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The Bay is a local news podcast about what’s really going on here. We’ll show you the messy and resilient culture of this place we call home, with help from Bay Area reporters, community leaders, and neighbors. The show is hosted by Devin Katayama, with new episodes every Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Sign up for The Bay's newsletter: https://bit.ly/2Ij412e

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    • Oct 15, 2021 LATEST EPISODE
    • weekdays NEW EPISODES
    • 16m AVG DURATION
    • 536 EPISODES

    Listeners of The Bay that love the show mention: thank you devin, local issues, kqed, local news, reporting, well produced, touch, coverage, happening, informed, team, analysis, thought provoking, daily, relevant, living, morning, grateful, important, community.



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    Latest episodes from The Bay

    ‘40 Acres and a Tesla'? California Considers Reparations for Black Americans

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 15:46

    California's Reparations Task Force has a huge challenge before them: to study and recommend reparation proposals for Black Californians and descendants of enslaved people. The task force wrapped up a series of meetings this week ranging from housing discrimination, to environmental racism to educational inequities. But this formal public process is also a time for people to share their personal emotions and experiences — and tell the state what reparations would mean to them. View past meetings and see more about upcoming meetings of the Task Force to Study and Develop Reparations Proposals for African Americans Guest: Lakshmi Sarah, KQED digital producer and reporter This episode was produced by Ericka Cruz Guevarra and Kate Wolffe, and hosted by Alan Montecillo.

    Unpacking the Rise in Gun Violence

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 17:08

    In 2020, homicides in the Bay Area increased by about 25%, according to a Guardian analysis of census and state data. Many of those deaths involved guns. The majority of people killed were Black and Latino, and some of the largest increases took place in Oakland, Vallejo, and Stockton. We don't yet know all of the reasons why this increase occurred, but many local practitioners of gun violence prevention point to factors like economic hardship, and the closures of important community spaces during the pandemic. Guest: Abené Clayton, lead reporter of The Guardian's ‘Guns & Lies in America' series Read Abené's full piece in The Guardian This episode was produced by Ericka Cruz Guevarra and Kate Wolffe, and hosted by Alan Montecillo.

    How Tahoe Protected Itself From the Caldor Fire

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 18:20

    The Caldor Fire came very close to burning thousands of homes and businesses in South Lake Tahoe. But in the end, while the wildfire has done a lot of damage, the city was largely spared. That's no accident. South Lake Tahoe was protected from the Caldor Fire thanks to the hard work of firefighters, some favorable wind shifts, and years of forest preparation.  Guest: Danielle Venton, KQED climate reporter This episode was produced by Ericka Cruz Guevarra and Adhiti Bandlamudi, and hosted by Alan Montecillo.

    Sonoma County Vineyard Workers are Demanding More Protections

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 17:14

    Vineyard workers already have hard jobs that usually don't pay high wages. And as wildfire season increasingly overlaps with harvest season, their work has gotten even more dangerous. Now, advocates and farmworkers in Sonoma County are demanding that wine businesses provide stronger protections for the laborers who make the industry possible in the first place. Guest: Nashelly Chavez, Diversity, Equity and Inclusion reporter for the Press Democrat Follow The Bay to hear more local Bay Area stories like this one. New episodes are released Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 3 a.m. Find The Bay on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, NPR One or via Alexa. This episode was produced by Alan Montecillo and Adhiti Bandlamudi, and hosted by Ericka Cruz Guevarra.

    California Can Soon Strip Badges from Cops for Serious Misconduct

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 14:51

    Currently, there's little stopping a police officer accused of serious misconduct from simply resigning and moving to a new department. But that's about to change. The Kenneth Ross Jr. Police Decertification Act of 2021, named after a Black man who was shot in the back by an exonerated Gardena Police Officer in 2018, makes it possible for the state to strip bad cops of their badges so they are barred from working in law enforcement for good. Guest: Sukey Lewis, KQED criminal justice reporter and host of On Our Watch This episode was produced by Alan Montecillo and Adhiti Bandlamudi, and hosted by Ericka Cruz Guevarra.

    What's the Deal with COVID-19 Booster Shots?

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 16:54

    The news about COVID-19 booster shots has been confusing. In mid-August, President Biden announced that a COVID-19 booster shot would roll out to all eligible U.S. residents starting the week of Sept. 20. But then, amid disagreement among federal health officials, that plan was scaled back. Now, the federal government is recommending that some people get a third shot. Today, we break down who is eligible, and how to get one. Read more about the COVID vaccine rollout and information on how to get a COVID booster shot.  Guest: Carly Severn, KQED senior engagement editor

    An Intergenerational Welcoming for Afghan Refugees

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 23:00

    Since July, at least 2,000 refugees from Afghanistan have arrived in California, with most settling in Northern California and the Bay Area. Since the Taliban took over Kabul in mid-August, the pace of resettlement has ramped up, and many of the people supporting newly arrived refugees come from already-established communities of Afghan Americans in the Bay — who know what it means to be displaced and start anew.   Guest: Tyche Hendricks, KQED immigration senior editor Click here to find more information about Jewish Family & Community Services East Bay's efforts to help resettle newly arrived Afghan refugees. This episode was produced by Ericka Cruz Guevarra and Adhiti Bandlamudi, edited by Alan Montecillo, and hosted by Ericka Cruz Guevarra.  

    The Immigrant Renters the Eviction Moratorium Didn't Protect

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 22:59

    California's eviction moratorium is set to expire tomorrow, September 30. But in many parts of the Bay, Latino immigrant tenants have still been getting evicted by their landlords. That's because protections on paper haven't necessarily added up to protections in practice, as many renters have not been made aware of their rights and face barriers to receiving rental assistance. Guest: Madeleine Bair, founding director of El Tímpano This episode was produced by Alan Montecillo and Adhiti Bandlamudi, and hosted by Ericka Cruz Guevarra. Translation assistance was provided by Madeleine Bair and Carlos Cabrera-Lomelí, with additional editorial and production help from Erika Kelly, Erin Baldassari, and Molly Solomon.

    How Two Wineries are Dealing With Climate Change

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 22:09

    Wineries have been affected by heat, drought and wildfires. Many have seen lower yields and have even lost grapes. But winemakers are also adapting, and finding creative ways to make sure their livelihoods continue. Today, we follow two wineries in the North Bay and learn how they're experiencing and adapting to climate change. Guest: Ezra David Romero, KQED climate reporter Episode transcript: https://bit.ly/3zQBiXD This episode was produced by Alan Montecillo and Mary Franklin Harvin, and hosted by Ericka Cruz Guevarra.

    California Passed a Law to End Single-Family Zoning

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 17:54

    Two days after the recall election, Gov. Gavin Newsom signed Senate Bill 9, which effectively ends single-family zoning in California. The law is part of a larger effort to increase the supply of housing, at a time when prices are at an all-time high and rents remain unaffordable for many people. Guest: Erika Kelly, senior editor of KQED's housing affordability desk This episode was produced by Ericka Cruz Guevarra and Mary Franklin Harvin, and hosted by Alan Montecillo.

    Will Oakland Require COVID-19 Vaccinations for Public School Students?

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 18:43

    Oakland Unified's Board of Education is considering a proposal that would require all students 12 and older to get vaccinated against COVID-19. Some say it's a necessary step to make schools safer, while others worry that it will create another barrier to in-person learning. The resolution could be voted on as early as tonight, and if passed, OUSD would become the first district in Northern California to mandate vaccines for students. OUSD's Board of Education meeting today starts at 4 p.m. Guest: Vanessa Rancaño, KQED education reporter

    Mountain View's Mobile Home Parks Could Have Rent Control Soon

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 19:40

    In Mountain View, residents of mobile home parks are on the verge of winning protections under the city's rent control law — which they have been excluded from so far. But in this expensive Silicon Valley city, the political fight about rent control in mobile homes is far from over.  Guest: Adhiti Bandlamudi, KQED Silicon Valley reporter This episode was produced by Christopher Beale and Ericka Cruz Guevarra, and hosted by Alan Montecillo.

    Where Our Water Comes From

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 18:00

    Most Bay Area residents rely on water that travels a long way to get here. And as we experience another drought, it's more important than ever to understand how our water works, especially in our different local communities. Today, we're sharing an episode from our friends at Bay Curious. This is one episode in their six-part series on drought. Episode transcript

    Gov. Gavin Newsom Easily Defeats the Recall

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 15:40

    19 months, 46 candidates, and hundreds of millions of dollars later, Gov. Gavin Newsom has easily defeated the effort to remove him from office. It marks the end of a campaign that was first launched in February 2020 by a retired Yolo County sheriff's deputy.  The governor will stay in office until at least January 2023, when his first term ends — or longer, if he wins re-election next year. Guest: Marisa Lagos, political correspondent for KQED and co-host of the Political Breakdown podcast This episode was produced by Christopher Beale and Ericka Cruz Guevarra, and hosted by Alan Montecillo.

    Two Latino Families on the Recall Election

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 30:45

    Latinos are roughly 28% of the voting public in California. And over the past 20 years or so, most have voted for Democrats, including Gov. Gavin Newsom. Now the recall election is here. And millions of Latino voters — from the Central Valley, to the Bay Area, to towns near the southern border — are deciding whether to vote yes, no, or whether to sit this one out. Guests: Maria Pena, producer for KQED en Espanol, and Scott Shafer, senior editor of KQED's politics and government desk

    What Could A Republican Governor Do?

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 22:10


    The last day to vote in the recall election is Tuesday, Sept. 14. And if Gov. Gavin Newsom is replaced, his most likely successor is conservative talk radio host Larry Elder — who, if elected, would be the only Republican statewide elected official. He would also have just one year before the next election in 2022. So how much could a new Republican governor actually do in that time? Guest: Marisa Lagos, political correspondent for KQED, and co-host of the Political Breakdown podcast This episode was cut by Alan Montecillo, scored and produced by Christopher Beale, and hosted by Ericka Cruz Guevarra.


    Many Communal Housing Residents in SF's Chinatown Want More Distance Learning

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 18:07

    Residents of communal housing in San Francisco's Chinatown are organizing to keep their students home. According to a survey of residents living in Single Room Occupancy hotels in Chinatown (or SROs) by the Chinatown Community Development Center, 70% of families in communal housing oppose in-person learning for their kids. A combination of factors — like a reliance on public transportation and the inability to quarantine in communal housing — are contributing to these feelings.  Guest: Joe Fitzgerald Rodriguez, producer and reporter for KQED Epiosde transcript here: https://bit.ly/3BRgdxR This episode was produced by Christopher Beale, Ericka Cruz Guevarra, and Alan Montecillo, and hosted by Ericka Cruz Guevarra.

    Why Was Angelo Quinto's Death Ruled an Accident?

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 25:38

    In December 2020, 30-year old Angelo Quinto died after an encounter with Antioch police. His family says that, after calling 911 for help, they witnessed officers using a knee-to-neck restraint, causing Quinto to die of asphyxiation in the hospital days later. In August, a coroner's inquest for Contra Costa County declared Quinto's death an accident. But the inquest process itself had some significant red flags — and it has left Quinto's family and many other Antioch residents feeling like that process is rigged. Guest: Sandhya Dirks, race and equity reporter for KQED This episode was produced by Christopher Beale and Alan Montecillo, and hosted by Ericka Cruz Guevarra.    

    What's at Stake as the Caldor Fire Threatens Lake Tahoe

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 18:15

    The Caldor Fire continues to burn, and tens of thousands of people have evacuated areas around Lake Tahoe, including the 22,000 residents of the city of South Lake Tahoe. The fire is threatening homes, livelihoods, and a place that so many in California know and love. Guest: Ezra David Romero, climate reporter for KQED Episode transcript here: https://bit.ly/3mQugiP This episode was produced by Alan Montecillo and Christopher Beale, and hosted by Ericka Cruz Guevarra. Listen and subscribe to the TahoeLand podcast from Capital Public Radio here.

    Benicia Breaks with Solano County on Masks

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 17:49

    In early August, 8 Bay Area counties reinstated mask mandates in indoor public spaces due to the spread of the Delta variant. Solano County was the only one that didn't. Last week, the city of Benicia broke with the county by approving its own indoor mask mandate. Today, we speak with the city's mayor about this decision, and what it says about differences within Solano County. Guest: Steve Young, Mayor of Benicia Transcript here: https://bit.ly/38oe6VJ

    A Farewell to Our Host, Devin Katayama

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 17:54

    It's time to say goodbye to our host. Devin Katayama is leaving The Bay to become KQED's first Editor of Talent and Development, where he'll help support interns and on-call staff develop their careers. To commemorate his three and a half years on the show, The Bay team took a field trip to a couple of Devin's treasured spots in the Bay Area to reflect on his time on the show, and what's next for him. Transcript here: https://bit.ly/3gErxFl

    Meet the Top 6 Recall Election Candidates

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 27:49


    When California voters look at their ballots for the Sept. 14 recall election, they will see 46 candidates who are running to replace Gov. Gavin Newsom. If a majority of voters mark “Yes” on the recall, Newsom will be removed from office, and 1 of these 46 people will become the state's next leader. Today, we'll meet the top 6 candidates: Larry Elder, Kevin Faulconer, John Cox, Kevin Kiley, Caitlyn Jenner, and Kevin Paffrath. Guest: Katie Orr, reporter with KQED's Politics and Government Desk.  To learn more about the recall election and the candidates mentioned in this episode click here.  Transcript here: https://bit.ly/3DeJy6T


    Some Santa Clara County Leaders Want the Sheriff Out

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 23:44

    In Santa Clara County, there are a series of controversies surrounding Sheriff Laurie Smith. They range from abuse in jails, to bribery — to even potential allegations of corruption and political influence. Now some South Bay leaders are saying enough is enough. San Jose Mayor Sam Liccardo wants Smith to resign, and county supervisors want her office investigated.  Guests: Adhiti Bandlamudi, KQED Silicon Valley reporter, and Alex Emslie, KQED criminal justice editor Read the episode transcript here. Follow The Bay to hear more local Bay Area stories like this one. New episodes are released Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 3 a.m.

    Our Fire Conversation Needs to Change

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 19:24

    Several wildfires are burning in Northern California — again. Fire is now a regular part of our lives, and we need to address it with the nuance and complexity it deserves.  But in order to do that, we need to rethink how we talk about and report on fire in the first place. Today, KQED Science reporter Danielle Venton shares what she's learned in 6 years of wildfire reporting — and what needs to change. More Resources: The Karuk Used to Manage the Forest for Centuries. Now They Want To Do That Again Map: Here's Your Daily Air Quality Report for the Bay Area What to Pack in Your Emergency Bag — With COVID-19 in Mind Read the episode transcript here.

    An ‘All-Hands-on-Deck' Moment for Afghan Refugee Resettlement

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 14:30

    The Bay Area is home to some of the largest Afghan communities in the U.S. And now, as the Taliban have taken over control of Afghanistan, refugee resettlement organizations here like Jewish Family and Community Services East Bay say the pace of people seeking refuge is "like nothing we've seen in recent years." Guest: Fouzia Azizi, Director of Refugee Services for Jewish Family and Community Services East Bay You can find opportunities to donate or help JFCS here. Read the episode transcript here.

    A Bay Curious Guide to Gov. Newsom's Recall Election

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 17:52

    Gov. Gavin Newsom's recall election is coming. Ballots have been mailed out and the last day to vote in Sept. 14. Feeling unprepared? Here's a primer with nitty-gritty voting details, some context for the campaign, and what you'll find on your ballot from our friends at Bay Curious. Transcript here: https://bit.ly/3sdB4I2

    Some Families Still Want Virtual Learning This Fall

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 20:51

    For the vast majority of families, this fall means a return to in-person school. But some have opted to stick with remote learning because of concerns over COVID-19. And in many cases — including in Oakland — the rollout of virtual learning this time around has been rocky. Guest: Vanessa Rancaño, KQED education reporter Transcript here: https://bit.ly/3sgb8vn

    Getting Ready to Teach in Person Again

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 20:14

    Bay Area teachers have been preparing to teach in-person again. There's so much to get ready for — whether it's taking steps to keep people safe from COVID-19, or figuring out how to navigate student group projects. But above all, these two Bay Area teachers are excited to return to what was lost: connecting in person with their students. Guests: Andreanna Yanez-Vierra, 1st grade teacher at Hoover Elementary School in Burlingame; Ralph Bedwell, English teacher at Pinole Valley High  Transcript here: https://bit.ly/3fRDmHO Follow The Bay to hear more local Bay Area stories like this one. New episodes are released Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 3 a.m. Find The Bay on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, NPR One or via Alexa. 

    Bay Area Students Are Going Back to School. Are Families Ready?

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 21:35

    Many Bay Area students are starting school this week, and in California, classes will mostly be in-person. At the same time, COVID cases are rising due to the delta variant. But after a year of remote learning, families and students have mixed feelings about going back to school in person. Guest: Julia McEvoy, KQED senior editor of education and equity. Read the episode transcript here. Follow The Bay to hear more local Bay Area stories like this one. New episodes are released Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 3 a.m. Find The Bay on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, NPR One or via Alexa. 

    The Youth Making BART Safer for Women and Girls as Service Increases

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 20:22

    Even before the pandemic, public transit did not feel safe to many women and girls. That's why the #NotOneMoreGirl initiative was launched and spearheaded by Bay Area youth — and they've already helped create changes at BART. As BART service resumes at near pre-pandemic hours, advocates say keeping vulnerable people safe is more important than ever. Guests: Haleema Bharoocha, senior advocacy manager at Alliance for Girls and Santana Tapia, with the #NotOneMoreGirl campaign and co-founder of Fluid Coffee and Events Click here to watch the bystander intervention training video produced by the Not One More Girl Campaign. Read the episode transcript here.

    The Race Against Time to Stop the Delta Variant in the Bay

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 18:22

    Just when there was a palpable sense that everything might be OK, the highly contagious Delta variant of COVID-19 came along. The race to vaccinate more people is now even more urgent; healthcare workers who are seeing more patients say another surge is entirely preventable, if only more people would get vaccinated.  Guest: Lesley McClurg, KQED science reporter Read the episode transcript here. Follow The Bay to hear more local Bay Area stories like this one. New episodes are released Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 3 a.m. Find The Bay on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, NPR One or via Alexa.

    Eating Inside? This Restaurant Requires Proof of Vaccination

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 15:46

    COVID-19 cases are on the rise again, fueled by the contagious Delta variant. And over the past few weeks, many Bay Area restaurants and bars have responded by requiring customers to prove they've been fully vaccinated before dining inside. Today, we visit one San Francisco business that recently made this decision. Guests: Eduardo Sandoval and Eva Lee of Santería margarita bar in San Francisco Read the transcript here.

    We're Taking a Break in July

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2021 2:27

    For the next few weeks, we're taking a break from making new episodes. It's a lot of work to bring you 3 shows a week, and we're going to use this time to rest up and reflect.  We're still going to be accessible if you want to hit us up with questions, comments or story ideas. We're on Twitter @TheBayKQED, and reachable via email at thebay@kqed.org.  Our next episode will be on Monday, August 2. Thank you all so much for listening and for supporting the show, and we're looking forward to sharing new episodes with you all when we come back. Episode transcript here: https://bit.ly/3hwPZbA

    On Our Watch: The Brady Rule

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2021 43:21

    Our colleagues at KQED and NPR have spent countless hours analyzing the world of police discipline, thanks to a police transparency law that unsealed thousands of files.  And over the past few weeks, they've been sharing that work in the form of On Our Watch, a limited-run podcast that brings you into the rooms where officers are interrogated and witnesses are questioned, to find out who this shadow system of police accountability really serves, and who it protects. Many episodes of On Our Watch also focus on Bay Area police departments. And today, we wanted to share an episode that focuses on Antioch — and what happened when a veteran detective spent years leaking operational secrets. Subscribe to On Our Watch here. 

    California Extended Its Eviction Moratorium (Again). Now What?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2021 17:30

    Gov. Gavin Newsom has signed a law that extends California's eviction protections for people economically impacted by COVID-19 — and who have paid at least 25% of the rent they owe — until Sept. 30. The state also has a plan to use $5.2 billion in federal money to pay for 100% of rental debt owed by eligible tenants. So for now, California has prevented thousands of landlords from evicting tenants who have been behind on rent due to the pandemic. But if we don't want to be in the same situation in 3 months, the state needs to get relief money to the people who need it — and fast.  Guest: Molly Solomon, KQED housing affordability reporter and co-host of Sold Out: Rethinking Housing in America Episode transcript here. Subscribe to our newsletter here.  

    ‘We Don't Want to See a Drop Wasted'

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2021 18:36

    California is in a second year of drought. And depending on where you live, you might already have water restrictions in place. Healdsburg, for example, has a mandatory 40% water restriction, while Santa Rosa has a voluntary 20%. In Mendocino County, and in areas of the North Bay that rely on the Russian River for water, cities, farmers and residents are trying to save for current and future droughts.  Guest: Ezra David Romero, KQED climate reporter Subscribe to our newsletter here.

    Tips on How to Address Your City Council (Also, It's Our 500th Episode!)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2021 25:05

    It's our 500th episode! One of the great joys of working on the show has been using our space to help people in the Bay Area get excited about or involved in issues they care about. Often that starts with local government. So we want to share one of our favorite episodes with you from earlier this year with tips about how to publicly address your elected leaders. Then, after that, we all hop on the mic to talk a little bit about why we love this episode, and share some stories from The Bay's early days. Guest: LaTonda Simmons, Oakland city clerk from 2004 to 2020, currently assistant city administrator Episode transcript here. This episode of our By the People series first published on January 4, 2021.

    From AIDS to COVID-19, Gay Activists in San Francisco Have Been Organizing in Public Health for Decades

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2021 18:35

    Forty years after the AIDS epidemic, the COVID-19 pandemic threatens those most at risk in the LGBTQ community across the world. Community organizers in the Bay Area have been building on the work of people like Bobbi Campbell, a San Francisco nurse who became the first person to go public with a cancer associated with AIDS. His work to educate the other gay men in the city was the beginning of an activist-led campaign that helped protect the queer community from AIDS even before the federal government acknowledged the disease. Guest: Sarah Hotchkiss, KQED Arts' Senior associate editor Read more of KQED Arts' series Pride as Protest. Episode transcript here. This episode originally aired on June 26, 2019. Subscribe to The Bay to hear more local Bay Area stories like this one. New episodes are released Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 3 a.m. Find The Bay on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, NPR One or via Alexa.

    A Pivotal Moment for Regulating Oil Companies in the Bay

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2021 17:42

    On June 2, so many people spoke during a Bay Area Air Quality Management District board meeting that the agency had to postpone a vote to regulate air pollution from two Bay Area refineries — one run by Chevron in Richmond, and one run by PBF Energy in Martinez. The proposal would force Chevron and PBF Energy to install potentially hundreds of millions of dollars' worth of equipment to clean the particulate matter released every day by their refineries. Now, the Air District board is has been rescheduled for July 21, in this pivotal decision that affects health, jobs, and our climate. Guest: Ted Goldberg, KQED senior editor Subscribe to our newsletter here.

    The Uncertain Future of La Pulga in San Jose

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2021 18:40

    On Tuesday, San Jose's City Council will vote on a plan to rezone parts of the Flea Market on Berryessa Road, where hundreds of immigrant vendors have set up shop for more than 60 years. The new development would include commercial and residential space near transit, including some affordable housing units. But it would also shrink the space for vendors dramatically, so much so that many fear they will lose their businesses altogether. Guests: Adhiti Bandlamudi, KQED Silicon Valley reporter and Carlos Cabrera-Lomeli, KQED en Español reporter

    Live Events Are Coming Back, But Challenges Remain for Arts Workers and Venue Owners

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2021 16:23

    Many live concerts and events are returning to the Bay Area, as COVID-19 cases remain low and the state ends capacity limits, social distancing and mask requirements in most places.  But not everyone working in live events is comfortable with the idea of working indoors with unmasked guests, and independent venues are still waiting for federal relief money that was promised months ago. Guest: Nastia Voynovskaya, KQED arts and culture associate editor Episode transcript here. Subscribe to our newsletter here.

    Why Some Fully Vaccinated Californians Will Keep Wearing Masks After June 15

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2021 20:26

    California will fully reopen for “business as usual”on June 15. That means, among other things, that fully vaccinated people will no longer be required to masks in most places around the state. But there are plenty of reasons you'll still see people in the Bay Area continuing to wear masks. We'll tell you about some of them. Guest: Carly Severn, KQED senior engagement editor Episode transcript here. Subscribe to our newsletter here.

    One Native American Tribe in Lake County is Creating Housing for Homeless Members

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2021 19:00

    The Scotts Valley Band of Pomo Indians doesn't have its own reservation. Like many Native communities, many members also struggle with poverty and homelessness. But recently, using funds from California's ‘Project Homekey,' the tribe bought an apartment building in Lake County to house members most in need. And leaders are also hoping it'll be the start of a new community hub for the tribe. Guest: Molly Solomon, KQED housing affordability reporter Read the transcript here. Subscribe to our newsletter here.

    Can California's 'Red Flag Law' Stop Gun Violence Before it Happens?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2021 17:32

    After the mass shooting at a Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority rail yard in San Jose two weeks ago, some politicians started talking about California's “Red Flag” gun control law, which uses the power of restraining orders to take guns away from people a judge deems at risk of harming themselves or others.  Many people aren't even aware of the red flag law. And using it as a way to prevent gun violence of all kinds — including mass shootings, suicides and domestic violence — is much more complicated than it seems.  Guest: Adhiti Bandlamudi, KQED Silicon Valley reporter  Episode transcript here. Subscribe to our newsletter here.

    The ‘Golden State Stimulus' Includes Undocumented Californians, But Many Can't Access Their Checks

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2021 16:02

    Undocumented Californians have been mostly shut out of three rounds of federal stimulus checks. So when the ‘Golden State Stimulus' was approved in February by the State Legislature and signed into law by Gov. Gavin Newsom, undocumented immigrants were hopeful that they'd finally receive some direct relief. But bureaucratic hoops have prevented many people from accessing this money in a timely fashion.  Guest: Carlos Cabrera-Lomelí, reporter for KQED en Español Episode transcript here. Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.

    Why The Vote to Recall Gov. Gavin Newsom Could Happen Sooner Than You Think

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2021 16:10

    The effort to recall Gov. Gavin Newsom picked up steam in late 2020, during the height of the pandemic. Now, COVID-19 has slowed down in California, and Gov. Newsom is currently in a strong position; one recent poll showed that just 40% of likely voters support recalling him from office. This has left some Democrats debating a thorny question: whether they should use the current recall laws to hold the election earlier, or wait until the fall, when most voters expect elections to take place. Guest: Guy Marzorati, KQED politics reporter and producer for the Political Breakdown podcast. Episode transcript here. Click here to subscribe to our weekly newsletter!

    Fentanyl Overdoses are Claiming Younger People’s Lives in Santa Clara County

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2021 17:48

    Deaths from fentanyl overdoses have been on the rise during the pandemic. In Santa Clara County, the ages of the victims are trending younger, according to an analysis by KQED and the Documenting COVID-19 project at Columbia University’s Brown Institute for Media Innovation. Fentanyl can be laced into pills that look like common painkillers — and thanks in part to COVID-19, buying these drugs online has become even more convenient. Now, parents and officials alike are trying to educate kids and community members about how much more lethal this synthetic opioid really is. Guest: Julie Small, KQED criminal justice & immigration reporter Columbia University students Mohar Chatterjee and Kyra Sense contributed to this story. Here Are Resources for Opioid Addiction in the Bay Area: More information about opioid addiction and fentanyl can be found on the Choose Change California website. Santa Clara County Behavioral Health Services treats people struggling with stress and substance use issues, including fentanyl use, through a program called Gateway, and the phone number is 1-800-488-9919. Elsewhere in the Bay Area, San Francisco County offers behavioral health care and services for addiction and substance abuse treatment. Alameda County offers similar services to people struggling with addiction. Episode transcript here. Subscribe to our newsletter here.

    The #VTAfamily is Mourning the Loss of Friends and Co-Workers

    Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2021 17:41

    The deadliest mass shooting in Bay Area history happened Wednesday at a rail yard for the Valley Transportation Authority, the Santa Clara County transit agency made up of around 2,000 employees. The 9 victims who died were maintenance workers, light rail operators, mechanics and supervisors. Public transit workers haven't had the privilege of sheltering at home during the pandemic, and for the past year they’ve kept transit going. Now, VTA workers are mourning the loss of friends and colleagues who they’ve worked alongside for years. Guest: Nico Savidge, transportation reporter for the San Jose Mercury Click here to view efforts to support victims' families. Episode transcript here. Subscribe to our newsletter here.

    The Black and Brown Families in Oakland Reimagining Education for Their Kids

    Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2021 17:54

    For years, Black and brown parents of Oakland Unified students have been pushing the district to do more to support kids in low-income communities of color. Then the pandemic hit, prompting fears of even more disparities in learning. So a group called The Oakland REACH decided to take matters into their own hands, and use the pandemic as an opportunity to continue reimagining their kids’ education. Guest: Vanessa Rancaño, KQED education reporter Episode transcript here: https://bit.ly/3oSiQu0 Subscribe to our newsletter here.

    South Hayward’s Trailing Vaccination Rate — and What’s Being Done About It

    Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2021 16:47

    South Hayward has one of the highest rates of per capita deaths in Alameda County. It also has one of the lowest vaccination rates. Some aren’t sure whether they want the vaccine, but there are also many other barriers related to language, work, and access. For volunteers, county officials and community clinics, addressing these barriers is central to a monthslong, on the ground effort to get more people vaccinated in a neighborhood with many immigrants and low-wage workers. Guest: Farida Jhabvala Romero, KQED immigration reporter Episode transcript here: https://bit.ly/3fdEBRI

    San Francisco’s ‘Guaranteed Income’ Pilot for Artists Starts Today. But Some Arts Groups are Unhappy with the Process So Far

    Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2021 21:36

    Starting Friday, May 21, 130 artists in San Francisco will receive $1,000 a month for the next 6 months through the city’s Guaranteed Income Pilot Program, which was announced in March to help artists from marginalized communities who have struggled during the pandemic. Most artists agree a guaranteed income would help. But as the program officially rolls out, some arts groups are concerned that the process of launching the experiment was inequitable from the beginning. Guest: Chloe Veltman, KQED arts and culture reporter Episode transcript here: https://bit.ly/3wsj39E. Subscribe to our newsletter here. Follow The Bay to hear more local Bay Area stories like this one. New episodes are released Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 3 a.m. Find The Bay on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, NPR One or via Alexa.

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