Podcasts about Cuban

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  • 3,605PODCASTS
  • 5,649EPISODES
  • 49mAVG DURATION
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  • Jan 26, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Cuban

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Latest podcast episodes about Cuban

Who, When, Wow!
Alicia Alonso: Ballerina (Encore - 1/26/22)

Who, When, Wow!

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 26:52


Meet Alicia Alonso, a nearly blind Cuban prima ballerina WHO stunned audiences around the world with her incredible talents. Alicia dedicated her life to her craft; even WHEN she was recovering from eye surgery and couldn't see, she would practice her routines with her fingers. Join Rebecca Sheir as we learn how Alicia WOWed the world as one of the best ballerinas of her time! Head to whowhenwow.com for activities and more based on this episode. (Originally aired 12/8/21)See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

White Sox Talk Podcast
The White Sox big signing of Oscar Colas with MLB.com's Jesse Sanchez

White Sox Talk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 20:37


A year after signing Cuban prospects Yoelki Cespedes and Norge Vera, the White Sox have added another top Cuban prospect in left-handed outfielder Oscar Colas. Chuck Garfien speaks with MLB.com's Jesse Sanchez who's been on the Colas story from the beginning. He talks about why other teams are envious of the White Sox for signing Colas and why he, unfortunately, won't live up to his nickname "The Cuban Ohtani." You'll also hear from White Sox international exec Marco Paddy about Colas the player and competitor.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Stay Tranquil'o
The Story of Johnny Cuba Beer w/ Juan Guixens

Stay Tranquil'o

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 28:02


Welcome back to the Stay Tranquilo Podcast, powered by Johnny Cuba. After a long delay of recording, we are officially back. We are revamped, and excited to show you all our new work. We are here powered by Johnny Cuba, a beer with European Roots & a Caribbean Soul. On this episode, we speak to Founder, Juan Guixens on the story of this passion project Johnny Cuba. Juan mentions his story behind the Johnny Cuba brand and how it came to life. As a Cuban American, Juan expresses how this is a legacy project; a project he can carry on the Cuban traditions life, one Johnny at a time. Juan explains what it means to him to stay tranquilo, how stay tranquilo plays a part in the overall motto of Johnny Cuba. If you are looking to stay in touch with us or Johnny Cuba, you can find us on Instagram: @staytranquilo @johnnycuba.us Leave us a review and share with your friends. When you share and tag us, we will enter you in a chance to win a trip on us! #StayTranquilo #PassMeAJohnny --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stay-tranquilo/support

Madigan's Pubcast
Episode 74: The Alamo, Walmart's Metaverse, & A Monkey Queen Rises

Madigan's Pubcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 84:55


Kathleen opens the show drinking Love Street Blonde ale from Karbach Brewing in Houston. She reviews her favorite Mexican restaurants that she ate at while in San Antonio (Rosario's) and Houston (Ninfa's Downtown) for shows. She takes a few minutes to toast and acknowledge the life of her dear friend Louie Anderson, who passed away on January 21st, sharing a few memories.“GOOD BAD FOOD”: In her quest for new and delicious not-so-nutritious junk food AND in continuing her search for the best Ranch, Kathleen samples her Buc-ee's jerky, which she loves and recommends eating as soon as you get it from the counter, and Buc-ee's Baked Cheese Curls which she likes as much as Cheetos. She finishes her tasting with Duke's Creamy Potato Salad Dressing, which she can't wait to use during Super Bowl weekend. QUEEN'S COURT: Kathleen is excited that Queen Stevie has expanded her summer tour to include New Orleans' JazzFest, Queen Chaka Khan has booked some 2022 shows, and Queen Dolly is releasing a new album called “Run Rose, Run” in March 2022.UPDATES: Kathleen gives updates on Adele's cancellation of her Las Vegas residency hours before it was set to open, Britney's family feud, the South Dakota Attorney General who hit and killed a man in 2020, and David Bowie and Bruce Springsteen selling their music catalogs along with John Legend.BADGER FINDS RARE ROMAN COINS: Kathleen laughs reading an article from Spain where a badger has led archaeologists to a stash of rare Roman coins. VICKI MADIGAN'S METAL DETECTOR: Kathleen reads an article about an amateur metal detectorist who found a Henry III gold penny in a field, which is one of England's earliest gold coins. The item will auction for almost $500K. MONKEY QUEEN RISES IN JAPAN: Kathleen reads an article about the first monkey “queen” in a Japanese sanctuary. The monkey led a violent coup to become her troop's first female leader, but her reign could be in jeopardy during mating season. CRUISE SHIP REPO: Kathleen laughs as she reads an article advising that Crystal Cruise line's Crystal Symphony is on the run from the law, changing their routing from Miami to Bimini, the Bahamas in order to escape bankruptcy repo seizure and stranding at least 300 people. Florida's U.S. District Court ordered that the ship be seized upon its arrival in Miami due to unpaid fuel bills of $4.6 million. MAN FOUND DEAD WITH 124 SNAKES: Kathleen is horrified to read an article about a 49-year-old man who was recently discovered in his Maryland home dead and surrounded by over 120 deadly poisonous snakes. AN ISLAND WITHOUT A PUB: Kathleen reads an article about a campaign that the small Scottish island of Rum Isle is undertaking in an effort to increase its population to 40 people. The island boasts beautiful, deserted beaches, a castle originally built as a hunting lodge and a lot of deer, and not a pub or restaurant in sight so you'd better love to cook at home. WALMART'S METAVERSE: Kathleen reads an article advising that Walmart appears to be venturing into the metaverse with plans to create its own cryptocurrency and collection of NFTs. She laughs out loud, musing scenarios where Walmart's employees have to explain these concepts to their general consumer base. CUBAN DRUGS: Kathleen is thrilled to read an article about a new business venture that billionaire Mark Cuban. Cuban is bringing affordable and transparent prescription drug pricing to the average consumer. The Mark Cuban Cost Plus Drug Company announced the opening of its online pharmacy, stating that it will bypass health care industry "middlemen" and help consumers avoid high drug prices by charging manufacturers' prices plus a flat 15% markup and pharmacist fee.NFL PLAYOFF DIVISIONAL ROUND: Kathleen provides some colorful commentary leading into the NFL Divisional Championship weekend, including her thoughts on LA Ram's owner Stan “Enos” Kroenke.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Radio Cachimbona
Ana Castillo's Book of the Dead

Radio Cachimbona

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 38:23


On this episode, Yvette interviews Ana Castillo about her new book of poems "Book of the Dead." They discuss Castillo's process in selecting the poems for this anthology, discuss the term 'Xicanisma' and its context, and address the controversy around Hache Carrillo's Cuban ancestry.  To support Radio Cachimbona. become a patron at: https://www.patreon.com/radiocachimbona?fan_landing=true Follow @radiocachimbona on instagram, twitter and facebook.

Reading With Your Kids Podcast
Reading With Your Kids - Tia Fortuna's New Home

Reading With Your Kids Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 29:36


Ruth Behar is on the #ReadingWithYourKids #Podcast to celebrate her new #PictureBook Tia Fortuna's New Home. A lyrical book about tradition, culture, and togetherness, Tía Fortuna's New Home explores Tía and Estrella's Sephardic Jewish and Cuban heritage. Through Tía's journey, Estrella will learn that as long as you have your family, home is truly where the heart is. Click here to visit Ruth's website - https://www.ruthbehar.com/books/tia-fortunas-new-home/       Click here to visit our website - www.readingwithyourkids.com

The Opperman Report
My Dad the Spy (Ricardo “Monkey”Morales)

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 47:51


Ricardo A. Morales if the son of notorious intelligence agent and hit man Ricardo “Monkey”Morales. Ricardo Morales Navarette (June 14, 1939 – December 20, 1983), also known by the moniker "El Mono", was a Cuban exile and agent of the United States Central Intelligence Agency. He also worked for the DISIP, or Venezuelan intelligence service, and as an informant for the US Federal Bureau of Investigation, Central Intelligence Agency, and Drug Enforcement Administration

Adventures in Luxury Travel
39. Cuba | A cultural trip designed to connect with the people, music pouring out on the streets, art and artisans, incredible food, spectacular fishing and classic cars

Adventures in Luxury Travel

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 54:44


Join David and me as we talk about Cuba. Cuba is the largest and least commercialized Caribbean island. It's a place where people live in the moment, where you are welcomed into the culture to learn, taste their food and experience their lifestyle. Visit UNESCO sites, eat the freshest ceviche, visit the birthplace of the mojito, Hemingway's favorite places, and enjoy dining on rooftops.   Also take the opportunity to talk with professors and former diplomats about the history, meet with artists in their studios, visit a local outdoor boxing gym and have your kids play baseball with a Cuban youth team. You can even get in a round of golf on the one golf course.   Visit truvaytravel.com/39 for a video of today's show and additional resources.

Locked On MLB Prospects
Nationals sign Cuban outfielder Cristian Vaquero, P Seth Romero gets a DWI, SS Brady House, and more Washington farm talk with LockedOn Nationals!

Locked On MLB Prospects

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 33:59


On today's show, we sit down with Josh Neighbors of LockedOn Nationals for a talk about the Nationals farm system. This is the 2nd year in a row they've given out the biggest International Free Agent bonus, this one for Cuban OF Cristian Vaquero - was it a smart move? What does Seth Romero's DWI mean for his future in Washington, and when do you finally pull the cord on a top prospect? Follow the show on Twitter @LockedOnFarm, follow Lindsay on Twitter @CrosbyBaseball, and send your questions/concerns/comments to LockedOnMLBProspects@gmail.com. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promo code: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

That One Audition with Alyshia Ochse
RERUN | Yara Martinez: Gratitude and Knowing Your Worth

That One Audition with Alyshia Ochse

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 74:59


Yara Martinez was last seen on Fox's police drama pilot, DEPUTY, from David Ayer, Aquaman writer Will Beall, and eOne. She co-starred opposite Stephen Dorff as his wife, ‘Dr. Paula Reyes'. Martinez can currently be seen starring as ‘Miss Lint' in Amazon's highly reviewed reboot of the popular superhero franchise, THE TICK. Based on creator Ben Endlund's favorite comic, the series follows Arthur Everest, an obsessive ex-accountant who suspects his city is controlled by an evil supervillain. The pilot episode quickly became the most watched in the network's history. Martinez can also be seen starring as ‘Dr. Luisa Alver' in the CW's Golden Globe nominated comedy series, JANE THE VIRGIN opposite Gina Rodriguez. The series solidifies Martinez as a fan favorite for her portrayal of the recovering alcoholic who accidentally inseminated the titular ‘Jane' in the pilot episode. Martinez is currently shooting the last and final season. Yara also recurs on CBS's BULL playing Michael Weatherly's lead character, Bull's, ex wife. Previously, Martinez starred in the second season of HBO's critically acclaimed TRUE DETECTIVE opposite Colin Farrell and Vince Vaughn and in Amazon's ALPHA HOUSE about four Republican senators sharing the same DC house rental. Additional television credits include THE LYING GAME, NASHVILLE, HOLLYWOOD HEIGHTS, FACELESS, VANISHED, THE APOSTLES, SOUTHLAND, BREAKOUT KINGS, and SPACED. Born in Puerto Rico to Cuban parents, Martinez grew up in Miami and is fluent in both English and Spanish. She studied acting at the New World School of the Arts, and spent a summer with Anne Bogart's SITI company in Saratoga before receiving her BFA and eventually moving to Los Angeles to pursue her passion for television. Guest links: IMDB: Yara Martinez INSTAGRAM: @yaritafrita TWITTER: @yaritafrita Show Links: PMO PEP TALKS: Click here to reserve your seat PMO POP SELF-TAPE CLASS: Click here to sign up INSTAGRAM: @alyshiaochse INSTAGRAM: @thatoneaudition WEBSITE: AlyshiaOchse.com ITUNES: Subscribe to That One Audition on iTunes SPOTIFY: Subscribe to That One Audition on Spotify STITCHER: Subscribe to That One Audition on Stitcher Credits: WRITER: Bebe Katsenes SOUND DESIGN: Zachary Jameson WEBSITE & GRAPHICS: Chase Jennings ASSISTANT: Elle Powell SOCIAL OUTREACH: Bebe Katsenes

NPR's Book of the Day
In 'Of Women And Salt,' women weave the future out of scraps

NPR's Book of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 6:32


"We are force." This line is originally from a Victor Hugo letter to Cuban independence fighters, but it's also found throughout Gabriela Garcia's novel, Of Women And Salt. The book, new in paperback, is about generations of Cuban and Salvadoran women navigating patriarchal societies. She told NPR's Sarah McCammon that she was especially inspired by this phrase because she "was thinking about all of the multitudes within women - how they're more than just immigrants or mothers or any of these other labels that are sort of imposed on them."

Mully & Haugh Show on 670 The Score
Transition: White Sox expected to sign Cuban prospect Oscar Colas

Mully & Haugh Show on 670 The Score

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 18:25


Mike Mulligan and David Haugh were joined by Mark Grote and Gabe Ramirez for the daily transition segment, where they discussed reporting that the White Sox are expected to sign talented Cuban prospect Oscar Colas this weekend and more.

Locked On Orioles - Daily Podcast On The Baltimore Orioles
Orioles expected to sign Cuban INF César Prieto when international signing period opens

Locked On Orioles - Daily Podcast On The Baltimore Orioles

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 43:29


Host Connor Newcomb is joined by Phil Selig, a Cuban baseball expert, writer, and owner of cubadugout.com, to talk about infielder César Prieto, who the Baltimore Orioles are expected to sign once the international signing period opens on Jan. 15. Connor and Phil talk: -Prieto's incredible offensive numbers in Cuba -How he profiles as a hitter despite a lack of home run power -How he fits in among this class of Cuban players -How long will it take him to get to the big leagues with the Orioles? Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Locked On Astros - Daily Podcast On The Houston Astros
Houston Astros Bright Future with Young Cuban Stars

Locked On Astros - Daily Podcast On The Houston Astros

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 27:15


Htown Wheelhouse talks about the Astros Future with Cuban prospects and how the signing of Yuli Gurriel, Yordan Alvarez and others has paved the way for them to become one of the top Cuban recruiting ballclubs in MLB. With the signings that are expected on january 15, 2022 the forcast for sucess continues to extend out beyond 2025. Htown Wheelhouse explains the logic behind his thought process. Locked On Astros, the daily podcast about the Houston Astros, hosted by Eric Huysman and Brett Chancey, is part of the Locked On Podcast Network. Be sure to subscribe to Locked On Astros in Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts, and come back every weekday morning and spend your morning commute listening to the latest Astros news and notes. Thanks for listening, and tell your friends!  We now have a YouTube channel as well, so go subscribe to that as well and get us to 5k subscribers! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9fXhBb2-ZTiPwk7WNwYjzQ https://linktr.ee/LockedOnAstros Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use the promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust.  Betonline.ag!   Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

KPFA - Against the Grain
Cuban Socialist Ideology

KPFA - Against the Grain

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 59:58


By Any Means Necessary
Frustration Is Not Enough - It Must Be Channeled Into Organizing

By Any Means Necessary

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 114:19


In this episode of By Any Means Necessary, hosts Sean Blackmon and Jacquie Luqman discuss the racist terror attack against voting rights activist Vernon Dahmer and why the vote has historically been kept away from Black and poor people, the mythology of access to equality under the vote in the era of monopoly capitalism, and the need for organizing outside of the political mainstream to fight for their communities.In the second segment, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Helen Yaffe, Visiting Fellow at the Latin America and Caribbean Centre and a Lecturer in Economic and Social History in the University of Glasgow and author of the new book We Are Cuba! How a Revolutionary People Have Survived in a Post-Soviet World to discuss the online premiere of Cuba's Life Task, Combating Climate Change covering Cuba's state plan for climate change mitigation, the threat climate change poses to Cuba, how the Cuban government engages local communities to find the best solutions to problems posed by climate change, and how Cuba's climate change mitigation strategies pose an important lesson for its neighbors in the Caribbean and the global south.In the third segment, Sean and Jacquie are joined by T.J. Coles, a postdoctoral researcher at Plymouth University in the UK, a regular contributor to CounterPunch, and the author of We'll Tell You What to Think: Wikipedia, Propaganda, and the Making of Liberal Consensus to discuss Washington's military presence in Djibouti and how it fits into US imperialism, how US propaganda efforts against China focus on China's sole overseas military base in Djibouti and exclude the reasons for the base and the extraordinary number of overseas US bases, and the public relations stunts that US forces in Djibouti use to paint a veneer of benevolence on the colonial exploitation of the country.Later in the show, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Chuck Modiano, justice journalist and Sports writer for Deadspin to discuss the firings of NFL coaches and general managers and the racism and nepotism in the NFL, the right-wing nature of the league as demonstrated by the black-balling of Colin Kaepernick and outsized economic power owners have over players, the valorization of police in media coverage of the anniversary of the Capitol insurrection despite their passivity in the face of right-wing violence, and the evasion of responsibility demonstrated by Eric Adams in his response to the tragic apartment fire in the Bronx.

By Any Means Necessary
Cuba's Community-Focused Answers To Climate Change

By Any Means Necessary

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 26:09


In this segment of By Any Means Necessary, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Helen Yaffe, Visiting Fellow at the Latin America and Caribbean Centre and a Lecturer in Economic and Social History in the University of Glasgow and author of the new book We Are Cuba! How a Revolutionary People Have Survived in a Post-Soviet World to discuss the online premiere of Cuba's Life Task, Combating Climate Change covering Cuba's state plan for climate change mitigation, the threat climate change poses to Cuba, how the Cuban government engages local communities to find the best solutions to problems posed by climate change, and how Cuba's climate change mitigation strategies pose an important lesson for its neighbors in the Caribbean and the global south.

Box Press
It's Not About Volume Now, It's About Quality, Says Abe Flores, PDR | Box Press Ep. 55

Box Press

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 46:00


When the world throws you a curve, lean into mentors, then pivot. For this elite boutique cigar maker, that meant revitalizing the c brand. Abe Flores has embraced the roots of the D.R.'s cigar lineage; simplified his tobacco blends; halved the number of cigars his Tamboril factory produces; and picked up business advice from cigar legends.  Talking to Boveda's Rob Gagner at 2021 PCA in Las Vegas, the cigar entrepreneur shares what's next as PDR nears its 20th anniversary. This cigar podcast's highlights include:   (6:31) Best place to buy Cuban cigars in Europe (8:13) What cigars you should try if you go to Cuba (10:50) How COVID affected the cigar industry (12:33) How smoking cigars influences what you do now for fun  (15:05) What to watch out for before investing in a vacation property if you're a cigar smoker (17:20) You can rent Abe Flores's apartment in the D.R. on Airbnb! (17:29) Dating advice for cigar aficionados—find a mate who likes cigars (or at least, doesn't mind them) (20:31) What Abe Flores learned from master blender Henke Kelner (23:02) What changes to make to stay in business post-pandemic (25:26) Remember the Tinder Box? (Did you know Abe Flores coded for the cigar retailer?!) (30:44) Why Abe Flores almost shut down PDR (31:37) What Abe Flores learned from Tabacalera Palma CEO Jochy Blanco (32:25) Selling cigars beyond the United States—you can buy PDR cigars in China (34:09) Finding mentors and listening to their business advice PDR protects its premium cigars by packaging with Boveda. You too can preserve the flavor and consistency of cigars like PDR's 10th Anniversary with Boveda. Boveda, makes 2-way humidity control for cigars, easy wood humidor seasoning, humidor bags and Humidor Starter Kits to condition new wood humidors before adding cigars. Shop Boveda for cigars here: https://store.bovedainc.com/collections/boveda-for-tobacco (https://store.bovedainc.com/collections/boveda-for-tobacco) For More Information About PDR Cigars, Visit: https://www.pdrcigars.com/ Check Out More of Boveda Cigar Exclusives: For My Humidor | Jochy Blanco https://youtu.be/Kw7VZ-0JA2k (https://youtu.be/Kw7VZ-0JA2k) How to Better Understand Your Cigar Tasting Palate  https://youtu.be/W-L976OtGlE (https://youtu.be/W-L976OtGlE) How to Spot A FAKE Cuban Cigar https://youtu.be/qiD5qFgSpqc?t=87 (https://youtu.be/qiD5qFgSpqc?t=87) 

Casting Lots: A Survival Cannibalism Podcast
S3 E11. SEA PART III – The Bay of Pigs

Casting Lots: A Survival Cannibalism Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022


When John F. Kennedy backs an invasion by sea of Fidel Castro's Cuba, disastrously poor planning leaves Brigade 2506 in dire straits. Did you know Casting Lots now has merch? Find us on Redbubble: https://www.redbubble.com/people/CastingLotsPod/shop TRANSCRIPT https://castinglotspod.home.blog/2022/01/06/s3-e11-sea-part-iii---the-bay-of-pigs/ CREDITS Written, hosted and produced by Alix Penn and Carmella Lowkis. Theme music by Daniel Wackett. Find him on Twitter @ds_wack and Soundcloud as Daniel Wackett. Logo by Riley. Find her on Twitter and Instagram @tallestfriend. Casting Lots is part of the Morbid Audio Podcast Network. Network sting by Mikaela Moody. Find her on Bandcamp as mikaelamoody1. BIBLIOGRAPHY Alfonso, P. (1998). ‘Bay of Pigs survivor: We became cannibals', Miami Herald, 16 April. Available at: http://www.latinamericanstudies.org/bay-of-pigs/baypigs2.htm ‘Bay of Pigs Invasion'. (2021). Wikipedia. Available at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bay_of_Pigs_Invasion ‘Bay of Pigs Survivor Tells ‘Secret' of Cannibalism'. (1998). Orlando Sentinel, 16 April. Available at: https://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/os-xpm-1998-04-16-9804151076-story.html Cannibalism: Secrets Revealed. (2007). History Channel, 24 April. Available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I95evV1eYqQ&ab_channel=DocumentaryArchive Cuba Archive. (2016). Case Record - Alejandro del Valle Martí. Available at: http://database.cubaarchive.org/search/simple-search-view-case/2121/ Cuba Archive. (2016). Case Record - Ernesto Ibrahín Hernández Cosío. Available at: http://database.cubaarchive.org/search/simple-search-view-case/2555/ Cuba Archive. (2016). Case Record - Jesús Vilarchao Quintana. Available at: http://database.cubaarchive.org/search/simple-search-view-case/2677/ Cuba Archive. (2016). Case Record - Jorge García Villalta y Espinosa. Available at: http://database.cubaarchive.org/search/simple-search-view-case/2675/ Cuba Archive. (2016). Case Record - José García Montes y Angulo. Available at: http://database.cubaarchive.org/search/simple-search-view-case/2695/ Cuba Archive. (2016). Case Record - Julio Caballero González. Available at: http://database.cubaarchive.org/search/simple-search-view-case/2694 Cuba Archive. (2016). Case Record - Manuel J. García Rosales. Available at: http://database.cubaarchive.org/search/simple-search-view-case/2344/ Cuba Archive. (2016). Case Record - Marco Tulio García Turino. Available at: http://database.cubaarchive.org/search/simple-search-view-case/2679/ Cuba Archive. (2016). Case Record - Raúl García Menocal Fowler. Available at: http://database.cubaarchive.org/search/simple-search-view-case/2680/ Cuba Archive. (2016). Case Record - Rubén Vera Ortíz. Available at: http://database.cubaarchive.org/search/simple-search-view-case/2676/ Cueto, J.C. et al. (2021). ‘How the Bay of Pigs invasion began - and failed - 60 years on', BBC News, 23 April. Available at: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-56808455 Editors of the Encyclopaedia Britannica. (2021). ‘Cold War', in Encyclopaedia Britannica Online. Available at: https://www.britannica.com/event/Cold-War Editors of the Encyclopaedia Britannica. (2021). ‘Fidel Castro', in Encyclopaedia Britannica Online. Available at: https://www.britannica.com/biography/Fidel-Castro ‘Fidel Castro: Dodging exploding seashells, poison pens and ex-lovers'. (2016). BBC News, 27 November. Available at: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-38121583 History.com editors. (2020). ‘Bay of Pigs Invasion', History, 30 March. Available at: https://www.history.com/topics/cold-war/bay-of-pigs-invasion History.com editors. (2021). ‘The Bay of Pigs Invasion Begins', History, 16 April. Available at: https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/the-bay-of-pigs-invasion-begins John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum. (n.d.). The Bay of Pigs. Available at: https://www.jfklibrary.org/learn/about-jfk/jfk-in-history/the-bay-of-pigs Newcott, B. (2021). ‘After 60 years, Bay of Pigs disaster still haunts veterans who fought', National Geographic, 16 April. Available at: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history/article/bay-of-pigs-disaster-still-haunts-veterans-who-faught-60th-anniversary Pruitt, S. (2021). ‘5 Things You Might Not Know About the Bay of Pigs Invasion', History, 15 March. Available at: https://www.history.com/news/5-things-you-might-not-know-about-the-bay-of-pigs-invasion Serena, K. (2018). ‘In 1994, The U.S. Military Actually Considered Building A “Gay Bomb”', All That's Interesting, 2 February. Available at: https://allthatsinteresting.com/gay-bomb ‘2 Bay of Pigs Survivors Tell of Cannibalism to Stay Alive'. (1998). Chicago Tribune, 16 April. Available at: https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-xpm-1998-04-16-9804170096-story.html#:~:text=2%20BAY%20OF%20PIGS%20SURVIVORS%20TELL%20OF%20CANNIBALISM%20TO%20STAY%20ALIVE,-CHICAGO%20TRIBUNE&text=Desperate%20to%20survive%2016%20days,of%20Pigs%20invasion%20of%20Cuba United States. Department of State. (n.d.). The Bay of Pigs Invasion and its Aftermath, April 1961–October 1962. Available at: https://history.state.gov/milestones/1961-1968/bay-of-pigs White, M. (2011). ‘Bay of Pigs invasion: Kennedy's Cuban catastrophe', BBC History Extra, May. Available at: https://www.historyextra.com/period/20th-century/bay-of-pigs-invasion-kennedys-cuban-catastrophe/

Cigar Coop Prime Time Show
2021 Cigar of the Year Countdown (Coop's List): #6 – Perdomo Reserve 10th Anniversary Box-Pressed Maduro Robusto (Audio)

Cigar Coop Prime Time Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 3:10


Coming in at #6 is the Perdomo Reserve 10th Anniversary Box-Pressed Maduro Robusto. Last year when Perdomo Cigars announced they were discontinuing the Champagne Noir and Champagne Sun Grown cigars, it surprised a lot of people - including this author. However, it was clear that Nick Perdomo and his team knew they had something special with the new 10th Anniversary Maduro and Sun Grown lines. The 10th Anniversary Sun Grown landed a #23 on this year's Countdown and now the Maduro lands at number six. The blend for the  Perdomo Reserve 10th Anniversary Maduro features 100% Nicaraguan tobaccos. According to Perdomo Cigars, the 10th Anniversary Maduro uses a six-year-aged Cuban-seed wrapper, binder, and fillers from its farms in Estelí, Condega, and Jalapa. The wrapper itself also has an additional 14 months of aging on it inside bourbon barrels. Production is handled out of the Tabacalera Perdomo S.A. facility in Estelí, Nicaragua. The Robusto measures 5 x 54. The Perdomo Reserve 10th Anniversary Box Pressed Maduro Robusto delivers notes of mocha (coffee, and chocolate fusion), citrus, oak, cedar, mineral, and pepper. The flavors start out medium-bodied before progressing to medium to full in the second half. This is countered by medium strength.  On top of an excellent flavor profile, this cigar delivers a stellar performance in terms of burn and draw. One can argue the combination of the 10th Anniversary Champagne, Sun Grown, and Maduro is one of the strongest blend trifectas ever. This is the second year in a row Perdomo Cigars has placed two cigars on the Cigar of the Year Countdown. Of the 25 cigars unveiled thus far on the 2021 Countdown, this is the 18th one from Nicaragua. For details of the 2021 Cigar of the Year Countdown, see our 2021 criteria: https://cigar-coop.com/2021/12/announcement-criteria-for-the-2021-cigar-of-the-year-countdown.html Cigar Coop Report: https://wp.me/p6h1n1-lMJ

Cigar Coop Prime Time Show
2021 Cigar of the Year Countdown (Coop's List): #6 – Perdomo Reserve 10th Anniversary Box-Pressed Maduro Robusto

Cigar Coop Prime Time Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 3:10


Coming in at #6 is the Perdomo Reserve 10th Anniversary Box-Pressed Maduro Robusto. Last year when Perdomo Cigars announced they were discontinuing the Champagne Noir and Champagne Sun Grown cigars, it surprised a lot of people - including this author. However, it was clear that Nick Perdomo and his team knew they had something special with the new 10th Anniversary Maduro and Sun Grown lines. The 10th Anniversary Sun Grown landed a #23 on this year's Countdown and now the Maduro lands at number six. The blend for the  Perdomo Reserve 10th Anniversary Maduro features 100% Nicaraguan tobaccos. According to Perdomo Cigars, the 10th Anniversary Maduro uses a six-year-aged Cuban-seed wrapper, binder, and fillers from its farms in Estelí, Condega, and Jalapa. The wrapper itself also has an additional 14 months of aging on it inside bourbon barrels. Production is handled out of the Tabacalera Perdomo S.A. facility in Estelí, Nicaragua. The Robusto measures 5 x 54. The Perdomo Reserve 10th Anniversary Box Pressed Maduro Robusto delivers notes of mocha (coffee, and chocolate fusion), citrus, oak, cedar, mineral, and pepper. The flavors start out medium-bodied before progressing to medium to full in the second half. This is countered by medium strength.  On top of an excellent flavor profile, this cigar delivers a stellar performance in terms of burn and draw. One can argue the combination of the 10th Anniversary Champagne, Sun Grown, and Maduro is one of the strongest blend trifectas ever. This is the second year in a row Perdomo Cigars has placed two cigars on the Cigar of the Year Countdown. Of the 25 cigars unveiled thus far on the 2021 Countdown, this is the 18th one from Nicaragua. For details of the 2021 Cigar of the Year Countdown, see our 2021 criteria: https://cigar-coop.com/2021/12/announcement-criteria-for-the-2021-cigar-of-the-year-countdown.html Cigar Coop Report: https://wp.me/p6h1n1-lMJ  

Fresh Era
Mellow Man Ace: Cuban Lottery to Soul Assassins Camaraderie

Fresh Era

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 37:10


Ulpiano Reyes, better known as Mellow Man Ace, was born with the Midas touch. As a toddler he won the Cuban Lottery which made it possible for him and his family to migrate to the United States. Come on the audio journey through his life and find out the origin story of The Godfather of Latin Rap - from growing up with his brother Sen Dog of Cypress Hill, the B-Boy brawl that connected him with his future DJ, Julio G, and how performing after a tank explosion is business as usual in Colombia. Come join the Stupid Fly cartel at www.stupid-fly.comSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

高效磨耳朵 | 最好的英语听力资源
(Level 3)-Day_51 The Islands of Caribbean

高效磨耳朵 | 最好的英语听力资源

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 5:59


词汇提示1.hemisphere 半球2.formerly 原先3.communist 共产主义的4.overthrew 推翻5.cigars 雪茄6.descendant 后代7.diverse 多种多样的8.destinations 目的地原文The Islands of CaribbeanThe Caribbean Sea is the large body of water that lies north of the northern tip of South America.Within the Caribbean Sea are many islands that have played an important role in the history and culture of the Western hemisphere.By far the largest island in the Caribbean is Cuba.Cuba was formerly a colony of Spain,but became independent in 1902.Cuba became a Communist country in 1959,when a revolution overthrew an unpopular government.After the revolution,many Cubans fled to the United States.Today,the American city of Miami,in the state of Florida,has been greatly influenced by Cuban culture.Tobacco is widely grown in Cuba,and the country is famous for the cigars that are produced in the capital city,Havana.The island of Hispaniola is located just east of Cuba.This island is divided into two countries.In the west is Haiti,where the people speak a variety of the French language that has been influenced by African languages.In the east is the Dominican Republic,where the people speak Spanish.Another important Caribbean island is Puerto Rico.This was previously a Spanish colony,but it is now governed by the United States.Many people from Puerto Rico have moved to the mainland United States,especially the New York area.In many other islands in Caribbean,English is the main language.The largest of these islands is Jamaica,which is located just south of Cuba.Most Jamaicans are the descendants of African people who were brought to work as slave on sugar plantations.Jamaica is famous as the birthplace of the style of music called“reggae”,which was popularized in other countries by Bob Marley,a famous Jamaican musician.Another important English-speaking Caribbean island is Trinidad.This island is located just north of South America.The population of Trinidad is very diverse.The largest groups of people are descended from people who came from Africa and India,but there are many other nationalities also.Trinidad is very famous for a style of music known as“calypso”,and for musicians who produce pleasant sounds by playing steel drums.There are many other smaller islands in the Caribbean,each with its own unique futures.Many of these islands possess fine beaches,and are popular tourist destinations.The warm weather of the Caribbean makes it a popular place for Northern American people who must live through cold winters!

Broken Record with Malcolm Gladwell, Rick Rubin, and Bruce Headlam

Pino Palladino and Blake Mills are renowned session musicians who recently collaborated on their own album, Notes With Attachments. It's an experimental, jazz-leaning project that blew Rick Rubin's mind. Pino Palladino is a bass player who has played on records with everyone from D'Angelo to The Who to Adele. Guitarist Blake Mills co-founded the band Dawes in 2005, and he has gone on to release critically acclaimed solo albums and produce records for the Alabama Shakes, John Legend and Fiona Apple.  Three years ago, Pino and Blake started collaborating on what would become Notes With Attachments. The album features other incredible session musicians and pulls from influences as diverse as West African, Cuban, and English folk music. Rick talks first with Pino Palladino on today's episode about those wide array of influences, and how hearing Motown music as a young boy in Wales changed his life. Pino also walks us through his evolution to becoming one of the most in-demand session players. Later Blake Mills joins the conversation to talk about collaborating with Pino and why he feels bad for the touring musicians who have to play his bass parts on the road. Subscribe to Broken Record's YouTube channel to hear all of our interviews:  https://www.youtube.com/brokenrecordpodcast and follow us on Twitter @BrokenRecord You can also check out past episodes here: https://brokenrecordpodcast.com Check out our favorite Pino Palladino and Blake Mills songs HERE. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Bright Side
Bermuda Triangle Added Another Mystery to Its Record

Bright Side

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 12:47


Bermuda Triangle earned its terrifying reputation by swallowing countless ships and airplanes, leaving no trace behind. But recently, the Bermuda Triangle has added another mystery to its record: Cuban coast guards came across a ship that had gone missing more than 90 years ago! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Florida Men on Florida Man
Episode 161- The Burger King

Florida Men on Florida Man

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 64:12


Greg, Wayne, Josh, and Cameron discuss illegal packages, Cuban pizza deliveries, lost and found stories, and the founder of Burger King, James McLamore.  To learn more about the show, visit our website. www.fmofm.com To support the show, please visit our Patreon.  https://www.patreon.com/fmofmpodcast

No Beer Left Behind
Episode 253: The Dominicast with Frank

No Beer Left Behind

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 101:45


Frank joins Bryan and Parker all the way from the Dominican Republic where Frank flexes his Internet connection on Parker and discusses the quality of modern Cuban products compared to products made by Cuban families outside of Cuba. Be sure to rate, review and subscribe to never miss an episode on your favorite podcast app. Cheers!

Jean & Mike Do The New York Times Crossword
Tuesday, December 28, 2021 - Dancing the HABANERA at ORU!

Jean & Mike Do The New York Times Crossword

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 12:55


Opinions are divided on today's crossword - Jean thought it fine, and tore through it in about 7 minutes, whereas Mike didn't even understand the theme, and only managed to eke out a victory by channeling his deep knowledge of  Cuban dance moves. In other news, it's Triplet Tuesday, so to hear Jean strut her stuff, intellectually speaking, all you need to do is download and listen up.

Cigar Sense Podcast
062: Partagás brand, a short history

Cigar Sense Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 8:30


Our members asked us to talk more about brands history, in addition to cigar tasting related topics. Therefore, in this episode, we are sharing a few facts about the history of the Partagás brand: from 1845 to the Cuban revolution, General Cigar Dominicana and the American market trademark. References mentioned in this episode: Ferri Luigi, "Storia del sigaro. Mitologia, tradizione e cultura", Odoya, 2019: https://www.ibs.it/storia-del-sigaro-mitologia-tradizione-libro-luigi-ferri/e/9788862884907 Cuban Cigar Website: https://www.cubancigarwebsite.com/ Cigar Sense: https://www.cigarsense.com/ 

How to Talk to [Mamí & Papí] about Anything
OG Check-in: She's Working to Forgive an Abusive Grandmother

How to Talk to [Mamí & Papí] about Anything

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 12:26


Last year, Odalys talked to us about her Cuban grandmother's toxic behavior and how familismo made it hard for her parents to address it. Today, she reflects on how their difficult relationship shaped her and how opening up about it on our podcast helped her begin to process it all.If you loved this episode, listen to Odalys's (aka Ody) original episode, When Familism Hurts.We'd love to hear your stories of triumph and frustration so send us a detailed voice memo to virginia@lwcstudios.com. You might be on a future episode! Let's connect on Twitter and Instagram at @TalkToMamiPapi and email us at hello@talktomamipapi.com. And follow us on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and anywhere you listen to your favorite podcasts.

VOMRadio
Moving Moments of 2021 – Part 1

VOMRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 24:57


Join in as we begin a look back on some of the amazing testimonies God allowed VOM Radio to share in 2021: C. Anderson from YWAM shares how she overcame fear to serve the Lord around the world. Brother Joshua from Cuba says he's afraid every time he encounters Cuban police or authorities—but trusts God will give him the words to say. Maria says she told God that if He was calling her to dangerous work in restricted nations, He needed to take away her fear—and God answered her prayer! Alayu from Ethiopia was given a choice: “choose Jesus or my gun.” He explained to his persecutor that he'd already made that choice: he chose Jesus. Brother Joe was almost overcome by a spirit of fear when he was told a spy had infiltrated his Bible smuggling network. Listen to how he prayed—and the Biblical example that inspired him to overcome. Paul and Suzy Childers serve together in ministry with YWAM. Listen to how they consistently send each other out into difficulties and danger, trusting each other into the Lord's care. Cheng Jie and her husband—a Chinese pastor—had talked about what would happen if he was arrested. But they weren't prepared for her to be the one who went to jail. Both Gracia and Semse lost their husbands to persecution attacks. They shared how they have been able to bear that loss—and how it affected their children. We'll also share a brief excerpt from the audio version of VOM Radio host Todd Nettleton's book, When Faith if Forbidden. After hearing these brief interview excerpts, you'll want to go back and listen to the entire conversations. You can search for VOM Radio on your favorite podcast app, or listen online at the links below. C. Anderson Brother Joshua Maria from Cuba Alayu from Ethiopia Joe and Dawn: “We didn't come here to be safe.” Paul and Suzy Childers: Part 1 and Part 2 Cheng Jie Gracia and Semse: Part 1 and Part 2 When Faith is Forbidden audio book: Departure Day and Day 1 Never miss an episode of VOM Radio! Subscribe wherever you listen to podcasts. Also: share a link to VOM Radio with a Christian friend who will also be blessed by these testimonies.

The Boardroom Buzz Pest Control Podcast
Bonus Buzz — Merry Christmas from San Juan

The Boardroom Buzz Pest Control Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 1:17


Watch Here You couldn't ask for better weather as the duo enjoy Cuban cigars on Paul's balcony. Paul makes time to chat as his firm works on closing out a banner year. Hop on over to YouTube, and watch Paul and Patrick reminisce on 2021 and look ahead to 2022. Merry Christmas from The Boardroom Buzz! Filmed, Edited, and Mixed by Dylan Seals of www.Verbell.Ltd Additional Videography by Gabriel Gonzalez.

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 142 Part 2: The Language of Jewelry: How the Editor in Chief of JCK Finds Inspiration with Editor in Chief JCK, Victoria Gomelsky.

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 31:12


What you'll learn in this episode: The history of JCK and the JCK Show How Victoria identifies trends to highlight in JCK Why the line between women's jewelry and men's jewelry has blurred, especially among younger consumers How travel influences jewelry design The most exciting new designers Victoria has her eye on About Victoria Gomelsky Victoria Gomelsky is editor-in-chief of JCK, a New York City-based jewelry trade publication founded in 1869. Her work has appeared in the New York Times, Robb Report, AFAR, WSJ Magazine, the Hollywood Reporter, Escape, The Sun and Waking Up American: Coming of Age Biculturally, an anthology published by Seal Press. She graduated summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa from UCLA with a BA in political science in 1995 and earned her MFA in nonfiction writing from Columbia University in 2002. She specializes in jewelry and watch writing but her greatest love has always been travel — 60 countries and counting. Victoria was born in St. Petersburg, Russia and emigrated to the United States in 1978 with her parents and twin sister, Julia. She divides her time between New York City and Los Angeles. Additional Resources:  Victoria's Website Victoria's Instagram Photos: Victoria Gomelsky watches: Transcript: Victoria Gomelsky, editor in chief of esteemed jewelry trade publication JCK, was bitten by the travel bug during her first-ever trip—when she and her family immigrated to the U.S. from the Soviet Union in the late 1970s. Since then, she's visited more than 60 countries, often traveling to visit jewelry shows and report on jewelry trends. She joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about how her career in jewelry started with a mysterious online job posting; why Gen Z is changing the way we categorize jewelry; and where to find her favorite jewelry destinations. Read the episode transcript here.   Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. This is a two-part Jewelry Journey Podcast. Keep your eyes open for part two, which we'll be posting later this week. Today, our guest is Victoria Gomelsky, editor-in-chief of the well-known industry publication JCK. Victoria is an accomplished writer. She's written about jewelry for the New York Times as well as an extensive list of respected publications. She also covers another of her passions, which is travel. She's had a quite a jewelry journey, as she was born in Russia and has been to more than 60 countries and counting. We'll hear all about her jewelry journey today. Victoria, welcome back to the program. Sharon: I have to ask you, why Las Vegas in July or in June? It's hot then.    Victoria: You know it's hot. It was this year that it was actually pushed back to August, which was so much hotter. It was hard to even fathom. I think the timing is such because it works well for the majors, the majors being the signets and the chain jewelers who really need to plan out their holiday buying much earlier than your average small boutique owner. A lot of it has to do with the schedule that makes sense for the industry. It's Vegas because it's hard to imagine another city that is appropriate for a giant tradeshow—   Sharon: That's true.   Victoria: That's easy to get, that has ample hotel room space. There are certainly smaller conferences that have been around the country. The American Gem Society has its annual conclave in a different city every year, but it's much, much smaller. It's convenience and ease of access, and I've gotten used to it. I don't love Vegas, but it does feel like my year is incomplete without my week at JCK. I've been going since 2000, so it's hard to imagine a year without it.   Sharon: How far in advance are you planning your publications? Are you thinking about the December issue in August?   Victoria: Well, if we had a December issue, yes.    Sharon: If it was an issue online?   Victoria: Online we can pull together pretty quickly. If it's a big feature, we like to plan it at least a month in advance, but so much of online is responding to what's happening in the world. Especially with the pandemic, it was really hard to plan because, as did everybody, we hit those walls where we thought, “This may not be relevant in a month.” Things were so changeable and volatile.    Online has a much different pace, but in terms of the print issue, we'll start planning the issue that heads out the door on the eve of JCK Vegas 2022. It'll probably go out in late May, and we'll probably start thinking about that in January in terms of big picture ideas. Just this morning, I was asked to give a sketch of content for a section on colored stones. It's hard to do that really early. You want to be timely. You want to be thoughtful about what people are thinking and what's happening the world.    Especially if an issue's coming out in the spring, I feel like after the holiday makes the most sense, because the holiday in the jewelry industry, as you can imagine or know, is everything. It's still the bulk of sales. The bulk of news comes out of this fourth quarter. To plan content without knowing how the holidays have gone is going to miss the mark, unless you're planning something general and vague. So, I like to wait until early January to start thinking about what makes sense and what people are talking about, what the news is.   Sharon: In terms of the holidays, since they're around the corner right now, you must have some features that are holiday-related that you think about early on, maybe in September or August.   Victoria: We do. If it's not about the holiday, it's about what people might start thinking about for the holiday. We do a lot of trend coverage on JCK, a lot of specific trend coverage, whether it be men's jewelry or something else. I'm actually working on a series of special report newsletters that go out every Monday in November all around the men's jewelry theme. We've covered colored stones, pearls, bridal. We tackle everything with a slight angle towards the holiday, questions like: Is this worth stocking? What are the trends? What kinds of things might retailers keep in mind as they prepare?    JCK is very much a style and trend publication, but it's also a business publication for people who happen to own jewelry businesses. We do a lot of marketing coverage, technology, social media apps that people need to know that might make them more efficient in their business. You could take jewelry out of a lot of what we cover and put in another field, whether it's fashion or home good or anything, and it might apply in terms of the strategies people might want to use to target customers, what they need to know. We try to cover it from all facets. It's always been a publication for businessowners in the jewelry space, so there's a lot of general business information we try to make sure our readers are aware of.   Sharon: If you're looking at trends, I'm thinking about the non-jewelry person that would go to Vogue or Harper's Bazaar or something like that—I'm dating myself, I realize—who can go online. I still think in terms of putting it online, like everybody else. Tell us about men's jewelry. Are men wearing more jewelry than before?   Victoria: Yes, they really are. It's funny, because I've been 20 years covering jewelry, and every four or five years, I'm either asked to or I initiate a story about the men's jewelry renaissance. There's always been something to say over the last 20 years. I do a lot of freelance writing for the New York Times. I did a piece for the Times about seven years ago, and there was a lot to say. There were a lot of jewelers introducing new men's collections and different takes on the subject, but no time has felt quite as relevant to that topic as now.    I think if you look to some of the most famous pop artists we see today, whether it's Harry Styles or Justin Bieber, the Jonas Brothers, Lil Nas X, any of these pop culture personalities, they are draped in jewelry, and not just any jewelry. A lot of them are draped in pearls, which for many of us are the most feminine gem around. There is this great, very interesting conversation about genderless or gender agnosticism in jewelry. Should we even define jewelry as a men's piece versus a woman's piece? Why not just make jewelry? Maybe it's a little more masculine/minimalist. Maybe it's a little more feminine/elaborate or diamond-set, but let it appeal to who it appeals to. Why do you need to tell people who it's for? It's a conversation.    I also write about watches quite a bit, and it's a conversation the watch world is grappling with, more so this year than any other year. Do we need to tell women that this is a “lady's watch”? Why don't we just market a watch, whether it, again, has feminine design codes or masculine design codes. Let whoever is interested in it buy it. We don't need to tell people what categories they are allowed to be interested in. It's been a very interesting conversation. I think fashion is embroiled in this conversation too, and it's been exciting to see.    When I talk about men's jewelry, I think what happens is that much of the industry still needs these categories because at retail, for example, a retailer might get a bunch of jewelry and they need to know how to merchandise or how to display it. For those kinds of problems, you still want to say, “O.K., well, this is my men's showcase,” but I think slowly things are changing. I don't know if in five years or 10 years, we'll even need those topics anymore. I think we'll just have a showcase of jewels. Again, they might be more minimalist or plainer, and they might appeal to men or women or people who consider themselves nonbinary.    Sharon: That's interesting, especially with watches, because when women wear men's watches, that's a fashion statement today.   Victoria: Very much so. I did a huge piece on female collectors for the Times in early 2020, and all of them wore men's pieces and felt a little grieved that they were being told what a woman's watch is. A woman's watch is a watch worn by a woman; that's it. I think the same might be true for jewelry. A men's jewel is a jewel worn by a man and so on. It's been an interesting thing to see evolve, and certainly there's a lot of momentum behind it. I think we'll slowly see these categories dissolve.   Sharon: There's a lot. I haven't seen men wearing brooches. Some of what you're talking about, to me, still has a way to go.   Victoria: A lot of it is being driven by Gen Z, Millennials, younger generations who look to their style icons like Harry Styles, as I mentioned. They're draped in a feather boa and necklaces. As that generation comes up they're going to age, and they're eventually going to be 30 or 40 and they'll be quite comfortable with jewelry because, 20 years later, they've been wearing it all these decades. But yeah, today, if you ask your average guy if he's going to wear a pearl necklace, I'm sure the answer's no, but I think these things do change. They change quicker than we expect them to. It's so much of what we see and what seems O.K. A lot of men might want to do that or might think they would look good in a pearl necklace.    I keep coming back to it because pearls are, again, the most feminine of gems, at least in terms of the lore we talk about, how we talk about them. Yet you see them on people like the Jonas Brothers or, for that matter, big, beautiful, iced-out Cuban chains. You see those on rappers or on hip hop stars. There is this communication out in the world where if you're just a regular guy and you're cruising through your Instagram and seeing these images, it all says to you, “This is O.K. This is right. Go for it if you're feeling it.” I think there is a lot more leeway in today's society to express yourself the way you want to. I think it's wonderful. It's quite exciting to see those barriers break down and have these conversations. It's been cool to write about.   Sharon: It would be interesting to have this conversation in 20 years. You reminded me of a conversation I had recently with an antique jewelry dealer about cufflinks. I said to her, “Cufflinks? Who wears cufflinks? I'm in Los Angeles.” Well, you're in Los Angeles too. Even the most staid businessperson, you don't see him with a cufflink, ever. I don't know.   Victoria: Maybe about a month ago, my boyfriend and I were invited to the opening of the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, which just opened in September in the heart of Miracle, right next to LACMA. It was a big gala affair sponsored by Rolex, which is a huge supporter of the Academy and the Oscars and now the museum. It was wonderful; it was like a little Oscars event, except it wasn't televised. It was black-tie glamor. Hollywood glamor was the theme, so my boyfriend rented a tux; he doesn't own one, of course, because we're in L.A. and it's a pandemic. Who needs a tux? But he got a tux, and I was gutted that I didn't have cufflinks for him or that he didn't have his own. He rented some, I think; he had a few shirt studs he was able to get from the rental place, but it was the first time. I thought, “Oh my God, cufflinks!” and we had a wonderful time. It was really exciting to be back in the world in such a fabulous way. It really felt special.   Sharon: I didn't realize it had opened. I was at LACMA, the L.A. County Museum of Art, this weekend and there was a big crowd around the Academy Museum, but I didn't realize it had opened. My antique jewelry dealer friend was also saying that she has collectors who collect antique cufflinks. I thought, “That's interesting.” I didn't know that was a collector's item in some circles, I guess.   Victoria: Yeah, when I think about it, there are a lot of great ones in London. If you ever go through Mayfair or Old Bond Street and you find those antique dealers there—there's Deakin & Francis, an old U.K. firm that specializes in cufflinks. I've never owned any, but now that we're talking about it, I feel I need to buy my partner some.   Sharon: I stopped buying my husband them 20 years ago when they just sat on his dresser not worn. I said, “O.K., I tried.” You're a traveler. You've been to how many countries?   Victoria: I lose track. It depends a little on how you count countries. I think I've counted Macao separately from China, even though it's a special administrative region of Hong Kong. Somewhere around 60. It might be about 61 or 62. A lot of countries I've been to—I mean, I've been to Switzerland at least 20 times, Brazil five times, Russia four times. I keep going back to places even though it's always very exciting to take another country off my list. As I mentioned earlier, I was a backpacker after college. My first trip was to Central America with some girlfriends with backpacks on. We took off for three months. We went to Costa Rica and Panama and Venezuela, and I ended up in the Caribbean for a couple of weeks.    I had already started a little bit of traveling. Initially, we came from Russia as a kid. I think when we left Russia in late 1978 as part of the exodus of Soviet Jews from the Soviet Union, we were allowed to seek asylum in the States. We took this journey via Vienna and then Rome and ended up in Cherry Hill, New Jersey, of all places, because that's where we had an invitation. We had to have a formal invitation because we were political refugees.    I think very early on, even though it was never articulated to me—it was something I felt in my bones—I thought that travel was a way to lead a better life. It was a road to a better life, as it was for us. Early on that knowledge imprinted on me, on my soul. In high school, I started saving money to go to an exchange program in Spain. That was my first real trip outside—I'd gone to Mexico with my family, but I had never traveled outside of that. So, I had the bug. After college, I was always interested in slightly more offbeat places.    One of my favorite places in the whole world—and I dream about going back all time—is India. I love places that still feel like they're not discovered. Clearly, India's very discovered, but it's not as easy to travel there as it might be to go to Europe. I love Europe and Paris and London as much as the next person, but there's always something that feels a little easy in those spots. I love Southeast Asia. I went to Vietnam in the 90s a couple of times. I loved it. I love Malaysia. I love the food there. I love the smells and the culture. I love things that feel different. India couldn't be more different than our lives. A lot of the same people go between the two, between L.A. and India, for example, and you'll find a lot of creature comforts in places like Mumbai. The culture and the heritage and the history, the way of life and the way people look at life is so, so different, and I'm really drawn to that. I like going places that test me a little bit.   Sharon: How do your jewelry and travel intersect? I'm sure you're traveling to the shows like Basle. India must be a great place for jewels. I don't know about the shows there.   Victoria: My first trip to India was for a show. There's a famous show—famous, I guess, depending on the circles you move in—in Mumbai called the India International Jewelry Show. That was my first reason to get to India in 2004. I ended up going back to do some reports on the diamond trade there. Mumbai is a real hub of diamonds, so I was going back to do research and then Jaipur in the north. Rajasthan is famous for its colored-stone industry. There are tons of colored-stone dealers and cutters and jewelers there, including the very famous Gem Palace, which I visited a couple of times.   My most recent trip to India was in 2017 to Jaipur to attend a conference on colored stones. It happened to intersect with a fair I had always wanted to go to called the Pushkar Camel Fair. Nothing to do with jewelry, although of course you see lots of jewelry in India. Jewelry's a ubiquitous thing there. When I went to this conference in Jaipur, my partner ended up meeting me. We spent a few days in Jaipur together, went down to Udaipur, which is a wonderful town in the south of Rajasthan, just stunning in terms of its history and heritage and hotels and palaces. Then we finished off in Pushkar, also in Rajasthan, at this camel fair. My entrée was for jewelry, but I try to explore as much as I can around it.    India's just remarkable. I'm very pleased that jewelry has such a natural and obvious connection to India because anytime I can have a work trip, take me there. Then if I can add on to it, I do. My son is only three—he's not even three; he's three in November, but I'm thinking, “How old does he have to be to go to India? What is too young to take a young, little guy to India?” Maybe when he's seven, hopefully.    Sharon: That's an interesting question. It could be three. There are people who are 33 who won't go because they're too afraid. It's on my list, but you're so adventurous.   Victoria: I wouldn't have pegged myself as the adventurous sort, at least not in high school. I was very type A. I was student body president. I was a cheerleader. I was very on track at least to go to college and who knows what after that, but I never really thought of myself as a risktaker and an adventure seeker. After spending time in Southeast Asia—I went to backpack there in the 90s, through Vietnam and Cambodia and Malaysia and Singapore—it just settled in my bones. I wanted more and more and more. Those places feel adventurous, but once you get there, they're not as challenging—well, they are challenging in that there's a lot of poverty; the heat is oppressive; it's hard sometimes to figure out your way around if the signage isn't clear and you don't speak the language, but I genuinely feel like the world is full of very good people. Maybe a few bad apples in there, but most people are very kind. So, it's easier than it seems.   Sharon: Do you think if somebody is a jewelry designer or looking at the field or profession, that travel would inform what they do?   Victoria: Oh, 100 percent yes. There are some jewelers who very much look to other cultures or travel. I think of Lydia Courteille, who's a Parisian jeweler who does insanely elaborate, beautiful gem-set pieces usually after a trip somewhere. She's done pieces based on the Mayan heritage. I believe she traveled to Guatemala. She's done pieces based on myths from Russia and India, and a lot of her collections really are inspired by travel she's taken.    There's another jeweler who's part Mexican, part French, named Colette. She has incredible jewels, a lot of them takes on various places she's visited. I think if I were a jeweler, I would certainly use travel as a jumping-off point to create a collection. I can't think of anything more evocative than a jewel that reminds you of a place you've been or the color of the ocean. A lot of people go to Greece and create a beautiful blue jewel that reminds them of the Aegean. Why not?    Sharon: I'm thinking of Thierry Vendome, where he goes and finds rusted pieces on his travels and then he'll come back and incorporate them. One piece had a grenade—   Victoria: An exploded grenade.   Sharon: An exploded grenade, yeah. Tell us who we should keep our eyes on, the top three you think of we should keep our eyes on.   Victoria: I just wrote about a jeweler that I only saw in person recently in Las Vegas at the Couture show, but I had Zoomed with them. They are Mumbai-based. It's a company called Studio Renn. It's a husband and wife named Rahul and Roshni Jhaveri, and they create jewelry for art lovers that really does live at the intersection between art and jewelry, philosophy, design. Sometimes you have to talk to them to hear the inspiration, but for example, one of them—they had stumbled across an object on a walk around Lake Tansa, which is a lake on the outskirts of Mumbai. There was this conversation they had about what it means to give something attention. Does that put value on the piece? And for them, it was this exploration of the meaning of value. They took this piece that was an organic object. They didn't tell me what it was. They cast it. They 3D scanned the whole thing and then encased it in precious metal, put rubies inside it in a way that you could only see them if you shone a light on the piece. There was this written source of very layered, complicated but also beautiful jewelry. They're just very interesting. They're really thoughtful.   Sharon: How do you spell Renn?   Victoria: R-e-n-n.   Sharon: I have to say it's the second time this week that somebody has mentioned them as somebody to keep your eye on.   Victoria: Yeah, I was thrilled to speak to them, and I ended up doing a piece for the New York Times on them. An Up Next Profile is what the column is called, because even though they've been around for a few years and they're not brand new, they're obviously new to people in the States. They are exploring this market. They worked a tour for the first time. They're really lovely and interesting and do beautiful work.    Another jeweler that's gotten a ton of attention—I know her pretty well personally. She is a client of a very good friend of mine. Her name is Lauren Harwell Godfrey, and her collection is called Harwell Godfrey. She's gotten a ton of attention over the last year. In fact, I just saw that she was nominated for a GEM Award, which is like the Oscars of the jewelry industry. The ceremony takes place in January in New York. She was nominated in the design category. Really fantastic use of color, lots of interesting motifs that feel very signature to her, lots of geometric work. We ended up commissioning a piece for my mom for her 75th birthday that my dad gifted to her this last summer. it wasn't a super bespoke piece, but there were bespoke elements to it. It was by Harwell Godfrey. She's a really lovely woman, super-talented designer based in Marin in Northern California.   I'll name one more. He's a really interesting guy. He does a ton of work with AI, artificial intelligence, in a way that scares a lot of people that are used to jewelry as this handmade, soulful object. His point is that there's no less soul in it, even though a computer helped to generate an algorithm that created a pattern that he inputs into this machine. His name is Nick Koss. His company is called Volund Jewelry. He's based in Canada and has a very interesting background that I cannot even attempt to encapsulate because it's rich and complicated, but he does really interesting jewelry. A lot of it is using 3D modelling software, AI, but in a thoughtful way. Again, there is lots of meaning baked into the way he sees things. He could talk about it very intelligently. He does custom work. You can go down a real rabbit hole with him. Check him out on Instagram. It's V-o-l-u-n-d.   I have a soft spot for one jeweler because I wrote a whole book on them that was published by Assouline probably six or seven years ago. It's a company called Lotus Arts de Vivre. They're based in Bangkok. They've been around since the early 80s, I want to say. It's a real family business. The patriarch is originally from Germany. He moved to Bangkok in the 60s and fell in love with a woman who had been born in Thailand but was the product of many years of intermarriage. Her grandfather was a Scottish captain who fell in love with a tribeswoman from north Thailand. Her other grandfather was an Englishman who married a woman from Malaysia. So, she was the distillation of generations of inner marriage between European and Asian backgrounds. They have this huge compound in Bangkok, and they have two sons that now help run the business.    They do extraordinary objects in jewelry. They started out as jewelers, but they do everything from home goods to accessories for people's cars. They use a lot of natural materials in addition to the finest gemstones. They use Golconda diamonds or emeralds from the Panjshir Valley in Afghanistan combined with snakeskin and buffalo horn and different woods. They're huge on different exotic woods from across southeast Asia. They find the finest craftspeople across Asia, whether it's lacquer artists from China or Japan to carvers from Indonesia. They will employ those crafts in their work, and it's just stunning.    They used to be with Bergdorf Goodman for many, many years. They are still available in the States. In fact, they won at the recent Couture show for some of their work. So, they're still here and they're everywhere. They have boutiques in different hotels, especially in Asia, like the Peninsula in Hong Kong or Raffles in Singapore. They have a presence, but they're not as well known, I would say, in the States.   Sharon: I'll check them out, especially if you wrote a whole book about them.    Victoria: The family is beyond interesting. It's the von Bueren family. He's a raconteur, somebody who you could listen to for hours. He's very, very interesting and has seen a lot, and their clients are very interesting. They appeal to a lot of high-society people across Asia, so they have these events. They have a space, a showroom, at their factory in Bangkok right on the river, and they host these soirées that are just magnificent.   Sharon: Wow! I'm sure you know all the ins and outs. You can go down a long list of jewelers and manufacturers. You could tell me about all of them. Victoria, thank you so much for being here today. This is so interesting. I'm sure our audience will enjoy hearing what you have to say about JCK since it is such a stalwart. Thank you very much.   Victoria: Thank you, Sharon. This is lovely. Thank you for giving me such an opportunity to talk about myself.   Sharon: So glad to have you.   We will have images posted on the website. You can find us wherever you download your podcasts, and please rate us. Please join us next time, when our guest will be another jewelry industry professional who will share their experience and expertise. Thank you so much for listening.   Thank you again for listening. Please leave us a rating and review so we can help others start their own jewelry journey.  

political and spiritual
EDDIE RODEIGUEZ....FORBIDDEN FRUIT..62 YEARS EMBARGO ON CUBAN MUSIC IN U.S.A.

political and spiritual

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 128:00


Pioneers of USA Spanish language radio station / owners were mostly Cuban Exiles who had to flee a dictatorship government. The music produced in Cuba after 1959 was considered to benefit the communist government of Cuba and dictator. No Cuban music on American Spanish Radio since embargo was declared. There are not enough hours to share the rich cultural value of Cuban Music. Cuban artists and bands perform worldwide excluding USA. Musicians are not provided work Visas to perform and cannot except compensation if the work visa is approved. Time to end the 62 year US Embargo on Cuban music. Your thoughts and comments welcomed. Call in 

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch
Absurd Truth: It's Called Acting...

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 16:41


Australia police approach sunbathers for not wearing masks, meanwhile Rich Zeoli discusses how the reboot of "Being The Ricardo's" is being criticized for not casting a Cuban as Ricky.Please visit our great sponsors:Patriot Mobile https://PatriotMobile.com/DanaFree Activation with promo code DANA. Patriotmobile.com/dana or call 972-PATRIOT. Kel-Techttps://KelTecWeapons.comKelTec: Creating Innovative, Quality Firearms to help secure your world. Delta Rescuehttps://deltarescue.orgGet your complete Estate Planning kit at deltarescue.org/dana today and let your passion for animals live well into the future. Black Rifle Coffee Companyhttps://blackriflecoffee.com/danatvUse code DANATV to save 20% off your first coffee club, coffee and select gear purchase. Legacy Precious Metalshttps://legacypminvestments.comPick up your free guide to precious metal investments today.Moinkhttps://moinkbox.com/DANASign up now and get Free Ground Beef for a year with promo code DANA.

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch
Absurd Truth: It's Called Acting...

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 16:41


Australia police approach sunbathers for not wearing masks, meanwhile Rich Zeoli discusses how the reboot of "Being The Ricardo's" is being criticized for not casting a Cuban as Ricky.Please visit our great sponsors:Patriot Mobile https://PatriotMobile.com/DanaFree Activation with promo code DANA. Patriotmobile.com/dana or call 972-PATRIOT. Kel-Techttps://KelTecWeapons.comKelTec: Creating Innovative, Quality Firearms to help secure your world. Delta Rescuehttps://deltarescue.orgGet your complete Estate Planning kit at deltarescue.org/dana today and let your passion for animals live well into the future. Black Rifle Coffee Companyhttps://blackriflecoffee.com/danatvUse code DANATV to save 20% off your first coffee club, coffee and select gear purchase. Legacy Precious Metalshttps://legacypminvestments.comPick up your free guide to precious metal investments today.Moinkhttps://moinkbox.com/DANASign up now and get Free Ground Beef for a year with promo code DANA.

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch
Tuesday December 21 - Full Show

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 109:30


Rich Zeoli fills in for Dana. President Biden plans to make a scripted speech about the Omicron variant to scare unvaccinated Americans. Professional sports leagues postpone games. Is the Build Back Better bill officially dead? Cancel Culture comes for the reboot of Being The “Ricardos” for not casting a Cuban actor to play Ricky. Elizabeth Warren defends her claim Elon Musk doesn't pay any taxes. Boston implements a vaccine mandate for all restaurants and entertainment venues.Please visit our great sponsors:Patriot Mobile https://PatriotMobile.com/DanaFree Activation with promo code DANA. Patriotmobile.com/dana or call 972-PATRIOT. Kel-Techttps://KelTecWeapons.comKelTec: Creating Innovative, Quality Firearms to help secure your world. Delta Rescuehttps://deltarescue.orgGet your complete Estate Planning kit at deltarescue.org/dana today and let your passion for animals live well into the future. Black Rifle Coffee Companyhttps://blackriflecoffee.com/danatvUse code DANATV to save 20% off your first coffee club, coffee and select gear purchase. Legacy Precious Metalshttps://legacypminvestments.comPick up your free guide to precious metal investments today.Moinkhttps://moinkbox.com/DANASign up now and get Free Ground Beef for a year with promo code DANA.

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch
Tuesday December 21 - Full Show

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 109:30


Rich Zeoli fills in for Dana. President Biden plans to make a scripted speech about the Omicron variant to scare unvaccinated Americans. Professional sports leagues postpone games. Is the Build Back Better bill officially dead? Cancel Culture comes for the reboot of Being The “Ricardos” for not casting a Cuban actor to play Ricky. Elizabeth Warren defends her claim Elon Musk doesn't pay any taxes. Boston implements a vaccine mandate for all restaurants and entertainment venues.Please visit our great sponsors:Patriot Mobile https://PatriotMobile.com/DanaFree Activation with promo code DANA. Patriotmobile.com/dana or call 972-PATRIOT. Kel-Techttps://KelTecWeapons.comKelTec: Creating Innovative, Quality Firearms to help secure your world. Delta Rescuehttps://deltarescue.orgGet your complete Estate Planning kit at deltarescue.org/dana today and let your passion for animals live well into the future. Black Rifle Coffee Companyhttps://blackriflecoffee.com/danatvUse code DANATV to save 20% off your first coffee club, coffee and select gear purchase. Legacy Precious Metalshttps://legacypminvestments.comPick up your free guide to precious metal investments today.Moinkhttps://moinkbox.com/DANASign up now and get Free Ground Beef for a year with promo code DANA.

I Survived Theatre School
Fresh and Fancy

I Survived Theatre School

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 70:07


Intro: Amtrak, you can't afford to live anywhere, where am I trying to go?, being of service, Legacy, Fresh and FancyLet Me Run This By You: We get feedback from Dave, talk about Jeff Garlin, NO ONE IS HIDING ANYTHINGCOMPLETE TRANSCRIPT (unedited):1 (10s):And I'm Gina Pulice. We went to theater school2 (12s):Together. We survived it.1 (14s):You didn't quite understand it. 20 years later, we're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense of it all2 (21s):Survived theater school. And you will too. Are we famous yet?1 (31s):Hello survivors. It is Gina. Just wanted to let you know that today, boss and I are guest lists. We are without a guest and we instead had a conversation, just the two of us, chickens about a ton of things, including the fact that nothing is a secret. Even the things that we think are and talking about legacy. This is a topic that boss has been really interested in recently. And I guess I'm starting to get interested in it too. At some point in one's life, one starts to think, Hmm, did it matter that I was here? What did I do? What, what proof or evidence of is there? What I did, or maybe you don't think that way, maybe your legacy is just that you lived a contented and happy life and, and it doesn't matter if it is written in the stars in any way, either way.1 (1m 22s):It's fine with me. Just interesting to learn about what people's philosophies or the thoughts are about legacy. And as we come to this end of the year and we're reflecting on, wow, we're reflecting on, I guess these last two crazy years, hopefully everybody is entering this time of reflection with a lot more clarity. Maybe I think the pandemic has been clarifying among many other things. And so hopefully you're feeling, I don't know, clear, and hopefully you are enjoying this podcast.1 (2m 4s):And if you are enjoying it, you are hopefully subscribed. And if you're subscribed, hopefully you have left us a review. Honestly, I don't even care what the review says. I think just having reviews is the thing that helps us with the king algorithm. And that's important only because we want to be able to keep doing this podcast. We enjoy doing it. We, we get a lot out of it. And we've heard from people that people are getting a lot out of it in return. So it's a mutually great thing that we'll be able to continue. If you are able to put your love for our podcast, not just in your heart, but in the world, tell the public, shout it from the rooftops.1 (2m 47s):I'm not going to stop you from shouting it from the rooftops. I'll tell you that much right now. Anyway, that's all for that. Please enjoy.3 (3m 10s):I'm going to take it to all those places. Cause those are like some of my favorite places in Southern California. And I didn't know that. So I'm learning a lot. And so I took it to San Francisco to Oakland and my cousin picked me up. But what is fantastic and sad about Amtrak for people that don't know? Like nobody knows shit about Amtrak, but Amtrak is a government funded. So rail is government funded. It was supposed to be like the thing of the future. It was supposed to be just rail. We weren't like flying and, and, and, and train travel was supposed to be comparable like it was going to be, but it just like, it has a lot to do. Someone was telling me like w who I met on the Amtrak.3 (3m 51s):Cause you eat in community eating. So these two amazing women that I met told me that like something with world war two and trains, the trains all had to be used for, for like ammunition, like the war Fs. And so then it became less of a, a passenger situation. And then when flying really anyway. So, but it's gorgeous. So w and what you can do is, so I bought a coach ticket, which is literally like, you know, I don't know, 50 bucks, a hundred bucks round trip from, but then you can bid to upgrade your seat because Amtrak has no money.3 (4m 32s):So what you can do is say, okay, well, like I'm willing to pay. They give you a range I'm willing to pay. And I did the lowest $20 more to go to business class, which is like super much nicer. Right. So I bid, and then they said, of course they accepted my bid because it's not a full train. Nobody trained travels by train. And so business classes dope. And it is like, you get two seats. It, they reclined almost all the way. There's, it's just, it's quiet. Like coaches, coaches, loud as hell, where people are eating, like, you know, Funyuns and like Takis chips the whole time. And like, you know, a lot of people like down on their luck and stuff like that.3 (5m 15s):Okay. So, you know, I did business class on the way there and lovely. I mean, there's wifi. I mean, it's like dope. And the bathrooms were relative are clean. I don't in business class anyway. All right. So it literally goes up the coast. And so you, you, you're on the ocean. It's the weirdest thing you're like, this is I'm, I'm traveling right next to the ocean. It's a long time. The whole time. Almost long as hell though. Okay. So like, you know, the flight is 45 minutes from Burbank to, to, to San Francisco. And the train ride is 10 hours. Like, that's just how it is. Like, that's, if you are in a hurry, you do not take the Amtrak.3 (5m 57s):You know what I mean? So there is like, I do have some shame, like, people think I'm ridiculous a little bit. They're like, I'm like, where am I going? I, it's not like I have pressing meetings. I am not. Yeah.1 (6m 9s):And for, for the life, so many of us are living right now, which is working from home or working remotely or making your own schedule. Why shouldn't you it's much better for the environment to take the train. Yeah.3 (6m 23s):It is it, you take the airplane. Yes. So, so it was amazing. And then I had a wonderful, wonderful time in San Francisco. Like I never really liked San Francisco. I don't know what my problem was. Like, I never really got into San Francisco even though like people cause1 (6m 41s):Your mom left you a spree for, oh3 (6m 43s):My God. Yeah. If you listen to this podcast, you know that like, you know, my mom was having an affair and, and, and we went to San Francisco and she literally left my sister and I at the esprit outlet, which thank God, had a restaurant in the outlet for like what felt like forever. But it, it was a work day. It was a full work day at a spree. It was like eight hours. So I just really, in the last couple years have really grown to love the shit out of the bay area. Like I know the tech bros have taken over. I know that you can't afford to live there. Okay. All those things are true. I still, because maybe I'm not from there.3 (7m 23s):I know I'm not so butt hurt about that. Like I, you know, and my aunt and uncle this beautiful, beautiful condo in north beach and my cousin lives in the inner inner Richmond, I don't know. Anyway. So she's on Clement street and it's gorgeous. And I walked everywhere and we went hiking in Moran and we drove to Marin. So I would live there. I would live. I mean, I, you know, who can afford to live there, but here's the thing that I think a lot of us too are, are, are really looking at. Most of us in my circle are like, we, we really literally can't afford to live anywhere. Like the, the world is becoming unaffordable on a, so many ways. And so many levels that the thing of like, oh, it's so expensive in blank.3 (8m 6s):City becomes less sort of exciting or like less sensational because it's like, look around what, what are you talking about? You can't live anywhere. It's all, it's all terrible. So, so all this to say, like, it was, it was a great trip. And then on the way back, I got smart and I was like, okay, well, let me see if I can upgrade to a room. You can bid on rooms on the train, right. Cause it's 10 hours or whatever. And I was like, okay, let me, and they took my bid of, you know, $40 or something to upgrade to a room. And that has all the amazing meals included. So two meals, which lunches, if you just paid for it is 25.3 (8m 49s):Dinner is 45. So I got lunch and dinner free. And I just tipped to the, and it was delicious salmon. I mean like this, and I got my own room and I wrote, and I, I like lived, lived my best life on the train1 (9m 5s):Girl. I need to do this, but I don't live in California. I mean, maybe I'll just pick a, maybe I'll pick it east coast version of that.3 (9m 16s):It doesn't matter. Like you could, you can also take it like they have specials. Like there's apparently a really beautiful ride between DC and New York. So1 (9m 29s):Yeah, no. So I also love or have loved the idea of train travel. And I always really wanted to take, there's a, there's a train that goes somehow through the Rockies. That's the one I really want to go on. But the first time I treated myself to a train trip. Oh, that's right. The worst possible3 (9m 53s):You were pregnant. Right.1 (9m 55s):I was the worst possible route to, we went from Chicago to Texas. So there's nothing to look at. The train was disgusting. It was so dirty and I was pregnant. So my, you know, my sense of smell, which is already very heightened was even, was just off the chain. And as a result of being on that train, I developed3 (10m 24s):Vertigo. I'm like, God, I mean,1 (10m 26s):It was coincidental. I never, we never did figure out what the deal was. But I developed a kind of vertigo when I was pregnant, where I had to crawl on the floor because I couldn't, you know, cause I couldn't walk and thankfully knock on wood that has not returned to me. And it also didn't return to my next two pregnancies, but yet it soured me and us on trains. But I think it's just the route we picked. We need to pick3 (10m 57s):It's the route and yeah, definitely don't have, don't be pregnant, but that's not going to happen for you again. So you don't have to worry about that. But like I'm all done with that. And so I had a great trip and I actually had like these huge realizations while I was there about, about working about money, about the entertainment industry, it was really, it was I, and I went with the intention of really looking at what is it that I'm going for in life? I mean, that's such a huge question, but like what, where am I trying to go? And, and the idea of service, right? So I always thought being of service was about other people, but really what it is for me is being of service in the way that I want to be of service is actually for me, like I didn't realize that I feel is good for my mental, physical, and emotional health when I'm being of service in a way that feels not to pleading, but all, but like really energizing and also like a, like thinking about legacy, I've also been thinking about legacy, like what is my, what is going to be my legacy?3 (12m 12s):And it tied into like, I was really, you know, I spend because the holidays are coming up way too much. It will not wait too much, but a lot of money on my nieces and nephew for Christmas gifts, right? Like thousands of dollars, right. Dish, I love giving gifts. It's my jam. But then I realized that like, and you probably, you know, I'd be so interested to hear what you have to say, but having children, but like a lot of this stuff, I got them, they outgrow, they don't care about very soon is cheaply made and is garbagey. And it has a very, very little lasting effect on their lives. And that's just the truth and I'm not judging it.3 (12m 52s):I'm just saying that seemed, that was the data I was picking up. And I'm like, that's literally like just throwing money away after a while year after year. So there's a, let me get smart about this. So we started a trust for each kid where we put that and I said to that shutter dude, I wish someone had done that for my ass. So I said to them, you can choose, we can keep going the way we're doing with gifts for Christmas and blah, blah, blah. Or you can, we can put donate every year and you could literally get very, very, very few gifts. But your huge gift is that each year we put a certain amount of money. And then basically by the time you're 30, you'll be millionaires.3 (13m 36s):I mean, just because of the way money grows, not even because we're putting that much in. And they were like, what? And so miles really educated me and them on the power of, of the investing money in a way that is with the interest and all that shit. And so that's what we're doing. And I, I got to say like, it tied into this idea of legacy and like, I would watch rather have those kiddos like be able to use it. And it's not like one of these things where they have to use it for college because fuck it, man, not everyone goes to goddamn college right away or ever, but they can't touch it until they're a certain age or they can choose to keep it in there and roll it over to another kind of account or whatever.3 (14m 17s):So, but I'm thinking about this shit differently in terms of legacy based on like, what do I want to leave this earth? Like, do I want to, you know, have, have my legacy be that I gave my, my niece to like a fake Dior ring that turned her finger green or right, right. It's fine. But it's so that's how we started it this Christmas. Cause I was like enough, enough, enough. Yeah. Yeah. Well, what you've just given us here in this conversation is like the center of a1 (14m 51s):Bicycle wheel by the goal wheel. And we have a, there's a bunch of spokes there. There's like talking about what's your purpose in life and where are you going? And there's talking about your legacy and then there's talking about consumption. And then there's talking about instant gratification that we give to kids in the form of gifts. And there's talking about that a lot, the pressures that we put on ourselves on Christmas, I mean just suffice it to say, I have been on the sometimes what feels like the circular journey of, you know, from, I mean, you know, when, when I first had kids, when we first had kids, it was really exciting to give the gifts.1 (15m 33s):It was exciting to create a Christmas that I remember from my childhood, the excitement of coming downstairs3 (15m 40s):And magic magic1 (15m 43s):1000%. And, and that sustained me for the period of time that the kids are literally happy to get whatever the minute it turned. And it turned when the oldest one was not that old. Yeah. I'm going to say like seven. Yeah. Yeah. And he, they had a bunch of presents and they opened everything up. And then he said, is that it? Yeah. And I went, oh damn, we're doing this wrong. We're doing it completely wrong. And so we've had a few Christmases and this is one of them where we're not doing gifts, which is to say, there will be stockings, you know, and maybe one little thing, but we're not doing the multiple presents under the trees.1 (16m 31s):We didn't do multiple Eddy presents for Hanukkah because of exactly what you said, toys is five to 15 minutes of joy for a lifetime, literally a lifetime of trash that I then, then it becomes my job to get rid of organized, find a space for a blood body block. And now the kids are pretty much almost all of them at an age where they don't want any of those things anymore. They want money, they want electronics. They want, so we have the way that we save money for them is not in the, for like Christmas, but that's actually a really good idea.1 (17m 12s):And something going to bring up with my husband and says,3 (17m 15s):Yeah, I mean, for those of us, I think it's a great idea. And also it's so much easier, not easy. Well, I don't know for miles and I don't have kids, so it's not in our face all the time. And we moved away from them. It's a different story when you're in under the same roof with being with children, with beings, small beings that, you know, are you so I, I am very aware that we have like the we're the aunt and uncle to different, it's a different deal. But like we just thought, wait a minute.1 (17m 44s):Yeah. And the thing that you're really after when you give a gift or at least I think is the joy that it brings to the person and, and that's great, but like you're saying most of the time, it's a, it's a very fleeting. And also like you don't want to teach kids that this is the way to direct your joy, right? Like from getting things, right. I'm not saying that that's, that's what you're definitely doing. If you give Christmas present, I'm not saying that. But you know, we just live in this very like consumer oriented culture,3 (18m 17s):The kid's fault. It's nobody's fault. It's a system, it's a systemic situation, but it hit me last. When I really, when I really was like, okay, I want to do this differently. It was last Christmas. My youngest niece wanted and got it is not knocking anyone involved, but it was very clear to me that we, it was really stark about what was going on. She wanted a claw machine, a mini Kalama machine from an arcade that literally just had candy in it, candy bars. And you made this loudest noise you've ever heard, took 10 batteries, 10 big ass batteries.3 (19m 7s):And literally there's candy in it. That's killing us all the sugar and look, you know, whatever. That was the least of my worries. But I was like, this is wait, what?1 (19m 16s):That's interesting. That has me3 (19m 20s):Wait. And it was a, probably a really expensive machine. It's not cheap, but that's what she wanted. My sister got it. And look, I'm not knocking anyone involved, but for me, I was like, it was so, so striking about what was going on. Cause it was so loud and obnoxious.1 (19m 39s):Let me ask you this. What do you remember getting for Christmas? Okay.3 (19m 42s):My favorite thing I ever got, this is so crazy in my life when I was a kid kid was okay. Two things I can tell the first gift that I like went Gaga, Google over was something, it was a makeup kit called fresh and fancy. And it had, it had perfumes. It had, and it was probably, you know, 9 99, 99 at Kmart. But like my sister and I each got one and it, what, what it was, was super fun, super adult, super smelled. So good. And I, there is a picture of me opening it up and in, in my I'm saying fresh and fancy.3 (20m 27s):And then I take the picture.1 (20m 30s):Do you have that picture accessible?3 (20m 33s):Yeah, I think so. I can send it, send it, send1 (20m 36s):It. Yeah.3 (20m 38s):I will send that and to fresh and fancy. Okay. That was number one. And then the second gift I remember as an adult getting that was really moving to was my mother who traveled all the time and who I really sort of labeled as a selfish, kind of a human at times gave my sister and I each a ticket, a plane ticket to go anywhere in the world because she had so many miles. But like the fact that she, she thought about us and the fact that her travel, which as a child brought so much grief to me because she was gone all the time that she was then turning it around and giving my sister and I each a plane ticket to anywhere was really moving to me and also was really abundant and felt like that's awesome.3 (21m 25s):You know, is that when you went to Columbia, that's when I went to Prague by myself for a week and a half, which was insane or two weeks, it was crazy, but1 (21m 34s):Oh yeah,3 (21m 37s):It was in, when I lived in LA, it was a long time ago. So, and I, I, I, it just, so I wish I had gone with somebody else. It was the most lonely, it was beautiful and Prague is crazy and, and fun, but I went alone, but that's like really just indicative of where I was at in my LA life. So it doesn't, that's not shocking to me. What about you? Like, what do you remember being like, oh my God,1 (22m 0s):I got to speak and spell. I, I really, I really coveted speak and spell. And for those of you who don't know a speak and spell is just, would be an app now. And it wouldn't be nearly as fun. This was a self-contained. It was like a really thick version, like a three inch thick version, maybe note or two of an iPad. And it was orange and it had a handle built into the top and it would say a word in a computerized voice, like structure, and then you'd have to spell it. And if you got it right, this is the, so this tells you a lot about my psychology, the high, I got that little sound telling me I spelled something, right.1 (22m 43s):I just felt like I could, I was vanquishing Rome. It was, I felt so powerful that I got a bike one year. That was amazing. And I kind of lip gloss that smelled like root beer.3 (22m 57s):Oh, I know that those1 (22m 59s):Are the things that just like off the top of my head. I remember just falling in love with, and, and being, you know, unequivocally joyful, happy with moments. And that's the thing that you're always after, like for yourself or the people that you love, you want to impart this joy. That's what I was going to get you. Like, you want to impart this joy and then there's this tacit thing about like, you better feel joy from this. At least that's what I find myself, you know, evaluate whether or not this person is feeling joy from it, because that's what I want. I want to give them joy of this present. And then I feel sad if it doesn't work out.3 (23m 38s):Yeah. And, and, and, and, and it, it usually doesn't work out like that only because people aren't mind readers people don't, everyone's different. And Joy's so, so personal. And so, so specific to that person. And it's like, it's just such a setup, but it's also, we keep trying and I'm going to still, I still love giving presents, but I now am like, oh, okay. Can't be for me, like the mass quantity of just, yeah. Crap. Like, it really hit me too. Like I bought one year, my niece was really into Shopkins.3 (24m 19s):Remember, oh yeah. I bought like $200 worth of Shopkins for her.1 (24m 23s): lasted for that year. And then she makes, never picked up shots.3 (24m 29s):Not even the whole year, maybe a month.1 (24m 32s):That's the thing, man. They get, and they get, and I, I, I was going to say, this is especially true for girls, but I'm, I'm going to re revise that because the boys did it too. When they love that thing, it's all they care about. It's their whole world. You know, my daughter said to me all, I, the only thing I want you to get me is just tons and tons of puppets. What's a3 (24m 58s):Pocket.1 (24m 59s):A pocket is a PLA silicone flat toy that has these half hemisphere, a half a hemisphere that you put, like you, it's a satisfying sensation to push it in. And then you flip it over and push it the other way. Shit.3 (25m 24s):What's in that what's in the pocket, like a little creatures,1 (25m 28s):Zero, nothing. It's in the shape of whatever you want it to be in the shape of it's a fidget choice. Essentially. I3 (25m 36s):Understand. It's like an ASMR founding,1 (25m 39s):Totally tile. It doesn't make a sound. It's all about it being tactile. Yeah. And, and, you know, go to the stores and they're everywhere. Puppets. You'll see if you start looking for now, you'll see that they're everywhere. And so that's what she wants. And a half of me completely wants to indulge that wish. And the other half of me says, I'll be throwing these all away in six months. And then I'll feel like an asshole because I spent a bunch of money on something that I knew was a fool's errand.3 (26m 10s):Yeah, I'm right. It's like so hard because they believe they really want it.1 (26m 18s):They really, it's3 (26m 18s):Not, it's not a joke. It's not a, it's not a joke. Like that's their jam.1 (26m 24s):Yeah. So this year we're going skiing for Christmas. That's3 (26m 27s):Our part of New Hampshire.1 (26m 29s):We're going to Vermont. And I think I've told everybody on the podcast I do. That's right.3 (26m 35s):You'd like the ski lodge into, right?1 (26m 38s):Yes ma'am. So I go and I get everybody off in the morning to their little activities and it's as, you know, a huge amount of work, then the gear and the schlepping. So I help everybody get to that. And I get back to my little cozy spot and read and write and just hang out that sound. So I'm really looking forward to it. Yeah. And honestly, that's the thing that people I I'm banking on. Cause this will be the third time we've done a trip instead of presence. And, and these are trips that we still talk about. So I think it is a good investment experiences are a better investment than3 (27m 14s):I absolutely agree. And I feel like that's the trust starting for these kids. It's like, we're gifting them with the experience of maybe like a down payment on a fricking home, a car to get them from here to there a education, like a real thing, like a thing that you need to like live your life versus a fricking fake Cuban Linx chain. I didn't even know what Cuban links were. I didn't know what was happening.1 (27m 42s):I don't know what that3 (27m 42s):Is. What is Cuban links? I oh, those1 (27m 45s):Big, Easy.3 (27m 51s):And it's just ugly. And it's also $6,006,000. What did Jackie about? Oh anyway,1 (27m 59s):I, you, you just did yourself, such a favor. I mean, you did them mostly a favor, but you did yourself such a favor because also the other thing is, you know, I have experienced, I go out shopping and I'm immediately overwhelmed and I'm trying, okay, now this one, I got this,3 (28m 14s):I asked who gets one and did, is it equal? And like,1 (28m 18s):Oh my God, it's just, it's like a, it's a hell3 (28m 33s):I thought we might start out with, I got some feedback on the, okay. So my, on the podcast from, so my, my parents' best friends, Nancy and Dave, they like helped raise me and blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. And they've really become like second parents. And, you know, they, they hadn't heard the podcast. So they were like, send us an episode. And I said, okay. And you know, it's always tricky because they really know me. They really know my parents. They really know my life in some ways in my childhood. So I was like, well, so I sent them an episode. I sent them the does small ocean Hooga knocker episode because Dave is a therapist and he works with people with addictions.3 (29m 13s):And I thought, oh, that might be interesting. And so the feedback is so interesting. The feedback I got was I'll read it on air because it's good. It's a podcast. Podcasts was good. Felt like a reunion. Sounds like David was deep into self-destruction before he recovered a talented guy was hoping to hear more from you. But that's for selfish reasons. I like how you identified the macro themes in your Roundup at the end. And then I wrote, thank you so much. We're we Gina and I are always aware that like, like, you know, we don't want it just to be us and we don't want to just to be guests.3 (29m 54s):So we're trying to find a mix. So his feedback it's so funny. He liked, he likes to give feedback. You know, if you and Gina are willing to talk about what life experiences brought you to embrace the arts and try and make a decent living, I liked the way you have reconstructed your family life so that you don't have to be an emotional casualty. There's a lot to talk about how you both learn to think from, from psychodynamic and systems orientation. I don't even know what that means. I'm not smart enough. The best stories are the stuff of good soap operas, good screenwriting can teach people how to better understand and navigate within their interpersonal worlds.3 (30m 36s):I'd like to hear another one, if you don't mind the feedback. So Loves our inter you know, he's, he's a therapist, obviously. So he loves that. But it was interesting. I mean, I seriously don't know what half of that means, but like,1 (30m 54s):No, he just means no, he just means like the thing, I mean here, here's this big secret that we've never told anybody, this podcast is not really about theaters. Right. And so what you saying is the, the, the psychodynamic for, you know, background that we have influences and informs our conversation so that we, we think about things dynamic and that's it. And that would be interesting to a therapist. Therapist thinks about things dynamically too. And yeah, I mean, honestly, it there's so much it's, so there's always so much to talk about. There's so much to talk about. Like, and I, well, the thing I, this ties into the thing that I kind of wanted to talk to you about, which is that when we first started recording a podcast, it was not, I survived theater school.1 (31m 44s):We were calling undeniable, right.3 (31m 46s):That's right.1 (31m 47s):And we had about eight, you know, hour long conversations that were about this concept of being undeniable. So I kind of wanted to clarify for people who may not know why is our company called undeniable? Why is not the website? Because when you told the great story about it, we didn't never air that till we did. So, no, because it was, it was for,3 (32m 20s):We never found and they tried to send to you and then it got1 (32m 23s):No, no, no, no, no. I'm just saying like, we recorded those and then we changed our mind about what the3 (32m 29s):Right. Yes. Okay. Yes. That makes sense. Oh, should we tell the story? Yeah. So it's so funny because I wonder if he ever heard this, if he would even remember, you know, it's so funny, like who remembers telling people what? All right. So the story is this. So I, well, first to say that, like you and I were talking about like, what, what is the thing of life? Like, what is again, where I'm at now, which is what are we going after, right. Like, what is the quality of life that I'm going after that you're going after that we're going after as a team. Okay. So it reminded me of this story of I did a solo show and it was called why not me love cancer and Jack White and the woman who was, and it was a solo show basically about cancer and about working for Nick cage and all kinds of things.3 (33m 19s):Just like I surprised theater school is not about theater. School is not really about Jack White, my show, you know, it's whatever. So, okay. So I'm doing this show. And my, the director of my show is this woman named Alison lion. And she happens to be good friends with the comedian and storyteller and actor, Jeff Garlin who I, I didn't know from Adam, like I wasn't a curb, your enthusiasm fan. So I didn't know, but I knew he of him. And I knew he's like a famous guy. Right. So she said, you know, how would you feel about Jeff? Garlin coming to see a dress rehearsal and giving notes. And I was like, oh, sure. Literally being like, oh, a famous person wants to come see my show.3 (34m 0s):That's cool. You know, not like, what can I glean from this artist? You know, just cause that's, that's where my mind went. I would've have been the same. I mean, I just am not mature enough for whatever, so, okay. So I do the, it was, it, it was real nerve and it was an empty house, but him, he and Alison were sitting up there at stage 7 73 on Belmont in Chicago. And so I did the show and whatever, and it was an okay show. I mean, I look, I don't know, but afterwards, if such an interesting story afterwards, he was giving notes to Alison, but not me. And I thought, well, that's weird, but he was really there for her.3 (34m 42s):That was her mentor kind of, you know, her comedy mentor. But then I came out of the house into the house and met and met Jeff and he was lovely. And he said, well, do you want notes? Or somehow it came up like, do I want actor notes? And I was like, of course, which is shocking to me because I never want notes. Right. And I always say, I would love feedback. And by feedback, I mean, compliments, like, that's my . I did say of course, because that's what you say when a fancy person wants to give you notes. And he gave me some great notes, which was stopped swearing so much. And he compared me to Robin Williams, which was amazing.3 (35m 22s):He said, because I could tell he called him by his first name. I do believe he was like, when Robin would swear a lot, I would know that he was, he was, was dying on stage, was off. Yeah. And I was like, that's fascinating or pushing, like I push when I'm swearing. Okay. Great note. I've I've kept that note and blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. All right. So then, then I have to tell us, because it's so interesting because I would have done the same thing. So then after he gave notes, which I kind of blacked out some of them, cause it was a lot, but then he, Alison, we're going to go out to eat at clerks on Belmont, but they didn't invite me. Right. And I was like, oh, and then I was in the bathroom and Alison called and she's like, I'm an idiot.3 (36m 5s):I didn't invite you. Do you want to come? And I was like, oh, of course. Yeah. She, and I think what happens is when you're around famous people, you forget, you1 (36m 13s):Lose your census. It's3 (36m 15s):Very weird. It's a weird thing. I think that's what happened for, so we went to Clark's on Belmont and he, we taught he's so what is he? He's he's a generous. No, he's, he's a big personality. So he takes over rooms. Right? So at clerks, he's the center of the show and it is not anything he's doing. It's just, that's how some people are like,1 (36m 42s):He's not trying to lay low. Right. He's3 (36m 45s):Not trying to lay low. And he also loves people I think, and loves human interaction. I mean, from what I know, as we got into this conversation and somehow, and he said, and he said to me, we were talking about acting and we were talking and he said, I'm going to make a movie and you're going to be in it one day. And I said, that's fantastic. I love that. That's great. That sounds great. And then we talked about other stuff and then he said, you know what you are? And I said, what? And he said, you are undeniable. And I was like, what is even happening? And I was like, okay, thanks. Great. He's like, no, no, no. You're undeniable. Like that show is undeniable.3 (37m 26s):And I was like, what does that mean? And he said, well, it just means that like eat exists in its truest form unapologetically. And I'm totally paraphrasing here, of course. But it was like, it exists in its truest form. It's just is you don't have to like it. You don't have to like, you, you don't have to like what you're saying, but there is a quality that cannot be taken away about the show. It's more than unique. It's more than that. It's undeniable. You don't have to like it. You don't have to dislike it, but it, it exists on its own. And it cannot be basically cannot be fucked with in, in, in that way, you know? And I was like, whoa, that is awesome. And that I feel like is what I'm going for in my life.1 (38m 10s):Yeah. And, and when you told the story before you also said that, that he said, you know, be undeniable continue to be undeniable because that, that is ultimately the only thing that lasts in terms of, you know, the industry or whatever. And as long as you're holding true to, you know, your own undeniable truth or whatever, you can, you know, you can't go wrong. It may not mean that you, whatever, get fame and fortune, but, but you'll be doing, you'll be on the right track.3 (38m 40s):You won't be led astray by your undeniable city. Like you, you won't be, it won't be, you won't go in the wrong direction for too long. If you use an deniability as your north star kind of a thing. And it really, and he, he later told Alison, you know, she's, you know, he kept reiterating like she's undeniable, she's undeniable. And he, and Alison had told me, and I, of course, because, you know, I just figure people say that about everybody analysis and no, he does not do that. And also he stands by his word. So you will one day be in a movie with Jeff Garlin and I was like, cool, great. That's fine. But I it's interesting looking back on the story, it's like, I wish everyone is so scared.3 (39m 24s):Like I wish that I would have used those quotes in my press, but Alison didn't want to use them because she felt she was already asking too. We're all, we always feel like we're asking too much. So she felt that she, she was asking too much just having him come to the show and having him give notes was enough and having him. And I remember at the time I had a musician as part of the show, you know, his name is Philip Michael scales. He's amazing. And he was like, we should totally use Garland's quotes to get more people to come to the show and both Alison and I, it's interesting, both Alex and I were like, oh no, no, no, no, like he's done enough.3 (40m 4s):You know, it's just so1 (40m 5s):Like, yeah. Like, and all I'll do to Alison I would've made probably the same choice, but you know, it's like, what are we so afraid of? What skin is it off of his nose? If you say that he said something that he said, you know what I mean? It's not like his reputation is living or dying on your show. It's just,3 (40m 25s):I mean, yeah. I would have done the same thing too. And I1 (40m 30s):That's the mentality that we've talked about so much on here, and it's definitely true for Hollywood entertainment, whatever, but it may also just be true for life that we kind of inherently have this idea that there's a finite pie. Sure. And you know, it's kind of like the people who think that only whatever 7,000 people are going to heaven, you know, what kind of cockamamie thing is that like you believe in heaven, you believe that all of this is God's plan and that people have been alive for millions of years and yet only 7,000 feet. Right. That to me is like a perfect evidence of the way in which we make ourselves and our, and the possibility so much smaller than they need to be.1 (41m 15s):Yes. So you think there's a finite amount of pie and you say, well, I can't take my one, one thousandths of a sliver, you know, that's Jeff Garlin because then there won't be any Jeff Garlin left. Like that's just simply not how it works. It's just simply, you know, anyway, the reason I said generous is because, I mean, you know, whatever, he has a friendship with her, but, but offering the feedback to you and then offering this truth about identifying your and deniability, which I'm guessing was one is one of the things that you carry with you. Okay.3 (41m 53s):Yeah. I mean, I do think, I do think that he's, that that was very generous of him. Like, and, and I do think that he and I do carry it with me and, and it obviously had an effect on me because I tell the story and because, you know, we, that you and I started a whole company around the idea of being undeniable, but like, and yeah, it, it really was like an affirmation, right. To just fucking pick a side already, like, like take a stand, like do something like th th th the gold boldly in one direction, because this sort of, this sort of, wishy-washy trying to please everybody, it, it, it not only does it not, it's not, it's a totally unpleasant, it actually doesn't work for the thing that you think you want.3 (42m 45s):Like, if you want notoriety power, fame, fortune, you have to pick a side at some point. Okay. But if you also want to feel good and be led, like we're saying by your north star, you could, you could use your, and deniability as a north star to eventually mean that sometimes quickly, sometimes slowly to get to a place where you really feel like you're doing right by yourself. If you follow your undeniable, whatever that means to you. So, yeah, he changed my life. Like that changed my life. I mean, the show did the sh you know, looking back on the show, I spent so much money. I would say, like, to be, if I'm completely honest, it was like a $25,000 investment I made over from 2012 to 2015 or whatever.3 (43m 31s):And, and I didn't bring in one dime, you know, I didn't make, make a dime, but it was, I would've done things differently, but I still I'm glad I did it. And, and that's one of the reasons stories. And one of the reasons I'm glad I did it was because I learned that lesson about being undeniable from Jeff Garlin. And yeah,1 (43m 55s):I don't think he went to theater school, but he needs to come on the podcast, you know, tell him that and, and, and hear more about his, his thoughts about, and deniability. So, so that you have shared that story with me, which really even moved me. I mean, it's, it's affected me. And then we linked it to this crooked, let's say path that we made, where we were pursuing this creative, creative career. And then we couldn't pursue it because we needed to make money. And we thought it would be okay to do else. And ultimately wasn't. And so the creative urge or whatever is undeniable in us.1 (44m 39s):And we're basically having to listen to it instead of, you know, pushing it away. And, and we also have a belief that many, many, many people are in that exact same position at this age in life, they were pursuing something. It wasn't financially viable. They had to do something else. And that when, what we're talking to a lot of people about these days is I think a lot of people who come on the podcast are reckoning with that question. Whether it be when we ask them to come on or while we're having the conversation or in the time after.1 (45m 21s):And we hear a variety of things from, from, you know, genuine like bridge equipment is a good example of somebody who went and did something else. And I think she found her thing. Yeah. I feel like therapy. She found the right thing for her. Yeah.3 (45m 37s):And she's now taking classes again, though. Acting classes, remember? Cause she wrote us.1 (45m 43s):Oh, that's right. Okay. Well, all right. So maybe, so maybe so maybe everybody, but what, we also talked to, a lot of people who I feel are trying to convince themselves, us, that they have moved on and you know, what, if that's true for you, I don't want to take that away from anybody, but it's hard for me to believe that's true for as many people as say it is true because if you, right, if you just, if you have, if you're born with this desire to express, and then you don't exp and you don't do it, it doesn't go away. And,3 (46m 19s):And here's the kicker too, is like the secret Willie, we can let everybody in a secret that you and I, because of our childhoods. And then on top of the childhood, the training that we received as actors, and then on top of that, the training we received as clinicians, we are able, here's the secret. We can see things in you that you may not be able to see in yourself or that you think you're hiding. Like that is just the secret.1 (46m 45s):And, and I'll say as a person who is fully does this all the time, nobody's hiding anything. I'm sorry to inform you. Nobody, you whoever's walking around. They're saying nobody knows that I, blah, blah, blah. Right? Yes, they do. I mean, they may not say it to you. They may not even have that thought in the front of their mind to everybody does truly know everything. And you're only kidding yourself, right? To, to hide behind, you know, dishonesty,3 (47m 20s):You're kidding yourself that you were hiding it and you're kidding yourself that other people can't see it. And you're kidding yourself that it's working for to hide it. But it's easier said than done to not hide it. I'm not saying coming out, coming clean about your truth is easy at all. But I just want to say like, cause people always ask like, and I, I run up against this a lot in Hollywood of like, how could you tell that? Like, so-and-so really, didn't like this script. I'm like, dude, body language. Blahbity blah, blah. And they're like, I didn't get that.3 (48m 0s):I'm like, dude, you just have to like, I have training. But also you just have to really, I always say this, but like you have to be sort of a neglected child that then decided that people pleasing was the way to freedom. Then learn that that is actually not true. But then use those skills to actually be like an emotional detective for other people. It's a whole process, but you could do it if you spent enough time, but I can tell like I can, I even at coworking, like I'm going to soundproof booth. So no one could hear me. But like I, I spent five minutes with somebody and I'm like, oh my God, they hate themselves. They hate themselves a passion they're pretending not to, but they hate themselves.3 (48m 42s):And that is unfortunate because I know they have redeeming qualities. I haven't talked to them for more than five minutes. So I don't know what that is. And I don't want to talk to them for more than five minutes because I'm not their therapist or friend, but I get it. I get it. It is a super power that I think people who really have trauma and then have chosen to work through the trauma. It's a super power that we have that we can, and it's also can be a burden, like any superpower to really see what the fuck is going on with people and call it out if need be. But we don't always call it out because it's not our job.3 (49m 23s):And you know, that is something we run into on this podcast too. It's like, there are times on the podcast where I want to be like, you know, this is just full transparency where I want to be like, you're full of shit. You're full of shit. Totally terrible. You, you, you hate blahbity blah, but you don't want to tell us you hate blabbity, blah. And I understand that because I've been in the same boat and I still am in the same boat, but just know that if you come on this podcast that it kind of behooves you to just tell the truth because what? Yeah. We all see it anyway. Right, right. We just do. We all see it anyway. Yeah. In your voice, we don't even have to look at your face.3 (50m 3s):Here's the other thing about human experience? So people think, I think because it's a podcast and it's not, we don't air the video that like, they can also hide shit. Well, your voice and the, and the PA I mean, I'm giving away all the secrets here, but there are no real secrets. Like the pauses in between watching the next person we have come on is gonna be like, okay, anyway. So I feel really bad about everything in my life. And I put the pauses, the pauses in between questions and answers. It's all part of the deal. And so I just encourage people. Like, I want you to come on this podcast and feel like you can, that you you're able to be undeniable and FYI on deniability does not mean everything is great about you.3 (50m 48s):Right? Like it doesn't mean, it just means that you're telling the truth about who you are. Good, bad, ugly, weird.1 (50m 56s):Yeah. You, you could be an undeniable asshole. There's no, it's a, it doesn't have a necessarily positive connotation, but you know, if you are an asshole and you're, well, that's not a good example. If you are, if you hate yourself, let's say that's a good example. If you hate yourself, you know, you're never going to get to a place where you don't hate yourself by pretending that you don't hate yourself. You have to start with the idea that, okay, here's what I'm up against right now. Hearn's out. I really hate myself. And you know, and I'm going to have to get real about that before I can, because how could you begin to interrogate a problem that you haven't named at all? That's like, that's like, you know, getting, I don't know that to the end of a math problem without having like what the3 (51m 43s):She's learning a new language without studying one minute of the language in your life. It doesn't, it's not possible. I mean, you might get one word. Right. But by luck. But1 (51m 55s):Yeah. And my thing, and I think this is your thing too in life is just encouraging people and the reason, and I understand why people want to lie to themselves about it because it's painful or because you don't want to be a person who hates yourself. You don't want to be a person who feels unfulfilled by career traces. I get that. But, but it's like that, that you are unfulfilled or you are that you just haven't done the work of accepting.3 (52m 23s):Right. And I, and I, I definitely feel like for me, the turning point, literally in my life had to, had to do with, when I had a physical problem with my heart, where I was like, oh, this is what is happening. I haven't taken care of my body for whatever reason. Not because I'm a bad person, but because I've always shit going on and all these issues and hereditary, but I haven't done the work to, to look at this. And so now it's coming, it's now it's, it's, it's a problem. And, and, and when you're laying in the hospitals hooked up to machines and you and people are telling you, it's a problem that are trained specifically in this problem.3 (53m 7s):And you finally are faced with, oh, either I'm going to believe this or not, and acknowledge it or not. And I just was like, okay, I acknowledge it. I need to lose weight. I need to move my body and I need to eat less shitty foods and okay. That's it. It's in my face. It's in my face. It's in my face. I'm the1 (53m 25s):Hospital. Yeah. My, my wish for it to be something other than it isn't has, it helped me to have it be something other than it isn't. But my, my courage, if, if you can summon the courage to face it, then it might actually be different. So the other thing that you were talking about before was legacy, and that is, that has been a theme in my life recently too, because, you know, I realized after my sister died, like it's all over for her. I, you know how a lot of times when people die, then people will go on their Facebook account and like, write these messages to them.1 (54m 16s):You know, I miss you, blah, blah, blah. No, nobody did that on my sister's Facebook page. Nobody and no, nobody and her kids, you know, who are too young, really to use Facebook there that's because it's an old person's thing, but they have Facebook accounts and they had each written something about their mom when she died. And periodically, I checked back in to see like, what the comments are at for first of all, I don't know, 95% of the people who were making the comments, cause I haven't been in their lives, but it really ended like a few, you know, a few days after she died, it ended.1 (54m 58s):And I just thought, wow, man, there's just no trace of this first. God, I don't like that. There's yeah. It's it's really unsettling. And so recently we came in to possession of unpublished manuscript that Aaron's grandfather wrote on which sirens grandfather, his dad's dad. Okay. Aaron's grandfather was a, you know, hardcore Chicago in, he was a tool and die maker. He worked in one of these factories where whenever there was factories in Chicago and he retired when he was 70, 70 or 75 and went back and went to college and he was the oldest graduate from Roosevelt university where I teach by the way weird.1 (55m 58s):Yeah. And he was a writer and a poet and he wrote a book. Now, dear listeners, I regret to inform you. It's not a great book. You know, he could have used an editor. I'm sure. And, but it doesn't matter. The point is we receive this cream and a half of paper that's wrapped up in like a grocery bag and bound with string and it hasn't been touched3 (56m 34s):How'd you get it? How'd you get it?1 (56m 37s):His mom had it. And she sent him a bunch of stuff in that, and that was in there. So we opened it up and, and I thought to myself, okay, this is fascinating because one of the things that I think compels people to write is a desire to leave some kind of an imprint. And I'm curious how other people think or don't think or feel, or don't feel about their legacy. I mean, I guess people do it in other ways you get really rich and you name a building after yourself or by the way, they took the Sackler name off the mat. Finally they took the Sackler name off the met. Yes. And oh God.1 (57m 18s):Yes. That's a whole other thing. Watch dope. Sick with John who can aprons really good. Yeah. Anyway, people do use philanthropy. I mean, it kind of seems like, unless you're in the arts or rich, how do you have a legacy? What's your, what is,3 (57m 33s):This is a great freaking question. Like this is the question that I really been thinking about in my brain. And I, I think I have the answer for me, but I'm not exactly sure. So, all right. So I love to teach, but I love to teach a very specific population. It's a population that is underrepresented in colleges. So I I'm trying to narrow down like what I want to do with my life basically. And I think I want, I know I want to be a writer, but I was like, okay. But my realtor says I have to make 80 to a hundred thousand dollars if I want a house in California.3 (58m 17s):Okay. And I'm tired of sitting around, waiting for Hollywood to discover me. Okay. Fine. And us. So what do I do? Okay, fine. So then I've been teaching right at Roosevelt and other places and I love it. I love the 1819 year olds. Okay. Fine. I love teaching acting. I don't know. I feel like I don't really know shit about acting, but I know I do when it's mixed with psychology. Does that make sense? Okay.1 (58m 44s):A hundred percent then the other3 (58m 45s):Day I was like, and then I was like, okay, but I don't want to teach at a fancy conservatory. Like I don't, that's just, I just don't. So I was like, all right. All right. All right. So then someone sent me a listing to teach a community college, making a $90,000 a year. Community colleges paid better than a lot of colleges. And so I'm applying to teach first year actors at a community college in Glendale. And I don't know, and I don't know, and I actually think it's going to make my writing. And I think it's going to make me hustle in a different way. I don't know if I'll get the job, but I gotta say my legacy might be, cause I thought, okay.3 (59m 30s):At first I thought my legacy was going to be, and we could track it with the podcast. Right. Like I thought my legacy was going to be famous actor even though like, I don't know if that's, that is a legacy like Brando and you know, that's a legacy. That's what I thought. I thought, oh, that'll be my legacy. I'll be fancy, famous lady. Okay, fine. That did not happen. Then I thought, okay, my legacy is going to be that I'm a very sort of famous PR prolific addictions counselor, like at a social service agency. Yeah. That's going to be my legacy, but that's what I thought, like, that's my mark. That's where I'm going to leave my mark. That did not happen. Then I thought, okay, I'm going to be again, a famous actor, but maybe a solo artist. Right.3 (1h 0m 10s):And, and then, and then a screenwriter and I'll get really famous as a television writer, which still could happen. But I was like, I'm not sure that is the flavor of legacy that we're talking. I'm talking about here in terms of service, right. Service. What I want is to teach, I could teach 18, 19 year olds tangible skills that they can use then and move on in their lives and then teach their kids. Like, like that seems more in alignment with what I'm talking about in terms of legacy than just fancy screenwriter.3 (1h 0m 50s):That makes a lot of money. So, yeah.1 (1h 0m 53s):Yeah, because actually I was just having this thought yesterday, if I was ever given an award that was related in any way to theater, the first person I would think is my junior high acting teacher and teachers truly do leave some of the biggest, like good and bad. Some of the biggest legacies. I remember every single teacher I've ever had. Yeah. And w I mean, I mostly remember the ones who were really good or really bad, but they, I can think of five people off the top of my head who should be canonized as saints, because really Mrs. McDaniels, you were a prima ballerina who ended up teaching math in junior high.1 (1h 1m 37s):And you know what she did, she knew that I had just a, I was having a really hard time in junior high. And she invited me to eat lunch in her classroom every day, because I think she was at a Mexican, she didn't eat. And so she could go over the math with me cause I was having a hard time getting it. And I was just having a hard time. Sure. In general, this is seventh grade. And she provided all under the guise of teaching me math. Of course she gave me mentorship. She gave me attention. She showed me love.1 (1h 2m 19s):Right. Like what's3 (1h 2m 20s):What more could you ask for legacy I'm looking for? I'm not, I decided like, especially during COVID times, I've really been thinking, I think a lot of us have about like, what is obviously important, but also what is lasting and what is, and I thought, yeah. Okay. So, so I don't have a desire to like go into the classroom and teach, you know, I don't wanna teach psychology. I don't want to teach, but I was like maybe. And the thing that like the community colleges in California in Southern California, like I believe Pasadena city college and Glendale community college are two of the best community colleges in the country. So I'm like, okay.3 (1h 3m 0s):And it's cheap to go there. And it's a bunch of different kinds of learners and it's not just white kids that are like, I'm fucking going to be the next, I don't know whoever it's like kids that actually want to learn. And I, I mean, look, there's going to be some real assholes in there. I know it. But like I thought, oh, okay. Like also I really, really need a house with a yard. And I don't know how, I don't want to do it by, by getting an office job that I'm gonna die at. And I, and I, and then try to write on top of that.3 (1h 3m 45s):So like, I really need more space. And we were looking at houses and this all really was, was sparked by talking to a realtor, a really great realtor who also was like a very therapeutic and his approach. And he was like, listen, do you want a house in California? Yes. Okay. Do you want a two bedroom, two bath? Yes. This is how much money you each need to bring in a year. And this is how much your down payment is going to be act accordingly. He just told me that like, it's not,1 (1h 4m 16s):It's not a mystery. It's not an unknowable path. It's just like, no, no, no.3 (1h 4m 22s):It's very clear. And he was very loving, but he was also like, you, you piecemealing the piecemealing, your salary together is not going to work for this. And I was like, and I, I needed him to say that too, to know that like, it's time for me to bring in a decent amount of money. Now, if it comes, if it, if, if, if somehow it comes from your mind getting a television show or our documentary taking off. Great. But like, in the meantime, I need to feel like I am, I am not just piecemealing my shit together.1 (1h 5m 8s):Right. Because in addition to all the other things we've mentioned, you have a lot other needs that are undeniable and it is much your responsibility to meet those needs your, your need to have, you know, your own space. You need to have address, you know, that's as important to listen to as anything else.3 (1h 5m 27s):I had no idea. Like I just thought it's interesting. I, I thought that I did not have those needs. Like I thought, who cares where you live literally. I mean, I've moved 15 times. So it's like, who cares if you live in a one bedroom with two people and a dog, I care. I care a lot now I really care. And it's really, really important to me to be out. So having an outside space,1 (1h 5m 55s):And what I hear in this for you is a shift from what does it look like to other people to, what does it feel like inside of me? And it was always more important,3 (1h 6m 8s):More important. And it's also super interesting. And I think we run up against this all the time. People think that they're like, oh, you're not going to be an actor anymore. Like you're not going to audition anymore. And I'm like, I don't think so. It's not like it's like I had the other night. I had the experience. So I get off the train right at eight o'clock the day before I got an audition from my agent for self-tape for a show in Chicago, that's a procedural show, you know, and that everyone auditions for in Chicago. And I got a self-tape quick turnaround. I had to get off and I chose to, I got off the train, dropped my stuff, picked up.3 (1h 6m 50s):My friend came to coworking and was up til midnight filming this scene. It's not a good scene. I'm not good. I'm not good in the scene because I don't, I'm, I'm not, I was having trouble memorizing because it's late at night. And then, and then I turned to my friend and I just said, you know, and, and I'm not paid, obviously we're not paid for the audition. If I book it, I have to go to Chicago on my own dime, stay in a hotel on my own, or place my own plane fare. I hate to fly to do this thing. That's going to terrorize me on set for a day to make $900.3 (1h 7m 32s):What the fuck am I doing? So I turned to my friend and I just said, who was nice enough to stay up with me till midnight, taping this in the fucking coworking space. I turned to her and I said, I don't want to do this anymore. And she said, okay. And she said, okay. I mean, she doesn't give a shit. She's a writer. She's not an actor. She doesn't, but she's like, okay. And I was like, yeah, this is no, no, no, it's not. That is not my legacy.1 (1h 8m 0s):Right.3 (1h 8m 1s):So it's very clear. So now I'm going to, I'm just, I'm not, I'm having calling my agents1 (1h 8m 8s):And you can't know until, you know, I mean, like that reality couldn't hit you until it did. I'm like, no, so yeah, yeah, yeah. Well, good for you. I mean, part of life is figuring out what it's not, and as much as it is figuring out what it is. Yeah. So4 (1h 8m 34s):If you liked what you heard today, please give us a positive five star review and subscribe and tell your friends. I survived. Theater school is an undeniable in production. Jen Bosworth, Ramirez and Gina plegia are the co-hosts. This episode was produced, edited, and sound mixed by Gina Culichi for more information about this podcast or other goings on of undeniable, Inc. Please visit our website@undeniablewriters.com. You can also follow us on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. Thank you. 

Man Cave Happy Hour
Man Cave Happy Hour - Gift Guide Founders Brewing - Episode 117

Man Cave Happy Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 36:10


Jamie and Matt dive into some special pours from Founders Brewing just in time for the holidays. What makes the perfect gift? Beer! Naturally, and spirits. This time of year brings up the ability to give some amazing gifts.  We got to try the MotherShip Series and some of the Barrel Aged Series - Frootwood, both are amazingThanks to Founders Brewing for sending us these samples...  so delicious. https://foundersbrewing.com/https://linktr.ee/ManCaveHappyHourwww.ManCaveHappyHour.comJamie Flanagan @DJJamieDetroitMatt Fox @fox_beazlefoxMerch www.WearingFunny.com

Alley-oop
Alley-oop #202: TOP 5 ERŐS EMBER ft. Németh István

Alley-oop

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 46:01


Curry rekordot döntött. Lesznek olyanok, amik örökké élnek? SGA megjárja a poklot és a mennyet. Carlise és a Dallas szakításának részletei. Top 5 erős ember a ligában: Pelinka, Cuban, James, Roberts és Silver. Összecsap a Bulls és a Lakers.

Hemingway's Picasso
The Writer

Hemingway's Picasso

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 21:09


Ernest Hemingway was embraced by many Cubans as Papa, the everyday man who lived in the iconic seaside estate, Finca Vigia.  He wrote some of his most masterful novels in Havana, Cuba - and lived quite the life there, too.  But Cuba is rarely highlighted or even remembered in Hemingway's biography. Fidel Castro saw the importance of Hemingway as a writer and political tool.   In this installment, Norberto Fuentes, the legendary Cuban journalist and author in exile, discusses Hemingway's life and legacy in Cuba.  This is a Somethin' Else production in association with Vespucci.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Opperman Report
Ricardo A. Morales My Dad the Spy (Ricardo “Monkey”Morales)

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 47:51


Ricardo A. Morales if the son of notorious intelligence agent and hit man Ricardo “Monkey”Morales. Ricardo Morales Navarette (June 14, 1939 – December 20, 1983), also known by the moniker "El Mono", was a Cuban exile and agent of the United States Central Intelligence Agency. He also worked for the DISIP, or Venezuelan intelligence service, and as an informant for the US Federal Bureau of Investigation, Central Intelligence Agency, and Drug Enforcement Administration

Cigar Coop Prime Time Show
2021 Cigar of the Year Countdown (Coop's List): #23 – Perdomo Reserve 10th Anniversary Box-Pressed Sun Grown Epicure (Audio)

Cigar Coop Prime Time Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 4:12


Coming in at #23 is the Perdomo Reserve 10th Anniversary Box-Pressed Sun Grown Epicure. Perdomo Cigars is not know for making a lot of new cigars, but in 2020 a couple of new blends were introduced under the Perdomo 10th Anniversary Reserve. These cigars are the Perdomo 10th Anniversary Reserve Box Pressed Sun Grown and Maduro offerings. To make room for these cigars, Perdomo made the decision to retire two other blends in the line – the Champagne Noir and the Champagne Sun Grown (but leaving the ever-popular original Perdomo 10th Anniversary Reserve Champagne). While these blends will be missed, the new blends come up very big for Perdomo. Today it's the Perdomo 10th Anniversary Box Pressed Sun Grown in the Epicure size that lands on the Countdown. The blend for the Perdomo Reserve 10th Anniversary Sun Grown features 100% Nicaraguan tobaccos. According to Perdomo Cigars, the 10th Anniversary Sun Grown uses a six-year aged Cuban-seed wrapper, binder, and fillers from its farms in Estelí, Condega, and Jalapa. The wrapper itself also has an additional ten months of age on it. Production is handled out of the Tabacalera Perdomo S.A. facility in Estelí, Nicaragua. The Epicure measures 6 x 54. Along the way, the Perdomo Reserve 10th Anniversary Box Pressed Sun Grown Epicure delivers notes of earth, natural tobacco, baker's spice, wood, nut, and black pepper. The flavors shine when working in unison, and are balanced throughout this medium strength, medium-bodied cigar. It's also a well-balanced cigar with enough complexity to keep one interested from start to finish. Now a sibling to legendary Perdomo 10th Anniversary Reserve Champagne, the 10th Anniversary Reserve Sun Grown earns its place among the elite. This is the second time Perdomo Cigars has landed on this list. As we continue to move up the Countdown, Nicaragua is making a strong showing as it has landed four cigars on the list thus far. For details of the 2021 Cigar of the Year Countdown, see our 2021 criteria: https://cigar-coop.com/2021/12/announcement-criteria-for-the-2021-cigar-of-the-year-countdown.html Cigar Coop Report: https://wp.me/p6h1n1-lBX

Herald Sports
Eye on the U (2021): Episode 47

Herald Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 48:20


With nine days and a lot of Cuban coffee, Mario Cristobal managed to save Miami's 2022 recruiting class. The Eye on the U podcast discusses an eventful week. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Daily Signal News
Is There Still Hope for a Free Cuba?

Daily Signal News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 30:24


Cuba's communist regime has done almost everything in its power to put an end to pro-democracy protests there. Now, the movement for freedom is fighting to stay alive even as many of its leaders and others have been imprisoned. Last month, Cubans again tried to gather and protest the regime, but the government met the effort with intimidation and force. The protest ultimately resulted in “about 80 new people that were detained and remained detained,” says John Suarez, executive director of the Center for a Free Cuba. The pro-democracy movement in Cuba gained new momentum in July, when thousands of Cubans took to the streets during several days of unplanned protests. Cuba's communist government is still detaining over 700 of those involved in the protests. The Cuban government's motive is that "they want control,” says Suarez, who joins “The Daily Signal Podcast” to describe the situation and what hope remains for a free Cuba. We also cover these stories: President Biden signs a measure, passed by Congress, to raise the debt ceiling by $2.5 trillion.YouTube cancels conservative talk show host and comedian Steven Crowder for the rest of the year.Kim Kardashian discusses cancel culture with former New York Times writer Bari Weiss on the podcast "Honestly." Enjoy the show! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2740 - The U.S. Right-Wing Paranoia We're Stuck With w/ Ted H. Miller

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 62:53


Emma hosts Ted H. Miller, associate teaching professor at Northeastern University, to discuss his recent book A Conspiratorial Life: Robert Welch, the John Birch Society, and the Revolution of American Conservatism, on the anti-communist paranoia that helped found the educational and political beliefs that define modern conservatism. Professor Miller begins with the birth of Robert Welch, eventual founder of the John Birch Society, at the end of the 19th Century, to a family engrained in the lost cause movement and fearful of an encroaching monopolizing eastern establishment, before exploring how Welch's profession as a Candyman bolstered this tendency towards conspiracy. Next, they move towards the political developments in the first half of the 20th Century that pushed him towards the founding of the John Birch Society in 1958, starting with FDR's new deal, with Welch fully pivoting to McCarthyist fear-mongering after China's transition to communism and William Taft's loss to Dwight Eisenhower solidified his belief that the U.S., like China, was being unwillingly taken over by communists. They dive into the extent of his conspiracy and paranoia during these years, including the belief that both of the Sputnik launches were faked by the U.S., as well as the Cuban missile crisis manufacturing the idea that Russia and Cuba had missile-launching capacities. Emma and Professor Miller then look into the role of William F Buckley in chronicling the conservative movement, publicly pushing back against Welch and the John Birch Society while further incorporating their educational agenda into electoral tactics. This brings us to the Kennedy administration, which saw a few key figures and concepts come into the fold of paranoia, including Reagan's claim that under the “boyish locks of hair” laid “Karl Marx,” Dan Smoot's creation of the concept of a “deep state,” and claims of false flag assassination attempts against Gerald Ford in the 70s. They wrap up the interview by discussing how the Reagan revolution of conservatism solidified the Robert Welch ideology into the party, finally bringing about the policies necessary for a worldview defined by evangelism and conspiracy, and look at how far ahead of the modern GOP positions Welch was. Emma also covers the devastating loss of bell hooks, and Pelosi reminding us that Congresspeople deserve to exploit the stock market too. And in the Fun Half: Matt and Brandon join Emma as they discuss Stephen Crowder getting one strike away from coming out – I mean, being forced out – of the Youtube world, Kasey Lee from Spokane raises concerns about the Fed's report on large amounts of government spending (it's fine), and Lindsey Graham (OmegaSpectrum from the IM's) offers a surprise make-up call then asks for the crew's takes on Eric Adams. This brings them to Adams's announcement of his new police chief in front of a mural of people who the NYPD would have probably planted evidence on at the time, a teen tech lord's pitch for Donald Trump's wall, and Ilya from Quebec explores emerging Islamophobic law in Canada. They also cover NFTV starting out as unoriginal as Marvel's copy/paste series concepts, plus, your calls and IMs! Purchase tickets for the live show in Boston on January 16th HERE! https://thewilbur.com/artist/majority-report/ Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com Subscribe to the AMQuickie newsletter here. Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ (Merch issues and concerns can be addressed here: majorityreportstore@mirrorimage.com) You can now watch the livestream on Twitch Support the St. Vincent Nurses today as they continue to strike for a fair contract! https://action.massnurses.org/we-stand-with-st-vincents-nurses/ Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Subscribe to AM Quickie writer Corey Pein's podcast News from Nowhere, at https://www.patreon.com/newsfromnowhere Check out Matt's show, Left Reckoning, on Youtube, and subscribe on Patreon! Subscribe to Matt's other show Literary Hangover on Patreon! Check out The Letterhack's upcoming Kickstarter project for his new graphic novel! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/milagrocomic/milagro-heroe-de-las-calles Check out Matt Binder's YouTube channel! Subscribe to Brandon's show The Discourse on Patreon! Check out The Nomiki Show live at 3 pm ET on YouTube at patreon.com/thenomikishow Check out Jamie's podcast, The Antifada, at patreon.com/theantifada, on iTunes, or at twitch.tv/theantifada (streaming every Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday at 7pm ET!) Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn @BradKAlsop

Just Break Up Podcast
Navigating Grief & Cultivating Joy in Partnerships: An Interview with Alyesha Wise and Matthew Cuban-Hernandez

Just Break Up Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 81:39


In this episode of Head and Heart Work Conversations, Sam and Sierra talk with Alyesha Wise and Matthew Cuban-Hernandez, Los Angeles-based writers, educators, and long-term partners. The conversation covers grieving in partnership, finding ways to laugh, and alien documentaries. Join us on Patreon and get an extra episode each week, a back catalog of 100+ episodes, and video! SUBMIT: justbreakuppod.com FACEBOOK: /justbreakuppod INSTAGRAM: @justbreakuppod TWITTER: @justbreakuppod BLIND DATE: Street Poets Inc Original music, recording, and editing by Spencer Wirth-Davis Advertise on Just Break Up!  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Lour After Hours
Lour After Hours - My Friends Call Me Lou

Lour After Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 48:15


On this episode, we get to talk with Luis @_lulank video producer for Meadowlark Media, and newest member of the #ShippingContainer We get some great behind the scenes info and he spills the tea on Cuban food #LourRangerLineup @BeepCount @iamkevinito @StugotzArmy790 @jayher17 @Huertaweightgo Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Who, When, Wow!
Alicia Alonso: Ballerina

Who, When, Wow!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 26:52


Meet Alicia Alonso, a nearly blind Cuban prima ballerina WHO stunned audiences around the world with her incredible talents. Alicia dedicated her life to her craft; even WHEN she was recovering from eye surgery and couldn't see, she would practice her routines with her fingers. Join Rebecca Sheir as we learn how Alicia WOWed the world as one of the best ballerinas of her time! Head to whowhenwow.com for activities and more based on this episode.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.