Podcasts about Jamelle Bouie

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  • 99PODCASTS
  • 393EPISODES
  • 48mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 13, 2022LATEST
Jamelle Bouie

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Best podcasts about Jamelle Bouie

Latest podcast episodes about Jamelle Bouie

Doughboys
QDOBA with Jamelle Bouie

Doughboys

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 117:48


Jamelle Bouie (The New York Times, Unclear and Present Danger) joins the 'boys to discuss Disney+ and homemade pies before a review of QDOBA. Plus, a cereal mascot edition of Slop Quiz during Snack or Wack. Sources for this week's intro:  https://laist.com/news/the-big-burrito-battle-la-or-sf https://theculturetrip.com/north-america/usa/california/articles/a-brief-history-of-the-mission-burrito/ https://www.mashed.com/162854/the-untold-truth-of-qdoba/ https://www.thebalancesmb.com/history-of-chipotle-mexican-grill-3973222 https://www.qdobafranchise.com/about-qdoba See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Our Opinions Are Correct
Episode 98: Will the United States Survive Another 50 Years? We Ask Jamelle Bouie

Our Opinions Are Correct

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 45:33


The United States is growing more dysfunctional, and it's increasingly obvious that our political systems are designed to fail. Can we continue to exist as a unified country for another fifty years? Or will our future look like the Hunger Games, with an unrecognizable USA? To find out, we asked New York Times columnist Jamelle Bouie. Show notes: www.ouropinionsarecorrect.com/shownotes

Slate Daily Feed
Political: Well, Obviously It's Jan. 6

Slate Daily Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 71:19


Emily Bazelon, John Dickerson and David Plotz discuss Jan. 6, with guest Jamelle Bouie and what to make of omicron's impact on schools, and the Theranos case. Here are some notes and references from this week's show: Matt Levine for Bloomberg: “Slaying the Blood Unicorn” Wall Street Journal: Theranos and Elizabeth Holmes: History of the WSJ Investigation  Emily Bazelon for the New York Times Magazine: “I Write About the Law. But Could I Really Help Free a Prisoner?” Ruddy Roye Photography Walker Evans Anastasia Taylor-Lind Sally Mann Larry Fink Photography Edward Hopper: Night Shadows, 1921 Alexander Calder: Finny Fish Wolfgang Laib: Wax Room Caravaggio: The Conversion of Saint Paul Here's this week's chatter: Emily: Crossroads, by Jonathan Franzen; Parul Sehgal for the New Yorker: “The Case Against the Trauma Plot” John: Window-Swap.com David: Fight Club; Free Guy; City Cast Listener chatter from Cynthia Weiner: Corryn Wetzel for Smithsonian Magazine: “Ten Hilarious Winners of the Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards” For this week's Slate Plus bonus segment Emily, John, David, and Jamelle discuss the famous works of art they would most like to possess.  Tweet us your questions and chatters @SlateGabfest or email us at gabfest@slate.com. (Messages may be quoted by name unless the writer stipulates otherwise.) Podcast production by Jocelyn Frank. Research and show notes by Bridgette Dunlap. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Political Gabfest
Well, Obviously It's Jan. 6

Political Gabfest

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 71:19


Emily Bazelon, John Dickerson and David Plotz discuss Jan. 6, with guest Jamelle Bouie and what to make of omicron's impact on schools, and the Theranos case. Here are some notes and references from this week's show: Matt Levine for Bloomberg: “Slaying the Blood Unicorn” Wall Street Journal: Theranos and Elizabeth Holmes: History of the WSJ Investigation  Emily Bazelon for the New York Times Magazine: “I Write About the Law. But Could I Really Help Free a Prisoner?” Ruddy Roye Photography Walker Evans Anastasia Taylor-Lind Sally Mann Larry Fink Photography Edward Hopper: Night Shadows, 1921 Alexander Calder: Finny Fish Wolfgang Laib: Wax Room Caravaggio: The Conversion of Saint Paul Here's this week's chatter: Emily: Crossroads, by Jonathan Franzen; Parul Sehgal for the New Yorker: “The Case Against the Trauma Plot” John: Window-Swap.com David: Fight Club; Free Guy; City Cast Listener chatter from Cynthia Weiner: Corryn Wetzel for Smithsonian Magazine: “Ten Hilarious Winners of the Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards” For this week's Slate Plus bonus segment Emily, John, David, and Jamelle discuss the famous works of art they would most like to possess.  Tweet us your questions and chatters @SlateGabfest or email us at gabfest@slate.com. (Messages may be quoted by name unless the writer stipulates otherwise.) Podcast production by Jocelyn Frank. Research and show notes by Bridgette Dunlap. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Democracy in Danger
Insurrection Reflection [Special Episode]

Democracy in Danger

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 31:30


Jamelle Bouie and Nicole Hemmer return to the show this week for a special conversation looking back on the siege of the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021 — and looking forward at the prospects for democracy in the post-Trump era. Both the country's political leaders and the media, our guests say, have been reluctant to embrace a rhetoric of emergency to define the moment. And as lawmakers investigate the attack, the window is closing on enacting genuine reforms to ensure voting rights and fair elections.

The Argument
The ‘End of an Ending': Was 2021 Really The Worst?

The Argument

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 34:41


As the days left in 2021 dwindle, you may feel that annual tug to judge this calendar year as cruelly as possible. After all, it was yet another year lived in a pandemic, on a warming planet, with teetering democracies and aspirational autocrats (tune in next week for that debate). But is it actually true? Did the world really get worse in 2021?For this Very NYT Opinion New Year's Eve* episode of “The Argument,” Jane Coaston called upon podcast listeners and Opinion voices like the columnists Michelle Goldberg, Farhad Manjoo and Jamelle Bouie, the editorial board member Michelle Cottle and the musician and contributing writer Tom Morello to make the case for whether the world will enter 2022 a little bit better, or a little bit worse for wear.*close enoughMentioned in this episode:Michelle Goldberg's column “The Problem of Political Despair”Michelle Cottle's editorials on Liz Cheney, Joe Manchin, progressive frustrations with Democrats and the future elections that could shake both partiesJamelle Bouie's newsletter on “Nightmare on Elm Street” — sign up for Jamelle's newsletter hereFarhad Manjoo's columns on the wind and solar energy boom, the California drought and the carbon footprint of travelTom Morello's newsletter on his 98-year-old mom's radical compassion — sign up for Tom's newsletter here“Devil Put the Coal in the Ground,” by Steve Earle“The Argument” episode on qualified immunity and Tony Timpa's case

Take Note
Episode 139: HB Omax

Take Note

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 49:57


Ted and Adam resist the urge to switch over to a ghosts/murders podcast by digging in on the stationery we're using, debate the use of voice-typing in a group setting, and try and pay some attention to all of the things we subscribe to. And of course whaddya gots.Jamelle Bouie's cereal reviewsWho's the Most Lovable Pooches?Field Notes All TrailsField Notes Harvest editionTombow Mono Graph Lite ballpoint penNarwhal fountain penTokyo Inklings podcastSubscriptions we came up with between the two of usPrint- NY Times- NY Review of Books- The Economist- Monocle- National Geographic- Texas Monthly- N+1- The Week (for kids)- Rosetowne, fancy postcardsStreaming- The Internet- HBO Max- Apple TV- Hulu/ESPN/Disney Plus- Netflix- Amazon PrimeDigital- MaxFun- Erasable Patreon- Effectively Wild baseball podcast- Fangraphs.com- Kottke.orgEmail newsletters- George Saunders Story Club newsletter- Starship Casual by Jeff Tweedy- Lettre Recommandée by Lauren Collins- Sports Stories by Eric Nusbaum and Adam Villacin (I said they've only done this for a year, I was way off)- Take Note Prompts newsletterMany more…

You're Wrong About...
Reconstruction w. Jamelle Bouie

You're Wrong About...

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 62:08


Jamelle Bouie explains to Sarah what the Reconstruction era was, why it remains relevant today, and how this history lesson is one that could get some high school teachers into legal trouble due to passage of anti-CRT laws. Jamelle at the New York TimesJamelle's podcast Unclear and Present DangerJamelle discussing the Electoral College on YWA Jamelle talking with Sarah about the Saw series on You Are Good. Support us:Bonus Episodes on PatreonDonate on PaypalBuy cute merchWhere else to find us:Sarah's other show, You Are Good[YWA co-founder] Mike's other show, Maintenance PhaseLinks:https://www.patreon.com/yourewrongabouthttps://www.nytimes.com/column/jamelle-bouiehttps://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/unclear-and-present-danger/id1592411580https://www.buzzsprout.com/1112270/episodes/6380692https://www.podpage.com/you-are-good/sawniverse/https://www.teepublic.com/stores/youre-wrong-abouthttps://www.podpage.com/you-are-good/http://maintenancephase.com/https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/ywapodcastSupport the show (http://patreon.com/yourewrongabout)Support the show (http://patreon.com/yourewrongabout)

The Takeaway
SCOTUS To Decide the Fate of Reproductive Rights 2021-11-30

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 56:44


SCOTUS To Decide the Fate of Reproductive Rights This week, the Supreme Court will be hearing arguments for a Mississippi case that challenges legal precedent set by Roe v. Wade. If SCOTUS sides with the State of Mississippi, nearly five decades of abortion law will almost immediately be undone, and the effects would be swift and consequential as there are nearly 21 other states with "trigger laws" intended to criminalize a woman's right to choose. We heard from some listeners what Roe v. Wade means to them, and we sat down with Melissa Murray, Law Professor at NYU, faculty director of the Birnbaum Women's Leadership Network, and co-host of the legal podcast “Strict Scrutiny.” Environmental Defenders Are Being Killed, Threatened for Protecting Their Land According to a report by Global Witness, an environment and human rights watchdog, 2020 was the deadliest year on record for environment and land defenders around the world. On average more than four people a week were killed as a result of their work. And these numbers almost certainly underestimate the true scope of the violence. Much of this brutality occurred in Central and South America and more than one third of the victims are Indigenous persons. President Josefina Tunki of the Shuar Arutam People (PSHA) and Herlin Odicio, leader of the Kakataibo people in the central Peruvian Amazon joined the Takeaway to discuss.   BOOK: A Field Guide to White Supremacy A Field Guide to White Supremacy creates a roadmap for understanding the existence of extremism and white supremacy in the United States and why it continues to persist. Co-Editor Kathleen Belew and Jamelle Bouie, one of the many leading thinkers contributing to the text, join us to discuss the new book. George McGovern's Impact on Today's Political System To understand the current polarization of our political system, we need to look at political campaigns in history. In the podcast, Of The People, creator and producer Ben Bradford focuses his lens first on the 1968 Democratic National Convention. While anti-Vietnam war protestors demonstrated outside the convention, party bosses selected pro-war vice presidential candidate Hubert Humphrey, who had not won a single primary. At the same time, South Dakota freshman Senator George McGovern decided to run for president. We speak with Ben Bradford about how the trajectory of McGovern's campaign impacted our political system. Transformational Takeaway Today, we honor the lifetime and legacy of American composer and lyricist Stephen Sondheim who composed scores for groundbreaking musicals like Into the Woods, Westside Story, and Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street.  Stephen Sondheim  For transcripts, see full segment pages.   

The Takeaway
SCOTUS To Decide the Fate of Reproductive Rights 2021-11-30

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 56:44


SCOTUS To Decide the Fate of Reproductive Rights This week, the Supreme Court will be hearing arguments for a Mississippi case that challenges legal precedent set by Roe v. Wade. If SCOTUS sides with the State of Mississippi, nearly five decades of abortion law will almost immediately be undone, and the effects would be swift and consequential as there are nearly 21 other states with "trigger laws" intended to criminalize a woman's right to choose. We heard from some listeners what Roe v. Wade means to them, and we sat down with Melissa Murray, Law Professor at NYU, faculty director of the Birnbaum Women's Leadership Network, and co-host of the legal podcast “Strict Scrutiny.” Environmental Defenders Are Being Killed, Threatened for Protecting Their Land According to a report by Global Witness, an environment and human rights watchdog, 2020 was the deadliest year on record for environment and land defenders around the world. On average more than four people a week were killed as a result of their work. And these numbers almost certainly underestimate the true scope of the violence. Much of this brutality occurred in Central and South America and more than one third of the victims are Indigenous persons. President Josefina Tunki of the Shuar Arutam People (PSHA) and Herlin Odicio, leader of the Kakataibo people in the central Peruvian Amazon joined the Takeaway to discuss.   BOOK: A Field Guide to White Supremacy A Field Guide to White Supremacy creates a roadmap for understanding the existence of extremism and white supremacy in the United States and why it continues to persist. Co-Editor Kathleen Belew and Jamelle Bouie, one of the many leading thinkers contributing to the text, join us to discuss the new book. George McGovern's Impact on Today's Political System To understand the current polarization of our political system, we need to look at political campaigns in history. In the podcast, Of The People, creator and producer Ben Bradford focuses his lens first on the 1968 Democratic National Convention. While anti-Vietnam war protestors demonstrated outside the convention, party bosses selected pro-war vice presidential candidate Hubert Humphrey, who had not won a single primary. At the same time, South Dakota freshman Senator George McGovern decided to run for president. We speak with Ben Bradford about how the trajectory of McGovern's campaign impacted our political system. Transformational Takeaway Today, we honor the lifetime and legacy of American composer and lyricist Stephen Sondheim who composed scores for groundbreaking musicals like Into the Woods, Westside Story, and Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street.  Stephen Sondheim  For transcripts, see full segment pages.   

Slate Daily Feed
Culture Gabfest: Hello, It's Me Again

Slate Daily Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 63:36


This week, Steve and Dana are joined by New York Times columnist and Slate graduate Jamelle Bouie. First, the panel discusses the Richard Williams—father of tennis phenoms Venus and Serena Williams—biopic, starring Will Smith, King Richard. Next, the panel is joined by Slate music critic Carl Wilson as they break down Adele's latest emotional rollercoaster, 30. Finally, the panel dives into a new comic book, The Department of Truth. In Slate Plus, the panel discusses their Thanksgiving culinary festivities. Email us at culturefest@slate.com. Endorsements Dana: An Adele related endorsement, a clip that went viral from the British TV series An Audience With... on ITV, where famous people perform for an audience of other famous people who then ask the performer questions. In this clip, Adele reunited with her former English Teacher, Ms. McDonald. Jamelle: The Apple TV+ adaptation of Isaac Asimov's Foundation trilogy. Steve: The all-time greatest/worst endorsement was in 2014 when John Swansburg endorsed the TV show Cheers. To do John Swansburg one better, Steve endorses The Beatles, more specifically the slant way to get at their greatness, an infamous bootleg that's been circulating for decades, The Esher Demos. Also: Rachel Cusk, a genius novelist. Podcast production by Cameron Drews. Production assistance by Nadira Goffe. Outro music is "Did I Make You Wait" by Staffan Carlen. Slate Plus members get ad-free podcasts, a bonus segment in each episode of the Culture Gabfest, full access to Slate's journalism on Slate.com, and more. Sign up now at slate.com/cultureplus. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Culture Gabfest
Culture Gabfest: Hello, It's Me Again

Culture Gabfest

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 63:36


This week, Steve and Dana are joined by New York Times columnist and Slate graduate Jamelle Bouie. First, the panel discusses the Richard Williams—father of tennis phenoms Venus and Serena Williams—biopic, starring Will Smith, King Richard. Next, the panel is joined by Slate music critic Carl Wilson as they break down Adele's latest emotional rollercoaster, 30. Finally, the panel dives into a new comic book, The Department of Truth. In Slate Plus, the panel discusses their Thanksgiving culinary festivities. Email us at culturefest@slate.com. Endorsements Dana: An Adele related endorsement, a clip that went viral from the British TV series An Audience With... on ITV, where famous people perform for an audience of other famous people who then ask the performer questions. In this clip, Adele reunited with her former English Teacher, Ms. McDonald. Jamelle: The Apple TV+ adaptation of Isaac Asimov's Foundation trilogy. Steve: The all-time greatest/worst endorsement was in 2014 when John Swansburg endorsed the TV show Cheers. To do John Swansburg one better, Steve endorses The Beatles, more specifically the slant way to get at their greatness, an infamous bootleg that's been circulating for decades, The Esher Demos. Also: Rachel Cusk, a genius novelist. Podcast production by Cameron Drews. Production assistance by Nadira Goffe. Outro music is "Did I Make You Wait" by Staffan Carlen. Slate Plus members get ad-free podcasts, a bonus segment in each episode of the Culture Gabfest, full access to Slate's journalism on Slate.com, and more. Sign up now at slate.com/cultureplus. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Culture Gabfest
Hello, It's Me Again

Culture Gabfest

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 63:36


This week, Steve and Dana are joined by New York Times columnist and Slate graduate Jamelle Bouie. First, the panel discusses the Richard Williams—father of tennis phenoms Venus and Serena Williams—biopic, starring Will Smith, King Richard. Next, the panel is joined by Slate music critic Carl Wilson as they break down Adele's latest emotional rollercoaster, 30. Finally, the panel dives into a new comic book, The Department of Truth. In Slate Plus, the panel discusses their Thanksgiving culinary festivities. Email us at culturefest@slate.com. Endorsements Dana: An Adele related endorsement, a clip that went viral from the British TV series An Audience With... on ITV, where famous people perform for an audience of other famous people who then ask the performer questions. In this clip, Adele reunited with her former English Teacher, Ms. McDonald. Jamelle: The Apple TV+ adaptation of Isaac Asimov's Foundation trilogy. Steve: The all-time greatest/worst endorsement was in 2014 when John Swansburg endorsed the TV show Cheers. To do John Swansburg one better, Steve endorses The Beatles, more specifically the slant way to get at their greatness, an infamous bootleg that's been circulating for decades, The Esher Demos. Also: Rachel Cusk, a genius novelist. Podcast production by Cameron Drews. Production assistance by Nadira Goffe. Outro music is "Did I Make You Wait" by Staffan Carlen. Slate Plus members get ad-free podcasts, a bonus segment in each episode of the Culture Gabfest, full access to Slate's journalism on Slate.com, and more. Sign up now at slate.com/cultureplus. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2722 - What Jordan Peterson Gets Wrong About "Structural Racism" w/ Jamelle Bouie, Jamie Peck & Jorge Rocha

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 96:20


Sam hosts Jamelle Bouie, opinion columnist at the New York Times and co-host of the Unclear and Present Danger podcast, to wrap up the week in news! And in the second half, Sam is joined by Jamie Peck, in her triumphant return to MR (!) and Jorge Rocha, co-hosts of the Everybody Loves Communism podcast! Jamelle starts off with a dive into his new 90's political-military thrillers podcast, before he and Sam get into the state of the Build Back Better bill, as it passes a House vote after a late night, in which Kevin McCarthy showed us why talking filibusters, while they force us to hear from some of the worst people, is drastically better than invoking cloture. Next, they get into the content of the bill, walking through the expansion in SALT deductions as an annoyingly large part of the $1.75 trillion package, as well as looking at the state of the Manchin and Sinema votes, and whether Democratic leadership successfully got rid of everything they didn't want, and included everything they did want. They also discuss the impact the passing of the bill is already having on the approval of the Democrats (other than Biden), and what this means heading into a midterm in which the GOP, simply by nature of re-gerrymandering borders, have picked up at least five very necessary seats. They wrap up the interview by touching on Bouie's recent piece for the NYT on structural racism, its relationship to capitalism's reliance on inequality, and what it would mean for remnants of racism in a truly restructured and redistributed society. Then, Jamie and Jorge hop on to discuss a variety of important audio projects they're working on, before getting into the state of the US's Democratic Socialist movement, and why, in the wake of the incredible leftist and abolitionist organizing that we saw with the George Floyd uprisings and COVID pandemic, the DSA has an essential task of taking a look outside of explicitly electoral organizing. Sam also covers John Kennedy misunderstanding comrade as a term of endearment in his fear-mongering during Saule Omarova's confirmation hearing. And in the Fun Half: After breaking down the announcement of the Rittenhouse decision, and the hypocrisy of the right screaming about being silenced when called racist, but being fully behind the murder of protesters. Next, Sam and the MR crew cover Kevin McCarthy's campaign to keep his house leadership position, centering the important issues of God and fentanyl in his country, Jordan Pederson reminds us that if you don't acknowledge structures, then no problem can structural, and Ben Shapiro says propaganda can't be animated. A Denver journalist takes on the incredibly low standards for Lauren Boebert, plus, your IMs!   Purchase tickets for the live show in Boston on January 16th HERE! https://thewilbur.com/artist/majority-report/ Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com Subscribe to the AMQuickie newsletter here. Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ (Merch issues and concerns can be addressed here: majorityreportstore@mirrorimage.com) You can now watch the livestream on Twitch Check out today's sponsors: sunsetlakecbd is a majority employee owned farm in Vermont, producing 100% pesticide free CBD products. Great company, great product and fans of the show! Use code Leftisbest and get 20% off at http://www.sunsetlakecbd.com. And now Sunset Lake CBD has donated $2500 to the Nurses strike fund, and we encourage MR listeners to help if they can. Here's a link to where folks can donate: https://forms.massnurses.org/we-stand-with-st-vincents-nurses/ Tushy: Hello Tushy cleans your butt with a precise stream of fresh water for just $79. It attaches to your existing toilet – requires NO electricity or additional plumbing – and cuts toilet paper use by 80% – so the Hello Tushy bidet pays for itself in a few months. Go to hellotushy.com/majority to get 10% off today! Support the St. Vincent Nurses today as they continue to strike for a fair contract! https://action.massnurses.org/we-stand-with-st-vincents-nurses/ Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Subscribe to AM Quickie writer Corey Pein's podcast News from Nowhere, at https://www.patreon.com/newsfromnowhere Check out Matt's show, Left Reckoning, on Youtube, and subscribe on Patreon! Subscribe to Matt's other show Literary Hangover on Patreon! Check out The Letterhack's upcoming Kickstarter project for his new graphic novel! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/milagrocomic/milagro-heroe-de-las-calles Check out Matt Binder's YouTube channel! Subscribe to Brandon's show The Discourse on Patreon! Check out The Nomiki Show live at 3 pm ET on YouTube at patreon.com/thenomikishow Check out Jamie's podcast, The Antifada, at patreon.com/theantifada, on iTunes, or at twitch.tv/theantifada (streaming every Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday at 7pm ET!) Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn @BradKAlsop Follow Jamie's record label House of Feelings here (and check out her DJ set tonight at Wonderville in Brooklyn here!) Follow North Brooklyn DSA here!  

Culture Gabfest
Culture Gabfest: Eternals Return of the Same

Culture Gabfest

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 63:07


This week, Steve and Dana are joined by New York Times columnist and Slate graduate Jamelle Bouie. First, the panel discusses Marvel's most recent big picture, Eternals—which Dana reviewed for Slate. Next, the panel gives an update on their feelings about HBO's hit TV show Succession, which is currently in its third season. Finally, the panel explores the controversy involving Critical Race Theory. In Slate Plus, the panel discusses Jamelle's new podcast Unclear and Present Danger. Email us at culturefest@slate.com. Endorsements Dana: Something small, but in hopes to find the entire thing: this 2 minute clip of Welsh actor Michael Sheen performing a segment of Welsh poet Dylan Thomas's drama Under Milk Wood. Jamelle: Norman Jewison's classic 1987 film Moonstruck, starring Cher and Nicolas Cage, which is currently in the Criterion Collection. Steve: A slightly odd endorsement of a book review. Peter Salmon's article for Prospect Magazine, titled “Boo to the Boo-Hurrahs: how four Oxford women transformed philosophy,” is a review of Benjamin J. B. Lipscomb's novel The Women Are Up to Something: How Elizabeth Anscombe, Philippa Foot, Mary Midgley, and Iris Murdoch Revolutionized Ethics. The book and review discuss the female-led movement to take on the male consensus in philosophy during the 1930s and ‘40s which saw the world as value free. Podcast production by Cameron Drews. Production assistance by Nadira Goffe. Outro music is “Self Made Woman” by Katharine Appleton. Slate Plus members get ad-free podcasts, a bonus segment in each episode of the Culture Gabfest, full access to Slate's journalism on Slate.com, and more. Sign up now at slate.com/cultureplus. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Culture Gabfest
Eternals Return of the Same

Culture Gabfest

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 63:07


This week, Steve and Dana are joined by New York Times columnist and Slate graduate Jamelle Bouie. First, the panel discusses Marvel's most recent big picture, Eternals—which Dana reviewed for Slate. Next, the panel gives an update on their feelings about HBO's hit TV show Succession, which is currently in its third season. Finally, the panel explores the controversy involving Critical Race Theory. In Slate Plus, the panel discusses Jamelle's new podcast Unclear and Present Danger. Email us at culturefest@slate.com. Endorsements Dana: Something small, but in hopes to find the entire thing: this 2 minute clip of Welsh actor Michael Sheen performing a segment of Welsh poet Dylan Thomas's drama Under Milk Wood. Jamelle: Norman Jewison's classic 1987 film Moonstruck, starring Cher and Nicolas Cage, which is currently in the Criterion Collection. Steve: A slightly odd endorsement of a book review. Peter Salmon's article for Prospect Magazine, titled “Boo to the Boo-Hurrahs: how four Oxford women transformed philosophy,” is a review of Benjamin J. B. Lipscomb's novel The Women Are Up to Something: How Elizabeth Anscombe, Philippa Foot, Mary Midgley, and Iris Murdoch Revolutionized Ethics. The book and review discuss the female-led movement to take on the male consensus in philosophy during the 1930s and ‘40s which saw the world as value free. Podcast production by Cameron Drews. Production assistance by Nadira Goffe. Outro music is “Self Made Woman” by Katharine Appleton. Slate Plus members get ad-free podcasts, a bonus segment in each episode of the Culture Gabfest, full access to Slate's journalism on Slate.com, and more. Sign up now at slate.com/cultureplus. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Slate Daily Feed
Culture Gabfest: Eternals Return of the Same

Slate Daily Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 63:07


This week, Steve and Dana are joined by New York Times columnist and Slate graduate Jamelle Bouie. First, the panel discusses Marvel's most recent big picture, Eternals—which Dana reviewed for Slate. Next, the panel gives an update on their feelings about HBO's hit TV show Succession, which is currently in its third season. Finally, the panel explores the controversy involving Critical Race Theory. In Slate Plus, the panel discusses Jamelle's new podcast Unclear and Present Danger. Email us at culturefest@slate.com. Endorsements Dana: Something small, but in hopes to find the entire thing: this 2 minute clip of Welsh actor Michael Sheen performing a segment of Welsh poet Dylan Thomas's drama Under Milk Wood. Jamelle: Norman Jewison's classic 1987 film Moonstruck, starring Cher and Nicolas Cage, which is currently in the Criterion Collection. Steve: A slightly odd endorsement of a book review. Peter Salmon's article for Prospect Magazine, titled “Boo to the Boo-Hurrahs: how four Oxford women transformed philosophy,” is a review of Benjamin J. B. Lipscomb's novel The Women Are Up to Something: How Elizabeth Anscombe, Philippa Foot, Mary Midgley, and Iris Murdoch Revolutionized Ethics. The book and review discuss the female-led movement to take on the male consensus in philosophy during the 1930s and ‘40s which saw the world as value free. Podcast production by Cameron Drews. Production assistance by Nadira Goffe. Outro music is “Self Made Woman” by Katharine Appleton. Slate Plus members get ad-free podcasts, a bonus segment in each episode of the Culture Gabfest, full access to Slate's journalism on Slate.com, and more. Sign up now at slate.com/cultureplus. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Past Present
Episode 300: The NYC Marathon and the History of Long-Distance Racing

Past Present

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 42:42


In this episode, Neil, Natalia, and Niki discuss the return of the New York City Marathon and the history of long-distance racing. Support Past Present on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/pastpresentpodcast Here are some links and references mentioned during this week's show:  The fiftieth New York City Marathon was canceled in 2020 due to the coronavirus, but the race has returned this year. Natalia referred to historian Dylan Gottlieb's Public Seminar article about the origins of the race and to runner Kathrine Switzer's memoir, Marathon Woman.   In our regular closing feature, What's Making History: Natalia shared the latest episode of Vox Media's Nice Try podcast, on which she contributes to a discussion of the history of the weight as a fitness accessory. Neil discussed the 2006 Chicago Tribune article, “Sushi and Rev. Moon.” Niki recommended a new podcast, Unclear and Present Danger, from Jamelle Bouie and John Ganz.

Brian Lehrer: A Daily Politics Podcast
Jamelle Bouie On Moral Panic Before And After The Election

Brian Lehrer: A Daily Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 20:16


Race and racism were key factors in this past week's elections, which centered largely around the debate over teaching kids about the history of racism in America. On Today's Show:Jamelle Bouie, New York Times opinion columnist and CBS News analyst, reflects on electoral strategy following state and local Republican wins including what he calls "moral panic" over race in education as well as the role of progressive messaging for future Democrat campaigns.

The Brian Lehrer Show
Friday Morning Politics with Jamelle Bouie

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 21:54


Jamelle Bouie, New York Times opinion columnist and CBS News analyst, reflects on electoral strategy following state and local Republican wins including what he calls "moral panic" over race in education as well as the role of progressive messaging for future Democrat campaigns. 

High and Mighty
335: Cereal (w/ Jamelle Bouie)

High and Mighty

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 61:12


Cereal enthusiast Jamelle Bouie joins gabrus to talk about the food that can be breakfast or a midnight snack. Check out gabrus' other podcast, Action Boyz. Advertise on High & Mighty via Gumball.fm. Shout out to Mack Weldon for sponsoring this episode of High & Mighty. For 20% off your first order, visit mackweldon.com/high and enter promo code: high. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Karen Hunter Show
Kathleen Belew - Author of A Field Guide to White Supremacy

Karen Hunter Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 32:02


Kathleen Belew is a historian of the present and leading expert on the white power movement, vigilante violence, and political extremism. Her first book, Bring the War Home, has been discussed on Fresh Air, Newshour, Frontline, and in the New York Times.The book brings together nineteen essays from writers and researchers like Adam Goodman, Judith Butler, Rebecca Solnit, Keeyanga-Yamahtta Taylor, Jamelle Bouie and others to excavate the history and current manifestations of white supremacy in the US. This book is meant as a tool for journalists, activists, and citizens who want to understand and oppose the 400-year history of white supremacy, which started with slavery and has led to Jim Crow, thousands of hate crimes, police violence, January 6th and countless other horrors. If we don't fully understand the contours of white supremacy, we have no chance of stopping it.  

Pop & Locke
The Thing

Pop & Locke

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 57:51


Jamelle Bouie and Julian Sanchez join the podcast to discuss John Carpenter's 1982 sci-fi cult classic, The Thing, a film that made our skin crawl with paranoia. Based on the 1938 John W. Campbell Jr. novella Who Goes There?, The Thing, tells the story of a group of American scientists in Antarctica who encounter the eponymous "Thing", a parasitic extraterrestrial life-form that assimilates, then imitates other organisms, including humans. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

In House Warrior
The Unknown World of the Confederate Constitution With Dr. Marshall DeRosa at Florida Atlantic University, With Host Richard Levick of LEVICK

In House Warrior

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 35:29


The Unknown World of the Confederate Constitution: Dr. Marshall DeRosa, professor of Constitutional Law and Judicial Process at Florida Atlantic University, speaks with host Richard Levick of LEVICK about the largely unknown world of the Confederate Constitution. The subject of a recent piece by New York Times columnist Jamelle Bouie, Dr. DeRosa shocks us with the things we get wrong about this little studied document, the unknown or forgotten parts of Northern hypocrisy, the fears of Southern emergence and the efficiency of the executive in the Confederate Constitution.

The Ezra Klein Show
What Keeping American Democracy Alive Looks Like

The Ezra Klein Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 53:06


In the wake of the “Stop the Steal” campaign, the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol and the wave of voter suppression bills making their way through Republican legislatures across the country, the struggle for American democracy feels, for many, visceral and even existential. But for Martha S. Jones, a legal and cultural historian at Johns Hopkins University, the moment we find ourselves in is anything but an aberration.“I'm not someone who tells stories about a Whiggish arc in which we are always getting better, doing better, improving upon,” Jones says. “Much of American history is a story about contest, about conflict, about disagreement over fundamental ideas and fundamental precepts, fundamental principles, like citizenship and voting rights.”Jones has spent her career documenting the contestation over American democracy. Her 2018 book, “Birthright Citizens,” tells the story of how Black Americans in the 19th century fought to address the Constitution's silence on the question of who counts as a citizen, ultimately securing the establishment of birthright citizenship through the 14th Amendment. And her 2020 book “Vanguard: How Black Women Broke Barriers, Won the Vote, and Insisted on Equality for All” is a sweeping account of Black women's 200-year fight for equal suffrage.This conversation is about how the political struggles waged by marginalized groups have forged American democracy as we know it — and the virtues, habits and practices of democratic citizenship we can glean from those struggles. But it also explores the need to reimagine America's true “founders,” how 19th- and 20th-century Black women were modeling intersectionality long before it became a buzzword, what current discussion around “Black women voters” gets wrong, how worried we should be about current threats to American democracy and much more.Mentioned:A Voice from the South by Anna J. CooperBook recommendations:All That She Carried by Tiya MilesThe Love Songs of W.E.B. Du Bois by Honorée Fanonne JeffersThick by Tressie McMillan CottomThis episode is guest-hosted by Jamelle Bouie, a New York Times columnist whose work focuses on the intersection of politics and history. Before joining The Times in 2019, he was the chief political correspondent for Slate magazine. You can read his work here and follow him on Twitter @jbouie. (Learn more about the other guest hosts during Ezra's parental leave here.)You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of “The Ezra Klein Show” at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at ezrakleinshow@nytimes.com.“The Ezra Klein Show” is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Mary Marge Locker and Michelle Harris; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld, audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Special thanks to Kristin Lin.

Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI Radio in New York
Chude Pam Allen & Steven Hiatt on Reluctant Reformers: Racism & Social Reform Movements in the US

Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI Radio in New York

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 54:54


(10/19/21) Chude Pam Allen and Robert Allen's new book Reluctant Reformers: Racism and Social Reform Movements in the United States, an updated edition of the latter's iconic 1974 title, explores the racism that drove the US political system from the early 19th century to the end of World War II. In addition to a forward by New York Times columnist Jamelle Bouie, this new printing includes a postscript describing the Black freedom movement of the 1960s and the central role it has played in the development of today's radical social justice movements. Join us for a conversation with Chude Pam Allen and the book's editor Steven Hiatt in this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI.

The Ezra Klein Show
The Story of America's Founding You Weren't Taught in School

The Ezra Klein Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 56:53


There are few periods of U.S. history that are as vigorously debated, as emotionally and civically charged as the American Revolution. And for good reason: How Americans interpret that period — its heroes, its villains, its legacy — shapes how we understand our social foundations, our national identity, our shared political project.Woody Holton is a historian at the University of South Carolina, a leading scholar of America's founding and the author of numerous books on the period, including, most recently, “Liberty Is Sweet: The Hidden History of the American Revolution.”Holton's work presents a fundamental challenge to the version of the American Revolution that most of us were taught in grade school. In his telling, America's “founding fathers” were far less central to the country's founding than we imagine. Class conflict was just as important a cause of the Revolution as aspirational ideals, if not more. And the way Holton sees things, the American Constitution was a fundamentally capitalist document designed to rein in democracy, not expand it.But Holton's work shouldn't be understood solely as a revisionist account of a particular era in history. It also provides a unique lens for rethinking some of the defining features of our present — the disconnect between the kinds of policies that democratic majorities support and what our systems of government enable, the fervor to which we cling to national heroes like George Washington and Thomas Jefferson, the enduring challenges of governing a fractious, deeply divided society, the complex relationship between material interests and ideology and much more.Mentioned“Rhetoric and Reality in the American Revolution” by Gordon S. WoodThe Framers' Coup by Michael J. KlarmanUnruly Americans and the Origins of the Constitution by Woody HoltonBook recommendationsA Midwife's Tale by Laurel Thatcher UlrichThe Negro in the American Revolution by Benjamin QuarlesRebecca's Revival by Jon F. SensbachThis episode is guest-hosted by Jamelle Bouie, a New York Times columnist whose work focuses on the intersection of politics and history. Before joining The Times in 2019, he was the chief political correspondent for Slate magazine. You can read his work here and follow him on Twitter @jbouie. (Learn more about the other guest hosts during Ezra's parental leave here.)You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of "The Ezra Klein Show" at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at ezrakleinshow@nytimes.com.“The Ezra Klein Show” is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Mary Marge Locker and Michelle Harris; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld, audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Special thanks to Kristin Lin.

The Ezra Klein Show
A Crypto Optimist and a Crypto Skeptic Walk Into a Podcast Studio

The Ezra Klein Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 67:51


I've been wanting to explore the world crypto and blockchain technologies could build on the show for a while. In certain ways, I'm an optimist: I think these technologies matter, and many of them will work. In other ways, I'm a skeptic: I'm unconvinced that their wide adoption will lead to the glittering, decentralized digital world that many crypto proponents imagine.So this is a crypto conversation that goes way beyond Bitcoin. It's about what will happen when we build the foundation for truly digital economies, with digital money, digital goods, and digital ownership. It's about technologies that could unlock a renaissance of creativity or an orgy of commercialization. Or both. And it's about whether we are mistaking problems of power for problems of technology, and what might happen if we fix the technologies without changing the power structures. As everyone in this debate agrees, we made a lot of mistakes with the internet we have. How do we avoid them on the internet we're building?My guest today is Katie Haun. Haun is a general partner at the venture firm A16Z, also known as Andreesen-Horowitz. She's a former Supreme Court clerk and federal prosecutor who has focused on cybercrime and prosecuted corrupt agents involved in Silk Road, the first big darknet market. So she saw the dark side of crypto first, and now, at A16Z, she's a leader of one of the biggest crypto venture funds there is. So this is a conversation about the world crypto might create, conducted with as little technical jargon as we could manage. Enjoy!I also want to note that this will be the last episode I host until January. I'm going on paternity leave for the next few months, and we're going to have an absolutely all-star lineup of guest hosts while I'm gone. That lineup will include Jamelle Bouie, Ross Douthat, Tressie McMillan Cottom, Nicole Hemmer, Heather McGhee, David Brooks, Julia Galef, and the one, the only, Rogé Karma. I'm excited to be a listener and trust me, you should be too. One last bit of housekeeping: The Times's Opinion section is looking for an editorial assistant to work with Michelle Goldberg and me on fact-checking our columns and doing some editorial research and clerical work. This is a great, entry-level role at The Times. It needs a year of journalism experience, and on my end, I'm particularly looking for candidates with a demonstrable obsession with policy analysis and social science research. You can find more information at http://nytco.com/careers.Mentioned:“NFTs and a Thousand True Fans” by Chris DixonBook recommendations:The Company by John Micklethwait and Adrian WooldridgeMy Life in Full by Indra NooyiPalace Walk by Naguib MahfouzYou can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of "The Ezra Klein Show" at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at ezrakleinshow@nytimes.com.“The Ezra Klein Show” is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld, audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Special thanks to Kristin Lin.

The Argument
Are You Contributing to America's Affordable Housing Crisis?

The Argument

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 36:13


Rent is soaring, but close to two-thirds of renters remain on leases because of financial reasons. In 2019, nearly 70 percent of millennials surveyed said that they could not afford to buy a home on account of rising prices, and the number of people in the United States without shelter has increased by about 30 percent in the past five years. We're in a housing crisis.There's a ton of debate on how we should go about solving these issues, particularly in dense cities. People who are for building more housing units in cities argue that zoning restrictions should be reduced, which would increase the number of homes, ideally allowing supply to keep up with demand. On the other hand, some residents support strict land use regulations that prevent further development in their areas.Today, Matt Yglesias, a D.C. resident, and Joel Kotkin, who lives in California, join host Jane Coaston to talk about the pros and cons of building more housing and single-family zoning and why moving to the suburbs isn't the only answer. Also, the Times columnist Jamelle Bouie tells Jane about zoning policy in his city, Charlottesville, Va.Mentioned in this episode:“Building Housing — Lots of It — Will Lay the Foundation for a New Future” by Matt Yglesias on Vox“In Defense of Houses” by Joel Kotkin, published in City Journal“How Blue Cities Became So Outrageously Unaffordable,” an interview with the Vox policy reporter Jerusalem Demsas on “The Ezra Klein Show”

Slate Daily Feed
Political: Get Those Huddled Masses Out of My Yard

Slate Daily Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 71:57


John, Emily and David discuss the fate of the Build Back Better agenda; vaccine mandates working; and journalist Caitlin Dickerson helps explain the recent U.S. immigration actions and to identify some fresh strategies for change. Here are some notes and references from this week's show: Jamelle Bouie for The New York Times: “It's All or Nothing for These Democrats, Even if That Means Biden Fails” Josh Marshall for Talking Points Memo: “Kill the Bill” Caitlin Dickerson for The Atlantic: “Democrats' Free Pass on Immigration Is Over” Caitlin Dickerson for The Atlantic: “America's Immigration Amnesia” Here's this week's chatter: John: Glamourdaze YouTube video: “A Walk in the Park - c.1900 | Bois de Boulogne Paris - AI Enhanced; Peril, by Bob Woodward and Robert Costa Emily: CNN: “Florida Man Fights Alligator With Trash Can”; Jonathan Mann's folk song celebrating the Florida Man Who Caught An Alligator In A Trash Can   David: The Cult of We: WeWork, Adam Neumann, and the Great Startup Delusion, by Eliot Brown and Maureen Farrell  Listener chatter from Matthew Ringel: Veritasium YouTube video, about the history of potash: “These Pools Help Support Half The People On Earth”  For this week's Slate Plus bonus segment John, David, and Emily talk about earlier times in history they would have liked to have been podcasting together. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Danny Lavery's show Big Mood, Little Mood and you'll be supporting the Political Gabfest. Sign up now at slate.com/gabfestplus to help support our work. Tweet us your questions and chatters @SlateGabfest or email us at gabfest@slate.com. (Messages may be quoted by name unless the writer stipulates otherwise.) Podcast production by Jocelyn Frank. Research and show notes by Bridgette Dunlap. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Political Gabfest
Get Those Huddled Masses Out of My Yard

Political Gabfest

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 71:57


John, Emily and David discuss the fate of the Build Back Better agenda; vaccine mandates working; and journalist Caitlin Dickerson helps explain the recent U.S. immigration actions and to identify some fresh strategies for change. Here are some notes and references from this week's show: Jamelle Bouie for The New York Times: “It's All or Nothing for These Democrats, Even if That Means Biden Fails” Josh Marshall for Talking Points Memo: “Kill the Bill” Caitlin Dickerson for The Atlantic: “Democrats' Free Pass on Immigration Is Over” Caitlin Dickerson for The Atlantic: “America's Immigration Amnesia” Here's this week's chatter: John: Glamourdaze YouTube video: “A Walk in the Park - c.1900 | Bois de Boulogne Paris - AI Enhanced; Peril, by Bob Woodward and Robert Costa Emily: CNN: “Florida Man Fights Alligator With Trash Can”; Jonathan Mann's folk song celebrating the Florida Man Who Caught An Alligator In A Trash Can   David: The Cult of We: WeWork, Adam Neumann, and the Great Startup Delusion, by Eliot Brown and Maureen Farrell  Listener chatter from Matthew Ringel: Veritasium YouTube video, about the history of potash: “These Pools Help Support Half The People On Earth”  For this week's Slate Plus bonus segment John, David, and Emily talk about earlier times in history they would have liked to have been podcasting together. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Danny Lavery's show Big Mood, Little Mood and you'll be supporting the Political Gabfest. Sign up now at slate.com/gabfestplus to help support our work. Tweet us your questions and chatters @SlateGabfest or email us at gabfest@slate.com. (Messages may be quoted by name unless the writer stipulates otherwise.) Podcast production by Jocelyn Frank. Research and show notes by Bridgette Dunlap. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Flop House
Ep. #351 - Andy the Talking Hedgehog, with Jamelle Bouie

The Flop House

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 105:20


America's foremost hedgehog expert, Jamelle Bouie, returns to usher in Smalltember (vember) 2021, with our discussion of the make-work project for Dean Cain and Tara Reid, Andy the Talking Hedgehog.LIVE SHOW ALERT! — We'll be doing another streaming live show, delivered directly to your computers or whatever you use for these things! Tune in on to watch us discuss the “classic” 1993 flop Super Mario Bros., do a few presentations, take a few questions via Twitter, and other assorted nonsense! Tickets are a mere $10! Hooray!Wikipedia entry for Andy the Talking HedgehogMovies recommended in this episode:The Night HouseSuperhostRise of the Planet of the ApesThe Last Seduction

Slate Daily Feed
Political: 20 Years Since 9/11

Slate Daily Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 69:37


Emily, John and David reflect on 9/11; the fight for the infrastructure agenda, and declining college enrollment among men. Here are some notes and references from this week's show: Garrett M. Graff for the Atlantic: “After 9/11, the U.S. Got Almost Everything Wrong” The Only Plane in the Sky: An Oral History of 9/11, by Garrett M. Graff Ady Barkan for The New York Times: “Home Care Keeps Me Alive. It Should Be Fully Funded.” Jamelle Bouie for The New York Times: “$1 Trillion Isn't as Much as It Sounds” Douglas Belkin for The Wall Street Journal: “A Generation of American Men Give Up on College: ‘I Just Feel Lost'” Emily Bazelon for The New York Times: “How Will America Recover From a Broken School Year?” Kevin Carey for The New York Times: “Men Fall Behind in College Enrollment. Women Still Play Catch-Up at Work.” The Case Against Education: Why the Education System Is a Waste of Time and Money, by Bryan Caplan Here's this week's chatter: John: Lee Drutman for The New York Times: “Quiz: If America Had Six Parties, Which Would You Belong To?”; John Dickerson for The Atlantic: “Every Dog Is a Rescue Dog” Emily: Ben Rothenberg for The New York Times: “At U.S. Open, Teen Spirit Rules and It's Contagious” David: Wilson Wong for NBC News: “Original 'Blue's Clues' Host Steve Tells Millennials He Never Forgot Them. He Just Went To College.” Listener chatter from Michael Sagmeister: Philip Oltermann for The Guardian: “‘Scholz Will Sort It' – The Catchphrase Winning the Hearts of German Voters” For this week's Slate Plus bonus segment John, David, and Emily discuss television's most indelible characters in the wake of Michael K. Williams' death. If you enjoy the show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Danny Lavery's show Big Mood, Little Mood and you'll be supporting the Political Gabfest. Sign up now at slate.com/gabfestplus to help support our work. Tweet us your questions and chatters @SlateGabfest or email us at gabfest@slate.com. (Messages may be quoted by name unless the writer stipulates otherwise.) Podcast production by Jocelyn Frank. Research and show notes by Bridgette Dunlap. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Political Gabfest
20 Years Since 9/11

Political Gabfest

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 69:37


Emily, John and David reflect on 9/11; the fight for the infrastructure agenda, and declining college enrollment among men. Here are some notes and references from this week's show: Garrett M. Graff for the Atlantic: “After 9/11, the U.S. Got Almost Everything Wrong” The Only Plane in the Sky: An Oral History of 9/11, by Garrett M. Graff Ady Barkan for The New York Times: “Home Care Keeps Me Alive. It Should Be Fully Funded.” Jamelle Bouie for The New York Times: “$1 Trillion Isn't as Much as It Sounds” Douglas Belkin for The Wall Street Journal: “A Generation of American Men Give Up on College: ‘I Just Feel Lost'” Emily Bazelon for The New York Times: “How Will America Recover From a Broken School Year?” Kevin Carey for The New York Times: “Men Fall Behind in College Enrollment. Women Still Play Catch-Up at Work.” The Case Against Education: Why the Education System Is a Waste of Time and Money, by Bryan Caplan Here's this week's chatter: John: Lee Drutman for The New York Times: “Quiz: If America Had Six Parties, Which Would You Belong To?”; John Dickerson for The Atlantic: “Every Dog Is a Rescue Dog” Emily: Ben Rothenberg for The New York Times: “At U.S. Open, Teen Spirit Rules and It's Contagious” David: Wilson Wong for NBC News: “Original 'Blue's Clues' Host Steve Tells Millennials He Never Forgot Them. He Just Went To College.” Listener chatter from Michael Sagmeister: Philip Oltermann for The Guardian: “‘Scholz Will Sort It' – The Catchphrase Winning the Hearts of German Voters” For this week's Slate Plus bonus segment John, David, and Emily discuss television's most indelible characters in the wake of Michael K. Williams' death. If you enjoy the show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Danny Lavery's show Big Mood, Little Mood and you'll be supporting the Political Gabfest. Sign up now at slate.com/gabfestplus to help support our work. Tweet us your questions and chatters @SlateGabfest or email us at gabfest@slate.com. (Messages may be quoted by name unless the writer stipulates otherwise.) Podcast production by Jocelyn Frank. Research and show notes by Bridgette Dunlap. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Charlottesville Community Engagement
September 2, 2021: Charlottesville PC reviews third version of Future Land Use Map

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 28:48


The name of the initiative is Cville Plans Together, but an attempt to update the Charlottesville Comprehensive Plan to increase the number of affordable places to live at times seems like it could tear the community apart. Here’s one of over 50 community members who spoke this week during a five-hour work session on the topic.“I wish this whole thing had been approached in a different way because it’s been so divisive and I’m sad to hear citizens of our community so upset with one another and I also wish we’d been able to talk in person,” said Mary Whittle. On this installment of Charlottesville Community Engagement, a summary and recap of the review and preparation of an aspirational map intended to guide future development. I’m your host and guide, Sean Tubbs. Most people in the community are unfamiliar with much of the jargon, but I’ve spent a good chunk of my career trying to explain the terms required to explain how the pieces fit together. Societies are complex organisms that have no instruction manual, but the goal of this newsletter and podcast, each and every time, is to help you better understand what’s happening. Thanks for listening.In today’s first Substack-fueled shout-out, Code for Charlottesville is seeking volunteers with tech, data, design, and research skills to work on community service projects. Founded in September 2019, Code for Charlottesville has worked on projects with the Legal Aid Justice Center, the Charlottesville Fire Department, and the Charlottesville Office of Human Rights. Visit codeforcville.org to learn about those projects, and to sign up for a new volunteer orientation coming up this Saturday, September 4, at 4 p.m. With four months to go until the end of 2021, the chair of the Charlottesville Planning Commission is hopeful Council will adopt a Comprehensive Plan before the clock strikes 2022. That will mark two years since the launch of the Cville Plans Together initiative. The firm Rhodeside & Harwell is leading the completion of the Comprehensive Plan, and subcontractor HR & Advisors has created an affordable housing plan that Council adopted in March. Preliminary work is underway on a rewrite of the zoning ordinance. All of the work is done to fulfil a previous City Council’s request in the spring of 2019 to hire a firm to complete work on all three. Before we begin, let’s review the languages in the request for proposals. (read the RFP). “Housing is at the root of historical structural inequity and oppression in the United States, and it came to be this way deliberately,” reads the request for proposals. “As we build a strategy to achieve a local housing landscape that is healthy, ample, high quality, and affordable, we must be equally deliberate in dismantling the dynamics and the structures that perpetuate continued inequity—structures that often go unnoticed by those of us who benefit from them or don’t directly experience their harm.”In Late August, Rhodeside and Harwell released the third version of something called the Future Land Use Map which is intended to guide future development. In late March, the Planning Commission directed Rhodeside & Harwell to increase potential residential density allowed across the entire city but mostly in single-family neighborhoods. Some in those neighborhoods pushed back, and a third map balanced the two previous drafts. At a work session on August 31, the Planning Commission met for over five and a half hours to weigh in on the map. While not a public hearing, nearly sixty people spoke during the virtual meeting. At the outset, RHI Project Manager Jennifer Koch stressed they were not reviewing a final product.“This is a draft and we expect there may be adjustments that may be made to it,” Koch said. “If we do make revisions to the map after tonight, the Future Land Use Map, we will make it clear how and why those changes were made.”The Commission also reviewed the Land Use chapter of the Comprehensive Plan, which is connected to the Future Land Use Map. “The land use map is connected to a variety of not only goals and strategies but also this overall chapter vision statement of what Charlottesville wants to be in the future related to land use, urban form, and historic and cultural preservation,” Koch said. During her review of public engagement, Koch summarized two major camps that emerged during the input process earlier this spring.“People who live in neighborhoods that are currently single family neighborhoods, there was a lot of expression of concern related to community character, development scale, and whatnot,” Koch said. “But I want to note there were a lot of comments and support for more housing, affordability and density in the city.”Koch said the Future Land Use Map is intended to implement the major tenets of the affordable housing plan. The current map dates back to 2013 and most of the city’s land is designated for low intensity residential. Beginning with the second draft map released in late April, that base level that has been renamed to General Residential.“What we were talking about at this point was to allow up to three units on those sites and a lot of those right now are currently zoned for single family use only,” Koch said. “So that represented a potential tripling of what was allowed in those areas.”Another change to General Residential is the ability for a property owner to build a fourth unit on a lot if that unit were kept below the fair market rent. Corridors and nodesBefore we get too much further, a little bit of history. You might want to take a look at the implementation chapter from the city’s 2001 Comprehensive Plan. The word “corridor” is used over four dozen times. Here are a few examples from a plan adopted by City Council 20 years ago. “We will support initiatives to increase commercial, retail and residential growth opportunities in our commercial corridors,” reads a progressive economic center vision principle. “We will increase the amount of market rate, higher density residential housing downtown and along the economic development corridors,” reads a residential opportunities principle. “Adopt zoning changes and urban design criteria to implement the recommendations of the Corridor Study,” reads a section on land use and zoning changes. That study refers to a December 2000 Commercial Corridor Study that heavily influenced the last major zoning citywide zoning change in 2003. If you’ve ever wondered why there are taller buildings on West Main Street or dense apartment complexes on Jefferson Park Extended, that rezoning is why. (read about the study on cvillepedia)Koch and her team of planners built all three drafts of the Future Land Use Map on the 2013 land use map, which builds off of the one from 2007 Comprehensive Plan. The review process never really ends.But, a new plan has to be adopted, and on August 31, 2021, Koch wanted to explain a bit more about corridors and nodes. “I want to be clear that when we’re talking about corridors and nodes in the city, we do have those land use categories that are called mixed-use nodes, mixed-use corridors,” Koch said. “But when we talk about a development pattern that is sort of node and corridor centric, we are also looking at things like residential corridors, you know, nodes of residential intensity.”For instance, maps designate a section of Cherry Avenue west of Roosevelt Brown as increasing to Medium Density Residential. That’s within walking distance to Buford Middle School, a facility proposed to be upgraded in the near future to accommodate 6th graders. That area is also near Forest Hills Park and Fifeville Park. “We’ve looked at how can we put potential intensity near schools and near parks, and that’s been important from the beginning of this process,” Koch said. In the second version of the map, most of the Lewis Mountain neighborhood was designated as Medium Intensity Residential as were portions of the Greenbrier and Barracks / Rugby neighboorhoods. However, feedback led the consultants to scale back some of those to General Residential. “We heard concerns about some locations of the medium intensity residential and the mixed-use nodes, and we heard concerns about the city’s ability to plan for infrastructure in advance of development, and that includes traffic, transportation, utility, stormwater, and other types of infrastructure,” Koch said. Koch said others are concerned that simply allowing more housing units will not lead to reduced prices. “We heard a lot of people who said density does not equal affordability and we 100 percent agree with that,” Koch said. “The land use map alone will not get to the housing goals that we have for Charlottesville.”There has been concern about people being displaced from neighborhoods that have historically been home to Black residents and people with lower-incomes. For many years, real estate investors and wealthier households have purchased single family homes in 10th and Page, Fifeville, and Rose Hill and invested in them. A feature of the third draft of the Future Land Use Map would seek to restrict intense development in these areas.“In the Future Land use map, to reduce the allowable intensity in those areas, we are proposing this Sensitive Community overlay that could then potentially include less development intensity in the zoning,” Koch said. “But we have heard mixed opinions on whether allowing less development in those areas would be preferable for those who may be in those at-risk communities. We want to make sure we’re not impacting potential wealth-building in those communities.” We’ll hear more details about the changes in this third iteration of the map as Commissioners ask questions.  For now, Koch said the changes made to the map, including the conditional allowance of a fourth unit in General Residential, could help the city attain its housing goals.Over fifty people speak at public commentKoch spoke for nearly an hour before members of the public were allowed to give their inputs. At that point in the call, there were 238 people watching the Zoom call. Over the course of the five hours meeting, nearly sixty people would speak. There’s not enough time to go through it all, but before we hear what Commissioners and the City Council think, let’s hear some voices skeptical opposed to the map. “We had no idea that the ultimate goal of Charlottesville was to have this high density area,” said Michelle Rowan. “We specifically looked for something close to the hospital, R-1, coming off of acreage. That’s what we were looking for.”“Is it really an issue of affordable housing or is it really an issue of poverty?” said Fred Borch. “Is the issue of poverty whether or not housing is affordable?”“Census data has shown that construction of new homes in the city has outpaced the city’s population growth,” said Kaki Pearson. “If the city of Charlottesville is serious about redressing housing and racial injustices, they could create a program to target individuals and families much like the voucher program created in Evanston, Illinois, where aggrieved African-Americans only need to show that they were descendants of residents during a certain time period,” said someone who was on the zoom call as Mary Simpson. “Instead, our government is proposing to dismantle single-family neighborhoods like mine. Yes, I will be punished twice. Let me be clear. I don’t want 12-unit buildings or commercial establishments in my neighborhood. I don’t want the traffic, the trash, the noise, the crime, and all of that which naturally accompanies denser neighborhoods.”“I really would like to just make a huge plea to slow down the process and expand it,” said Martha Smythe. “We are still living in a pandemic which has changed everything and we’re talking about a rezoning which projects to alter everything in the city and I see no reason to rush it.”“This plan being presented by the consulting team is what I believe to be an ideological blueprint for pro-density interests,” said Philip Harway.“I want to confess that I do not share your goal of increasing density in the city and I don’t recall ever that ever being on any ballot presented to the citizens,” said Andrew Grimshaw. There were also many comments in favor of the plan.“I’m a little puzzled at all the outrage behind what’s being proposed given that the unit that I live in currently is pretty emblematic of a lot of the proposed changes, which is a converted house that looks just like all of the other houses on the block,” said Brendan Novak. “The only difference is that I can afford to live there whereas I could not live in an entire single family home for example.” “Something that we noticed when were looking at the side-by-side slide of the August map and the May map is that there is in general a lot less gray in the historically exclusionary neighborhoods, the white neighborhoods,” said attorney Caroline Klosko with the Legal Aid Justice Center, speaking on behalf of the Charlottesville Low-Income Housing Coalition. “North Downtown, Lewis Mountain Road. Locust Grove. Barracks / Rugby. There’s less allowance for medium density than under the May version of the map and we think this is a step backwards and we’re disappointed by this. “I hope we can move back in the direction that the first Future Land Use Map was going,” said Chris Schopper. “I feel like we’ve taken a step back.” “I think that cutting down the General Residential stories from 3.5 to two is going to create issues in the long run,” said Tim Giles. “We’re going to have houses that can’t even be built in existing R-1 neighborhoods.”“It’s important that this process considers to take the needs of renters and center them as we are fifty percent renters and probably will grow as that demand grows with the University of Virginia’s growth,” said Oliver Platts-Mills, a developer with several holdings in the Fifesville and Rose Hill neighborhood. “I think you need to support a version of this plan that increases density across the city and allows all sorts of people who want to live here to be able to move here,” said David Singerman. “I’d just like to express my support for the May revision that had more substantial changes to density across the city and I’d like to express my support for greater density in historically exclusionary neighborhoods as well as neighborhoods across the city,” said Jamelle Bouie. You’re reading a special edition of Charlottesville Community Engagement on the Charlottesville Planning Commission’s August 31 work session on the Future Land Use Map and the Comprehensive Plan. In today’s second Substack-supported public service announcement: The Charlottesville Jazz Society at cvillejazz.org is dedicated to the promotion, preservation, and preservation of jazz, and there’s no time like now to find a time to get out and watch people love to play. The Charlottesville Jazz Society keeps a running list of what’s coming up at cvillejazz.org. This week, find out that the Charles Owen Trio plays at Miller’s Downtown on Friday at 9:30 p.m., Zuzu’s Hot 5 will play the WTJU Free Fall Concert on Saturday, and the Beleza Trio plays at Potter’s Craft Cider also on Saturday. For details, visit cvillejazz.org.But what did the Commissioners think? When it was their turn, Commissioners had five minutes to ask questions and make comments. Commissioner Jody Lahendro has served on the advisory body since August 2014 and is one of the most critical voices on the Commission. “I have been doing a lot of reading and most of the literature that I’ve come across has concluded that simply adding density does little to nothing to adding affordability to a city, or affordable units to a city,” Lahendro said. The current draft allows a fourth unit in General Residential if it is subsidized or sold below its market value. Lahendro expressed skepticism. “Why wouldn’t developers simply turn single family parcels into three residential units and take the money and run?” Lahendro asked. “Is the fourth unit based on some kind of data?”Koch repeated that the Future Land Use Map and the zoning would not be enough, and that tools in the affordable housing plan would be required. But, size of units could play a role in bringing down housing costs. “There is an opportunity to provide units that are more sort of naturally affordable if they are at a size that is not available in a neighborhood right now,” Koch said. The zoning rewrite will be overseen by subcontractor Code Studio. Lee Einsweiler is the founding principal. “You’re right, Jody,” Einsweiler said. “There’s no specific evidence that that fourth unit is somehow magically more affordable. It is just a trade-off we felt was reasonable for adding to our original three that if you were going to add more we needed some guarantee that some portion might be affordable.” Lahendro said he could not support the additional density without precautions. He said developers will purchase existing homes, tear them down, and build three units where they can. “The land has become more valuable now than the buildings that are on it,” Lahendro said. “Given the opportunity to provide more housing units on the same parcel of land through upzoning, developers will build more units but at market rates that will not meet the affordability definition.”Lahendro said he could support the density of or three additional units in single-family zoning in if the units were guaranteed to be rented or sold at affordable levels. As a general rule, households who pay more than 30 percent of their income for the roof of their head are considered distressed. Commissioner Lyle Solla-Yates said areas near the University of Virginia such as the Lewis Mountain neighborhood should be places where children in low-income families can live and have opportunity. He studied the changes to the Future Land Use Map over the weekend. “And I only saw really large reductions in potential affordable housing there,” Solla-Yates said. “I didn’t understand it. I understand there has been public comment calling for less, especially among the highest-income homeowners. That’s really the big group that’s been pushing this story.”Commissioner Taneia Dowell went next. She also supported Lahendro’s idea of an overlay district for additional units only if all are affordable. “I too have some heartburn about the density in this plan,” Dowell said. The newest Commissioner is Karim Habbab, who joined the advisory body earlier this summer. “I think we need more assertive language regarding affordable housing and the affordability of the affordable housing throughout all different intensities and zoning requirements, not just the General Residential one,” Habbab said. “I think it could apply to most of them.”Commissioner Rory Stolzenberg began his comments with a pointed question to the consultants. “How do you decide whose opinions matter?” Stolzenberg said. “We’ve heard many hundreds of people’s feedback. Many people are arguing for one thing while many others are arguing for the direct opposite.”Koch said the consultants have tried to strike a balance between multiple points of view. “In terms of who we are listening to, we are trying to make that equity and affordability piece maintain strength and we think we have while also making compromise,” Koch said. “We are not swinging wildly one way or the other. I would say if we did that, if we really listened specifically to certain neighborhoods, a lot of these neighborhoods outside of those sensitive communities would not have any additional increase in potential density at all.”Back to affordability. Stolzenberg said the city needs to provide incentives to developers if anyone is ever going to build the fourth unit. He said the nonprofit housing groups may not be interested unless they can build certain kinds of units in more places. “My understanding in talking to our local housing nonprofits is that we have a couple of rental-oriented ones that don’t build buildings that size and you need at least 40 or 50 to get to a [Low-Income Housing Tax Credits] application,” Stolzenberg said. “And then we have homeownership ones like Habitat and the Community Land Trust.  And for them, I think what they’re really seeking is for townhomes and in particular stacked townhomes. They keep saying stacked townhomes. That’s the fastest path to get affordability because land is so expensive and you can half the cost of land.”Stolzenberg also said he did not favor a reduction in the number of stories allowed in General Residential from 3.5 in the second draft to 2.5 in the third. Commissioner Liz Russell picked up on this thread.“It seems that the definition of missing middle housing is 2.5 to 3 stories, so if that’s what we say we want then that explains the reduction from 3.5 stories,” Russell said. Russell said the process should result in a city that provides choices in housing. “A range of housing opportunities in a way that is sensitive to the built form of our existing neigborhoods,” Russell said. “I think that’s what Cville Plans is working toward and I think it’s our role as Planning Commisioners to guide the density more specifically and not leave it to the market to decide what is built and what is affordable.”This was Hosea Mitchell’s last meeting as chair. As such, he thought he would be candid in what said about the latest draft. “The latest iteration disappoints,” Mitchell said. “The affordable housing plan that the consultants put together was designed to promote zoning and development that increased multifamily development in a way that buoyed equity and buoyed affordability in Charlottesville.”Mitchell said the latest draft does not do enough to combat the long history of exclusionary zoning. Mitchell said he would support four stories in General Residential in places where it would make sense. Three City Councilors weigh-inThe Commission’s role is advisory. Elected officials will make the final call. Let’s hear from three of them. First, Councilor Lloyd Snook. “We have to remember that the Future Land Use Map is part of the Comprehensive Plan,” Snook said. “It is only about three pages of the Comprehensive Plan. The purpose of the Comprehensive Plan is to plan to deal with current and emerging problems. It is not particularly frankly to only preserve existing neighborhoods, though in some instances that could be a problem that we’re trying to address.”Snook said the three values the Comprehensive Plan should address are racial equity, climate change, and affordable housing. “Number three is dealing with all varieties of affordable housing,” Snook said. “We have to recognize that at the moment Charlottesville is becoming increasingly unaffordable for virtually everybody and that includes people who are making 100 percent of [area median income], not just 80 percent or 40 percent of 50 percent.”Snook also said he wanted to see more information about the costs of building multiple units within one building. Mayor Nikuyah Walker was on City Council in February 2019 when the decision was made to hire a firm to finish the Comprehensive Plan. “I understand that a lot of people are challenged by Charlottesville, what has happened with past developments, the increase in pricing of housing and land, but there are certain members of our population who without us prioritizing them and especially the lower [area median income] they won’t be able to figure out in Charlottesville or existing areas,” Walker said.Councilor Michael Payne said the Comprehensive Plan gives the change to change Charlottesville’s ecosystem for the better.“Opening up the opportunity for more affordable homeownership and rental opportunity throughout the entire city and directly confronting the reasons that those opportunities aren’t available and allow more affordable duplexes, triplexes, townhomes to be built instead of having a system where you can only build a single family homes that’s selling for $600,000 or $700,000 in many cases,” Payne said he was concerned that the latest version of the map was a step back in terms of meeting the city’s affordable housing goals. He said the longer the delay, the worse the housing ecosystem will get. “Every day, week, month, and year the status quo continues and we know exactly what the status quo is, it’s gentrification, it’s displacement, it’s all the things that people continue to highlight as problems in our city,” Payne said.Next steps?Koch said she and her team will return to the Planning Commission at their regular meeting on September 14 for that review, and there is a work session slot reserved for September 21. The official public hearing will take place in October. Between now and then, what are you going to do if you’re a Charlottesville resident? Have you taken a look at the map? Have you talked to your neighbors? As you’ve heard in this program, there are many opinions and thoughts. As you continue to read or listen to Charlottesville Community Engagement, I’ll continue to track this story, alongside the many other stories I write about land use, growth, economic development, and more of what makes this community function. Or not function. It’s a matter of perspective, but I’ll be here, documenting from as many views as I can. Was this newsletter and podcast useful to you? Please consider support if you’ve not done so already. Here are some ways to do so:Support general research by making a donation through PatreonSign for a subscription to Charlottesville Community Engagement, free or paid. Ting will match that amount!Pay through Venmo This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Slate Daily Feed
Political: Back to School

Slate Daily Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 64:54


Jamelle, Emily and David discuss the Afghanistan evacuation, starting school during delta, and the path forward for infrastructure. Here are some notes and references from this week's show: Jamelle Bouie for the New York Times: “$1 Trillion Isn't as Much as It Sounds”  Here's this week's chatter: Jamelle: Godzilla: The Album Emily: Jessica Stoya for Slate: “What We Can Really Learn From the OnlyFans Debacle” David: Atul Gawande for the New Yorker: “Costa Ricans Live Longer Than Us. What's the Secret?” Listener chatter from Nilo Garza: The Daily: “Why Mexico is Suing U.S. Gun Manufacturers”; James Fredrick for NPR: “Mexico's Suit Against U.S. Gun Companies May Seek More Than A Court Win”  If you enjoy the show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Danny Lavery's show Big Mood, Little Mood and you'll be supporting the Political Gabfest. Sign up now at slate.com/gabfestplus to help support our work. For this week's Slate Plus bonus segment Jamelle, Emily, and David talk about electric bikes and scooters. Tweet us your questions and chatters @SlateGabfest or email us at gabfest@slate.com. (Messages may be quoted by name unless the writer stipulates otherwise.) Podcast production by Jocelyn Frank. Research and show notes by Bridgette Dunlap. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Political Gabfest
Back to School

Political Gabfest

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 64:54


Jamelle, Emily and David discuss the Afghanistan evacuation, starting school during delta, and the path forward for infrastructure. Here are some notes and references from this week's show: Jamelle Bouie for the New York Times: “$1 Trillion Isn't as Much as It Sounds”  Here's this week's chatter: Jamelle: Godzilla: The Album Emily: Jessica Stoya for Slate: “What We Can Really Learn From the OnlyFans Debacle” David: Atul Gawande for the New Yorker: “Costa Ricans Live Longer Than Us. What's the Secret?” Listener chatter from Nilo Garza: The Daily: “Why Mexico is Suing U.S. Gun Manufacturers”; James Fredrick for NPR: “Mexico's Suit Against U.S. Gun Companies May Seek More Than A Court Win”  If you enjoy the show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Danny Lavery's show Big Mood, Little Mood and you'll be supporting the Political Gabfest. Sign up now at slate.com/gabfestplus to help support our work. For this week's Slate Plus bonus segment Jamelle, Emily, and David talk about electric bikes and scooters. Tweet us your questions and chatters @SlateGabfest or email us at gabfest@slate.com. (Messages may be quoted by name unless the writer stipulates otherwise.) Podcast production by Jocelyn Frank. Research and show notes by Bridgette Dunlap. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Brian Lehrer Show
Summer Friday: 'Other Tulsas'; Bill Barr's DOJ; Prison Food Justice; Shade as Social Issue; Joni Mitchell's 'Blue' at 50

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 104:43


On this Summer Friday, we've put together some of our favorite recent interviews, including: Jamelle Bouie, New York Times opinion columnist and CBS News analyst, talks about the many other moments in United States history, besides the massacre in a Black neighborhood of Tulsa, Oklahoma in 1921, where White Americans committed organized acts of terror seeking the destruction of Black communities and neighborhoods. Elie Honig, CNN senior legal analyst and author of Hatchet Man: How Bill Barr Broke the Prosecutor's Code and Corrupted the Justice Department (HarperCollins, 2021) talks about his new book examining the Bill Barr era at the DOJ, plus offers analysis of current legal issues. People behind bars are six times more likely to experience food poisoning than those on the outside. Bianca Tylek, Worth Rises's executive director, and Leslie Soble, a research fellow at Impact Justice, non-profit innovation and research center working towards a more restorative and humane justice system, talk about how companies that provide food to jails and prisons stay profitable by cutting corners. In a heat wave, shade from trees can be life saving. Alejandra Borunda, former climate scientist and a National Geographic writer on climate change, adaptation, and the environment, explains how redlining and other racist practices mean in many American cities, communities of color often have less access to shade, and what can be done to fix that as the planet continues to warm. Jessica Hopper, music critic, producer and author of several books, including an expanded second edition of The First Collection of Criticism by a Living Female Rock Critic (MCD × FSGO, 2021), discusses how Joni Mitchell's 1971 album "Blue" was shaped by its time and has influenced music for generations to come.   These interviews were edited slightly for time, the original versions are available here: The 'Other' Tulsas (June 7, 2021) Bill Barr and the Law (July 20, 2021) The Injustice of Prison Food (April 5, 2021) Why Shade is an Equity Issue (June 29, 2021) Iconic at 50: Joni Mitchell's 'Blue' (July 2, 2021)

The Cunning of Geist
032 - Race & Racism: The Dark Side of the Enlightenment vs. Hegel's Notion of Freedom

The Cunning of Geist

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2021 30:36


The great enlightenment document, the U.S. Declaration of Independence, pronounced that "all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights,  that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness."  Yet the United States also kept portions of its population enslaved at that time.  How were these ideals and the facts at hand kept compatible?New York Times columnist Jamelle Bouie has an the answer, “Racism as we understand it now, as a socio-political order based on the permanent hierarchy of particular groups, developed as an attempt to resolve the fundamental contradiction between professing liberty and upholding slavery. . .  It took the scientific thought of the Enlightenment to create an enduring racial taxonomy and the 'color-coded, white-over-black' ideology with which we are familiar." This episode explores this dark-side of the Enlightenment.  While some statements of Hegel's may be seen as racially insensitive by today's standards, he condemned slavery in the strongest terms and found no rational at all in judging people by how they looked.  "A judgment based on physiognomic expression has accordingly only the value of an immediate judgment, which can just as well be untrue as true.  . . Man is known much less by his outward appearance than by his deeds. (Encyclopaedia, III, §411, Addition).     

Know Your Enemy
UNLOCKED: Why the New Deal Matters (w/ Eric Rauchway)

Know Your Enemy

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2021 64:09


In this unlocked bonus episode, Matt is joined by historian Eric Rauchway for a deep-dive into his new book, Why the New Deal Matters. It's Rauchway's latest effort to recover Franklin Delano Roosevelt as an anti-fascist political leader who sought to expand the meaning and practice of American democracy—that in a robust democracy, people don't just need enough to live on, but something to live for. Topics include: Herbert Hoover's and FDR's different responses to the Bonus Army's march on Washington; why Hoover is the true founding father of modern conservatism; how FDR understood the New Deal as more than just a pragmatic series of experiments; the importance to the New Deal of public art and projects like building libraries and theaters; why, despite its compromises with white supremacists in the Democratic Party, the New Deal continues to inspire; and more! Further Reading:Eric Rauchway, Why the New Deal Matters (Yale University Press, 2021)Eric Rauchway, Winter War: Hoover, Roosevelt, and the First Clash Over the New Deal (Basic  Books, 2018)Jamelle Bouie, "F.D.R. Didn't Just Save the Economy," New York Times, April 16, 2021...and don't forget to subscribe to Know Your Enemy on Patreon for access to all of our bonus episodes!

Political Gabfest
Failed Justice Breyer Countdown

Political Gabfest

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021 63:28


Emily Bazelon is joined by Ruth Marcus and Jamelle Bouie to discuss the infrastructure negotiations, alarming Supreme Court decisions and Bill Cosby's release. Here are some notes and references from this week's show: Catherine Rampell for The Washington Post: “Three Things That Could Still Blow Up The Bipartisan Infrastructure Deal” Give Us the Ballot: The Modern Struggle for Voting Rights in America, by Ari Berman Ruth Marcus for The Washington Post: “I've Urged Supreme Court Justices to Stick Around — But Never to Retire. Until Now.” The New Book of Middle Eastern Food: The Classic Cookbook, Expanded and Updated, with New Recipes and Contemporary Variations on Old Themes, by Claudia Roden Here's this week's chatter: Emily: Emily Bazelon for the New York Times: “I Write About the Law. But Could I Really Help Free a Prisoner?”; My Octopus Teacher Ruth: Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum Jamelle: Croupier; Athletic Brewing Company  If you enjoy the show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Danny Lavery's show Big Mood, Little Mood and you'll be supporting the Political Gabfest. Sign up now at slate.com/gabfestplus to help support our work. For this week's Slate Plus bonus segment Emily, Jamelle, and Ruth talk about their favorite summer foods and recipes. Tweet us your questions and chatters @SlateGabfest or email us at gabfest@slate.com. (Messages may be quoted by name unless the writer stipulates otherwise.) Podcast production by Jocelyn Frank Research and show notes by Bridgette Dunlap Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Slate Daily Feed
Political: Failed Justice Breyer Countdown

Slate Daily Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021 63:28


Emily Bazelon is joined by Ruth Marcus and Jamelle Bouie to discuss the infrastructure negotiations, alarming Supreme Court decisions and Bill Cosby's release. Here are some notes and references from this week's show: Catherine Rampell for The Washington Post: “Three Things That Could Still Blow Up The Bipartisan Infrastructure Deal” Give Us the Ballot: The Modern Struggle for Voting Rights in America, by Ari Berman Ruth Marcus for The Washington Post: “I've Urged Supreme Court Justices to Stick Around — But Never to Retire. Until Now.” The New Book of Middle Eastern Food: The Classic Cookbook, Expanded and Updated, with New Recipes and Contemporary Variations on Old Themes, by Claudia Roden Here's this week's chatter: Emily: Emily Bazelon for the New York Times: “I Write About the Law. But Could I Really Help Free a Prisoner?”; My Octopus Teacher Ruth: Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum Jamelle: Croupier; Athletic Brewing Company  If you enjoy the show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Danny Lavery's show Big Mood, Little Mood and you'll be supporting the Political Gabfest. Sign up now at slate.com/gabfestplus to help support our work. For this week's Slate Plus bonus segment Emily, Jamelle, and Ruth talk about their favorite summer foods and recipes. Tweet us your questions and chatters @SlateGabfest or email us at gabfest@slate.com. (Messages may be quoted by name unless the writer stipulates otherwise.) Podcast production by Jocelyn Frank Research and show notes by Bridgette Dunlap Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Brian Lehrer Show
The 'Other' Tulsas

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2021 34:01


Jamelle Bouie, New York Times opinion columnist and CBS News analyst, talks about the many other moments in United States history, besides the massacre in a Black neighborhood of Tulsa, Oklahoma in 1921, where White Americans committed organized acts of terror seeking the destruction of Black communities and neighborhoods.

Blank Check with Griffin & David
Rosewood with Jamelle Bouie

Blank Check with Griffin & David

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2021 143:46


Blankie favorite Jamelle Bouie returns to the pod to discuss “Rosewood” - an ambitious historical epic whose failure at the box office (against not one, but TWO Star Wars re-releases) may have necessitated a shift for Singleton towards more commercial fare. The careers of Ving Rhames, Jon Voight, and Michael Rooker are spotlighted, as well as the surprising filmography of Rosewood’s screenwriter Greg Poirier. This episode is sponsored by:Indeed (indeed.com/check)Bombas (bombas.com/check)HelloFresh - hellofresh.com/blankcheck12 (CODE: BLANKCHECK12) Join our Patreon at patreon.com/blankcheck Follow us @blankcheckpod on Twitter and Instagram!Buy some real nerdy merch at shopblankcheckpod.myshopify.com

Slate Daily Feed
Political: Live at 100 Days

Slate Daily Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2021 51:06


A live Gabfest with Emily, David and John on the policies and politics of Biden’s first 100 days— with special guest Jamelle Bouie! A reference from this week’s show: Thomas B. Edsall for The New York Times: “Should Biden Emphasize Race or Class or Both or None of the Above” Here’s this week’s chatter: John: The Premonition: A Pandemic Story by Michael Lewis; Gertrude Stein on punctuation from Lectures in America.  Emily: Rosanna Xia for The Los Angeles Times: “DDT Waste Barrels Off L.A. Coast Shock California Scientists” David: Steven Johnson for The New York Times Magazine: “How Humanity Gave Itself an Extra Life” Listener chatter from David Friedlander-Holm: Cara Giaimo for The New York Times: “One of the World’s Oldest Science Experiments Comes Up From the Dirt” Slate Plus members get great bonus content from Slate, a special segment on the Gabfest each week, and access to special bonus episodes throughout the year. Sign up now to listen and support our show. For this week’s Slate Plus bonus segment, Emily, John, and David take questions from the live audience. Tweet us your questions and chatters @SlateGabfest or email us at gabfest@slate.com. (Messages may be quoted by name unless the writer stipulates otherwise.) Podcast production by Jocelyn Frank. Research and show notes by Bridgette Dunlap. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Political Gabfest
Live at 100 Days

Political Gabfest

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2021 51:06


A live Gabfest with Emily, David and John on the policies and politics of Biden’s first 100 days— with special guest Jamelle Bouie! A reference from this week’s show: Thomas B. Edsall for The New York Times: “Should Biden Emphasize Race or Class or Both or None of the Above” Here’s this week’s chatter: John: The Premonition: A Pandemic Story by Michael Lewis; Gertrude Stein on punctuation from Lectures in America.  Emily: Rosanna Xia for The Los Angeles Times: “DDT Waste Barrels Off L.A. Coast Shock California Scientists” David: Steven Johnson for The New York Times Magazine: “How Humanity Gave Itself an Extra Life” Listener chatter from David Friedlander-Holm: Cara Giaimo for The New York Times: “One of the World’s Oldest Science Experiments Comes Up From the Dirt” Slate Plus members get great bonus content from Slate, a special segment on the Gabfest each week, and access to special bonus episodes throughout the year. Sign up now to listen and support our show. For this week’s Slate Plus bonus segment, Emily, John, and David take questions from the live audience. Tweet us your questions and chatters @SlateGabfest or email us at gabfest@slate.com. (Messages may be quoted by name unless the writer stipulates otherwise.) Podcast production by Jocelyn Frank. Research and show notes by Bridgette Dunlap. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

KCRW's Left, Right & Center
Pause & Review

KCRW's Left, Right & Center

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 17, 2021 50:31


The Johnson & Johnson vaccine is on pause, out of an abundance of caution, federal officials say. Out of more than 7 million J&J doses administered so far, there have been six incidents of a rare and serious kind of blood clot. The idea for the pause is to figure out whether anything needs to change about the use of this particular vaccine, but are there unintended consequences? Josh Barro and panelists Jamelle Bouie and Lanhee Chen discuss that, plus President Biden’s effort to raise corporate taxes and alternative proposals from Republicans, and new sanctions against Russia over the SolarWinds hack. Andrea Kendall-Taylor, formerly the senior intelligence officer who led the U.S. intelligence community’s strategic analysis on Russia from 2015-18, talks about the design of this sanctions package and what it shows about the Biden administration’s strategy for advancing American interests through diplomacy. Finally, there has been outrage this week over two fatal shootings by police of two young men, Daunte Wright in Minnesota and Adam Toledo in Chicago, that should have been avoided. The panel discusses accountability for police officers and what can be done to reduce the use of deadly force by police in this country.

KCRW's Left, Right & Center
Carrots over sticks

KCRW's Left, Right & Center

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 10, 2021 52:16


Joe Biden’s infrastructure plan has stretched the definition of infrastructure. One component is over $200 billion for housing. Home prices are rising around the country and affordability is a bigger issue than ever, but will incentivizing local governments to make zoning less restrictive and build more housing actually get more Americans into the homes they want? Then: Josh Barro and panelists Jamelle Bouie and Lanhee Chen discuss how governors have handled the pandemic and how they’ve fared politically. For all the national criticism Florida and its governor, Ron DeSantis, has gotten, Florida’s been an average performer at fighting the spread of Covid-19. Did Governor DeSantis get a bad rap? And how did Governor Cuomo in New York get so overrated? Can all of this be explained by our hyper-partisan times? Georgia’s new voting law might be explained by that too — the panel analyzes critiques of this law and its projected effects on future elections.

Jordan, Jesse, GO!
Ep. 678: Oral and Whatnot with Jamelle Bouie

Jordan, Jesse, GO!

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 14, 2021 103:16


Jamelle Bouie (The New York Times) joins Jordan and Jesse for a discussion of Jamelle's connoisseurship of the many Highlander sequels (and the impressive proliferation of the series in general), Jesse's fondness for Dad Cinema and a beautiful but boring sci-fi movie, and the Tom Clancy and John Grisham books everyone read when they were young library nerds. Plus, Jamelle weighs in on exactly what side of the Wario Sauce debate he comes down on. 

Political Gabfest
Short Squeeze

Political Gabfest

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2021 74:52


Emily, John and David discuss the Senate obstruction that may be ahead; delegating deplatforming; and GameStop. Here are some notes and references from this week’s show: Jamelle Bouie for the New York Times: “Democrats Should Act as if They Won the Election” Tom Wilson and Kate Starbird for The Harvard Kennedy School Misinformation Review: “Cross-Platform Disinformation Campaigns: Lessons Learned and Next Steps”  Matt Levine for Bloomberg: “GameStop is Just a Game” David Leonhardt for the New York Times: “Underselling the Vaccine” Andy Rose for CNN: “Health Workers, Stuck in the Snow, Administer Coronavirus Vaccine to Stranded Drivers” Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity by David Allen Here are this week’s cocktail chatters:  Emily: A Children’s Bible by Lydia Millet; Matt Stieb for New York Magazine: “The Fyre Festival of Vaccine Rollouts” John: Derek DelGaudio’s In & Of Itself David: David Blight’s Open Yale Course: “HIST 119: The Civil War and Reconstruction Era, 1845-1877”; Dessa’s “Who’s Yellen Now?” Listener chatter from Ghael Fobes @GhaelFobes: a Twitter thread of animals interrupting wildlife photographers by @JoaquimCampa Slate Plus members get a bonus segment on the Gabfest each week, and access to special bonus episodes throughout the year. Sign up now to listen and support our show. For this week’s Slate Plus bonus segment a listener asks John, Emily, and David to discuss how they organize their work, lives, and minds. You can tweet suggestions, links, and questions to @SlateGabfest. Tweet us your cocktail chatter using #cocktailchatter. (Messages may be quoted by name unless the writer stipulates otherwise.) The email address for the Political Gabfest is gabfest@slate.com. (Email may be quoted by name unless the writer stipulates otherwise.) Podcast production by Jocelyn Frank. Research and show notes by Bridgette Dunlap. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices