Podcasts about Pulitzer Prize

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U.S. award for achievements in newspaper and online journalism, literature, and musical composition

  • 3,546PODCASTS
  • 7,134EPISODES
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  • Oct 21, 2021LATEST
Pulitzer Prize

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Best podcasts about Pulitzer Prize

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Latest podcast episodes about Pulitzer Prize

Failing Forward
Episode 104: Ben Montgomery - Author + Journalist

Failing Forward

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 42:27


Journalist and author Ben Montgomery has spent much of his career telling other people's stories. Some have happy endings, and others—like the stories of the White House Boys in Florida—don't. But the common threads that run through them all are our capacity for resilience and adventure. On episode 104, Ben talks about reporting on tragedies and triumphs. His article in the Tampa Bay Times called “For Their Own Good” about boys who were abused at a reform school operated by the state of Florida was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. Ben is also the author of four books, including “Grandma Gatewood's Walk” and “The Man Who Walked Backward.” Show Notes: - Read “For Their Own Good” about Florida's White House Boys: https://www.tampabay.com/archive/2009/04/19/for-their-own-good/ - Check out all of Ben's books: https://www.benmontgomerywrites.com/books

FANTI
Diversity Programs - Do Better! (ft. Dr. Jon Paul)

FANTI

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 58:08


 Mentioned in the showDr. Jon Paul's piece Punching Down: Why Netflix Deserves Some of the Heat for Dave Chapelle's Transphobic CommentsiHeartRadio NextUp Fellowship ProgramNetflix firing of walkout organizerTransLash Podcast with Imara JonesDIS/Honorable Mentions Tre'Vell picksHM Unholier Than Thou w/ guest Michelle WilliamsHM Transhealth NorthamptonDr. Jon Paul picksDM - Niggas who don't read!HM - Ashlee Marie Preston, organizer of the Netflix walkoutHM - Colman Domingo and everyone connected to the new film “Rustin” where her will be playing Bayard Rustin.Black History is Happening Every Day!Monica Roberts in NABJ's Hall of FameRelated EpisodesEp 49 Is Dave Chappelle Half Baked?Ep 41 Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Oh My (ft. Sharon Smith)Our Sponsors This WeekLumi LabsFor free shipping & 30% off your first order… use code: FANTI.Uncommon GoodsFor 15% off your next gift, click the above link.Go ahead and @ usEmail: FANTI@maximumfun.orgIG@FANTIpodcast@Jarrett Hill@rayzon (Tre'Vell)@DoctorJonPaulTwitter@FANTIpodcast@TreVellAnderson@JarrettHill@DoctorJon Paul (guest)@Swish (Senior Producer Laura Swisher)@Rainewheat (Producer Lorraine Wheat)FANTI is produced and distributed by MaximumFun.orgLaura Swisher is senior producer and Lorraine Wheat is producer. 

Seneca's 100 Women to Hear
Dr. Marcia Chatelain: Author of “Franchise: The Golden Arches in Black America”

Seneca's 100 Women to Hear

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 27:30


Since the 1960s, the history of fast-food giant McDonald's has been interwoven with the lives of Black Americans—sometimes in surprising ways. In her Pulitzer Prize-winning book, Franchise, Dr. Chatelain, a professor of history and African American studies at Georgetown University, reveals the complex interrelationship of the fast food chain and the crusade for civil rights. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Prosperity 101 Podcast hosted by Linda J Hansen
A Better Future For All – with Raynard Jackson [Ep.93]

Prosperity 101 Podcast hosted by Linda J Hansen

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 56:30


In this episode, Linda interviews Raynard Jackson, a Pulitzer Prize nominated columnist, business leader, radio talk show host, TV commentator, and political, government affairs, and PR consultant. Raynard is also the Founder and Chairman of Black Americans for a Better Future, an organization created to empower and encourage Black entrepreneurs to be involved in the Conservative movement and to potentially run for elected office. Building a better future for all involves protecting life, supporting and defending the nuclear family, firmly upholding the policies and values of our US Constitution, and creating a society where faith, opportunity, freedom, and prosperity can flourish for all people, regardless of their skin color. America is not as divided as the media would like us to believe, and by focusing on understanding each other and the values that unite us, we will create a better future for all. © Copyright 2021, Prosperity 101, LLC -------------------------------- For information and resources visit: https://prosperity101.com Or click here to order a copy of Prosperity 101 – Job Security Through Business Prosperity by Linda J. Hansen. If you enjoy this podcast, please consider becoming a sponsor. Contact us today!

The New Yorker: Poetry
Forrest Gander Reads Ada Limón

The New Yorker: Poetry

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 31:22


Forrest Gander joins Kevin Young to read “Privacy,” by Ada Limón, and his own poem “Post-Fire Forest.” Gander is a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets, a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the winner of a Pulitzer Prize for his collection “Be With.”

Free Library Podcast
Anthony Doerr | Cloud Cuckoo Land

Free Library Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 59:11


In conversation with John Freeman Anthony Doerr won the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for All the Light We Cannot See, ''a beautiful, daring, heartbreaking, oddly joyous novel'' (Seattle Times) about a blind French girl and a German boy navigating the carnage of World War II. Also the winner of the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction and a National Book Award finalist, it spent more than two years on the New York Times bestseller list. Doerr's other work includes the novel About Grace, two story collections, and a memoir, for which he has earned five O. Henry Prizes, the Story Prize, and a Guggenheim Fellowship, among other honors. A novel of the interconnected tapestry of human experience, Cloud Cuckoo Land weaves together the lives of a fifteenth century orphan, an octogenarian in present-day Idaho, and a girl on an interstellar spacecraft decades from today. John Freeman was the editor of Granta until 2013. His books include Dictionary of the Undoing, How to Read a Novelist, Tales of Two Americas, and Tales of Two Planets. His poetry includes the collections Maps, The Park, and the forthcoming Wind, Trees. In 2021, he edited the anthologies There's a Revolution Outside, My Love with Tracy K. Smith, and The Penguin Book of the Modern American Short Story. An Executive Editor at Knopf, he teaches writing and literature classes at NYU. (recorded 10/19/2021)

Haymarket Books Live
Angela Davis, Ruth Wilson Gilmore, & Mike Davis on Abolition, Cultural Freedom, Liberation

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 84:56


Join 2020 Lannan Prize recipients Angela Y. Davis, Mike Davis, and Ruth Wilson Gilmore for a conversation hosted by Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor. The Lannan Cultural Freedom Prize for 2020 was awarded to Angela Y. Davis for her lifetime achievements as a public intellectual advocating for racial, gender, and economic justice; to Mike Davis for his life's work as a public intellectual who encourages critical analysis of society in the service of constructing an alternative, post-capitalist future in both theory and practice; and Ruth Wilson Gilmore for a lifetime of achievement as a public intellectual working toward the decarceration of California, the United States, and the world. Join all three, along with Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor for a conversation on abolition, cultural freedom, and liberation. Speakers: Mike Davis, professor emeritus of creative writing at UC Riverside, joined the San Diego chapter of the Congress of Racial Equality in 1962 at age 16 and the struggle for racial and social equality has remained the lodestar of his life. His City of Quartz challenged reigning celebrations of Los Angeles from the perspectives of its lost radical past and insurrectionary future. His wide-ranging work has married science, archival research, personal experience, and creative writing with razor-sharp critiques of empires and ruling classes. He embodies the Lannan vision of working at the intersection of art and social justice. Angela Y. Davis is Distinguished Professor Emerita in the History of Consciousness and Feminist Studies Departments at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Dr. Davis grew up in Birmingham, Alabama, and has been an activist and Marxist-Feminist in the Black Power and abolitionist movements since the late 1960s. In the 1980s, her book Women, Race and Class helped to establish the concept of intersectionality. She also helped to develop the concept of prison abolition, especially in her books Are Prisons Obsolete? . Ruth Wilson Gilmore is Professor of Earth & Environmental Sciences and Director of the Center for Place, Culture, and Politics at the City University of New York Graduate Center. Co-founder of many grassroots organizations including the California Prison Moratorium Project, Critical Resistance, and the Central California Environmental Justice Network, Gilmore is author of the prize-winning Golden Gulag: Prisons, Surplus, Crisis, and Opposition in Globalizing California. Recent publications include, co-edited with Paul Gilroy, Stuart Hall: Selected Writings on Race and Difference. Forthcoming projects include Change Everything: Racial Capitalism and the Case for Abolition; Abolition Geography: Essays Toward Liberation. Gilmore has lectured in Africa, Asia, Europe, and North America. Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor writes and speaks on Black politics, social movements, and racial inequality in the United States. She is author of From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation (a Lannan Cultural Freedom Especially Notable Book Award recipient) and editor of How We Get Free. Her third book, Race for Profit was a finalist for a National Book Award for nonfiction, and a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for History. She is a contributing writer at The New Yorker and professor at Princeton University. This event is a partnership between Lannan Foundation and Haymarket Books. Lannan Foundation's Readings & Conversations series features inspired writers of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, as well as cultural freedom advocates with a social, political, and environmental justice focus. Lannan Foundation is a family foundation dedicated to cultural freedom, diversity, and creativity through projects that support exceptional contemporary artists and writers, inspired Native activists in rural communities, and social justice advocates. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/WLO0UuSnPzU Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Podcast – The Jazz Session
The Jazz Session #571: Maria Schneider

Podcast – The Jazz Session

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 64:54


Maria Schneider is a multiple Grammy Award winner and a recent Pulitzer Prize finalist in...

WMFA
Enlarging People's Perception of Sylvia Plath w. HEATHER CLARK

WMFA

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 60:03


Heather Clark is the author of Red Comet: The Short Life and Blazing Art of Sylvia Plath, a 2021 Pulitzer Prize finalist now out in paperback from Knopf. She and Courtney discuss how biography is like archeology, the "hysterical woman writer" stereotype, and the "profound and bottomless optimism" needed to undertake a large writing project. In the bonus segment, Heather talks about finding joy in the writing process and how the joy she found writing Red Comet influenced the book's structure. Bonus segments are available to Patreon subscribers at patreon.com/wmfapodcast. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Tangentially Speaking with Christopher Ryan
498 - Ian Urbina (Journalist / The Outlaw Ocean)

Tangentially Speaking with Christopher Ryan

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 62:12


Ian Urbina is an investigative reporter who writes for a variety of outlets, including The New York Times, The New Yorker, and The Atlantic. Urbina is the author of The New York Times bestseller The Outlaw Ocean, based on more than five years of reporting, much of it offshore, exploring lawlessness on the high seas. As a journalist, his investigations typically focus on human rights, worker safety and the environment, and he has received a Pulitzer Prize and a George Polk Award, and has been nominated for an Emmy. (Wikipedia) The Outlaw Ocean Project is here, and the Outlaw Ocean Music Project is here. Find Ian on Twitter and Instagram. Find me on Instagram or Twitter. Please consider supporting this podcast. This Amazon affiliate link kicks a few bucks back my way. Intro music: “Brightside of the Sun,” by Basin and Range; "Mother Moana," by Joel Havea; "Smoke Alarm," by Carsie Blanton. 

Bookreporter Talks To
Sarah Ruhl: SMILE: The Story of a Face

Bookreporter Talks To

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 63:53


Sarah Ruhl is a playwright, essayist, and poet, as well as a two time Pulitzer Prize finalist and Tony Award nominee. Sarah joins Carol Fitzgerald and Austin Ruh to discuss her memoir, Smile: The Story of a Face. Smile is the story of Sarah Ruhl's decade long journey with Bell's palsy, as well as her experiences as a mother and artist. After surviving a high-risk pregnancy, half of her face is left paralyzed. She's told that most patients recover within a few days, but Sarah's face doesn't go back to normal. Her life is roses to the public, with a play going up on Broadway and her family growing, but she struggles with happiness, both in what others can see on her face and what she reflects on internally. Sarah talks to Carol and Austin about how people feel emotion, and especially in how external expressions have the power to control our own feelings. She discusses beauty, symmetry, and expression. Then about her writing, how her story grew into a memoir, how certain writing projects are handled differently, and a bit about what she's working on next. Book discussed in this episode: Smile: The Story of a Face by Sarah Ruhl https://www.bookreporter.com/reviews/smile-the-story-of-a-face More Bookreporter Talks To: The Night She Disappeared: https://youtu.be/053PmMGI1wk Last Girl Ghosted: https://youtu.be/rv8j5gSQXFQ Maid: https://youtu.be/TlsUW9ZbbbM Check out our Bookaccino Book Club live events! Julie Clark: https://youtu.be/8AjJHRttMpU William Kent Krueger: https://youtu.be/dX-mHWLmv5k Sign up for the weekly Bookreporter.com newsletter here: http://tbrnetwork.com/newsletters/bookreporter-weekly-newsletter-subscribe FOLLOW US Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bookreporter Website: https://www.bookreporter.com

Here & Now
Author Elizabeth Strout's 'Oh William!'; Composer pens remembrance songs

Here & Now

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 41:44


Pulitzer Prize-winning author Elizabeth Strout talks about her new novel "Oh William!" The book explores the relationship between Lucy Barton, a familiar character to Strout's readers, and her ex-husband William. And, composer Phil Woodmore is creating music to capture the grief felt during this pandemic. His works debuted at a public memorial earlier this month in St. Louis. Angela Kender, who attended the public memorial in honor of her mother, also joins us.

FINCast
Ep. 31 – The Pandora Papers: A Conversation with Greg Miller, The Washington Post

FINCast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 39:07


The Pandora Papers: As the world absorbs the explosive revelations in the mass amounts of leaked financial documents, what do the Pandora Papers reveal about the way global elites move and hide money in the international financial system and how regulations and policies for financial transparency are working or overpowered? On this episode of FINCast, K2 Integrity's Juan Zarate hosts Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Greg Miller from The Washington Post, discussing Greg's in-depth reporting and analysis of the Pandora Papers' exposure of the challenges to financial transparency, good governance, corruption, and national security. While the reaction to illicit activity and financial secrecy ripples throughout the world, fundamental questions remain: will these revelations prompt action to address high-level corruption and financial crimes, accelerate regulatory changes to ensure transparency and accountability, and spur action to address growing economic inequity and safeguard the integrity of the global financial system?

Emergence Magazine Podcast
A Little More Than Kin – Richard Powers

Emergence Magazine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 19:49


As part of a new Emergence series, we're publishing a selection of essays from Kinship: Belonging in a World of Relations—a five-volume collection edited by Gavin Van Horn, Robin Wall Kimmerer, and John Hausdoerffer—including this poignant essay from Richard Powers. Richard is the author of twelve novels, including the newly released Bewilderment, and The Overstory, winner of the Pulitzer Prize in Fiction. In this essay, as he reflects on whether there is a genetic basis for altruism, Richard arrives at story as the vehicle through which human beings can find kinship with other creatures—recognizing and remembering our shared narrative in the urgent drama of this moment. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Artist as Leader
christopher oscar peña

Artist as Leader

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 28:25


christopher oscar peña is an accomplished playwright with a resume that includes productions, commissions and residencies at some of the country's most forward-thinking theatrical institutions. Among his most recent productions are the world premieres of his plays “a cautionary tail” at the Flea Theater in New York and “The Strangers” at the Clarence Brown Theatre in Knoxville, TN. chris is also amassing impressive credits as a TV writer, having written for the Emmy-nominated first season of “Jane the Virgin” on the CW and HBO's highly lauded “Insecure” as well as the Starz series “Sweetbitter.” He is currently on the writing staff for “Promised Land,” a new series that will air this season on ABC.Early in the pandemic, chris was approached by director James Darragh to join him and composer Ellen Reid, who won the 2019 Pulitzer Prize for her opera “p r i s m,” on a new project: a brand-new operatic work to be created specifically for and presented in the digital space. Never an opera aficionado, chris nonetheless jumped at the novel opportunity, and with the addition of “p r i s m” librettist Roxie Perkins, the creators hired a team of writers and composers and then filmed and recorded “Desert In.” All eight episodes are available for viewing on the streaming platform, OperaBox.tv. “Desert In” was described by The Wall Street Journal as “lush and expansive … a highly original marriage of opera and series television,” and The New York Observer wrote that “this stylish film-opera hybrid … is a sun-drenched melodrama.”In this interview with Pier Carlo Talenti, chris describes how his enduring passion for breaking form and pushing artistic envelopes has allowed him to craft an eclectic career that amplifies his voice and core beliefs. https://www.operabox.tv/desert-in

Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk
Ep. 116: Nuclear Roulette and the Cuban Missile Crisis with Martin Sherwin

Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 59:38


"As Kennedy said at the United Nations, there is a 'sword of Damocles hanging by a thread over humanity,' and we're still in that same position today and will remain in that position unless we figure out how to get rid of nuclear weapons." This is a rebroadcast of Ep. 88, aired originally April 7th, 2021. Marty Sherwin died on October 6th, 2021. ----- Pulitzer-prize winning historian Martin J. Sherwin is on the podcast, discussing his new book Gambling with Armageddon: Nuclear Roulette from Hiroshima to the Cuban Missile Crisis. The book sheds new light and brings fresh insights into what was one of the most volatile, potentially catastrophic periods of time in history— a time when the fate of the world was at a precipice. Many of the questions one naturally has about this period are answered by Marty Sherwin in dramatic, detailed manner. How did it happen in the first place that the Soviet leader, Nikita Khrushchev, was storing nuclear arms in Cuba? What role, contrary to what he writes in his autobiography, did Bobby Kennedy play? Who were the real heroes here that caused the world to avoid all-out nuclear war, and how close did we really come? Perhaps, most importantly: what have we, what has the world learned? Are we any better off now than before? Marty Sherwin, the world's preeminent Cold War historian is here, and he explains our past, our future, and our tragic reliance on Nuclear Arms. Support Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk on Patreon. Martin Jay Sherwin (1937-2021) was an author and historian specializing in the development of atomic weapons and nuclear policy. Along with Kai Bird, Sherwin co-wrote American Prometheus: The Triumph and Tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer, which won the Pulitzer Prize for biography in 2006. Sherwin was born in Brooklyn and studied at Dartmouth College. After four years in the Naval Air Force, Sherwin began graduate studies at the University of California, Los Angeles, receiving a Ph.D. in history in 1971. His dissertation focused on the decision to drop the atomic bomb, and was revised and published in 1975 as A World Destroyed: The Atomic Bomb and the Grand Alliance to much acclaim. In addition to A World Destroyed and American Prometheus, Sherwin has advised a number of documentaries and television series relating to the Manhattan Project, including The Day after Trinity: A History of Nuclear Strategy, Stalin's Bomb Maker: Citizen Kurchatov, and War and Peace in the Nuclear Age. Sherwin also had a long and distinguished teaching career. In 1988, Sherwin founded the Global Classroom Project, which joined students from the United States and Russia in conversations over issues such as the nuclear arms race. Sherwin was professor emeritus in history at Tufts University and a professor of history at George Mason University. His collection of more than two dozen interviews and oral histories with Oppenheimer's colleagues and friends is available on the "Voices of the Manhattan Project" website.

The Daily Poem
Sara Teasdale's "The Writer"

The Daily Poem

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 8:31


Sara Teasdale (August 8, 1884 – January 29, 1933) was an American lyric poet. She was born Sarah Trevor Teasdale in St. Louis, Missouri, and used the name Sara Teasdale Filsinger after her marriage in 1914.[1 In 1918 she won a Pulitzer Prize for her 1917 poetry collection Love Songs.Bio via Wikipedia. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Quarantine Tapes
The Quarantine Tapes: 209 Forrest Gander

The Quarantine Tapes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 34:20


Born in the Mojave Desert in Barstow, California, Forrest Gander grew up in Virginia and spent significant years with the poet CD Wright, in San Francisco, Dolores Hidalgo, Mexico, Eureka Springs, AR, and Providence, RI. With CD Wright, he has a son, the artist Brecht Wright Gander. Forrest holds degrees in both geology and English literature. He lives now in northern California with the artist Ashwini Bhat.Gander's book Be With was awarded the 2019 Pulitzer Prize. Concerned with the way we are revised and translated in encounters with the foreign, his book Core Samples from the World was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award. Gander has collaborated frequently with other artists including photographers Sally Mann, Graciela Iturbide, Raymond Meeks, and Lucas Foglia, glass artist Michael Rogers, ceramic artists Rick Hirsch and Ashwini Bhat, artists Ann Hamilton,Tjibbe Hooghiemstra, dancers Eiko & Koma, and musicians Vic Chesnutt and Brady Earnhart, among others. The author of numerous other books of poetry, including Redstart: An Ecological Poetics and Science & Steepleflower, Gander also writes novels (As a Friend; The Trace), essays(A Faithful Existence) and translates. His most recent translations are Alice Iris Red Horse: Poems of Gozo Yoshimasu, Then Come Back: the Lost Neruda Poems and Fungus Skull Eye Wing: Selected Poems of Alfonso D'Aquino. His most recent anthologies are Pinholes in the Night: Essential Poems from Latin American (selected by Raúl Zurita) and Panic Cure: Poems from Spain for the 21st Century.Gander's books have been translated and published in more than a dozen other languages. He is a United States Artists Rockefeller Fellow and has received fellowships from The National Endowment for the Arts and the Guggenheim, Whiting, and Howard Foundations. In 2011, he was awarded the Library of Congress Witter Bynner Fellowship. Gander was the Briggs-Copeland poet at Harvard University before becoming The Adele Kellenberg Seaver Professor of Literary Arts and Comparative Literature at Brown University where he taught courses such as Poetry & Ethics, EcoPoetics, Latin American Death Trip, and Translation Theory & Practice. He is a Chancellor for the Academy of American Poets and an elected member of The Academy of Arts & Sciences.

First Draft: A Dialogue on Writing
First Draft - Richard Powers

First Draft: A Dialogue on Writing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 57:00


Richard Powers has published thirteen novels. His most recent is Bewilderment. He is a MacArthur Fellow and received the National Book Award. His novel, The Overstory, won the Pulitzer Prize in Fiction. He lives in the Great Smoky Mountains. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Professional Book Nerds
Interview with Pulitzer Prize winner Elizabeth Strout

Professional Book Nerds

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 24:51


Pulitzer Prize winning author Elizabeth Strout joins the podcast to discuss her new book Oh, William! She shares where the idea came from to return to her beloved character Lucy Barton, her history with the state of Maine, and how we all discover that no matter how well we think we know someone, there is always something new to learn. Today's episode is sponsored by Fast Growing Trees. Visit FastGrowingTrees.com/PBN to save 15% Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

City Arts & Lectures
Andrea Elliott

City Arts & Lectures

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 60:58


Andrea Elliott is a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter for The New York Times and a former staff writer at The Miami Herald. In 2012, Elliott set out to report about what it was like to be an unhoused child in New York City. She met 11-year-old Dasani Coates, living in a shelter with her parents and seven siblings.  The conditions were unsurprisingly horrible, and the challenges faced by Dasani's family enormous and multigenerational. Elliott followed Dasani and her family for eight years, and her book Invisible Child: Poverty, Survival, and Hope in an American City, weaves together Dasani's story - including her time at a boarding school designed to help disadvantaged girls escape poverty – with the history of Dasani's family, tracing the passage of their ancestors from slavery to the Great Migration north. It's the story of a fierce, resilient, and overburdened child – and the profound impacts of poverty and racism.  On October 5, 2021, Andrea Elliott spoke with Isabel Duffy about the book - what it took to write it and what she'd like readers to take from it.

The Chris Voss Show
The Chris Voss Show Podcast – Red Comet: The Short Life and Blazing Art of Sylvia Plath by Heather Clark

The Chris Voss Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 27:30


Red Comet: The Short Life and Blazing Art of Sylvia Plath by Heather Clark Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award in Biography • “One of the most beautiful biographies I've ever read." —Glennon Doyle, author of #1 New York Times Bestseller, Untamed The highly anticipated biography of Sylvia Plath that focuses on her remarkable literary and intellectual achievements, while restoring the woman behind the long-held myths about her life and art. With a wealth of never-before-accessed materials--including unpublished letters and manuscripts; court, police, and psychiatric records; and new interviews--Heather Clark brings to life the brilliant daughter of Wellesley, Massachusetts who had poetic ambition from a very young age and was an accomplished, published writer of poems and stories even before she became a star English student at Smith College in the early 1950s. Determined not to read Plath's work as if her every act, from childhood on, was a harbinger of her tragic fate, Clark evokes a culture in transition, in the shadow of the atom bomb and the Holocaust, as she explores Plath's world: her early relationships and determination not to become a conventional woman and wife; her conflicted ties to her well-meaning, widowed mother; her troubles at the hands of an unenlightened mental-health industry; her Cambridge years and thunderclap meeting with Ted Hughes, a marriage of true minds that would change the course of poetry in English; and much more. Clark's clear-eyed portraits of Hughes, his lover Assia Wevill, and other demonized players in the arena of Plath's suicide promotes a deeper understanding of her final days, with their outpouring of first-rate poems. Along with illuminating readings of the poems themselves, Clark's meticulous, compassionate research brings us closer than ever to the spirited woman and visionary artist who blazed a trail that still lights the way for women poets the world over

BroadwayRadio
All The Drama: “The Subject Was Roses”, 1965 Winner, Pulitzer Prize for Drama

BroadwayRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 26:01


All The Drama is hosted by Jan Simpson. It is a series of deep dives into the plays that have won The Pulitzer Prize for Drama. The Pulitzer Prize for Drama: The Subject Was Roses by Frank D. Gilroy The Subject Was Roses Wikipedia pagehttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Subject_Was_Roses Frank Gilroy Wikipedia pagehttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_D._Gilroy Howard read more The post All The Drama: “The Subject Was Roses”, 1965 Winner, Pulitzer Prize for Drama appeared first on BroadwayRadio.

America: Changed Forever
CBS News Special: America Changed Forever 10/15

America: Changed Forever

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 49:31


On this week's "America Changed Forever," we look at the scourge of Domestic Terrorism in America. Chief Justice and Homeland Security Correspondent Jeff Pegues speaks with former head of Homeland Security Michael Chertoff in an exclusive interview. We also hear from Mary McCord, former acting Assistant Attorney General for the Department of Justice. Plus, Pulitzer Prize winner Eric Foner explains how the Ku Klux Klan Act of 1871 is being used to protect us from domestic terrorists.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Midday
'What About the Baby?': Essays by Alice McDermott on writing fiction

Midday

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 49:44


Tom's guest today is the acclaimed author, Alice McDermott. She is the winner of a National Book Award. Three of her novels have been finalists for the Pulitzer Prize, and she's garnered many other prizes and accolades in a career that has spanned 40 years, and counting. She's an insightful observer of the passing parade and her prose is a delight to encounter. Books like Charming Billy,After This, Someone, or her most recent novel, The Ninth Hour, have afforded readers some of the most enjoyable and enlightening experiences available in contemporary fiction. Alice McDermott has long been revered as a teacher of writing as well, serving for many years on the faculties of the Johns Hopkins Writing Seminars and the Sewanee Writers' Conference. Her latest book is a work of non-fiction, in which she proffers what might be dubbed a Bill of Rights for readers, and a how-to guide for writers. It is a celebration of great writing, and an investigation into what makes great writing, great. The book is called What About the Baby?: Some Thoughts on the Art of Fiction.  Alice McDermott joins us on our digital line from her home in Bethesda, Maryland. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Brian Lehrer Show
Tracy K. Smith Shares Poems From Her New Collection

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 9:35


Tracy K. Smith, Pulitzer Prize winning poet, former Poet Laureate of the United States from 2017 to 2019, author of Such Color: New and Selected Poems (Graywolf, 2021) and editor of The Best American Poetry 2021 (Scribner, 2021) shares poems from her new collection.

Slightly Foxed
36: Graphic Novels: A Comic Turn with Posy Simmonds & Paul Gravett

Slightly Foxed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 44:39


The cartoonist, writer and illustrator Posy Simmonds brilliantly captures the ambitions and pretensions of the literary world, and the journalist and curator Paul Gravett has worked in comics publishing for decades. Together they bring graphic novels and comic books to the foreground with the Slightly Foxed team. We draw moral lessons from the Ally Sloper cartoons of the 1870s, glimpse Frans Masereel's wordless woodcut stories of the 1920s, view the pictorial politics of Citizen 13660 by Miné Okubo in the 1940s and revisit Art Spiegelman's 1992 Pulitzer Prize-winning Maus before taking a closer look at more contemporary works. From a tragicomic summer with Joff Winterhart, nuclear explosions with Raymond Briggs, the shadow of James Joyce with Mary and Bryan Talbot and an Iranian childhood with Marjane Satrapi's Persepolis, the discussion moves through panels, frames, splashes and spreads to Posy Simmonds's own methods in bringing literature to life, including crosshatching to Vivaldi. Originally serialized in the Guardian, Posy's Gemma Bovery builds on the bones of Flaubert's Madame Bovary and Tamara Drewe draws from Hardy's Far from the Madding Crowd, while Cassandra Darke takes inspiration from Dickens's A Christmas Carol. Though rooted in the classics, the devil is in Posy's detail, be it real French coffee pots, the joy of characters' names, such as Kevin Penwallet, and fictional places, such as Tresoddit. We continue our travels off the beaten track with our usual round-up of reading recommendations, and a trip to Gilbert White's House and Gardens in Hampshire, where we view the landscapes that sparked his evergreen classic The Natural History of Selborne. (Episode duration: 44 minutes; 39 seconds) Books Mentioned We may be able to get hold of second-hand copies of the out-of-print titles listed below. Please get in touch with Jess in the Slightly Foxed office for more information. Ally Sloper: A Moral Lesson, cartoons by Marie Duval and words by Judy's office boy is out of print (4:48) Miné Okubo, Citizen 13660 (6:29) George Takei, They Called Us Enemy (7:25) Jules Feiffer, Passionella and Other Stories is out of print (9:05) Art Spiegelman, Maus (10:37) Mary M. Talbot & Bryan Talbot, Dotter of Her Father's Eyes (12:52) Joff Winterhart, Days of the Bagnold Summer (13:22) Raymond Briggs, When the Wind Blows (15:42) Raymond Briggs, Ethel & Ernest (17:07) Posy Simmonds, Gemma Bovery (17:48) Posy Simmonds, Tamara Drewe (17:48) Marjane Satrapi, Persepolis (28:31) Posy Simmonds, Cassandra Darke (29:04) Riad Sattouf, The Arab of the Future (30:24) Alison Bechdel, Fun Home (31:20) Posy Simmonds, Literary Life Revisited Paul Gravett, Posy Simmonds Emma Tennant, Burnt Diaries is out of print (34:20) Robert Macfarlane, The Old Ways (37:28) Our Time, an anthology commissioned by The Lakes International Comic Art Festival (38:29) Laurie Lee, As I Walked Out One Midsummer Morning. Published in our series of Slightly Foxed Editions, along with Cider with Rosie (39:54) Gilbert White, The Natural History of Selborne (41:24) Related Slightly Foxed Articles & Illustrations Underwear Was Important, Hazel Wood on the cartoons of Posy Simmonds, Issue 15 Cover illustration by Posy Simmonds, Issue 16 Inside cover illustration by Posy Simmonds, Issue 60 Touched with a Secret Delight, Melissa Harrison on Gilbert White, The Natural History and Antiquities of Selborne, Issue 48 Other Links Posy Simmonds Close Up, Cartoonmuseum Basel, Switzerland. The exhibition runs until 24 October 2021 (2:39) The bd BOUM festival, Blois, France. The festival is chaired by Posy Simmonds and runs from 19-21 November 2021 Gosh! Comics, London, UK (31:58) The Lakes International Comic Art Festival, Kendal, UK (32:08) Thought Bubble, The Yorkshire Comic Convention, Harrogate, UK (32:26) Gilbert White's House & Gardens, Selborne, UK (41:13) Opening music: Preludio from Violin Partita No.3 in E Major by Bach The Slightly Foxed Podcast is hosted by Philippa Lamb and produced by Podcastable

The Jeremiah Show
SN8 | Ep416 - Chef Suzanne Tracht | JAR | Anne Heche

The Jeremiah Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 63:01


Our Special Guest Today is Chef Suzanne Tracht, Owner of JAR + Actor Anne Heche Zagat Says of Chef Suzanne: “Walk into Suzanne Tracht's modern chophouse restaurant today, and it's as good as it was when it opened in 2001. The wood-paneled walls, the chic mushroomlike light fixtures, the warm tones — this dining room is recognizable from any angle, especially when it's used as a set for movies like "La La Land." Even when full, there's a soft hum to the place that makes dinner here great for business meetings, dates, and family gatherings. The bar is a good option for drop-ins, especially for martinis and complimentary potato chips and horseradish dip. Chef Suzanne Tracht has built JAR into one of the most beloved and successful restaurants in Los Angeles. Drawing inspiration from classic American comfort cuisine, JAR is a pilgrimage for passionate eaters and wine lovers from across the country. It's my favorite kind of restaurant: A classic chophouse imagined as only the great Chef Suzanne Tracht could imagine. Jar's interior evokes the aura of a timeless supper club, JAR has become an indelible part of the city's culture, even starring as a memorable location in the Academy Award-winning classic La La Land during a pivotal dramatic moment. Utilizing the very best in local ingredients, Chef Tracht delights in taking classic chophouse dishes—deviled eggs, blue cheese wedge salad, and prime steaks The widespread praise for JAR over the years includes acclaim from the late Pulitzer Prize-winning Los Angeles Times and LA Weekly restaurant critic Jonathan Gold, who gave JAR a coveted spot on his “101 Best Restaurants in LA” list every year since its inception. “Tracht's gift lies in her ability to reproduce the old tastes within a modern context,” wrote Mr. Gold, “so that the sautéed pea tendrils with garlic make as much sense as the creamed spinach, the duck-fried rice as the mashed potatoes, and the char siu-style pork chop as the prime filet mignon.” Chef Suzanne Tracht Prepares a Menu of her Favorite Dishes for the Thanksgiving Holiday Jar, present Thanksgiving Dinner Take-Out ready for pick up on Wednesday, November 25, 2021, with easy instructions for heating and preparing for the holiday home table. The menu features dishes inspired by Suzanne's family traditions and American holiday flavors. All prepaid ordering, exclusively through TOCK, must be completed by 6:00 p.m. Saturday, November 20, 2021 with pick-up on Wednesday, October 25, 2020, only from 12:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.  JAR is closed on Thanksgiving Day.  www.thejar.com 323.655.6566 8225 Beverly Boulevard    Los Angeles, CA 90048

KQED’s Forum
Black-Jewish Solidarity for Prison Abolition, Expressed Through Aerial Dance

KQED’s Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 21:00


“I am freedom,” says Rahsaan Thomas in a recorded phone call from San Quentin State Prison, featured in a new performance by Flyaway Productions and Museum of the African Diaspora. "Meet Us Quickly with Your Mercy" combines first-person recordings with music and aerial choreography— with the goal of conveying the solidarity of Black and Jewish activism for racial justice and prison abolition. It's rooted in a four-year collaboration that comprised hundreds of letters, prison visits and monitored phone calls between artistic director Jo Kreiter and lead writer Thomas, who co-hosts and co-produces the Pulitzer Prize-nominated podcast “Ear Hustle” and who is currently incarcerated in San Quentin. "Meet Us Quickly with Your Mercy” will run through Oct. 17 and charge no admission fee. Kreiter and Thomas join us to discuss the show and its message.  

First Draft with Sarah Enni
Arguably Achievable Perfection With Benjamin Dreyer

First Draft with Sarah Enni

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 62:37


First Draft Episode #327: Benjamin Dreyer Benjamin Dreyer, vice president, executive managing editor and copy chief of Random House, and New York Times bestselling author of Dreyer's English: An Utterly Correct Guide to Clarity and Style and Dreyer's English (Adapted for Young Readers): Good Advice for Good Writing. Links to Topics Mentioned In This Episode: “Meet the Guardian of Grammar Who Wants to Help You Be a Better Writer,” by Sarah Lyall in The New York Times Before and After the Book Deal: A Writer's Guide to Finishing, Publishing, Promoting and Surviving Your First Book by Courtney Maum (hear Courtney weigh in on the traditional publishing process in Track Changes: Publishing 101) #1 New York Times bestselling author and Pulitzer Prize winner Elizabeth Strout, author of Olive Kitteridge, Olive Again, and the recent release Oh William! Shirley Jackson, author of The Haunting of Hill House, The Lottery, and more

The Brian Lehrer Show
Tracy K. Smith Picks the Best Recent Poetry

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 8:37


Tracy K. Smith, Pulitzer Prize winning poet, former Poet Laureate of the United States from 2017 to 2019, author of Such Color: New and Selected Poems (Graywolf, 2021) and editor of The Best American Poetry 2021 (Scribner, 2021) shares some of the best recent poetry (including her own) to end the show.

Art of Citizenry
Anti-Trafficking, Christian Supremacy and the Rescue Industry

Art of Citizenry

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 84:37


Human trafficking is a complex issue with layers of deep seated power structures influencing the way we both understand and think about trafficking. All too often, the narratives we read and share fail to capture the nuance that makes this industry so complex. The images we see are compelling -- those of young women, mostly women of color in the Global South, looking weak and disempowered. Their stories, often told through a translator, are powerful and typically follow the same storytelling structure, subconsciously etching stereotypes of communities and cultures into our psyches. Those stories coupled with a call to action pull at our heart strings, captivating our attention and compelling us to either donate or buy a product in hopes that we too can feel like heroes, saving these poor women from modern day slavery. During the last episode, host Manpreet Kaur Kalra spoke with Madina Wardak about the ways in which the global narratives about Afghan women perpetuate harmful stereotypes that deny any form of agency. We see these same themes play out in conversations surrounding the anti-trafficking industry. From refugee resettlement efforts to anti-trafficking organizations, often “doing good” centers the “hero,” all while continuing to sideline the voices of those who are being “saved.” This puts the “savior” up on a pedestal while turning those whose stories are being used into nothing more than a metric with a marketable soundbite. The blatant stereotypes that are often perpetuated by anti-trafficking organizations reinforce the pervasive assumption that women of color are oppressed by using terms such as “rescuing” or “saving,” which take power and agency away from the individual. With a hyper-fixation on sex trafficking, anti-trafficking organizations often fail to recognize the many other forms of trafficking that exists, including forced labor. A lot of the narratives surrounding Human Trafficking upheld by the Rescue Industry are influenced deeply by the work of Nicholas Kristof, a Pulitzer Prize winning NY Times journalist and the author of many do-gooders' bible, “Half the Sky." His reporting, writing, and stereotypical interpretations of human trafficking have not just influenced the narratives within the industry, but have also inspired many to start social enterprises, especially those dedicated to addressing trafficking.During Episode 15 of Art of Citizenry Podcast, Manpreet Kaur Kalra is joined by Rachel Faller, the co-creator of zero-waste fashion brand, tonlé. Together, they deconstruct the ways in which the anti-trafficking industry is a perpetuation of Christian supremacy, rooted in imperialistic and colonial power structures that further the belief in Euro-American superiority.Rachel Faller is an entrepreneur by trade and a creative at heart. She dedicates most of her time to rectifying harm within the garment industry using a systemic approach- encouraging people to think about the root of systemic injustice and tackling these issues at their core rather than simply treating the symptoms. Rachel is a co-creator of tonlé – a zero waste, ethical and sustainable fashion line that is both a brand and a manufacturer. Rachel is also a co-founder at Reclaim Collaborative. Rachel's personal and community care practices include crafting, painting, mending, gardening, and foraging.Art of Citizenry is a community supported podcast dedicated to decolonizing storytelling. Please consider supporting by visiting:  patreon.com/manpreetkalra

The Psychology Podcast
Steven Pinker || Why Rationality Matters

The Psychology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 65:41


Today it's great to have Steven Pinker on the podcast. Dr. Pinker is the Johnstone professor of psychology at Harvard University. A two-time Pulitzer Prize finalist and the winner of many awards for his research, teaching, and books. He's been elected to the National Academy of Science, and named as one of Time's “100 Most Influential People”, and one of Foreign Policy's “100 Leading Global Thinkers”. His books include How the Mind Works, The Blank State, The Stuff of Thought, The Better Angels of Our Nature, The Sense of Style, Enlightenment Now, and most recently, Rationality: What It Is, Why It Seems Scarce, Why It Matters.  In this episode, I talk to Steven about the definition of rationality, how it relates to truth, and how it's different from logic. We also discuss the trade-offs in decision making, the limited usefulness of strategic irrationality, the boundaries of socially acceptable fiction, and why people have weird beliefs among other things.Website: stevenpinker.comTwitter: @sapinker Topics01:02 Must we always follow reason? 03:34 Steven's definition of rationality 05:24 Tension between conflicting goals 08:31 What is truth? 13:12 When to apply logic or rationality 23:14 There can be no trade-off between rationality and justice 25:35 Politicizing knowledge and research 29:24 Strategic irrationality has limits 36:13 Taboo trade-offs, heretical counterfactuals, and forbidden base rates 42:04 The changing norms of acceptable fiction 45:56 Why rationality is cool 49:39 The costs of decision making 55:54 Progress came from utilitarian reasoning 57:52 "The pandemic of poppycock" 01:01:23 Expressive rationality: morally empowering beliefs 01:05:26 Bayesian reasoning  

The Quarantine Tapes
The Quarantine Tapes: 207 Chris Hedges

The Quarantine Tapes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 38:28


Chris Hedges is a Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist who was a foreign correspondent and bureau chief in the Middle East and the Balkans for fifteen years for The New York Times. He previously worked overseas for The Dallas Morning News, The Christian Science Monitor, and NPR. He is host of the Emmy Award­–nominated RT America show On Contact. Hedges, who holds a Master of Divinity from Harvard University, is the author of numerous books and was a National Book Critics Circle finalist for War Is a Force That Gives Us Meaning. He has taught at Columbia University, New York University, Princeton University, and the University of Toronto. He has taught college credit courses through Rutgers University since 2013 in the New Jersey prison system. 

The Brian Lehrer Show
Tracy K. Smith Reads 'The Best American Poetry 2021'

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 8:16


Tracy K. Smith, Pulitzer Prize winning poet, former Poet Laureate of the United States from 2017 to 2019, author of "Such Color: New and Selected Poems"(Graywolf, 2021) and editor of "The Best American Poetry 2021" (Scribner, 2021), shares some of the best recent poetry to end the show.

All Of It
Anthony Doerr on 'Cloud Cuckoo Land'

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 18:04


Author Anthony Doerr won the Pulitzer Prize in Fiction for his 2014 novel All The Light We Cannot See. His new novel, Cloud Cuckoo Land, tells a story spanning centuries and continents from fifteenth century Constantinople to present day Idaho. He joins us to discuss.

Working Wife, Happy Life!
Ep 41 - Power Moms with Joann S. Lublin

Working Wife, Happy Life!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 58:55


Joann S. Lublin is an extremely established and recognized leader in the journalist world who raised two children while rising to management news editor of the Wall Street Journal, where she's been recognized with a shared Pulitzer Prize and the highest accolade in business journalism, the Gerald Loeb Lifetime Achievement Award. She also inaugurated the Journal's career advice column in 1993, continuing to write its “Your Executive Career” column until May of last year. She's now written two books, her first: Earning It: Hard-Won Lessons from Trailblazing Women at the  Top of the Business World and now POWER MOMS: How Executive Mothers Navigate Work and Life where she interviewed 86 Power Moms - Baby Boomers from the first wave and Gen Xers from the second wave -- along with 25 adult daughters of those first wave boomers.  Together we discuss the differences and similarities across generational power moms, perspectives from adult daughters of power moms (ditch the mom guilt!), the importance of supportive partners, as well as how women navigate and are perceived in the workplace as they make more humans (spoiler alert: motherhood makes us better leaders!) We also cover how to think about the ever elusive work-life sway. You can connect with Joann via @joannlublin on social channels and on www.joannlublin.com

Stitch Please
A Sewing Chat with Rita Dove

Stitch Please

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 27:09


Thank you to volunteer sound designer for her work on this episode including the following music: “Chill Lo-Fi Hip Hop” by Skilsel; “News Corporate” by Skilsel; “Hip Hop Lo-Fi” by John Sib; “Hip Hop Funk” by John Sib and “African Percussion” by SofraMore about Rita DoveWhether she is crafting a line of poetry or stitching together her husband's lavender velvet wedding suit, Rita Dove is a master of storytelling. In this episode of Stitch Please, Lisa talks with former US Poet Laureate, Rita Dove, about her introduction to sewing, the relationship between poetry and sewing, and how to walk along the seam sewn by those who have come before us. After graduating from Buchtel High School as a Presidential Scholar, Dove went on to graduate summa cum laude with a B.A. from Miami University in 1973. In 1974, she was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship from the University of Tübingen, Germany and later completed her MFA at the Writers' Workshop at the University of Iowa in 1977 where she met her husband, Fred Viebahn. In 1987, Dove received the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry. In 1992, Dove was named US Poet Laureate and served as Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress—a position she would later hold again as a Special Bicentennial Consultant in 1999. In addition to being the youngest individual and the first African American to hold the position of Poet Laureate, Rita Dove is the recipient of 28 honorary doctorates and numerous awards, some of which include: Poet Laureate of Virginia, the National Humanities Medal presented by President Bill Clinton, the National Medal of Arts presented by President Barack Obama, several lifetime achievement awards, and the Gold Medal in poetry from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Dove has published the poetry collections The Yellow House on the Corner (1980), Museum (1983), Thomas and Beulah (1986), Grace Notes (1989), Selected Poems (1993), Mother Love (1995), On the Bus with Rosa Parks (1999), American Smooth (2004), Sonata Mulattica (2009), Collected Poems: 1974-2004 (2016) which was a finalist for the National Book Award, and her most recent work, Playlist for the Apocalypse (2021).  In addition to poetry, Dove has published a book of short stories, Fifth Sunday (1985), the novel Through the Ivory Gate (1992), and the play The Darker Face of the Earth (1994). Rita Dove is currently the Commonwealth Professor of English at the University of Virginia. When she's not writing timeless literary gems, Dove might be found thumbing through High Fashion Sewing Secrets and creating her own wearable works of art.

Now I've Heard Everything
Alice Walker

Now I've Heard Everything

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 17:31


She may be best known by most people for her novel The Color Purple, which won the 1982 Pulitzer Prize for fiction, and which later became a hugely popular movie. But Alice Walker has also written dozens of other books, both fiction and nonfiction, including many collections of poetry. I met and interviewed her several times over the years, including in tghe spring of 2003 when she published a book of poetry called Absolute Trust in the Goodness of The Earth. Our conversation took place just hours before the Us and other nations launched the attacks that initiated the Iraq war. And that was weighing heavily on her mind.

Free Library Podcast
Keisha N. Blain | Until I Am Free: Fannie Lou Hamer's Enduring Message to America

Free Library Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 61:35


In conversation with Mitchell S. Jackson Keisha N. Blain's Set the World on Fire, a history of some of the early 20th century's leading Black nationalist women, won the Berkshire Conference of Women Historians Book Prize and was named one of Smithsonian Magazine's best history books of 2018. With Ibram X. Kendi, she coauthored the #1 New York Times bestseller Four Hundred Souls: A Community History of African America, 1619–2019. An associate professor of history at the University of Pittsburgh, Blain is an editor for The Washington Post's ''Made by History'' section and is the president of the African American Intellectual History Society. In Until I Am Free, Blain combines biography and social commentary to share the enduring life and legacy of Civil Rights activist Fannie Lou Hamer, and also offers a manifesto for those who wish to continue fighting for racial, voting, and women's rights. Mitchell S. Jackson is the John O. Whiteman Dean's Distinguished Professor in the Department of English. Recipient of a 2021 Guggenheim fellowship, Jackson won the 2021 Pulitzer Prize in Feature Writing for his article about the killing of Ahmaud Arbery. His debut novel The Residue Years was recognized with a Whiting Award and the Ernest J. Gaines Prize. His nonfiction book, Survival Math: Notes on an All-American Family, was named a best book of 2019 by NPR, Time and elsewhere. (recorded 10/12/2021)

Thresholds
Rita Dove

Thresholds

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 46:03


Jordan talks to the incomparable Rita Dove about discovery, about taking a break from creating and publishing, and about re-learning to hold a pen again after her MS diagnosis. Rita Dove, Pulitzer Prize winner and former U.S. Poet Laureate, is the only poet honored with both the National Humanities Medal and the National Medal of Arts. Her recent works include Playlist for the Apocalypse, Sonata Mulattica, and the National Book Award–shortlisted Collected Poems: 1974–2004. In 2021 she was awarded the Gold Medal for Poetry from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. She lives in Charlottesville, where she teaches creative writing at the University of Virginia. For more Thresholds, visit us at www.thisisthresholds.com Be sure to rate/review/subscribe! -------------------------------- This episode is presented in collaboration with the 2021 Miami Book Fair. Rita Dove is just one of the many writers from around the world participating in the nation's largest gathering of writers and readers of all ages. This year's Miami Book Fair takes place online and in person from November 14th to November 21st. Please visit miamibookfair.com for more information, or follow MBF at @miamibookfair Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Front Row
Suzan-Lori Parks, Owen Sheers, stolen artefacts and the portrayal of scientists

Front Row

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 42:23


Suzan-Lori Parks, the first African-American woman to win the Pulitzer Prize for Drama on her play White Noise, which has its the UK premier tonight. Life is not so bad for four liberal friends, two couples, black with a white partner, until Leo has a run in with the cops and it all begins to unravel. The poet, playwright, and novelist, Owen Sheers, has written a new BBC One drama, The Trick. He talks to Samira about exploring what became known in 2009 as Climategate, when the emails of Professor Philip Jones, Director of the Climate Research Unit at East Anglia University, were hacked and doubt cast on the research into climate change. For Front Row's regular Tuesday Arts Audit today we're exploring ongoing debates around the questionable provenance of artefacts housed in some of the world's most famous museums with Malia Politzer from the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists and Alexander Herman, Assistant Director of the Institute of Art and Law. How can broadening the representation of scientists on the page, screen and stage drive diversity among scientists and increase public trust in science itself? Andrea Sella, broadcaster and professor of chemistry at University College London and award-winning debut novelist Temi Oh join Samira live in the studio on Radio 4's Day of the Scientist. Presenter: Samira Ahmed Producer: Kirsty McQuire

Outspoken with Shana Cosgrove
I'm Speaking: Danelle Barrett, Author and Keynote Speaker and Independent Director at Federal Home Loan Bank of New York, Protego Trust Bank N.A. and KVH Industries Inc.

Outspoken with Shana Cosgrove

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 58:59


Leadership, Cybersecurity, and Transformation.In this episode of The Outspoken Podcast, host Shana Cosgrove talks to retired Rear Admiral Danelle Barrett, former deputy CIO of the US Navy, Director of Operations at Cyber Command and Author of ‘Rock the Boat'. Danelle talks about what it was like to be a wife and mother while serving the Nation. She goes into the values of communication and importance of the transformational opportunities in life. We also get to hear about the writing and production process of Danelle's book, Rock the Boat and what made her decide to write. Lastly, Danelle allows us to hear about her past experiences working at Disney World, what she wishes she did differently, and her ‘embarrassing mom moment.' QUOTES “So, I think sometimes we have to really be mindful and open to whatever's coming our way. Be a little Semper Gumby, a little flexible, and leap at that opportunity that we just wouldn't have seen or didn't see because we were so blind [with] everything we thought we wanted.”– Danelle Barrett [12:20] “So, her dream was just as important as mine and my husband's. So, there's ways in families to manage that, but it takes effort, takes some coordination and stuff like that, but you know, you can't be solely focused on your career yourself. You got to make sure that everybody else's dreams and aspirations are just as important as yours and taken care of.”– Danelle Barrett [28:56] “...I do believe, you know, as a leader you have to look for those opportunities that are transformational. That will change something for the better.”– Danelle Barrett [36:53]   TIMESTAMPS  [00:04] Intro [01:52] Meet Danelle Barrett [02:59] Rock the Boat  [03:37] Corporate Boards [04:58] Leaving the Navy [06:58] Going into the Navy and Working in the Pentagon [09:37] Evolution of Technology [10:10] Shifting to Leadership Roles [12:34] Women Going to Sea and the Ships [15:25] Danelle's Husband and Daughter [16:58] Danelle's Parents and Siblings [18:47] Being in the Navy as a Mom [22:05] Danelle's Mother [24:40] Marriage Tips and Familial Communication [28:06] Danelle's Daughter [30:02] Women in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science [33:11] Hair and Clothing [36:12] Rock the Boat [38:51] Ideas, Visions, and Evolution [41:53] Communication Systems Impacting Cybersecurity [43:51] Writing a Book and the Distribution Process [48:08] Ping Pong and Piano [50:53] Danelle's Favorite Book [52:02] What Danielle Looks Back on [53:27] Working at Disney World [54:17] Funny Mom Moment [58:39] Outro   RESOURCES https://www.navy.mil/ (United States Navy) https://marineparents.com/marinecorps/sempergumby.asp (Semper Gumby) https://www.navysite.de/ships/lcc19.htm (USS Blue Ridge (LCC 19)) https://www.c6f.navy.mil/About-Us/Our-Task-Forces/CTF-63/USS-Mount-Whitney-LCC-20/ (USS Mount Whitney (LCC 20)) https://www.va.gov/ (U.S. Department of Federal Affairs) https://explorehealthcareers.org/career/nursing/occupational-health-nurse/ (Occupational Health Nurse) https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0218839/ (Best in Show) https://www.uky.edu/UKHome/ (University of Kentucky) https://www.sears.com/ (Sears) https://www.amazon.com/ (Amazon) https://www.tesla.com/elon-musk (Elon Musk) https://www.waltdisney.org/walt-disney (Walt Disney) https://www.neilgaiman.com/ (Neil Gaiman) https://www.salvationarmyusa.org/usn/ (The Salvation Army) https://www.amazon.com/Bell-Adano-John-Hersey/dp/0394756959 (A Bell for Adano) by John Hersey https://www.pulitzer.org/ (The Pulitzer Prize) https://www.amazon.com/All-Light-We-Cannot-See/dp/1501173219 (All The Light We Cannot See) by Anthony Doerr https://www.janeausten.org/ (Jane Austen) https://www.amazon.com/Far-Madding-Crowd-Wordsworth-Classics/dp/1853260673 (Far from the Madding Crowd) by Thomas Hardy https://www.amazon.com/Lincoln-Leadership-Executive-Strategies-Tough/dp/0446394599 (Lincoln on Leadership) by Donald T. Phillips...

Food with Mark Bittman
Marcia Chatelain and the McUniverse

Food with Mark Bittman

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 36:30


Mark talks to Pulitzer Prize winner Dr. Marcia Chatelain about the fascinating relationship between Black America and McDonalds, how McDonalds can lift people up (and bring them down), and her dreams for her child's future eating habits.  Order Marcia's book Franchise: The Golden Arches in Black America wherever books are sold. Today's episode was sponsored by Brami Snacks (promo code BITTMAN30), Mr. Espresso (promo code FREESHIP1978, and O Olive Oil. Subscribe to Food with Mark Bittman on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you like to listen, and please leave us a 5 star review on Apple Podcasts. Follow Mark on Twitter at @bittman, and on Facebook and Instagram at @markbittman. Subscribe to Mark's newsletter The Bittman Project at www.bittmanproject.com. Submit your listener questions to Mark and Team Bittman on our toll-free listener voicemail line at (833) FOOD-POD or (833) 366-3763. Food with Mark Bittman is part of the Airwave Media podcast network. Email sales@advertisecast.com to advertise on the podcast. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

SmartLess
"David Remnick"

SmartLess

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 54:05


Why is David Remnick always so cold? He's surrounded by drafts. Editor of The New Yorker and Pulitzer Prize-winning writer David Remnick joins us this week to discuss penne pasta, drunk tweeting, feeding the recycling bin, and Leonard Cohen. Theres some other good stuff in their two also, its'See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Science Friday
State Of COVID And Antiviral Pill, Future Pandemics. Oct 8, 2021, Part 1

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 47:14


First Malaria Vaccine Is Approved by WHO The malaria parasite is one of the world's deadliest infectious diseases, killing on average about 500,000 people per year—half of them children under the age of 5, nearly all of them in sub-Saharan Africa. Now, the World Health Organization has finally approved RTS,S or Mosquirix, the first vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum, which is the most deadly strain of the parasite. The vaccine has already been administered via a pilot program to 800,000 children in Kenya, Ghana, and Malawi, and in clinical trials showed an efficacy rate of about 50% against severe disease. WNYC's Nsikan Akpan explains this and other stories, including a climate change-linked Nobel Prize in physics, controversy over the naming of the James Webb Space Telescope, and a new surveillance method that uses only the shadows you cast on a blank wall. Will Improved Testing And New Antivirals Change The Pandemic's Path? Late last week, the pharmaceutical company Merck released data on a new antiviral medication called molnupiravir—a drug taken as a course of pills over five days that the company said was dramatically effective at keeping people with COVID-19 out of the hospital. In a press release, the company said that trial participants on the medication had a 50% lower risk of hospitalization or death compared to people getting the placebo. And while eight people in the placebo group died during the trial, none of the people getting the new drug did. However, the full data from the trial has yet to be released—and the medication must still go through the FDA approval process before it can be used. Matthew Herper, senior writer at STAT covering medicine, joins Ira to talk about the drug and what questions remain. Then, infectious disease specialist and epidemiologist Céline Gounder discusses other recent coronavirus news—from a government plan to spend a billion dollars on at-home testing to recent data on the Delta variant, including projections of what might happen next. Preparing For The Next Pandemic Needs To Start Now The United States has a long history of public health crises. For many, our first pandemic has been COVID-19. But long before the SARS-CoV-2 virus arrived, HIV, measles, and the flu all left a lasting impact. As a wealthy country, you may think the United States would be prepared to deal with public health crises, since they happen here with a degree of regularity. However, that's not the case. The longstanding issues that left the country vulnerable to COVID-19 are explored in a recent article from The Atlantic, called “We're Already Barreling Toward the Next Pandemic.” The piece was written by science writer Ed Yong, who won a Pulitzer Prize last year for his coverage of COVID-19. Ira speaks to Ed and Gregg Gonsalves, global health activist and epidemiologist at Yale, about the country's history of public health unpreparedness, and what needs to happen to be ready for the next pandemic.  

Sinica Podcast
Can China meet its ambitious emissions targets?

Sinica Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 65:53


This week on Sinica, Kaiser chats with Michael Davidson, a leading scholar on China's environmental policy, who holds joint appointments at UC San Diego as an assistant professor at the School of Global Policy and Strategy and the Jacobs School of Engineering. Michael unpacks recent announcements out of Beijing, including Xí Jìnpíng's 习近平 decision to cease all funding for coal-fired power plants outside of China, and explains the linkage between China's push for non-fossil energy and the recent power shortages that have affected 20 provinces. He also explains China's new emissions trading scheme, or ETS, and discusses what China still needs to do to meet the ambitious targets set by Xi Jinping last year: reaching peak carbon emissions by 2030, and achieving carbon neutrality by 2060. 3:26 – Xi Jinping's announced end to funding for coal-fired generators outside China at UNGA12:00 – China's recent power outages and their relationship to emissions reduction19:32 – The basics of China's new emissions trading scheme38:37 – Coercive environmentalism, command-and-control, and market instruments47:15 – Can U.S.-China competition result in a “race to the top” in emissions reduction?54:24 – GHG reduction and the Red New DealA transcript of this interview is available on SupChina.com.Recommendations:Michael: The Chair, a Netflix show starring Sandra Oh.Kaiser: Bewilderment, the new novel by the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Overstory, Richard PowersMentioned in the show: Valerie Karplus's paper on China's ETS; New York Times Magazine piece on The Many Saints of Newark, a Sopranos prequel.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Adversity Advantage
How Discomfort Helps You Improve Your Mental Health, Build Confidence & Live Happier w/ Michael Easter

The Adversity Advantage

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 62:14


Michael Easter is a leading voice on how humans can integrate modern science and evolutionary wisdom for improved health, meaning, and performance in life and at work. He travels the globe to embed himself with brilliant thinkers and people living at the extremes.    He is the author of best selling book, "The Comfort Crisis" which has been adopted by Major League Baseball teams, top-ranked NCAA D1 football programs, top-tier universities and law programs, major corporations, tier-one military units, and more. Michael's work has appeared in over 60 countries. It's been endorsed by directors of the CIA and Navy SEALs, gold medal-winning Olympians, leading physicians, Pulitzer Prize-winning authors, Buddhist and environmental leaders, and more.    While Michael has taken a variety of intense life-changing trips including a 30-day adventure to the arctic of Alaska, he states that out of all the extreme endeavors he has done, getting sober was the hardest.    Michael is a contributing editor at Men's Health, a columnist at Outside Magazine, and is a journalism professor at UNLV.    In this episode, Michael shares his sobriety journey including what led him down the path of addiction, why he got sober, and how he learned to deal with the discomforts of early recovery. We chat about why people today are scared to get uncomfortable as well as certain stressors that are actually beneficial for us that we have done away with. Michael reveals daily things that ANYONE can do to push themselves out of their comfort zone and why you don't need a sauna or a cold tub to practice discomfort. Our convo gets into the dangers of certain current parenting styles and how they can be detrimental to the health of their children. We also get into his experience surviving 30 days in the arctic and what inspired him to keep going when things got hard and more.    Connect with Michael by clicking here   Connect with Doug by clicking here   More on Earth Echo Foods/Cacao Bliss:   www.earthechofoods.com/dougbopst   Use Promo code "Doug" at checkout to receive 15% off your order    

Danger Close with Jack Carr
Craig Whitlock: The Afghanistan Papers

Danger Close with Jack Carr

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 89:36


Today's guest on the Danger Close podcast is Craig Whitlock. Craig Whitlock is a three-time Pulitzer Prize finalist who has specialized in reporting on national security issues for The Washington Post since 1998. Since 2001, he has covered the Global War on Terrorism as a foreign correspondent, Pentagon reporter, and national security specialist.  His new book, The Afghanistan Papers: A Secret History of the War, asks and answers the question every American is asking in the wake of the chaotic withdrawal from Afghanistan: after 20 years of war, thousands of lives lost with even more suffering the physical and emotional trauma of the battlefield, and trillions of dollars spent - what went wrong in Afghanistan?   To gain access to what are now known as The Afghanistan Papers, The Washington Post had to sue the federal government twice under the Freedom of Information Act to force them to release unclassified interviews with 428 generals, diplomats, aid workers and Afghan officials. These documents along with 59,000 pages of Donald Rumsfeld's memos obtained through another Freedom of Information Act lawsuit filed by the National Security Archive at George Washington University and 600 unclassified interviews with veterans of the war conducted by the Army's Combat Studies Institute and another series of interviews with Bush White House officials from the Miller Center at UVA form the foundation of research for Craig's book.   If you suspected that elected and appointed officials, diplomats, government bureaucrats and senior level military leaders have been lying to congress, the tactical level troops, reporters and the American people about the war in Afghanistan for the past 20 years, this book provides you the truth - in their own words.   You can follow Craig on Twitter @CraigMWhitlock. Presented by SIG Sauer. Gear Spotlight: The Life of General Ulysses S. Grant by J.S.C. Abott Petzl Headlamps Ten Thousand “Interval” Short

American Scandal
Theranos | Are Venture Capitalists to Blame? | 4

American Scandal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 37:37


Lindsay sits down with Charles Duhigg, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist who covers the tech industry. The two explore why venture capitalists work to create monopolies, and whether these powerful investors bear responsibility for the failures at Theranos.Support us by supporting our sponsors!Better Help - American Scandal listeners get 10% off their first month at betterhelp.com/as.Sleep Number - Special offers now available for a limited time only at sleepnumber.com/scandal.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.