] postcard mailers were incorrectly sent to ineligible Coloradans,” a spokesperson for the Colorado Secretary of State’s Office told local media. “The office is undertaking an internal review of the incident and will take any corrective action that is warranted.” Griswold insisted noncitizens would not be allowed to register to vote. The postcards, which the office printed in English and Spanish, read, “A message from Colorado Secretary of State Jena Griswold . . . Our records indicate that you or your household may be eligible to vote, but do not appear to be registered at your current address.” The mailers did include that to vote that residents must be 18 years old by Election Day, a United States citizen, and a Colorado resident for at least 22 days before the upcoming election, according to Colorado Public Radio News. Griswold’s office said they plan on sending out correction mailers to the noncitizens, “reminding them that only those that meet the above requirements are eligible to register.” According to local media, while the office had compared the list of potential unregistered voters to local DMV records, the data had included noncitizen drivers with Colorado driver’s licenses which the state issues for noncitizens to drive legally. The National Council on State Legislatures website shows Colorado as one of at least 17 states, along with the District of Columbia, that issue driver’s licenses to non-U.S. citizens. However, the system did not distinguish their eligibility to vote. Sean Morales-Doyle, director of the Voting Rights Program at the Brennan Center for Justice, told The Journal that the system making a mistake indicates it works. Griswold is up for reelection in the November midterms, where she will face Republican Pam Anderson, the head of the state’s county clerks association. https://www.theepochtimes.com/exclusive-cdc-wont-release-review-of-post-vaccination-heart-inflammation_4786038.html?utm_source=partner&utm_campaign=BonginoReport&src_src=partner&src_cmp=BonginoReport CDC Won’t Release Review of Post-Vaccination Heart Inflammation The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) will not release its review of post-COVID-19-vaccination heart inflammation. The CDC has been performing abstractions on reports of post-vaccination myocarditis, a form of heart inflammation, submitted to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. But the agency is saying that federal law prevents it from releasing the results. The abstractions “are considered medical records which are withheld in full from disclosure,” the CDC told The Epoch Times in a recent letter, responding to a Freedom of Information Act request. One of the exemptions in the act says that agencies can withhold materials that are “specifically exempted from disclosure by statute, if that statute (i) requires that the matters be withheld from the public in such a manner as to leave no discretion on the issue; or (ii) establishes particular criteria for withholding or refers to particular types of matters to be withheld; and (B) if enacted after the date of enactment of the OPEN FOIA Act of 2009, specifically cites to this paragraph.” The CDC pointed to the Public Health Service Act, which was enacted in 1944, and says that vaccine injury reports and other information that may identify a person shall not be made available to any person except the person who received the vaccine or a legal representative for that person. The information sought is available through the CDC website without details that would identify patients, the agency also said. The CDC said that it does not have a formal definition of “abstraction” but that it means the process of reviewing medical records, including autopsy reports and death certificates, and recording data in a database. “Please note that this definition means that any abstracted data, because they originate from medical records, is also considered medical records,” a CDC records officer told The Epoch Times in an email. Refusing to release the data raises concerns about transparency, according to Barbara Loe Fisher, co-founder and president of the National Vaccine Information Center. “The stubborn refusal of officials heading up federal health agencies responsible for protecting the public health to come clean with Americans about what they know about COVID vaccine risks is stunning,” Fisher told The Epoch Times in an email. Fisher noted that the CDC has funded electronic medical record systems that collect personal health information and that the agency shares the data with a number of third parties, such as contractors and researchers. Fisher called for a congressional probe into what she described as “the disturbing lack of transparency on the part of federal agency officials, who granted COVID vaccine manufacturers an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) to widely distribute the vaccines in December 2020 and have recommended and aggressively promoted the vaccines for mandated use ever since.” In response to a separate Freedom of Information Act request, the CDC initially said that it did not perform any abstractions or produce any reports on post-vaccination myocarditis. That request was for reports between April 2, 2021, and Oct. 2, 2021. The agency also falsely said that a link between myocarditis and the messenger RNA COVID-19 vaccines was not known during that time. A possible link between those vaccines, made by Pfizer and Moderna, became known in early 2021. Many experts now acknowledge the link is likely or definitely causal. Dr. Rochelle Walensky, the CDC’s director, said in a press conference in April 2021 that the agency had not detected a link between the vaccines and myocarditis. The basis for that statement remains unclear. The CDC still hasn’t released the results of the data mining, to The Epoch Times, Sen. Ron Johnson (R-Wis.), or a nonprofit called Children’s Health Defense. The agency also declined to provide results from a different monitoring system, V-safe, to a nonprofit called Informed Consent Action Network, which then sued the agency and just recently received the first tranche of data. The FDA, meanwhile, has refused to release the results of a different type of analysis on the VAERS data, claiming it cannot separate the results from protected internal communications. The agency is also withholding autopsies conducted on people who died after getting COVID-19 vaccines, pointing to exceptions laid out in the Freedom of Information Act. Along with Johnson, several other lawmakers are pressing at least one of the agencies to release the data, asserting that not doing so is illegal. https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2022/10/10/nike-co-founder-phil-knight-donates-1-million-to-republican-oregon-gov-candidate-christine-drazan/ Nike Co-Founder Phil Knight Donates $1 Million to Republican Oregon Gov. Candidate Christine Drazan Knight’s donation to Drazan’s campaign comes after he donated $3.75 million to Independent candidate Betsy Johnson, signaling his strong dislike for Tina Kotek. Republican strategist Rebecca Tweed told KGW Knight’s donation said the two donations are not meant as an endorsement of either candidate but rather an attack against the Democrat candidate. The donation comes as Christine Drazan stands within striking distance of unseating Kotek in a deep blue state that has not elected a Republican governor since Vic Atiyeh in 1982. As Breitbart News reported last week, a recent Emerson College poll showed the Oregon House Republican leader actually leading Koteck by two points – 36 percent to 34 percent. A new Emerson College Polling survey shows former Oregon House Republican leader Drazan ahead of former state House Speaker Tina Kotek (D)–36 percent to 34 percent. Nineteen percent of those polled plan to vote for former Democrat state senator-turned independent Betsy Johnson. The poll was conducted between Sept. 30 – Oct. 1 with 796 very likely Oregon voters. The survey’s Credibility Interval (CI), similar to a margin of error, is ±3.4 percentage points. KGW political analyst Len Bergstein concurred with Rebecca Tweed that Phil Knight’s donation should be seen as a knock against Kotek by potentially putting Drazan on the path to victory. “As soon as he sees some polls that say ‘wait a minute, there’s a chance that Drazan could win,’ he’s saying well maybe my money could make the difference to push her over the top,” said Bergstein. “This is not a normal election. We’re having fun watching it because we have three original candidates for governor and a lot of interesting twists and turns in the race already,” Bergstein added. Armored Republic The Mission of Armored Republic is to Honor Christ by equipping Free Men with Tools of Liberty necessary to preserve God-given rights. In the Armored Republic there is no King but Christ. We are Free Craftsmen. Body Armor is a Tool of Liberty. We create Tools of Liberty. Free men must remain ever vigilant against tyranny wherever it appears. God has given us the tools of liberty needed to defend the rights He bestowed to us. Armored Republic is honored to offer you those Tools. Visit them, at ar500armor.com https://thepostmillennial.com/bidens-railway-deal-to-avert-strike-spiked-by-union?utm_campaign=64487 Biden's railway deal to avert strike spiked by union Nearly a month after President Biden announced that a deal had been reached between railroad companies and their unions, the deal has fallen apart, raising concerns for a possible strike. The Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way Employees Division of the Teamsters, one of the nation’s largest railroad unions, rejected the deal on Monday, expressing discontent with the number of paid sick days, according to the Washington Post. Officials said that members of the third-largest union rejected the proposed five-year contract in a 56 to 43 percent split. Both sides have agreed to continue with negotiations until at least November 19. Railroads are currently expected to continue operating normally. The deal included a 24 percent increase in pay by 2024, as well as $1,000 annual bonuses for employees over five years. The plan ensured that healthcare co-pays would not increase in price, but included only one paid sick day compared to the 15 days union leaders pushed for. The deal followed two years of negotiations between the rail carriers and unions, which prompted the White House to appoint an emergency board in July to mediate between the two groups. In September, Biden applauded the tentative deal reached, calling it "an important win for our economy and the American people." Now, it’s time for my favorite topic, sports! Let’s catch up with what’s happening in the world of football shall we? First in the college ranks: #3 Alabama 24 Texas A&M 20 #2 Ohio State 49 Michigan State 20 #1 Georgia 42 Auburn 10 #15 NC State 19 Florida State 17 Texas 49 OU 0 #13 TCU 38 #19 Kansas 31 #7 USC 30 WSU 14 NFL: Giants 27 Packers 22 Chargers 30 Browns 28 Jets 40 Dolphins 17 Bills 38 Steelers 3 Cowboys 22 Rams 10 Chiefs 30 Raiders 29 So that’s what you may have missed over the weekend: This has been your CrossPolitic Daily News Brief. If you liked the show, hit that share button for me down below. If you want to come to our conference next year, if you want to sign up for a club membership, or sign up for a magazine subscription, you can do all of that at fightlaughfeast.com. As always, if you’d like to email me a news story, ask about our conference, or become a corporate partner of CrossPolitic, email me, at garrison@fightlaughfeast.com. For CrossPolitic News, I’m Garrison Hardie. Have a great day, and Lord bless.

CrossPolitic Studios
Daily News Brief for Wednesday, October 12th, 2022 [Daily News Brief]

CrossPolitic Studios

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 16:39


This is Garrison Hardie with your CrossPolitic Daily News Brief for Wednesday, October 12th, 2022. I just got back from our Fight Laugh Feast Conference in Knoxville TN, and we announced while we were out there, where our next conference will be at the Ark Encounter next year! So stay tuned for when registration will open up, and we hope to see you and your family out in Kentucky, October of next year. Also, FLF Magazine: We are on a mission to make magazines great again. So, subscribe to our Fight Laugh Feast magazine. This is a quarterly mini-book like experience, packed full of a variety of authors that includes theologically-driven cultural commentary, a Psalm of the quarter, recipes for feasting, laughter sprinkled throughout the glossy pages, and more. Sign your church up, sign your grumpy uncle up, and while you are at it…sign up the Pope, Elon Musks, and Russel Moore. Disclaimer: This magazine will guarantee various responses and CrossPolitic is not held liable for any of them. Reading the whole magazine may cause theological maturation, possibly encourage your kids to take the Lord’s Supper with you, and will likely cause you to randomly chuckle in joy at God’s wondrous world. Sign up today! Four issues and $60 per year, that is it. Go to fightlaughfeast.com right now to sign up!. Now, here’s what you may have missed over the weekend. https://www.dailywire.com/news/colorado-officials-incorrectly-sent-out-30000-voter-registration-postcards-to-noncitizens Colorado Officials ‘Incorrectly’ Sent Out 30,000 Voter Registration Postcards To Noncitizens Colorado officials claim they accidentally sent approximately 30,000 postcards last month to noncitizens instructing them how they could register to vote. First reported by Colorado Public Radio News, Democratic Secretary of State Jena Griswold’s office said department employees had sent the postcards on Sept. 27 after comparing a list of 102,000 names provided by the Electronic Registration Information Center, a nonprofit organization aiming to improve U.S. voter rolls and advocating residents to vote. “The Department has become aware that approximately 30,000 EBU [Eligible But Unregistered] postcard mailers were incorrectly sent to ineligible Coloradans,” a spokesperson for the Colorado Secretary of State’s Office told local media. “The office is undertaking an internal review of the incident and will take any corrective action that is warranted.” Griswold insisted noncitizens would not be allowed to register to vote. The postcards, which the office printed in English and Spanish, read, “A message from Colorado Secretary of State Jena Griswold . . . Our records indicate that you or your household may be eligible to vote, but do not appear to be registered at your current address.” The mailers did include that to vote that residents must be 18 years old by Election Day, a United States citizen, and a Colorado resident for at least 22 days before the upcoming election, according to Colorado Public Radio News. Griswold’s office said they plan on sending out correction mailers to the noncitizens, “reminding them that only those that meet the above requirements are eligible to register.” According to local media, while the office had compared the list of potential unregistered voters to local DMV records, the data had included noncitizen drivers with Colorado driver’s licenses which the state issues for noncitizens to drive legally. The National Council on State Legislatures website shows Colorado as one of at least 17 states, along with the District of Columbia, that issue driver’s licenses to non-U.S. citizens. However, the system did not distinguish their eligibility to vote. Sean Morales-Doyle, director of the Voting Rights Program at the Brennan Center for Justice, told The Journal that the system making a mistake indicates it works. Griswold is up for reelection in the November midterms, where she will face Republican Pam Anderson, the head of the state’s county clerks association. https://www.theepochtimes.com/exclusive-cdc-wont-release-review-of-post-vaccination-heart-inflammation_4786038.html?utm_source=partner&utm_campaign=BonginoReport&src_src=partner&src_cmp=BonginoReport CDC Won’t Release Review of Post-Vaccination Heart Inflammation The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) will not release its review of post-COVID-19-vaccination heart inflammation. The CDC has been performing abstractions on reports of post-vaccination myocarditis, a form of heart inflammation, submitted to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. But the agency is saying that federal law prevents it from releasing the results. The abstractions “are considered medical records which are withheld in full from disclosure,” the CDC told The Epoch Times in a recent letter, responding to a Freedom of Information Act request. One of the exemptions in the act says that agencies can withhold materials that are “specifically exempted from disclosure by statute, if that statute (i) requires that the matters be withheld from the public in such a manner as to leave no discretion on the issue; or (ii) establishes particular criteria for withholding or refers to particular types of matters to be withheld; and (B) if enacted after the date of enactment of the OPEN FOIA Act of 2009, specifically cites to this paragraph.” The CDC pointed to the Public Health Service Act, which was enacted in 1944, and says that vaccine injury reports and other information that may identify a person shall not be made available to any person except the person who received the vaccine or a legal representative for that person. The information sought is available through the CDC website without details that would identify patients, the agency also said. The CDC said that it does not have a formal definition of “abstraction” but that it means the process of reviewing medical records, including autopsy reports and death certificates, and recording data in a database. “Please note that this definition means that any abstracted data, because they originate from medical records, is also considered medical records,” a CDC records officer told The Epoch Times in an email. Refusing to release the data raises concerns about transparency, according to Barbara Loe Fisher, co-founder and president of the National Vaccine Information Center. “The stubborn refusal of officials heading up federal health agencies responsible for protecting the public health to come clean with Americans about what they know about COVID vaccine risks is stunning,” Fisher told The Epoch Times in an email. Fisher noted that the CDC has funded electronic medical record systems that collect personal health information and that the agency shares the data with a number of third parties, such as contractors and researchers. Fisher called for a congressional probe into what she described as “the disturbing lack of transparency on the part of federal agency officials, who granted COVID vaccine manufacturers an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) to widely distribute the vaccines in December 2020 and have recommended and aggressively promoted the vaccines for mandated use ever since.” In response to a separate Freedom of Information Act request, the CDC initially said that it did not perform any abstractions or produce any reports on post-vaccination myocarditis. That request was for reports between April 2, 2021, and Oct. 2, 2021. The agency also falsely said that a link between myocarditis and the messenger RNA COVID-19 vaccines was not known during that time. A possible link between those vaccines, made by Pfizer and Moderna, became known in early 2021. Many experts now acknowledge the link is likely or definitely causal. Dr. Rochelle Walensky, the CDC’s director, said in a press conference in April 2021 that the agency had not detected a link between the vaccines and myocarditis. The basis for that statement remains unclear. The CDC still hasn’t released the results of the data mining, to The Epoch Times, Sen. Ron Johnson (R-Wis.), or a nonprofit called Children’s Health Defense. The agency also declined to provide results from a different monitoring system, V-safe, to a nonprofit called Informed Consent Action Network, which then sued the agency and just recently received the first tranche of data. The FDA, meanwhile, has refused to release the results of a different type of analysis on the VAERS data, claiming it cannot separate the results from protected internal communications. The agency is also withholding autopsies conducted on people who died after getting COVID-19 vaccines, pointing to exceptions laid out in the Freedom of Information Act. Along with Johnson, several other lawmakers are pressing at least one of the agencies to release the data, asserting that not doing so is illegal. https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2022/10/10/nike-co-founder-phil-knight-donates-1-million-to-republican-oregon-gov-candidate-christine-drazan/ Nike Co-Founder Phil Knight Donates $1 Million to Republican Oregon Gov. Candidate Christine Drazan Knight’s donation to Drazan’s campaign comes after he donated $3.75 million to Independent candidate Betsy Johnson, signaling his strong dislike for Tina Kotek. Republican strategist Rebecca Tweed told KGW Knight’s donation said the two donations are not meant as an endorsement of either candidate but rather an attack against the Democrat candidate. The donation comes as Christine Drazan stands within striking distance of unseating Kotek in a deep blue state that has not elected a Republican governor since Vic Atiyeh in 1982. As Breitbart News reported last week, a recent Emerson College poll showed the Oregon House Republican leader actually leading Koteck by two points – 36 percent to 34 percent. A new Emerson College Polling survey shows former Oregon House Republican leader Drazan ahead of former state House Speaker Tina Kotek (D)–36 percent to 34 percent. Nineteen percent of those polled plan to vote for former Democrat state senator-turned independent Betsy Johnson. The poll was conducted between Sept. 30 – Oct. 1 with 796 very likely Oregon voters. The survey’s Credibility Interval (CI), similar to a margin of error, is ±3.4 percentage points. KGW political analyst Len Bergstein concurred with Rebecca Tweed that Phil Knight’s donation should be seen as a knock against Kotek by potentially putting Drazan on the path to victory. “As soon as he sees some polls that say ‘wait a minute, there’s a chance that Drazan could win,’ he’s saying well maybe my money could make the difference to push her over the top,” said Bergstein. “This is not a normal election. We’re having fun watching it because we have three original candidates for governor and a lot of interesting twists and turns in the race already,” Bergstein added. Armored Republic The Mission of Armored Republic is to Honor Christ by equipping Free Men with Tools of Liberty necessary to preserve God-given rights. In the Armored Republic there is no King but Christ. We are Free Craftsmen. Body Armor is a Tool of Liberty. We create Tools of Liberty. Free men must remain ever vigilant against tyranny wherever it appears. God has given us the tools of liberty needed to defend the rights He bestowed to us. Armored Republic is honored to offer you those Tools. Visit them, at ar500armor.com https://thepostmillennial.com/bidens-railway-deal-to-avert-strike-spiked-by-union?utm_campaign=64487 Biden's railway deal to avert strike spiked by union Nearly a month after President Biden announced that a deal had been reached between railroad companies and their unions, the deal has fallen apart, raising concerns for a possible strike. The Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way Employees Division of the Teamsters, one of the nation’s largest railroad unions, rejected the deal on Monday, expressing discontent with the number of paid sick days, according to the Washington Post. Officials said that members of the third-largest union rejected the proposed five-year contract in a 56 to 43 percent split. Both sides have agreed to continue with negotiations until at least November 19. Railroads are currently expected to continue operating normally. The deal included a 24 percent increase in pay by 2024, as well as $1,000 annual bonuses for employees over five years. The plan ensured that healthcare co-pays would not increase in price, but included only one paid sick day compared to the 15 days union leaders pushed for. The deal followed two years of negotiations between the rail carriers and unions, which prompted the White House to appoint an emergency board in July to mediate between the two groups. In September, Biden applauded the tentative deal reached, calling it "an important win for our economy and the American people." Now, it’s time for my favorite topic, sports! Let’s catch up with what’s happening in the world of football shall we? First in the college ranks: #3 Alabama 24 Texas A&M 20 #2 Ohio State 49 Michigan State 20 #1 Georgia 42 Auburn 10 #15 NC State 19 Florida State 17 Texas 49 OU 0 #13 TCU 38 #19 Kansas 31 #7 USC 30 WSU 14 NFL: Giants 27 Packers 22 Chargers 30 Browns 28 Jets 40 Dolphins 17 Bills 38 Steelers 3 Cowboys 22 Rams 10 Chiefs 30 Raiders 29 So that’s what you may have missed over the weekend: This has been your CrossPolitic Daily News Brief. If you liked the show, hit that share button for me down below. If you want to come to our conference next year, if you want to sign up for a club membership, or sign up for a magazine subscription, you can do all of that at fightlaughfeast.com. As always, if you’d like to email me a news story, ask about our conference, or become a corporate partner of CrossPolitic, email me, at garrison@fightlaughfeast.com. For CrossPolitic News, I’m Garrison Hardie. Have a great day, and Lord bless.

The Brian Lehrer Show
The People's Guide To Power: The Power Of Money In New York Politics

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 47:27


WNYC/Gothamist senior political reporter Brigid Bergin hosts a conversation about how elections are financed, and what it means for our democracy. How Do Elections Change When Taxpayers Help Pay For Them?First, we'll talk with a local elected official who has sought office both in New York City's system of public financing for political campaigns, and in a state election where all her money came from donors. NYC Council Member Tiffany Cabán (District 22, Astoria, Jackson Heights, East Elmhurst, Woodside and Rikers Island) discusses what running for office looks like under those different systems, and how money can affect a candidate's priorities. A Public Campaign Finance System for the Empire StateNext, we hear about some changes to the campaign finance system that experts at the Brennan Center argue could make our elections more democratic. Chisun Lee, director of the Brennan Center's Elections and Government Program previews a new program for a public financing system similar NYC's for the whole state, and more on the impact of dark money on politics. Who's Funding Albany Lawmakers' Campaigns?Then, Albany reporter for WNYC and Gothamist Jon Campbell brings his reporting and analysis on how candidates vying for New York State offices are filling their campaign war-chests ahead of next month's midterm elections. Plus, callers try to guess whether a given big-money donor contributed to the campaign of incumbent Gov. Kathy Hochul, or Republican challenger Lee Zeldin. Throughout the show, voters who have given to political campaigns call in to explain what motivated their decision. Visit The People's Guide To Power for more information and episodes.

Detroit Today with Stephen Henderson
Recent US Supreme Court decisions and the upcoming term

Detroit Today with Stephen Henderson

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 31:40


This week, the U.S. Supreme Court starts its new term with its 6-3 conservative super-majority. Anne Marimow, legal affairs reporter for the Washington Post, joins the show to discuss, the Court's prior term, why public opinion of the court is polling at historic lows, and what to look for in the new term. Then, Tom Wolf, deputy director with the Brennan Center's Democracy Program, stops by to preview the new term, including important cases implicating voting rights, and how they might impact our democracy.

Here & Now
'Making Black America' takes a journey through history; SCOTUS redistricting case

Here & Now

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 22:59


The Supreme Court is hearing a case Tuesday that experts say could further erode the landmark 1965 Voting Rights Act. Yurij Rudensky, senior counsel at the Democracy Program at the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University School of Law, joins us. Then, some residents in southwest Florida are seeking shelter at a local high school after Hurricane Ian flooded their homes. WUSF's Cathy Carter reports. And, Henry Louis Gates Jr. talks about a new PBS series focusing on the vast richness of Black life in American history called "Making Black America: Through the Grapevine."

Amanpour
Why hurricanes seem to be increasingly more powerful

Amanpour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 54:47


One of the strongest storms ever to hit the US is causing catastrophic flooding and destruction across hundreds of miles. Speaking this morning, Florida Governor Ron DeSantis said the storm is “basically a 500-year flood event,” and the government confirms that Ian produced “one in a thousand-year rainfall” in some Florida locations. It embodies a trend in recent hurricanes, as warmer water – driven by climate change – fuels stronger, more destructive storms. UC Santa Barbara Professor of Environmental Politics Leah Stokes is a climate policy expert and joins the show to discuss.  Also on today's show: historian Nina Khrushcheva on what's behind Putin's annexation of Ukrainian territory; Katy Hessel, author of The Story of Art Without Men; Brennan Center for Justice Sr. Fellow Ted Johnson.To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

The Lawfare Podcast
How to Fix the Insurrection Act

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 54:16 Very Popular


For much of its history, the United States has had a single law on the books that governs when the president can deploy the military to enforce federal law within the United States: the Insurrection Act. While the act hasn't been invoked in decades, it played an important role in several recent controversies, including the acts of Jan. 6. Now, some scholars have written the Jan. 6 commission, urging that it be included in the broader set of reforms that committee is reportedly getting ready to endorse. To learn more, Lawfare senior editor Scott R. Anderson sat down with the two authors of the recent submission to the committee: Liza Goitein, senior director of the Liberty & National Security Program at the Brennan Center for Justice, and her colleague Joseph Nunn, counsel at the same program. They discussed the history of the Insurrection Act, what they think makes it dangerous, and how Congress should try to fix it.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

On The Issues With Michele Goodwin
Women Saving Democracy: On the Front Lines of the Election

On The Issues With Michele Goodwin

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 44:40


On today's show, we're delving into the lives and work of the women coming together to save our democracy. Election administration has become one of the most challenging jobs in the U.S. government. One in three election officials reports feeling unsafe because of their job. Americans are doubting the legitimacy of our elections, despite the fact that experts described the 2020 election as the “most secure” in American history.In the face of these fundamental challenges to our democracy—and in an environment increasingly characterized by political polarization—how can we protect our elections, and support our elections officials?Helping us to sort out these questions and set the record straight are our very special guests: Natalie Adona: Natalie Adona is the county clerk-recorder elect and former assistant clerk-recorder/registrar of voters for Nevada County, Calif. She previously worked as the senior research and learning associate for the elections program at Democracy Fund, where she co-authored the reports "Understanding the Voter Experience” and “Stewards of Democracy.”Tonya Wichman: Tonya Wichman is the director of the Defiance County Board of Elections in Defiance, Ohio, and a certified elections and registration administrator. Kathy Holland: Kathy Holland was the director of the Alamance County Board of Elections for over 31 years until she retired in 2021. She served in eight presidential elections, and was the president of the North Carolina Association of Directors of Elections.This special episode of On the Issues with Michele Goodwin is presented in conjunction with Ms. Magazine's “Women Saving Democracy” platform, produced in collaboration with the Brennan Center for Justice and RepresentWomen. Explore the whole project—featuring reported pieces, firsthand accounts from election officials, video events with women political leaders, and more—here. Check out this episode's landing page at MsMagazine.com for a full transcript, links to articles referenced in this episode, further reading and ways to take action.Tips, suggestions, pitches? Get in touch with us at ontheissues@msmagazine.com. Support the show

Live at America's Town Hall
The NCC's Constitutional Convention Reports: The Proposed Amendments

Live at America's Town Hall

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 63:26


This summer, as a continuation of the National Constitution Center's Constitution Drafting Project, teams of leading conservative, libertarian, and progressive scholars  convened for a virtual constitutional convention. After debating and deliberating together, they drafted and proposed a series of amendments to the Constitution. In this episode, we share the presentation that the team leaders made, discussing the five amendments they all agreed upon. Caroline Fredrickson, senior fellow at the Brennan Center for Justice represented team progressive, Ilan Wurman, associate professor at the Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law at Arizona State University, represented team conservative, and Ilya Shapiro, senior fellow and director of constitutional studies at the Manhattan Institute, represented team libertarian. Other convention “delegates” included team progressive's Jamal Greene of Columbia Law School; team libertarian's Christina Mulligan of Brooklyn Law School and Timothy Sandefur of the Goldwater Institute; and team conservative's  Robert George of Princeton University, Michael McConnell of Stanford Law School, and Colleen Sheehan of Arizona State University.  Read the amendments along with introductions by the team leaders here.  This program is presented in conjunction with the National Constitution Center's Constitution Drafting Project. Stay Connected and Learn More Continue the conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr. Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate, at bit.ly/constitutionweekly. Please subscribe to Live at the National Constitution Center and our companion podcast We the People on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, or your favorite podcast app. To watch National Constitution Center Town Hall programs live, check out our schedule of upcoming programs. Register through Zoom to ask your constitutional questions in the Q&A or watch live on YouTube. You can find transcripts for every episode in our Media Library.

We the People
The NCC's Constitutional Convention Reports: The Proposed Amendments

We the People

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 64:21


This summer, as a continuation of the National Constitution Center's Constitution Drafting Project, teams of leading conservative, libertarian, and progressive scholars  convened for a virtual constitutional convention. After debating and deliberating together, they drafted and proposed a series of amendments to the Constitution. In this episode, we share the presentation that the team leaders made on Monday, discussing the five amendments they all agreed upon. Caroline Fredrickson, senior fellow at the Brennan Center for Justice represented team progressive, Ilan Wurman, associate professor at the Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law at Arizona State University, represented team conservative, and Ilya Shapiro, senior fellow and director of constitutional studies at the Manhattan Institute, represented team libertarian. Other convention “delegates” included team progressive's Jamal Greene of Columbia Law School; team libertarian's Christina Mulligan of Brooklyn Law School and Timothy Sandefur of the Goldwater Institute; and team conservative's  Robert George of Princeton University, Michael McConnell of Stanford Law School, and Colleen Sheehan of Arizona State University.  Read the amendments along with introductions by the team leaders here.  This program is presented in conjunction with the National Constitution Center's Constitution Drafting Project. Questions or comments about the show? Email us at podcast@constitutioncenter.org. Continue today's conversation on Facebook and Twitter using @ConstitutionCtr. Sign up to receive Constitution Weekly, our email roundup of constitutional news and debate, at bit.ly/constitutionweekly.

WashingTECH Tech Policy Podcast with Joe Miller
Feds have massive trove of Americans' data; CA legislature passes nation's first children's privacy law -- Tech Law & Policy This Week -- 09.16.2022

WashingTECH Tech Policy Podcast with Joe Miller

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 5:08


Hey everybody, I'm Joe Miller and here's what's going on in the world of online safety and free speech this week.   Sen. Wyden: CBP has massive trove of American's cellphone data   Senator Ron Wyden sent a letter to Customs and Border Protection Commissioner Chris Magnus on Thursday revealing that CBP has a massive amount of Americans'    data from millions of drivers' license photos, license plate readers, mobile devices, and who knows what else. Some 3,000 CBP operations employees apparently have access to the data, and CBP doesn't need probable cause to obtain warrants to search the data – they only need reasonable suspicion. Brennan Center scholar Faiza Patel told the Washington Post that the database goes far beyond reasonableness. Patel joined me on this podcast back in 2017 to discuss how the government's surveillance of Muslims negatively impacts innocent civilians.   New York City's Metro Transit Authority's switch to tap-to-enter system raises surveillance alarms   The City of New York will be moving away from Metro Cards and towards a new tap-to-enter system called OMNY. Surveillance and privacy experts are concerned that the new system will be able to track anyone wherever they go within the nation's largest public transportation system. The system will also be a public-private partnership between the City and a company called Cubic Corp. even though the State of New York has not yet updated its 1984 privacy law. No one knows what the government will do with that data, much less what Cubic Corp will do with it, since nondisclosure agreements often govern these types of partnerships. California becomes first state to pass Children's Online Privacy law   The California legislature has passed a landmark Children's Online Privacy law that directs tech companies to follow age-appropriate design principles to protect children online. The bill, modeled after a bill in the UK, passed the California Senate unanimously and is the first in the US to address children's online safety directly, beyond the weaker standards imposed by the Children's Online Privacy and Protection Act, which Congress passed back in 1998 before it had any idea what the internet would become.  California Governor Gavin Newsom hasn't yet indicated whether he plans to sign the new legislation.   California enacts new social media moderation disclosure law   The state of California is also leading the way when it comes to state-based efforts to establish content moderation standards. California governor Gavin Newsom signed into law on Tuesday a new bill requiring social media companies to file semiannual reports on how they moderate hate speech, disinformation, and extremism. The California law differs from Republican-led efforts, particularly in Texas and Florida, to tamp down on social media companies' content moderation in general, and instead requires social media companies to report on what they're actually doing. The new law is expected to face resistance from the tech industry.   Separately, the Wall Street Journal's editorial board seems to believe that the federal government and Facebook collude on content moderation.   Color of Change launches ‘Black Tech Agenda'   Color of Change has launched a Black Tech Agenda that centers racial justice in technology policymaking. The agenda includes a vision for robust antitrust policy, better privacy protections and an end to surveillance, preventing algorithmic discrimination, expanding broadband access, protecting net neutrality, and addressing misinformation and disinformation. The agenda is supported by Senators Cory Booker and Elizabeth Warren, as well as Representatives Robin Kelly and Pramila Jayapal. Facebook reverses ban on Holocaust film   Facebook reversed a ban on an holocaust film starring Roy Schneider, who played the police chief in Jaws. The filmmaker, Joshua Newton, based the movie on his father's life after he survived the holocaust. Facebook pulled the movie because its name is Beautiful Blue Eyes, which Facebook's moderators found contained a racist connotation that violated its community standards.   The movie Newton wants to advertise on Facebook is actually a re-release of a 2009 version of the film which now includes previously lost footage. It was Schneider's final film. White House issues new digital assets development framework   Following President Biden's March Executive Order to streamline regulation of digital assets, the White House on Friday released a fact sheet laying out a framework for interagency coordination to protect consumers and larger stakeholders, make financial services safe and affordable, encourage responsible innovation, ensure financial stability and protect America's financial competitiveness globally, fight illicit financial activities, and develop a Central Bank Digital Currency (CBDC). Part of the list of to-dos is a call for federal agencies to consider the environmental implications of digital finances. To go deeper, you can find links to all of these stories in the show notes. Stay safe, stay informed, have a great week. Ciao.