Podcasts about Napa

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Best podcasts about Napa

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Latest podcast episodes about Napa

Hopewell Baptist Church
When You Don't Feel Like It

Hopewell Baptist Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 39:00


"When You Don't Feel Like It" from Genesis 27:21-22 was preached by Pastor Mike Ray at Hopewell Baptist Church on Sunday Morning, 11/13/2022. You can watch the video archive of this sermon on our church website. You can also watch archived services on Vimeo, YouTube, Medium, or audio podcast. Stay up to date by following us on Facebook and Instagram. Hopewell Baptist Church is an Independent Baptist Church in Napa, California pastored by Mike Ray. It is Bible-based with a warm, friendly atmosphere. Hopewell is dedicated to bringing the water of life to the Napa Valley and beyond.

Hopewell Baptist Church
When God Visits

Hopewell Baptist Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 35:21


"When God Visits" from Psalm 8:4 was preached by Pastor Mike Ray at Hopewell Baptist Church on Sunday Evening, 11/13/2022. You can watch the video archive of this sermon on our church website. You can also watch archived services on Vimeo, YouTube, Medium, or audio podcast. Stay up to date by following us on Facebook and Instagram. Hopewell Baptist Church is an Independent Baptist Church in Napa, California pastored by Mike Ray. It is Bible-based with a warm, friendly atmosphere. Hopewell is dedicated to bringing the water of life to the Napa Valley and beyond.

BourbonBlog.com
Savage & Cooke's Lil Guero Bourbon Whiskey and Guero Rye Cognac Finish

BourbonBlog.com

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 28:39


Whiskey tasting and review of Savage & Cooke's Lil Guero Bourbon Whiskey at 7 years old and Guero Rye Finished in Cognac Barrels as Master Distiller Jordan joins Bourbon expert Tom Fischer in this podcast. These limited edition offerings are only part of the whiskey portfolio from Napa winemaker Dave Phinney's Nothern California Distillery. Feeling thirsty? We host Bourbon tastings . Contact us at tasting@bourbonblog.com about both our virtual and in-person whiskey and Bourbon tasting services. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bourbonblog/support

Foodie Chap
Liam's List: Napa Film Festival, Rocket Dog Rescue and Salute to Veterans

Foodie Chap

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 4:34


KCBS Radio's Foodie Chap Liam Mayclem discusses this weekend's fun events including the Napa Film Festival, Opera in the Park and more!

The Bellas Podcast
Bellas Flashback: Nikki & Brie 2022

The Bellas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 45:49


As Nikki & Brie spend time with family and get ready for the live show in Arizona later this week, we thought it would be fun to revisit some of the most memorable conversations that The Bellas had on the mic this year. We've had a lot of great guests on the show, but nothing beats the co-host chemistry between Nikki & Brie. This flashback episode starts off with Brie recounting a Birdie meltdown at an ice rink, only to be matched with a Matteo mess at a store that left Nikki showing the other shoppers more than she bargained for. Then we fast forward to a discussion about wedding guest etiquette, exceptions of guests, and a classic Nikki vs. Brie disagreement about hotel rooms. Then we jump ahead to Nikki's moving day. We've seen her heated before, but never like this. An infuriated Nikki shows no restraint when expressing her dissatisfaction with a landlord and some remorse for being "Nice Nikki." The episode closes out with a segment that left tire marks on the backs of both Bellas play "Under the Bus." Nikki & Brie compete to protect themselves from embarrassing stories and confessions by showing no mercy on the mic and revealing every detail. Be sure to join Nikki & Brie at CB Live in Phoenix on Thursday, 11/9/22, for Bellas Homecoming 2022 as they return to their hometown and celebrate with special guests and some fun plans on stage. Call The Bellas at 855-3BELLAS and leave a voicemail!Follow Nikki & Brie on Instagram.To watch exclusive videos of this week's episode, follow The Bellas Podcast on Instagram, Facebook, and Tik Tok!

Storied: San Francisco
Alemany Farm, Part 2 (S5E4)

Storied: San Francisco

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 28:41


There's wine grapes being grown in San Francisco. In Part 2, Christopher tells us all about the 280 Project, a viticulture apprenticeship and wine school. He partnered with a winemaker from Napa, a professor at UC Davis, and others back at home to bring BIPOC, LGBTQIA, and people who feel marginalized and want to learn anything at all about wine together to do just that. The 280 Project is a very hands-on adventure, with apprentices taking frequent field trips, learning how grapes are grown from the ground-up. They also cover winemaking as well as the financial side of things. Then we take a walk through Alemany Farm, starting with their outdoor kitchen. Christopher talks about the importance of location for the farm and kitchen, situated as it is between a gentrifying and affluent neighborhood and a housing project. To the south and east, it's a virtual food desert, with corner stores and chain fast-food most abundant. Up the hill in Bernal Heights, it's quite a different story. We chat about the idea of using parts of Golden Gate Park to cultivate the land and grow food for the people. It's what some call "food parks," and it's not as radical an idea as you might think. Another project Christopher is working on is a Black indigenous seed bank, which he tells us about. Besides providing seeds, it would be a repository of people and their food stories and histories. Count us on board for that. Then our tour takes us up to the vines, appropriately. We end our little journey at the greenhouse. We want to thank Christopher for his time talking with us and showing us around. Shout out to Isaiah Powell of Dragonspunk GRO for introducing us to Christopher and the 280 Project. Photography by Michelle Kilfeather

The Oregon Wine History Archive Podcast
Chenin And Sean Carlton: Oral History Interview

The Oregon Wine History Archive Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 91:33


This oral history interview is with Chenin and Sean Carlton of Twist Wine Company. Chenin and Sean talk about their various paths into the wine industry, with some recollections of the Temecula and Napa wine industries in California. They also talk about how they ended up in Oregon, and how they ended up with a hospitality space on the Oregon coast. Along the way, the pair talks about the growth of their brand and the various events they host, as well as the effects of the pandemic on their business and how they see things progressing in the future. This interview was conducted by Rich Schmidt at Twist Wine Company in Pacific City on March 15, 2022.

The Taste with Doug Shafer

Third-generation vintner Violet Grgich tells an incredible family wine story that spans a century that includes a world war, daring escapes, and a years-long journey to Napa Valley. Her grandfather was a winemaker in their small town in Croatia, her father came to Napa and help put the region on the world stage and started a winery, Grgich-Hills Estate, where today Violet is president. Enjoy!

Italian Wine Podcast
Ep. 1149 Felicity Carter | Uncorked

Italian Wine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 34:39


Welcome to episode 1149, in which host Polly Hammond interviews Felicity Carter, this week on Uncorked. Just arrived home from MediaFest22 in Washington DC, Felicity Carter and I sit down to discuss the state of journalism, insights from the conference, what it takes to make it in content these days…oh, and what we learned from five days of eating and drinking in the US capitol. This is a no-holds barred chat between friends, and we invite you to come along! Let's get into it. More about today's guest: Felicity Carter is a wine journalist, editor, and researcher. She is Editor of ARENI Global, International Editor of Star Wine List. Previously she worked for Meininger Verlag, Europe's biggest wine and spirits publisher, where she built Meininger's Wine Business International into the world's premier wine business magazine, with subscribers in more than 38 countries. Her work has also appeared in The Age and Sydney Morning Herald newspapers in Australia, and in The Guardian USA, among others. Felicity is an acclaimed international wine judge, speaker, and mentor. To learn more visit: Twitter: https://twitter.com/FelicityCarter LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/felicity-carter-a5754380/ Website: https://felicitycarter.com.au/ More about the host: Polly is Founder and CEO of 5forests. She splits her time between Barcelona, Auckland, and Napa, consulting, writing, and speaking about the trends that impact today's wine businesses. She's an advisor to New Zealand Trade & Enterprise, host of Uncorked with the Italian Wine Podcast, cohost of the Real Business of Wine with Robert Joseph, and, occasionally, a knitter. Polly is a graduate of the University of Southern California, where she earned degrees in International Relations and French. Those studies led to a deep and abiding love affair with behavioral Economics, and her wine work is based on insights into all the crazy and irrational reasons consumers engage with brands. With over 20 years' experience in growing successful companies, Polly knows first-hand the challenges faced by independent businesses. She approaches each client experience with empathy and understanding for what it takes to adapt and thrive in the real world. To learn more visit: Twitter: @mme_hammond Instagram: @pollyhammond_ website: https://5forests.com/ Let's keep in touch! Follow us on our social media channels: Instagram @italianwinepodcast Facebook @ItalianWinePodcast Twitter @itawinepodcast Tiktok @MammaJumboShrimp LinkedIn @ItalianWinePodcast If you feel like helping us, donate here www.italianwinepodcast.com/donate-to-show/ Until next time, Cin Cin!

Hopewell Baptist Church
Words On The Calendar

Hopewell Baptist Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 42:13


"Words On The Calendar" from Psalm 90:9, 12; Ecclesiastes 3:1, 11; Luke 10:38-42 was preached by Pastor Mike Ray at Hopewell Baptist Church on Sunday Morning, 11/6/2022. You can watch the video archive of this sermon on our church website. You can also watch archived services on Vimeo, YouTube, Medium, or audio podcast. Stay up to date by following us on Facebook and Instagram. Hopewell Baptist Church is an Independent Baptist Church in Napa, California pastored by Mike Ray. It is Bible-based with a warm, friendly atmosphere. Hopewell is dedicated to bringing the water of life to the Napa Valley and beyond.

Hopewell Baptist Church
The Christian Life And Spiritual Warfare

Hopewell Baptist Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 35:23


"The Christian Life And Spiritual Warfare" from Joshua 10:3-6 was preached by Pastor Mike Ray at Hopewell Baptist Church on Sunday Evening, 11/6/2022. You can watch the video archive of this sermon on our church website. You can also watch archived services on Vimeo, YouTube, Medium, or audio podcast. Stay up to date by following us on Facebook and Instagram. Hopewell Baptist Church is an Independent Baptist Church in Napa, California pastored by Mike Ray. It is Bible-based with a warm, friendly atmosphere. Hopewell is dedicated to bringing the water of life to the Napa Valley and beyond.

Tony Bruno Show
Into the Night w/ Tony Bruno - Nov 4, 2022

Tony Bruno Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 163:33


(Excuse the sound in the 1st couple of minutes. It clears up thereafter). First Friday of November and last weekend before we plunge into early darkness as DST ends and the long cold winter nears: but enough about the election as we had lots of fun on our latest "Into the Night" On @NoFilterNetwork World Series talk and an exquisite break down of the breaks of the Phillies which suddenly broke in games 4 and 5 as the Series WILL end in Houston this weekend. Live Wine talk and Tasting with the Brunos from Napa at MathewBruno.com (no relation) but the Pinot Noir pour was excellent and the finish was superb!  The big story was the sigh of relief as the entire nation awaits the end of this wretched election season (formerly known as election day) and the avalanche of awful TV and radio ads, plus an International #TwoChicksAtTheSameTime story. Tony Bruno covers News, Politics, Sports & Entertainment like no other & it will keep you laughing all night long. Join him, Miss Robin & guests from 7-9p ET every Fri Night, LIVE on the NoFilter Network. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Crime, Cults, & Coffee.
Episode 108: "Cloak of Darkness”/ Napa Halloween Murders

Crime, Cults, & Coffee.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 56:29


In 2004, Halloween turned tragic when 2 brutal murders shocked the city of Napa. Adriane Insogna and Leslie Mazarra were taken from the lives that they had started for themselves. Before that night, the safe community hadn't dealt with a homicide in years. They were left with devastation and the constant fear of who did it and why. Was it a neighbor, a friend, a stranger… & why? --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/crime-cults-and-coffee/support

Flyover Boys
Episode 38 - Smashing Ducks Bucks

Flyover Boys

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 85:52


The boys are back at it! Topics discussed: Wine season, Chad's start of duck hunting season, Brett's adventures down at the Eagle Open in Knoxville and the UT game, Things Brazilians have invented, Silly lawsuits, Halloween night with Brett, Greg and the neighbors, We got a new company coming to you soon... you're welcome, New studio updates, Virus lawsuits in New York, Elon's Twitter corrections are on point for now, Apple vs Google phones, Where will be on election night next Tuesday, Bad senate candidates, Drink of the Week courtesy of Greger is The Long Meadow Ranch Cab out of Napa, We got a couple lists, What sporting league would you buy a franchise in and all the extra banter you expect.    Any questions for an upcoming pod shoot us a line at flyoverboyspod@gmail.com

Chad Hartman
Is wine more important to Chad than his work?

Chad Hartman

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 14:54


Chad has a dilemma as he works from home. Should he get up and leave the show in the middle of a segment if the FedEx driver shows up with the Napa wine delivery he is expecting? We explore that after hearing from some howling Wolves fans getting ready for tonight's game against Milwaukee.

Cork & Taylor Wine Podcast
Episode 63: Ron Scharman, Fly with Wine

Cork & Taylor Wine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 40:04


As you know, I go to Napa/Sonoma quite a bit to record the Cork & Taylor Wine Podcast and I usually get some wine...I always struggle to find the time to ship it back home well Ron Scharman of Fly With Wine has the solution on this weeks C&T Episode. Scharman joins us this week and he has a very strong and interesting background in wine which he shares along with some other funny stories from a wine life well travelled. Thanks to Ron you now can bring home wine with you!Don't forget to Subscribe, Rate and Review! Please please It only takes a few minutes and helps me/the show grow. The more subscribers, reviews and rates helps us to get discovered! Also, follow us on our Facebook @corkandtaylor and Instagram accounts @corkandtaylorpodcast.Also, Please consider supporting the show as it would be appreciated. This helps me offset  expenses to continue to run and grow the Cork & Taylor Wine Podcast. Thanks! Lukehttps://www.patreon.com/corkandtaylor

Coast Mornings Podcasts with Blake and Eva
11 - 3-22 BEB REXHA. INGRID ANDRESS AND OTHER MUSIC FROM NAPA

Coast Mornings Podcasts with Blake and Eva

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 5:13


11 - 3-22 BEB REXHA. INGRID ANDRESS AND OTHER MUSIC FROM NAPA by Maine's Coast 93.1

The Wine CEO Podcast
The Wine CEO Episode #97: Interview with Trevor Durling, Senior Winemaker at Beaulieu Vineyards

The Wine CEO Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 46:27


Beaulieu Vineyards (BV) is one of Napa's oldest and most significant wineries with many of their wines gracing the tables of Presidents and Heads of State around the world. Today on The Wine CEO Podcast, Sarah sits down with Senior Winemaker, Trevor Durling, to discuss his journey to BV, the history of this incredible brand, the hardest thing about being a winemaker, and what exciting things BV has in store for 2023. They discuss the unique terroir of Rutherford AVA and also talk some unique food and wine pairings. It's an episode you don't want to miss, so grab a glass of your favorite wine and press play now! -------- Sign up for my newsletter and get a free guide to Food & Wine Pairing! >> thewineceo.com Email: Sarah@thewineceo.com  Instagram: @thewineceo Facebook: @sarahthewineceo Today's Sponsor: Wash & Wik washandwik.com Use my code THEWINECEO for 20% off your purchase. -------- Today's Guest: Trevor Durling, Head Winemaker BV Wines bvwines.com Beaulieu Vineyard Instagram: @bvwines Trevor Durling Instagram: @trevor.durling  

The Cannabis Connection
Aaron Keefer - Cultivation & Production Sonoma Hills Farm 10/14/22

The Cannabis Connection

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 53:08


Vice President of Cultivation & Production, Aaron Keefer of Sonoma Hills FarmPrior to joining in February 2020, Aaron Keefer held a ten-year tenure as culinary gardener for the Thomas Keller Restaurant Group (TKG), which includes famed, three-Michelin Star restaurant, The French Laundry, in Napa, California. Keefer's green thumb and passion for the land emerged as a young child in his grandfather's farm in upstate New York. In the restaurant world Keefer built a reputation as one of the most respected gardeners in the industry. From the life of soil to pest management, microbial and fungal elements to the weather, he understands that gardening does not exist in a vacuum. The finest ingredients are produced in harmony with nature and the elements that it brings. Furthermore, Keefer cultivated legal and top-shelf medical cannabis flower that sold at premium dispensaries like The Apothecarium, Grass Roots, and Peace in Medicine (now SPARC) before 2018 under Proposition 215 guidelines. Before developing his passion for culinary gardening, Keefer honed his culinary skills under notable Bay Area Chefs Michael Chiarello and Julian Serrano and subsequently became the Executive Chef at Marin Country Club, where he was later promoted as its Food and Beverage Director. He is a graduate of the Culinary Institute of America.

XChateau - Navigating the Business of Wine
Enhancing the Enjoyment of Wine Collecting w/ Elton Potts, Vine Vault

XChateau - Navigating the Business of Wine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 47:52


Catching the wine bug from the nudge of a physical trainer, Elton Potts, Founder & Managing Partner of Vine Vault, has built a business focused on enhancing the enjoyment of wine and wine collecting. From full-service wine storage to refrigerated shipping to hosting wine events, Vine Vault has grown rapidly and serves six markets in the US.  Detailed Show Notes: Elton's backgroundA 27-year career in finance & ops ran a global storage and logistics businessA physical trainer said beer would undo the impacts of training and to substitute it with red wineFrustrated with storage and delivery options that existed, he started Vine VaultVine Vault1st two facilities launched in Q4 of 201570% annual revenue growth, doubled in 2021Six markets (Napa, LA, Austin, Atlanta, Miami, Philadelphia), >50 team members (incl ~12 sommeliers)>75% of wine stored in a full-service storage programMission: to enhance the enjoyment of wine and wine collecting (beyond storage)Additional services Fully refrigerated, door-to-door delivery services Fulfillment service for high-end wineries, incl pick & pack, hand labeling, wax dippingMoving cellarsWine eventsSommelier servicesStorage basicsClimate control with low temp fluctuationHumidity - too dry dries corks; too humid creates moldSecurity - feel safe and have ease of accessAccess wine - want availability, but doesn't risk securityClean facility - no chemical smells that can damage wine or rodents that might eat labels and packagingLocation access - ease of drop off / pick up (e.g., ramps)No vibrationLifestyle requirements - staff to receive shipments, inventory winesPricing varies by locationSelf storage - ~$3-4/case/monthConcierge / full service - ~$4.5-8/case/monthScale is not that important for only storageScale supports logistics and eventsPlans to expand into more markets Arranges pickup & delivery of wines bought from wineries for consumersSchedules delivery, refrigerated, no styrofoam Winery avoids breakage, returns, and damageWinery knows customers get the best experience of the wineInflation and supply chain impacts - price not keeping up with cost increasesAdded a fuel surchargeThe most significant issues are supply chain, e.g., a truck offline for 4 months waiting for a door latchDeveloped boxes for storage & shippingCardboard lays bottles flat, sturdy for stacking, and bottles don't touch each other40-60% recycled material, no styrofoamWhite color to show confidence in the process, won't get dirty or damagedTraveling road show for wineries - organize and plan eventsBusiness breakdown - all segments growingWine delivery 40%, storage 30%, wine moving 20%, events 10%The biggest opportunity is delivering wineTrendsMore women collecting winePost-baby boomers collecting wineThe storage business is still growing, and people are becoming aware of it Get access to library episodes Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Marcus & Sandy's Second Date Update
Lance & Jade Both Live in Napa

Marcus & Sandy's Second Date Update

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 8:07


They went out to dinner, and Lance says he had a great time with Jade! He really wants to see her again, but she's ghosting him. Lance is asking for our help to figure out what's going on.

Remarkable Results Radio Podcast
Google Reviews: New Value From the Words Used [RR 791]

Remarkable Results Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 30:23


We are with Jimmy Lea from Kukui at ASTE 2022 with another important Google Update. We are always keeping you in the know as it relates to mother Google. Google is now giving more credibility and weight to customer reviews. It goes beyond their ranked star review and dives into what they wrote, word for word, literally. What does that mean for your shop? Jimmy Lea, https://www.kukui.com/ (KUKUI) Evangelist. Listen to Jimmy's previous episodes https://remarkableresults.biz/?s=jimmy+lea (HERE) Key Talking Points The Google algorithms have  changed, and now they are giving more credibility and more weight to customer reviews Be an open book when we're asking for our reviews. You want five stars, but you also need three, two, and one in order to get the ranking right. Customers want to know how you handle mistakes. Recent reviews show a customer what they will expect.  The good and the bad of Google Reviews are once you go on and leave a Google Review when you come back, you can revise the review, but you can't leave another standalone review The about us page is so important. You must have employee testimonials, customer testimonials, and what makes your shop unique  Do short videos on your about page from the customers and technicians The power of blogs. Google gives more credibility to the blog, and they  need to be consistent Connect with the Podcast: https://aftermarketradionetwork.com/ (Aftermarket Radio Network) http://youtube.com/carmcapriotto (Subscribe on YouTube) https://remarkableresults.biz/episodes (Visit us on the Web) https://www.facebook.com/RemarkableResultsPodcast (Follow on Facebook) https://remarkableresults.biz/insider/ (Become an Insider) https://www.buymeacoffee.com/carm (Buy me a coffee) https://remarkableresults.biz/books/ (Important Books) Check out today's partner: Learn more about NAPA AutoCare and the benefits of being part of the NAPA family by visiting http://www.NAPAAutoCare.com (www.NAPAAutoCare.com) https://aftermarketradionetwork.com () https://remarkableresultsradio.captivate.fm/listen ()

Gritmen Show
Episode 12: Grant Long Jr. - Harvesting Grit

Gritmen Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 87:57


From making wine in his parents garage as a teenager to being the youngest first generation winery owner in Napa Valley history, Grant Long Jr. has done it his way one relationship at a time. Grant makes wine a personal experience and the only way to get his wine is to make the trip to Napa and shake his hand. Gritman records this interview amongst the vines at Grant's winery Aonair with the help of fellow Gritmen Cale, Danny and Chip. From the casual wine drinker to the wine enthusiast, this episode has a little something for everyone. In the end, we discover that grit does exist in California.  Show highlights: -building a grassroots family business -leading from the front, no excuses attitude -leasing vs owning land -balancing business and family -teaching kids the value of a dollar -navigating the wine list at a nice restaurant -how to open wax covered bottles -scaling a business without losing the craft -God bless Texas Disclaimer: This episode was recorded under the influence of good wine  Visit Grant's wineries:  Aonair  Reverie II  Call Matt Lonergan to schedule a tasting (707) 738-8352  Thank you to our Episode Sponsors:  Clear Companies  Bubela Real Estate  Higginbotham  Shirt Sponsor:  Poncho Outdoors  Brand Partners:  Turtle Box Audio  Chama Chairs *use code GRIT to unlock special Gritmen savings

Truth, Lies & Alibis
Halloween Homicide - Adriane Insogna and Leslie Mazzara

Truth, Lies & Alibis

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 32:38


For this Halloween Monday, Brittany tells Jess about Adriane Insogna and Leslie Mazzara, who were murders on a Halloween night in 2004. Case episodes will be released every Monday. They are available anywhere you get your podcasts, including Youtube."Atlantean Twilight" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 Licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/References:“links”Facebook - Truth, Lies, and AlibisInstagram - @truthliesandalibisTwitter - @TLandApodcastYoutube - Truth, Lies & Alibis PodcastEmails can be sent to - TLApodcast@yahoo.comPodcast website - Truthliesandalibis.buzzsprout.com

Uglee Truth
Uglee Truth 592: Pet Tech, Potstickers and Pedicure Porn

Uglee Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 50:09


On this episode, Jamie has had just about enough of a particular vet tech and Producer Dub (aka, Jamie's husband who sits in for Stephanie) has his ultimate "I was today years old" moment. Plus, while dining at the upscale restaurant where their daughter currently works, they decided to have an Only Fans conversation which included a debate about toe nails... for sale. Have fun with this one HUgs and thanks, as always, for listening.

I Said God Damn! A True Crime Podcast

This week Erin tells us about the brutal murder of Adriane Insogna and Leslie Mazzara in Napa, Ca in 2004 . Sources: https://abcnews.go.com/Primetime/LegalCenter/story?id=1187524&page=1 https://forensicfilesnow.com/index.php/tag/eric-copple/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V71UlNRU2M4

Italian Wine Podcast
Ep. 1140 Steph Duboudin | Uncorked

Italian Wine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 60:22


Welcome to episode 1140, in which host Polly Hammond interviews Steph Duboudin, this week on Uncorked. In this episode, we welcome Steph Duboudin, an absolute powerhouse in Australasian wine marketing. With a wine career spanning over 20 years, Steph has been the Australia/New Zealand manager for Wine Intelligence and Decanter, Judge of the Wine Communicators of the Year Award for five years running, and Chair of Wine Victoria. Today, Steph shares her extensive knowledge on the state of Australian wine while we dive into my favourite topic: the future of wine marketing. We'll talk changing markets and trends to watch for, data and ecomm, no and low alc, and what it took to sell wine in the longest locked-down city in the world. More about today's guest: Stephanie Duboudin has over two decades of experience in Marketing Strategy, Brand Management, Innovation and Consumer and Category Insights in the food and wine industries. She is Chair of WIne Victoria and a Board Member of the Wine Communicators of Australia. Stephanie has worked in London, New York, China, Hong Kong, Canada and Melbourne with brands across the food and wine industries. Stephanie established the Wine Intelligence office in Australia/NZ for the global wine insights agency. During her time as Country Manager Australia/NZ with Wine Intelligence she managed projects across Australia and Asia for Dan Murphy's, Accolade, Constellation, Lion Nathan, Treasury, Pernod Ricard, Brown Brothers, Wine Australia, NZ Gov't, Delegats, Coles, WFA, McWilliams, Brown Brothers and De Bortoli. Prior to this Stephanie was a global brand manager in New York for the esteemed Kobrand Corporation, Marketing Manger for Yabby Lake & Heathcote Estate and Global Brand Manager for the Rathbone Wine Group. Stephanie has developed and launched numerous brands including Craggy Range and Foley Estates in the US and Yabby Lake and Heathcote Estate in Australia. To learn more visit: Food & Wine Insights: http://foodandwineinsights.com.au/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephanie-duboudin-8ab05b1/ Referenced in the show: https://tourismmarketing.agency/ More about the host: Polly is Founder and CEO of 5forests. She splits her time between Barcelona, Auckland, and Napa, consulting, writing, and speaking about the trends that impact today's wine businesses. She's an advisor to New Zealand Trade & Enterprise, host of Uncorked with the Italian Wine Podcast, cohost of the Real Business of Wine with Robert Joseph, and, occasionally, a knitter. Polly is a graduate of the University of Southern California, where she earned degrees in International Relations and French. Those studies led to a deep and abiding love affair with behavioral Economics, and her wine work is based on insights into all the crazy and irrational reasons consumers engage with brands. With over 20 years' experience in growing successful companies, Polly knows first-hand the challenges faced by independent businesses. She approaches each client experience with empathy and understanding for what it takes to adapt and thrive in the real world. To learn more visit: Twitter: @mme_hammond Instagram: @pollyhammond_ website: https://5forests.com/ Let's keep in touch! Follow us on our social media channels: Instagram @italianwinepodcast Facebook @ItalianWinePodcast Twitter @itawinepodcast Tiktok @MammaJumboShrimp LinkedIn @ItalianWinePodcast If you feel like helping us, donate here www.italianwinepodcast.com/donate-to-show/ Until next time, Cin Cin!

The Right Wine
Episodio 176 - Monopoly de Napa? Preguntas y respuestas.

The Right Wine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 49:26


En este episodio hablamos sobre algunas noticias interesantes en el mundo del vino y contestamos sus preguntas y respuestas!

Music in the Bottle
Who Wears Beats?

Music in the Bottle

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 98:23


The guys are back, driving new whips & ready to pod! Wayne touches on his time back in Detroit & the guys think he might be moving back! Darryl shares updates from running his 3rd Marathon & Jamele updates the guys on weekend plans back in Lansing. They show love this episode to Bronny on his NIL deal & the newest Beats by Dre commercial with Lebron. In music they give their takes on Lil Baby's new album and what makes his sound unique compared to other rappers that get categorized for sounding the same. They give love to Lil Yachty and his new single, "Poland" , Diddy's latest remix to "Gotta Move On". Favorite Halloween costumes, early NBA Champion picks & more this episode! Grab a Napa cab, Riesling, or Pet-Nat & tune in to the full episode now! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/musicinthebottle/support

The Vint Podcast
Ep. 47: Interview with Winery Owner and BNY Mellon Senior Strategist Ken Freeman, Vint Updates, & Billy's Exam

The Vint Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 43:09


In this episode of the Vint Podcast,  Brady and Billy are joined by Ken Freeman , owner of Freeman Winery and BNY Mellon senior strategist, aka the perfect combination of finance and wine. We discuss how he and Akiko acquired a Sonoma vineyard and winery for a steal and were immediately profitable (unheard of in the wine space), Sonoma Coast wines, and his work with regional viticultural organizations. We also cover his work outside of the winery, where Ken is at BNY Mellon and works with estates throughout Napa and Sonoma to manage the sale and acquisition of high-profile vineyards and wine brands.  Cheers!Contact us anytime at brady@vint.co or billy@vint.co

The Lunar Society
Brian Potter - Future of Construction, Ugly Modernism, & Environmental Review

The Lunar Society

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 145:57


Brian Potter is the author of the excellent Construction Physics blog, where he discusses why the construction industry has been slow to industrialize and innovate.He explains why:* Construction isn't getting cheaper and faster,* We should have mile-high buildings and multi-layer non-intersecting roads,* “Ugly” modern buildings are simply the result of better architecture,* China is so great at building things,* Saudi Arabia's Line is a waste of resources,* Environmental review makes new construction expensive and delayed,* and much much more!Watch on YouTube. Listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or any other podcast platform. Read the full transcript here.Follow me on Twitter for updates on future episodes.More really cool guests coming up; subscribe to find out about future episodes!You may also enjoy my interviews with Tyler Cowen (about talent, collapse, & pessimism of sex). Charles Mann (about the Americas before Columbus & scientific wizardry), and Austin Vernon about (Energy Superabundance, Starship Missiles, & Finding Alpha).If you end up enjoying this episode, I would be super grateful if you share it, post it on Twitter, send it to your friends & group chats, and throw it up wherever else people might find it. Can't exaggerate how much it helps a small podcast like mine.A huge thanks to Graham Bessellieu for editing this podcast and Mia Aiyana for producing its transcript.Timestamps(0:00) - Why Saudi Arabia's Line is Insane, Unrealistic, and Never going to Exist (06:54) - Designer Clothes & eBay Arbitrage Adventures (10:10) - Unique Woes of The Construction Industry  (19:28) - The Problems of Prefabrication (26:27) - If Building Regulations didn't exist… (32:20) - China's Real Estate Bubble, Unbound Technocrats, & Japan(44:45) - Automation and Revolutionary Future Technologies (1:00:51) - 3D Printer Pessimism & The Rising Cost of Labour(1:08:02) - AI's Impact on Construction Productivity(1:17:53) - Brian Dreams of Building a Mile High Skyscraper(1:23:43) - Deep Dive into Environmentalism and NEPA(1:42:04) - Software is Stealing Talent from Physical Engineering(1:47:13) - Gaps in the Blog Marketplace of Ideas(1:50:56) - Why is Modern Architecture So Ugly?(2:19:58) - Advice for Aspiring Architects and Young Construction PhysicistsTranscriptWhy Saudi Arabia's Line is Insane, Unrealistic, and Never going to Exist Dwarkesh Patel Today, I have the pleasure of speaking with Brian Potter, who is an engineer and the author of the excellent Construction Physics blog, where he writes about how the construction industry works and why it has been slow to industrialize and innovate. It's one of my favorite blogs on the internet, and I highly, highly recommend that people check it out. Brian, my first question is about The Line project in Saudi Arabia. What are your opinions? Brian Potter It's interesting how Saudi Arabia and countries in the Middle East, in general, are willing to do these big, crazy, ambitious building projects and pour huge amounts of money into constructing this infrastructure in a way that you don't see a huge amount in the modern world. China obviously does this too in huge amounts, some other minor places do as well, but in general, you don't see a whole lot of countries building these big, massive, incredibly ambitious projects. So on that level, it's interesting, and it's like, “Yes, I'm glad to see that you're doing this,” but the actual project is clearly insane and makes no sense. Look at the physical arrangement layout–– there's a reason cities grow in two dimensions. A one-dimensional city is the worst possible arrangement for transportation. It's the maximum amount of distance between any two points. So just from that perspective, it's clearly crazy, and there's no real benefit to it other than perhaps some weird hypothetical transportation situation where you had really fast point-to-point transportation. It would probably be some weird bullet train setup; maybe that would make sense. But in general, there's no reason to build a city like that. Even if you wanted to build an entirely enclosed thing (which again doesn't make a huge amount of sense), you would save so much material and effort if you just made it a cube. I would be more interested in the cube than the line. [laughs] But yeah, those are my initial thoughts on it. I will be surprised if it ever gets built. Dwarkesh Patel Are you talking about the cube from the meme about how you can put all the humans in the world in a cube the size of Manhattan? Brian Potter Something like that. If you're just going to build this big, giant megastructure, at least take advantage of what that gets you, which is minimum surface area to volume ratio.Dwarkesh Patel Why is that important? Would it be important for temperature or perhaps other features? Brian Potter This is actually interesting because I'm actually not sure how sure it would work with a giant single city. In general, a lot of economies of scale come from geometric effects. When something gets bigger, your volume increases a lot faster than your surface area does. So for something enclosed, like a tank or a pipe, the cost goes down per thing of unit you're transporting because you can carry a larger amount or a smaller amount of material. It applies to some extent with buildings and construction because the exterior wall assembly is a really burdensome, complicated, and expensive assembly. A building with a really big floor plate, for instance, can get more area per unit, per amount of exterior wall. I'm not sure how that actually works with a single giant enclosed structure because, theoretically, on a small level, it would apply the same way. Your climate control is a function of your exterior surface, at some level, and you get more efficient climate control if you have a larger volume and less area that it can escape from. But for a giant city, I actually don't know if that works, and it may be worse because you're generating so much heat that it's now harder to pump out. For examples like the urban heat island effect, where these cities generate massive amounts of waste heat, I don't know if that would work if it didn't apply the same way. I'm trying to reach back to my physics classes in college, so I'm not sure about the actual mechanics of that. Generally though, that's why you'd want to perhaps build something of this size and shape. Dwarkesh Patel What was the thought process behind designing this thing? Because Scott Alexander had a good blog post about The Line where he said, presumably, that The Line is designed to take up less space and to use less fuel because you can just use the same transportation across. But the only thing that Saudi Arabia has is space and fuel. So what is the thought process behind this construction project? Brian PotterI get the sense that a lot of committees have some amount of success in building big, impressive, physical construction projects that are an attraction just by virtue of their size and impressiveness. A huge amount of stuff in Dubai is something in this category, and they have that giant clock tower in Jeddah, the biggest giant clock building and one of the biggest buildings in the world, or something like that. I think, on some level, they're expecting that you would just see a return from building something that's really impressive or “the biggest thing on some particular axis”. So to some extent, I think they're just optimizing for big and impressive and maybe not diving into it more than that. There's this theory that I think about every so often. It's called the garbage can theory of organizational decision-making, which basically talks about how the choices that organizations make are not the result of any particular recent process. They are the result of how, whenever a problem comes up, people reach into the garbage can of potential solutions. Then whatever they pull out of the garbage can, that's the decision that they end up going with, regardless of how much sense it makes. It was a theory that was invented by academics to describe decision-making in academia. I think about that a lot, especially with reference to big bureaucracies and governments. You can just imagine the draining process of how these decisions evolve. Any random decision can be made, especially when there's such a disconnect between the decision-makers and technical knowledge.Designer Clothes & eBay Arbitrage Adventures Dwarkesh PatelTell me about your eBay arbitrage with designer clothes. Brian Potter Oh man, you really did dive deep. Yeah, so this was a small business that I ran seven or eight years ago at this point. A hobby of mine was high-end men's fashion for a while, which is a very strange hobby for an engineer to have, but there you go. That hobby centers around finding cheap designer stuff, because buying new can be overwhelmingly expensive. However, a lot of times, you can get clothes for a very cheap price if you're even a little bit motivated. Either it shows up on eBay, or it shows up in thrift stores if you know what to look for. A lot of these clothes can last because they're well-made. They last a super, super, super long time–– even if somebody wore it for 10 years or something, it could be fine. So a lot of this hobby centered around finding ways to get really nice clothes cheaply. Majority of it was based around eBay, but it was really tedious to find really nice stuff on eBay. You had to manually search for a bunch of different brands, filter out the obviously bad ones, search for typos in brands, put in titles, and stuff like that. I was in the process of doing this, and I thought, “Oh, this is really annoying. I should figure out a way to automate this process.” So I made a very simple web app where when you searched for shoes or something, it would automatically search the very nice brands of shoes and all the typos of the brand name. Then it would just filter out all the junk and let you search through the good stuff. I set up an affiliate system, basically. So anybody else that used it, I would get a kick of the sales. While I was interested in that hobby, I ran this website for a few years, and it was reasonably successful. It was one of the first things I did that got any real traction on the internet, but it was never successful in proportion to how much effort it took to maintain and update it. So as I moved away from the hobby, I eventually stopped putting time and effort into maintaining the website. I'm curious as to how you even dug that up. Dwarkesh Patel I have a friend who was with you at the Oxford Refugees Conference, Connor Tabarrok. I don't know if you remember him. Brian Potter Nice. Dwarkesh Patel Yeah. Finding other information about you on the internet was quite difficult actually. You've somehow managed to maintain your anonymity. If you're willing to reveal, what was the P&L of this project? Brian Potter Oh, it made maybe a few hundred dollars a month for a few years, but I only ever ran it as a side hobby business, basically. So in terms of time per my effort or whatever, I'm sure it was very low. Pennies to an hour or something like that. Unique Woes of The Construction Industry   Dwarkesh Patel A broad theme that I've gotten from your post is that the construction industry is plagued with these lossy feedback loops, a lack of strong economies of scale, regulation, and mistakes being very costly. Do you think that this is a general characteristic of many industries in our world today, or is there something unique about construction? Brian Potter Interesting question. One thing you think of is that there are a lot of individual factors that are not unique at all. Construction is highly regulated, but it's not necessarily more regulated than medical devices or jet travel, or even probably cars, to some extent, which have a whole vat of performance criteria they need to hit. With a couple of things like land use, for example, people say, “Oh, the land requirements, could you build it on-site,” explaining how those kinds of things make it difficult. But there is a lot that falls into this category that doesn't really share the same structure of how the construction industry works.I think it's the interaction of all those effects. One thing that I think is perhaps underappreciated is that the systems of a building are really highly coupled in a way that a lot of other things are. If you're manufacturing a computer, the hard drive is somewhat independent from the display and somewhat independent from the power supply. These things are coupled, but they can be built by independent people who don't necessarily even talk to each other before being assembled into one structured thing. A building is not really like that at all. Every single part affects every single other part. In some ways, it's like biology. So it's very hard to change something that doesn't end up disrupting something else. Part of that is because a job's building is to create a controlled interior environment, meaning, every single system has to run through and around the surfaces that are creating that controlled interior. Everything is touching each other. Again, that's not unique. Anything really highly engineered, like a plane or an iPhone, share those characteristics to some extent. In terms of the size of it and the relatively small amount you're paying in terms of unit size or unit mass, however, it's quite low. Dwarkesh Patel Is transportation cost the fundamental reason you can't have as much specialization and modularity?Brian Potter Yeah, I think it's really more about just the way a building is. An example of this would be how for the electrical system of your house, you can't have a separate box where if you needed to replace the electrical system, you could take the whole box out and put the new box in. The electrical system runs through the entire house. Same with plumbing. Same with the insulation. Same with the interior finishes and stuff like that. There's not a lot of modularity in a physical sense. Dwarkesh Patel Gotcha. Ben Kuhn  had this interesting comment on your article where he pointed out that many of the reasons you give for why it's hard to innovate in construction, like sequential dependencies and the highly variable delivery timelines are also common in software where Ben Koon works. So why do you think that the same sort of stagnation has not hit other industries that have superficially similar characteristics, like software? Brian Potter How I think about that is that you kind of see a similar structure in anything that's project-based or anything where there's an element of figuring out what you're doing while you're doing it. Compared to a large-scale manufacturing option where you spend a lot of time figuring out what exactly it is that you're building. You spend a lot of time designing it to be built and do your first number of runs through it, then you tweak your process to make it more efficient. There's always an element of tweaking it to make it better, but to some extent, the process of figuring out what you're doing is largely separate from the actual doing of it yourself. For a project-based industry, it's not quite like that. You have to build your process on the fly. Of course, there are best practices that shape it, right? For somebody writing a new software project or anything project-based, like making a movie, they have a rough idea for how it's going to go together. But there's going to be a lot of unforeseen things that kind of come up like that. The biggest difference is that either those things can often scale in a way that you can't with a building. Once you're done with the software project, you can deploy it to 1,000 or 100,000, or 1 million people, right? Once you finish making a movie, 100 million people can watch it or whatever. It doesn't quite look the same with a building. You don't really have the ability to spend a lot of time upfront figuring out how this thing needs to go. You kind of need to figure out a way to get this thing together without spending a huge amount of time that would be justified by the sheer size of it. I was able to dig up a few references for software projects and how often they just have these big, long tails. Sometimes they just go massively, massively over budget. A lot of times, they just don't get completed at all, which is shocking, but because of how many people it can then be deployed to after it's done, the economics of it are slightly different. Dwarkesh Patel I see, yeah. There's a famous law in software that says that a project will take longer than you expect even after you recount for the fact that it will take longer than you expect. Brian Potter Yeah. Hofstadter's law or something like that is what I think it is. Dwarkesh Patel Yeah. I'm curious about what the lack of skill in construction implies for startups. Famously, in software, the fact that there's zero marginal cost to scaling to the next customer is a huge boon to a startup, right? The entire point of which is scaling exponentially. Does that fundamentally constrain the size and quantity of startups you can have in construction if the same scaling is not available?Brian Potter Yeah, that's a really good question. The obvious first part of the answer is that for software, obviously, if you have a construction software company, you can scale it just like any other software business. For physical things, it is a lot more difficult. This lack of zero marginal cost has tended to fight a lot of startups, not just construction ones. But yeah, it's definitely a thing. Construction is particularly brutal because the margins are so low. The empirical fact is that trying what would be a more efficient method of building doesn't actually allow you to do it cheaper and get better margins. The startup that I used to work at, Katerra, their whole business model was basically predicated on that. “Oh, we'll just build all our buildings in these big factories, get huge economies of scale, reduce our costs, and then recoup the billions of dollars that we're pumping into this industry or business.” The math just does not work out. You can't build. In general, you can't build cheap enough to kind of recoup those giant upfront costs. A lot of businesses have been burned that way. The most success you see in prefabrication type of stuff is on the higher end of things where you can get higher margins. A lot of these prefab companies and stuff like that tend to target the higher end of the market, and you see a few different premiums for that. Obviously, if you're targeting the higher end, you're more likely to have higher margins. If you're building to a higher level of quality, that's easier to do in a factory environment. So the delta is a lot different, less enormous than it would be. Building a high level of quality is easier to do in a factory than it is in the field, so a lot of buildings or houses that are built to a really high level of energy performance, for instance, need a really, really high level of air sealing to minimize how much energy this house uses. You tend to see a lot more houses like that built out of prefab construction and other factory-built methods because it's just physically more difficult to achieve that on-site. The Problems of Prefabrication Dwarkesh Patel Can you say more about why you can't use prefabrication in a factory to get economies of scale? Is it just that the transportation costs will eat away any gains you get? What is going on? Brian PotterThere's a combination of effects. I haven't worked through all this, we'll have to save this for the next time. I'll figure it out more by then. At a high level, it's that basically the savings that you get from like using less labor or whatever is not quite enough to offset your increased transportation costs. One thing about construction, especially single-family home construction, is that a huge percentage of your costs are just the materials that you're using, right? A single-family home is roughly 50% labor and 50% materials for the construction costs. Then you have development costs, land costs, and things like that. So a big chunk of that, you just can't move to the factory at all, right?  You can't really build a foundation in a factory. You could prefab the foundation, but it doesn't gain you anything. Your excavation still has to be done on-site, obviously. So a big chunk can't move to the factory at all. For ones that can, you still basically have to pay the same amount for materials. Theoretically, if you're building truly huge volume, you could get material volume discounts, but even then, it's probably not looking at things like asset savings. So you can cut out a big chunk of your labor costs, and you do see that in factory-built construction, right? These prefab companies are like mobile home companies. They have a small fraction of labor as their costs, which is typical of a factory in general, but then they take out all that labor cost while they still have their high material costs, and then they have overhead costs of whatever the factory has cost them. Then you have your additional overhead cost of just transporting it to site, which is pretty limited. The math does not really work out in favor of prefab, in terms of being able to make the cost of building dramatically cheaper. You can obviously build a building in a prefab using prefab-free methods and build a successful construction business, right? Many people do. But in terms of dramatically lowering your costs, you don't really see that. Dwarkesh Patel Yeah, yeah. Austin Vernon has an interesting blog post about why there's not more prefabricated homes. The two things he points out were transportation costs, and the other one was that people prefer to have homes that have unique designs or unique features. When I was reading it, it actually occurred to me that maybe they're actually both the result of the same phenomenon. I don't know if I'm pronouncing it correctly, but have you heard of the Alchian-Allen theorem in economics? Brian Potter Maybe, but I don't think so. Dwarkesh Patel Basically, it's the idea that if you increase the cost of some category of goods in a fixed way––let's say you tax oranges and added a $1 tax to all oranges, or transportation for oranges gets $1 more expensive for all oranges––people will shift consumption towards the higher grade variety because now, the ratio of the cost between the higher, the more expensive orange and the less expensive orange has decreased because of the increase in fixed costs. It seems like you could use that argument to also explain why people have strong preferences for uniqueness and all kinds of design in manufactured houses. Since transportation costs are so high, that's basically a fixed cost, and that fixed cost has the effect of making people shift consumption towards higher-grade options. I definitely think that's true. Brian PotterI would maybe phrase this as, “The construction industry makes it relatively comparatively cheap to deliver a highly customized option compared to a really repetitive option.” So yeah, the ratio between a highly customized one and just a commodity one is relatively small. So you see a kind of industry built around delivering somewhat more customized options. I do think that this is a pretty broad intuition that people just desire too much customization from their homes. That really prevents you from having a mass-produced offering. I do think that is true to some extent. One example is the Levittown houses, which were originally built in huge numbers–– exactly the same model over and over again. Eventually, they had to change their business model to be able to deliver more customized options because the market shipped it. I do think that the effect of that is basically pretty overstated. Empirically, you see that in practice, home builders and developers will deliver fairly repetitive housing. They don't seem to have a really hard time doing that. As an example, I'm living in a new housing development that is just like three or four different houses copy-pasted over and over again in a group of 50. The developer is building a whole bunch of other developments that are very similar in this area. My in-laws live in a very similar development in a whole different state. If you just look like multi-family or apartment housing, it's identical apartments, you know, copy-pasted over and over again in the same building or a bunch of different buildings in the same development. You're not seeing huge amounts of uniqueness in these things. People are clearly willing to just live in these basically copy-pasted apartments. It's also quite possible to get a pretty high amount of product variety using a relatively small number of factors that you vary, right? I mean, the car industry is like this, where there are enough customization options. I was reading this book a while ago that was basically pushing back against the idea that the car industry pre-fifties and sixties we just offering a very uniform product. They basically did the math, and the number of customization options on their car was more than the atoms in the universe. Basically just, there are so many different options. All the permutations, you know, leather seats and this type of stereo and this type of engine, if you add it all up, there's just a huge, massive number of different combinations. Yeah, you can obviously customize the house a huge amount, just by the appliances that you have and the finishes that are in there and the paint colors that you choose and the fixtures and stuff like that. It would not really theoretically change the underlying way the building comes together. So regarding the idea that the fundamental demand for variety is a major obstruction, I don't think there's a whole lot of evidence for that in the construction industry. If Construction Regulation Vanished… Dwarkesh Patel I asked Twitter about what I should ask you, and usually, I don't get interesting responses but the quality of the people and the audience that knows who you are was so high that actually, all the questions I got were fascinating. So I'm going to ask you some questions from Twitter. Brian Potter Okay. Dwarkesh Patel 0:26:45Connor Tabarrok asks, “What is the most unique thing that would or should get built in the absence of construction regulation?”Brian Potter Unique is an interesting qualifier. There are a lot of things that just like should get built, right? Massive amounts of additional housing and creating more lands in these really dense urban environments where we need it, in places like San Francisco–– just fill in a big chunk of that bay. It's basically just mud flat and we should put more housing on it. “Unique thing” is more tricky. One idea that I really like (I read this in the book, The Book Where's My Flying Car),  is that it's basically crazy that our cities are designed with roads that all intersect with each other. That's an insane way to structure a material flow problem. Any sane city would be built with multiple layers of like transportation where each one went in a different direction so your flows would just be massively, massively improved. That just seems like a very obvious one.If you're building your cities from scratch and had your druthers, you would clearly want to build them and know how big they were gonna get, right? So you could plan very long-term in a way that so these transportation systems didn't intersect with each other, which, again, almost no cities did. You'd have the space to scale them or run as much throughput through them as you need without bringing the whole system to a halt. There's a lot of evidence saying that cities tend to scale based on how much you can move from point A to point B through them. I do wonder whether if you changed the way they went together, you could unlock massively different cities. Even if you didn't unlock massive ones, you could perhaps change the agglomeration effects that you see in cities if people could move from point A to point B much quicker than they currently can. Dwarkesh Patel Yeah, I did an episode about the book, where's my flying car with Rohit Krishnan. I don't know if we discussed this, but an interesting part of the book is where he talks about transistor design. If you design transistors this way, can you imagine how slow they would be? [laughs] Okay, so Simon Grimm asks, “What countries are the best at building things?”Brian Potter This is a good question. I'm going to sort of cheat a little bit and do it in terms of space and time, because I think most countries that are doing a good job at building massive amounts of stuff are not ones that are basically doing it currently.The current answer is like China, where they just keep building–– more concrete was used in the last 20 years or so than the entire world used in the time before that, right? They've accomplished massive amounts of urbanization, and built a lot of really interesting buildings and construction. In terms of like raw output, I would also put Japan in the late 20th century on there. At the peak of the concern and wonder of “Is Japan gonna take over the world?”, they were really interested in building stuff quite quickly. They spent a lot of time and effort trying to use their robotics expertise to try to figure out how to build buildings a lot more quickly. They had these like really interesting factories that were designed to basically extrude an entire skyscraper just going up vertically.All these big giant companies and many different factories were trying to develop and trying to do this with robotics. It was a really interesting system that did not end up ever making economic sense, but it is very cool. I think big industrial policy organs of the government basically encouraged a lot of these industrial companies to basically develop prefabricated housing systems. So you see a lot of really interesting systems developed from these sort of industrial companies in a way that you don't see in a lot of other places. From 1850 to maybe 1970 (like a hundred years or something), the US was building huge massive amounts of stuff in a way that lifted up huge parts of the economy, right? I don't know how many thousands of miles of railroad track the US built between like 1850 and 1900, but it was many, many, many thousands of miles of it. Ofcourse, needing to lay all this track and build all these locomotives really sort of forced the development of the machine tool industry, which then led to the development of like better manufacturing methods and interchangeable parts, which of course then led to the development of the automotive industry. Then ofcourse, that explosion just led to even more big giant construction projects. So you really see that this ability to build just big massive amounts of stuff in this virtuous cycle with the US really advanced a lot of technology to raise the standard of development for a super long period of time. So those are my three answers. China's Real Estate Bubble, Unbound Technocrats, and JapanDwarkesh Patel Those three bring up three additional questions, one for each of them! That's really interesting. Have you read The Power Broker, the book about Robert Moses? Brian Potter I think I got a 10th of the way through it. Dwarkesh Patel That's basically a whole book in itself, a 10th of the way. [laughs] I'm a half of the way through, and so far it's basically about the story of how this one guy built a startup within the New York state government that was just so much more effective at building things, didn't have the same corruption and clientelism incompetence. Maybe it turns into tragedy in the second half, but so far it's it seems like we need this guy. Where do we get a second Robert Moses? Do you think that if you had more people like that in government or in construction industries, public works would be more effectively built or is the stagnation there just a result of like other bigger factors? Brian Potter That's an interesting question. I remember reading this article a while ago that was complaining about how horrible Penn Station is in New York. They're basically saying, “Yeah, it would be nice to return to the era of like the sort of unbound technocrat” when these technical experts in high positions of power in government could essentially do whatever they wanted to some extent. If they thought something should be built somewhere, they basically had the power to do it. It's a facet of this problem of how it's really, really hard to get stuff built in the US currently. I'm sure that a part of it is that you don't see these really talented technocrats occupy high positions of government where they can get stuff done. But it's not super obvious to me whether that's the limiting factor. I kind of get the sense that they would end up being bottlenecked by some other part of the process. The whole sort of interlocking set of institutions has just become so risk averse that they would end up just being blocked in a way that they wouldn't when they were operating in the 1950s or 1960s.Dwarkesh Patel Yeah, yeah, that's interesting. All right, so speaking of Japan, I just recently learned about the construction there and how they just keep tearing stuff down every 30 to 40 years and rebuilding it. So you have an interesting series of posts on how you would go about building a house or a building that lasts for a thousand years. But I'm curious, how would you build a house or a building that only lasts for 30 or 40 years? If you're building in Japan and you know they're gonna tear it down soon, what changes about the construction process? Brian Potter Yeah, that's interesting. I mean, I'm not an expert on Japanese construction, but I think like a lot of their interior walls are basically just paper and stuff like that. I actually think it's kind of surprising that last time I looked, for a lot of their homes, they use a surprising post and beam construction method, which is actually somewhat labor-intensive to do. The US in the early 1800s used a pretty similar method. Then once we started mass producing conventional lumber, we stopped doing that because it was much cheaper to build out of two-by-fours than it was to build big heavy posts. I think the boring answer to that question is that we'd build like how we build mobile homes–– essentially just using pretty thin walls, pretty low-end materials that are put together in a minimal way. This ends up not being that different from the actual construction method that single-family homes use. It just even further economizes and tightens the use of materials–– where a single-family home might use a half inch plywood, they might try to use three-sixteenths or even an eighth inch plywood or something like that. So we'd probably build a pretty similar way to the way most single-family homes and multi-family homes are built currently, but just with even tighter use of materials which perhaps is something that's not super nice about the way that you guys build your homes. But... [laughs]Dwarkesh Patel Okay, so China is the third one here. There's been a lot of talk about a potential real estate bubble in China because they're building housing in places where people don't really need it. Of course, maybe the demographics aren't there to support the demand. What do you think of all this talk? I don't know if you're familiar with it, but is there a real estate bubble that's created by all this competence in building? Brian PotterOh, gosh, yeah, I have no idea. Like you, I've definitely heard talk of it and I've seen the little YouTube clips of them knocking down all these towers that it turns out they didn't need or the developer couldn't, finish or whatever. I don't know a huge amount about that. In general, I wish I knew a lot more about how things are built in China, but the information is in general, so opaque. I generally kind of assume that any particular piece of data that comes out of China has giant error bars on it as to whether it's true or not or what the context surrounding it is. So in general, I do not have a hard opinion about that. Dwarkesh Patel This is the second part of Simon's question, does greater competence and being able to build stuff translate into other good outcomes for these countries like higher GDP or lower rents or other kinds of foreign outcomes? Brian Potter That's a good question. Japan is an interesting place where basically people point to it as an example of, “Here's a country that builds huge amounts of housing and they don't have housing cost increases.” In general, we should expect that dynamic to be true. Right? There's no reason to not think that housing costs are essentially a supply-demand problem where if you built as much as people wanted, the cost would drop. I have no reason to not think that's true. There is a little bit of evidence that sort of suggests that it's impossible to build housing enough to overcome this sort of mechanical obstacle where the cost of it tends to match and rise to whatever people's income level are. The peak and the sort of flattening of housing costs in Japan also parallel when people basically stopped getting raises and income stopped rising in Japan. So I don't have a good sense of, if it ends up being just more driven by some sort of other factors. Generally though I expect the very basic answer of “If you build a lot more houses, the housing will become cheaper.”Dwarkesh PatelRight. Speaking of how the land keeps gaining value as people's income go up, what is your opinion on Georgism? Does that kind of try and make you think that housing is a special asset that needs to be more heavily taxed because you're not inherently doing something productive just by owning land the way you would be if you like built a company or something similar?Brian Potter I don't have any special deep knowledge of Georgism. It's on my list of topics to read more deeply about. I do think in general, taxing encourages you to produce less of something for something that you can't produce less of. It's a good avenue for something to tax more heavily. And yeah, obviously if you had a really high land value tax in these places that have a lot of single-family homes in dense urban areas, like Seattle or San Francisco, that would probably encourage people to use the land a lot more efficiently. So it makes sense to me, but I don't have a ton of special knowledge about it. Dwarkesh Patel All right, Ben Kuhn asked on Twitter, “What construction-related advice would you give to somebody building a new charter city?”Brian Potter That is interesting. I mean, just off the top of my head, I would be interested in whether you could really figure out a way to build using a method that had really high upfront costs. I think it could otherwise be justified, but if you're gonna build 10,000 buildings or whatever all at once, you could really take advantage of that. One kind of thing that you see in the sort of post-World War II era is that we're building huge massive amounts of housing, and a lot of times we're building them all in one place, right? A lot of town builders were building thousands and thousands of houses in one big development all at once. In California, it's the same thing, you just built like 6 or 10 or 15,000 houses in one big massive development. You end up seeing something like that where they basically build this like little factory on their construction site, and then use that to like fabricate all these things. Then you have something that's almost like a reverse assembly line where a crew will go to one house and install the walls or whatever, and then go to the next house and do the same thing. Following right behind them would be the guys doing the electrical system, plumbing, and stuff like that. So this reverse assembly line system would allow you to sort of get these things up really, really fast, in 30 days or something like that. Then you could have a whole house or just thousands and thousands of houses at once. You would want to be able to do something similar where you could just not do the instruction the way that the normal construction is done, but that's hard, right? Centrally planned cities or top-down planned cities never seem to do particularly well, right? For example, the city of Brasilia, the one that was supposed to be a planned city— the age it goes back to the unfettered technocrat who can sort of build whatever he wants. A lot of times, what you want is something that will respond at a low level and organically sort out the factories as they develop. You don't want something that's totally planned from the top-down, that's disconnected from all the sorts of cases on the ground. A lot of the opposition to Robert Moses ended up being that in a certain form, right? He's bulldozing through these cities that are these buildings and neighborhoods that he's not paying attention to at all. So I think, just to go back to the question, trying to plan your city from the top down doesn't have a super, super great track record. In general, you want your city to develop a little bit more organically. I guess I would think to have a good sort of land-use rules that are really thought through well and encourage the things that you want to encourage and not discourage the things that you don't want to discourage. Don't have equity in zoning and allow a lot of mixed-use construction and stuff like that. I guess that's a somewhat boring answer, but I'd probably do something along those lines. Dwarkesh Patel Interesting, interesting. I guess that implies that there would be high upfront costs to building a city because if you need to build 10,000 homes at once to achieve these economies of scale, then you would need to raise like tens of billions of dollars before you could build a charter city. Brian Potter Yeah, if you were trying to lower your costs of construction, but again, if you have the setup to do that, you wouldn't necessarily need to raise it. These other big developments were built by developers that essentially saw an opportunity. They didn't require public funding to do it. They did in the form of loan guarantees for veterans and things like that, but they didn't have the government go and buy the land. Automation and Revolutionary Future Technologies Dwarkesh Patel Right, okay, so the next question is from Austin Vernon. To be honest, I don't understand the question, you two are too smart for me, but hopefully, you'll be able to explain the question and then also answer it. What are your power rankings for technologies that can tighten construction tolerances? Then he gives examples like ARVR, CNC cutting, and synthetic wood products. Brian Potter Yeah, so this is a very interesting question. Basically, because buildings are built manually on site by hand, there's just a lot of variation in what ends up being built, right? There's only so accurately that a person can put something in place if they don't have any sort of age or stuff like that. Just the placement itself of materials tends to have a lot of variation in it and the materials themselves also have a lot of variation in them. The obvious example is wood, right? Where one two by four is not gonna be exactly the same as another two by four. It may be warped, it may have knots in it, it may be split or something like that. Then also because these materials are sitting just outside in the elements, they sort of end up getting a lot of distortion, they either absorb moisture and sort of expand and contract, or they grow and shrink because of the heat. So there's just a lot of variation that goes into putting a building up.To some extent, it probably constrains what you are able to build and how effectively you're able to build it. I kind of gave an example before of really energy efficient buildings and they're really hard to build on-site using conventional methods because the air ceiling is quite difficult to do. You have to build it in a much more precise way than what is typically done and is really easily achieved on-site. So I guess in terms of examples of things that would make that easier, he gives some good ones like engineered lumber, which is where you take lumber and then grind it up into strands or chips or whatever and basically glue them back together–– which does a couple of things. It spreads all the knots and the defects out so they are concentrated and everything tends to be a lot more uniform when it's made like that. So that's a very obvious one that's already in widespread use. I don't really see that making a substantial change.I guess the one exception to that would be this engineered lumber product called mass timber elements, CLT, which is like a super plywood. Plywood is made from tiny little sheet thin strips of wood, right? But CLT is made from two-by-four-dimensional lumber glued across laminated layers. So instead of a 4 by 9 sheet of plywood, you have a 12 by 40 sheet of dimensional lumber glued together. You end up with a lot of the properties of engineered material where it's really dimensionally stable. It can be produced very, very accurately. It's actually funny that a lot of times, the CLT is the most accurate part of the building. So if you're building a building with it, you tend to run into problems where the rest of the building is not accurate enough for it. So even with something like steel, if you're building a steel building, the steel is not gonna be like dead-on accurate, it's gonna be an inch or so off in terms of where any given component is. The CLT, which is built much more accurately, actually tends to show all these errors that have to be corrected. So in some sense, accuracy or precision is a little bit of like a tricky thing because you can't just make one part of the process more precise. In some ways that actually makes things more difficult because if one part is really precise, then a lot of the time, it means that you can't make adjustments to it easily. So if you have this one really precise thing, it usually means you have to go and compensate for something else that is not built quite as precisely. It actually makes advancing precision quite a bit more complicated. AR VR, is something I'm very bullish on. A big caveat of that is assuming that they can just get the basic technology working. The basic intuition there is that right now the way that pieces are, when a building is put together on site, somebody is looking at a set of paper plans, or an iPad or something that tells them where everything needs to go. So they figure that out and then they take a tape measure or use some other method and go figure out where that's marked on the ground. There's all this set-up time that is really quite time consuming and error prone. Again, there's only so much accuracy that a guy dragging a tape 40 feet across site being held by another guy can attain, there's a limit to how accurate that process can be. It's very easy for me to imagine that AR would just project exactly where the components of your building need to go. That would A, allow you a much higher level of accuracy that you can easily get using manual methods. And then B, just reduce all that time it takes to manually measure things. I can imagine it being much, much, much faster as well, so I'm quite bullish on that. At a high level and a slightly lower level, it's not obvious to me if they will be able to get to the level where it just projects it with perfect accuracy right in front of you. It may be the case that a person moving their head around and constantly changing their point of view wont ever be able to project these things with millimeter precision––it's always gonna be a little bit jumpy or you're gonna end up with some sort of hard limit in terms of like how precisely you can project it. My sense is that locator technology will get good enough, but I don't have any principle reason believing that. The other thing is that being able to take advantage of that technology would require you to have a really, really accurate model of your building that locates where every single element is precisely and exactly what its tolerances are. Right now, buildings aren't designed like that, they are built using a comparatively sparse set of drawings that leaves a lot to sort of be interpreted by the people on site doing the work and efforts that have tried to make these models really, really, really precise, have not really paid off a lot of times. You can get returns on it if you're building something really, really complex where there's a much higher premium to being able to make sure you don't make any error, but for like a simple building like a house, the returns just aren't there. So you see really comparatively sparse drawings. Whether it's gonna be able to work worth this upfront cost of developing this really complex, very precise model of where exactly every component is still has to be determined. There's some interesting companies that are trying to move in this direction where they're making it a lot easier to draw these things really, really precisely and whave every single component exactly where it is. So I'm optimistic about that as well, but it's a little bit TBD. Dwarkesh Patel This raises a question that I actually wanted to ask you, which is in your post about why there aren't automatic brick layers. It was a really interesting post. Somebody left in an interesting comment saying that bricks were designed to be handled and assembled by humans. Then you left a response to that, which I thought was really interesting. You said, “The example I always reach for is with steam power and electricity, where replacing a steam engine with an electric motor in your factory didn't do much for productivity. Improving factory output required totally redesigning the factory around the capabilities of electric motors.” So I was kind of curious about if you apply that analogy to construction, then what does that look like for construction? What is a house building process or building building process that takes automation and these other kinds of tools into account? How would that change how buildings are built and how they end up looking in the end? Brian Potter I think that's a good question. One big component of the lack of construction productivity is everything was designed and has evolved over 100 years or 200 years to be easy for a guy or person on the site to manipulate by hand. Bricks are roughly the size and shape and weight that a person can move it easily around. Dimensional lumber is the same. It's the size and shape and weight that a person can move around easily. And all construction materials are like this and the way that they attach together and stuff is the same. It's all designed so that a person on site can sort of put it all together with as comparatively little effort as possible. But what is easy for a person to do is usually not what is easy for a machine or a robot to do, right? You typically need to redesign and think about what your end goal is and then redesign the mechanism for accomplishing that in terms of what is easy to get to make a machine to do. The obvious example here is how it's way easier to build a wagon or a cart that pulls than it is to build a mechanical set of legs that mimics a human's movement. That's just way, way, way easier. I do think that a big part of advancing construction productivity is to basically figure out how to redesign these building elements in a way that is really easy for a machine to produce and a machine to put together. One reason that we haven't seen it is that a lot of the mechanization you see is people trying to mechanize exactly what a person does. You'd need a really expensive industrial robot that can move exactly the way that a human moves more or less. What that might look like is basically something that can be really easily extruded by a machine in a continuous process that wouldn't require a lot of finicky mechanical movements. A good example of this technology is technology that's called insulated metal panels, which is perhaps one of the cheapest and easiest ways to build an exterior wall. What it is, is it's just like a thin layer of steel. Then on top of that is a layer of insulation. Then on top of that is another layer of steel. Then at the end, the steel is extruded in such a way that it can like these inner panels can like lock together as they go. It's basically the simplest possible method of constructing a wall that you can imagine. But that has the structural system and the water barrier, air barrier, and insulation all in this one really simple assembly. Then when you put it together on site, it just locks together. Of course there are a lot of limitations to this. Like if you want to do anything on top of like add windows, all of a sudden it starts to look quite a bit less good. I think things that are really easy for a machine to do can be put together without a lot of persistent measurement or stuff like that in-field. They can just kind of snap together and actually want to fit together. I think that's kind of what it looks like. 3D Printer Pessimism & The Rising Cost of LabourDwarkesh Patel What would the houses or the buildings that are built using this physically look like? Maybe in 50 to 100 years, we'll look back on the houses we have today and say, “Oh, look at that artisanal creation made by humans.” What is a machine that is like designed for robots first or for automation first? In more interesting ways, would it differ from today's buildings? Brian Potter That's a good question. I'm not especially bullish on 3D building printing in general, but this is another example of a building using an extrusion process that is relatively easy to mechanize. What's interesting there is that when you start doing that, a lot of these other bottlenecks become unlocked a little bit. It's very difficult to build a building using a lot of curved exterior surfaces using conventional methods. You can do it, it's quite expensive to do, but there's a relatively straightforward way for a 3D-printed building to do that. They can build that as easily as if it was a straight wall. So you see a lot of interesting curved architecture on these creations and in a few other areas. There's a company that can build this cool undulating facade that people kind of like. So yeah, it unlocks a lot of options. Machines are more constrained in some things that they can do, but they don't have a lot of the other constraints that you would otherwise see. So I think you'll kind of see a larger variety of aesthetic things like that. That said, at the end of the day, I think a lot of the ways a house goes together is pretty well shaped to just the way that a person living inside it would like to use. I think Stewart Brand makes this point in––Dwarkesh Patel Oh, How Buildings Learn. Brian Potter There we go. He basically makes the point that a lot of people try to use dome-shaped houses or octagon-shaped houses, which are good because, again, going back to surface area volume, they include lots of space using the least amount of material possible. So in some theoretical sense, they're quite efficient, but it's actually quite inconvenient to live inside of a building with a really curved wall, right? Furniture doesn't fit up against it nicely, and pictures are hard to hang on a really curved wall. So I think you would see less variation than maybe you might expect. Dwarkesh Patel Interesting. So why are you pessimistic about 3D printers? For construction, I mean. Brian Potter Yeah, for construction. Oh God, so many reasons. Not pessimistic, but just there's a lot of other interesting questions. I mean, so the big obvious one is like right now a 3D printer can basically print the walls of a building. That is a pretty small amount of the value in a building, right? It's maybe 7% or 8%, something like that. Probably not more than 10% of the value in a building. Because you're not printing the foundation, you're not printing like the overhead vertical, or the overhead spanning structure of the building. You're basically just printing the walls. You're not even really printing the second story walls that you have in multiple stories. I don't think they've quite figured that out yet. So it's a pretty small amount of value added to the building. It's frankly a task that is relatively easy to do by manual labor. It's really pretty easy for a crew to basically put up the structure of a house. This is kind of a recurring theme in mechanization or it goes back to what I was talking about to our previous lead. Where it takes a lot of mechanization and a lot of expensive equipment to replace what basically like two or three guys can do in a day or something like that. The economics of it are pretty brutal. So right now it produces a pretty small value. I think that the value of 3D printing is basically entirely predicated on how successful they are at figuring out how to like deliver more components of the building using their system. There are companies that are trying to do this. There's one that got funded not too long ago called Black Diamond, where they have this crazy system that is like a series of 3D printers that would act simultaneously, like each one building a separate house. Then as you progress, you switch out the print head for like a robot arm. Cause a 3D printer is basically like a robot arm with just a particular manipulator at the end, right?So they switch out their print head for like a robot arm, and the robot arm goes and installs different other systems like the windows or the mechanical systems. So you can figure out how to do that reliably where your print head or your printing system is installing a large fraction of the value of the building. It's not clear to me that it's gonna be economic, but it obviously needs to reach that point. It's not obvious to me that they have gotten there yet. It's really quite hard to get a robot to do a lot of these tasks. For a lot of these players, it seems like they're actually moving away from that. I think in ICON is the biggest construction 3D printer company in the US, as far as I know. And as far as I know, they've moved away from trying to install lots of systems in their walls as they get printed. They've kind of moved on to having that installed separately, which I think has made their job a little bit easier, but again, not quite, it's hard to see how the 3D printer can fulfill its promises if it can't do anything just beyond the vertical elements, whichare really, for most construction, quite cheap and simple to build. Dwarkesh Patel Now, if you take a step back and talk how expensive construction is overall, how much of it can just be explained by the Baumol cost effect? As in labor costs are increasing because labor is more productive than other industries and therefore construction is getting more expensive. Brian Potter I think that's a huge, huge chunk of it. The labor fraction hasn't changed appreciably enough. I haven't actually verified that and I need to, but I remember somebody that said that they used to be much different. You sent me some literature related to it. So let's add a slight asterisk on that. But in general the labor cost has remained a huge fraction of the overall cost of the building. Reliably seeing their costs continue to rise, I think there's no reason to believe that that's not a big part of it. Dwarkesh Patel Now, I know this sounds like a question with an obvious answer, but in your post comparing the prices of construction in different countries, you mentioned how the cost of labor and the cost of materials is not as big a determiner of how expensive it is to construct in different places. But what does matter? Is it the amount of government involvement and administrative overhead? I'm curious why those things (government involvement and administrative overhead) have such a high consequence on the cost of construction. Brian Potter Yeah, that's a good question. I don't actually know if I have a unified theory for that. I mean, basically with any heavily regulated thing, any particular task that you're doing takes longer and is less reliable than it would be if it was not done right. You can't just do it as fast as on your own schedule, right? You end up being bottlenecked by government processes and it reduces and narrows your options. So yeah, in general, I would expect that to kind of be the case, but I actually don't know if I have a unified theory of how that works beyond just, it's a bunch of additional steps at any given part of the process, each of which adds cost. Dwarkesh Patel Yeah. Now, one interesting trend we have in the United States with construction is that a lot of it is done by Latino workers and especially by undocumented Latino workers. What is the effect of this on the price and the quality of construction? If you have a bunch of hardworking undocumented workers who are working for below-market rates in the US, will this dampen the cost of construction over time? What do you think is going to happen? Brian Potter I suspect that's probably one of the reasons why the US has comparatively low construction costs compared to other parts of the world. Well, I'll caveat that. Residential construction, which is single-family homes and multi-family apartment buildings all built in the US and have light framed wood and are put together, like you said, by a lot of like immigrant workers. Because of that, it would not surprise me if those wages are a lot lower than the equivalent wage for like a carpenter in Germany or something like that. I suspect that's a factor in why our cost of residential construction are quite low. AI's Impact on Construction ProductivityDwarkesh Patel Overall, it seems from your blog post that you're kind of pessimistic, or you don't think that different improvements in industrialization have transferred over to construction yet. But what do you think is a prospect of future advances in AI having a big impact on construction? With computer vision and with advances in robotics, do you think we'll finally see some carry-over into construction productivity or is it gonna be more of the same? Brian Potter Yeah, I think there's definitely gonna be progress on that axis. If you can wire up your computer vision systems, robotic systems, and your AI in such a way that your capabilities for a robot system are more expanded, then I kind of foresee robotics being able to take a larger and larger fraction of the tasks done on a typical construction site. I kind of see it being kind of done in narrow avenues that gradually expand outward. You're starting to see a lot of companies that have some robotic system that can do one particular task, but do that task quite well. There's a couple of different robot companies that have these little robots for like drawing wall layouts on like concrete slabs or whatever. So you know exactly where to build your walls, which you would think would not be like a difficult problem in construction, but it turns out that a lot of times people put the walls in the wrong spot and then you have to go back and move them later or just basically deal with it. So yeah, it's basically a little Roomba type device that just draws the wall layout to the concrete slab and all the other systems as well–– for example, where the lines need to run through the slab and things like that. I suspect that you're just gonna start to see robotics and systems like that take a larger and larger share of the tasks on the construction site over time. Dwarkesh Patel Yeah, it's still very far away. It's still very far away. What do you think of Flow? That's Adam Neumann's newest startup and backed with $350 million from Andreeseen Horowitz.Brian Potter I do not have any strong opinions about that other than, “Wow, they've really given him another 350M”. I do not have any particularly strong opinions about this. They made a lot they make a lot of investments that don't make sense to me, but I'm out of venture capital. So there's no reason that my judgment would be any good in this situation–– so I'm just presuming they know something I do not. Dwarkesh Patel I'm going to be interviewing Andreeseen later this month, and I'm hoping I can ask him about that.Brian Potter You know, it may be as simple as he “sees all” about really high variance bets. There's nobody higher variance in the engine than Adam Neumann so, maybe just on those terms, it makes sense. Dwarkesh Patel You had an interesting post about like how a bunch of a lot of the knowledge in the construction industry is informal and contained within best practices or between relationships and expectations that are not articulated all the time. It seems to me that this is also true of software in many cases but software seems much more legible and open source than these other physical disciplines like construction despite having a lot of th

XChateau - Navigating the Business of Wine
Library Release - Putting Trust in Data w/ Russ Mann, WineBid

XChateau - Navigating the Business of Wine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 53:51


Library Release - Originally released as episode 26 on Nov 11th, 2020With a 25-year history, WineBid is the oldest and largest online wine auction site. The original re-commerce platform, Russ tells us about the auction process from the buyer and seller perspective and all the data they collect and display for the wines. This includes innovations such as a 360-degree bottle shot, price history charts, and new functionality like their customized shipping feature. He spills the beans on a few tips and tricks to get the best deals on WineBid! Detailed Show Notes: WineBid - 25 years old, based in Seattle with operations in Napa, the oldest and largest wine auction siteWeekly auctions - open at 7:15 pm PST on Sundays, close at 7 pm PST the next SundayAll items open at the same timePro's get 1st 5-10 minutes to view and place bidsWhat doesn't sell rolls into the following weekNow introducing some wines mid-week, with most wines going in one weekSet good reserves upfrontFor Sellers of wineConsignors are mostly private individualsMost sales are for $10,000-$1M+, ideally $100+ average bottle valueSellers send their list and get an estimateWineBid does the appraisal and after agreeing with the consignor, ships wine to the Napa warehouseWines are inspected, authenticated, and photographedOnce sold, sellers get a check or electronic wire transferAs part of an estimate, for larger cellars, WineBid will help catalog and pre-inspect on-siteReasons people sell winesAs in many businesses, the 3 D's - divorce, debt, and deathPeople also have their tastes change and swap out what's in their cellarsThey move and want to downsize their cellarSpouse/partners - may force sales before they can buy moreConsignment vs. cash buyout for wine sellers - generally make more money consigning and capture more upside, but takes more time and can get paid sooner, at a discount, with immediate cash buyoutBusiness modelSeller commissions - at most auction houses, 5-25%, the larger the consignment, the lower the premiumBuyer's premiums - generally 15-25%, 17% at WineBid vs ~20-25% for live auctionsBuyer demographics - ~135-150,000 registered bidders70% US, 20% Asia, 10% Europe⅔ Male, ⅓ FemaleUpper middle-income with professionals in high-tech, finance, lawyers, doctors, etc.Demographics are getting younger, particularly in 2020 -> interested in a broader selection of wines with higher mobile usageMost learn about WineBid via word of mouth, recently doing more social and digital advertising and trying to make the experience more personalWineBid Innovations360-degree hi-res bottle shotsOne of the best for still photography in wine auctionsShipping functionality - can see everything you have and pick and choose what and when to shipSome of the most detailed condition notes on bottlesWine price chart for the history of the bottleProvenance premiumsDon't see significant premiums on provenanceNo significant premiums for original wood cases (“OWC”) - buyers often don't want to pay extra to ship the wood caseCertificates of authenticity not seeing significant premiumsLabel appearance is important to many buyersThe proliferation of wine critics and influencers has led to some influencers rivaling and outpacing traditional media Get access to library episodes Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

In The Nick Of Crime
Episode 24 - The Napa Halloween Murders

In The Nick Of Crime

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 70:51


This week, Michelle is bringing you the harrowing case of the 2004 Napa Halloween Murders. On October 31, 2004, 3 roommates, Lauren, Adriane and Leslie were sleeping peacefully in their home when an intruder would change everything and take the lives of Adriane and Leslie. Lauren survived to tell this tale and we are so privileged to be able to tell it from her perspective. Thank you as always for listening! Link to Courtney's coverage of the Kristin Smart case: https://anchor.fm/dashboard/episode/e1k7omh All of the things In the Nick of Crime live here: linktr.ee/nickofcrimepod Follow us on Instagram: @NickofCrimePodcast Follow us on TikTok: @InTheNickOfCrimePodcast Follow us on Twitter: @NickofCrime Email us your stories or case suggestions to: IntheNickofCrimePodcast@gmail.com Become a Patron! https://www.patreon.com/IntheNickofCrime - Get ad-free and early episodes, as well as a bonus episode every month! We also post extended show notes, pictures and materials for the public from this page. Source material for this episode: https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2022-10-18/paul-flores-guilty-in-murder-of-kristin-smart?_amp=true https://abcnews.go.com/Primetime/LegalCenter/story?id=1187524&page=1 https://loriajohnston.medium.com/the-2004-napa-halloween-murders-37c8d97e3d4b https://forensicfilesnow.com/index.php/tag/leslie-mazzara/#:~:text=Adriane%20Insogna%20and%20Leslie%20Mazzara%20Are%20Murdered%20in%20Napa&text=Eric%20Copple%20surrendered%20to%20a,2008%20episode%20of%20Forensic%20Files. https://www.swordandscale.com/jealous-rage-to-double-murder-in-napa-valley/

The Tech Chef, Restaurant, Hospitality and Hotel Technology Business Podcast
TCP 061: Menches Bros Is Now On The Blockchain!

The Tech Chef, Restaurant, Hospitality and Hotel Technology Business Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 29:19


Next week should be exciting for a couple of reasons: First, I will be speaking at the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association's Show in Orlando, Florida. For those of you that will be there, make sure you come see my session on November 3rd where I will explore how web3 is changing the landscape of restaurants. Don't know what #web3 is? Want to learn more about NFTs, cryptocurrency and actually see the metaverse in action? Most importantly, do you want to know how this is impacting the hospitality industry from the large chains down to the “mom and pops?” This is the session you DON'T want to miss! Now, for those of you not attending, that probably means, if you are an operator, you will be at the https://www.murtecsummit.com/ (MURTEC Executive Summit) in Napa Valley. Why, oh why, did these two events have to happen on the same exact days? I have been waiting to go to Napa for that show for a couple of years now, ever since it was first announced during COVID. Oh well, you will all have a great time without me, I am sure. Just make sure you don't have too much fun… you will make me even more jealous! The show today was recorded live at the https://www.menchesbros.com/ (Menches Bros.) NFT minting party in Green, Ohio. Yep, you heard me right. This is the mom and pop that I have been talking about quite a bit lately and you have seen in the industry news channels. If you want to hear my original podcast about this initiative, go back and listen to https://skipkimpel.com/tech-chef/mom-and-pop-launches-nft/ (Episode 58) where I have https://www.linkedin.com/in/daniellekimble/ (Dani Kimble), CMO for https://www.menchesbros.com/ (Menches Bros.) on the show. During that discussion, she talked about her Uncle John. Well, I was fortunate enough to sit down with John Menches, CEO of https://www.menchesbros.com/ (Menches Bros). to go into more depth about this project and why they felt that this little hamburger joint was the perfect concept for a NFT project.  During this conversation, I learned a whole lot more about John, the family and other interesting facts other than being the originator and creator of the hamburger back in 1885. How To Contact MeWebsite: https://skipkimpel.com/ (https://SkipKimpel.com) (all archived shows and show notes will be posted here) Website: https://constrata.io/ (https://ConStrata.io) Instagram: https://instagram.com/skipkimpel (https://instagram.com/skipkimpel) Twitter: https://twitter.com/skipkimpel (https://twitter.com/skipkimpel) Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/skipkimpel1/ (https://www.facebook.com/skipkimpel1/) TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@skipkimpel (https://www.tiktok.com/@skipkimpel) LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/skipkimpel/ (https://www.linkedin.com/in/skipkimpel) LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/constrata-consulting (https://www.linkedin.com/company/constrata-consulting) You can also hear all these new episodes on the ConStrata website at https://my.captivate.fm/ConStrata.io (ConStrata.io) Email me at skip.kimpel@constrata.io Next Week's ShowNext week will kind of be a continuation of today's episode except I will be talking with the company out of New York behind this NFT project, https://www.metaversal.gg/ (Metaversal). We will talk with the CEO, https://www.linkedin.com/in/yossi-hasson/ (Yosi Hasson), the creative director, https://www.linkedin.com/in/sam-brukhman-17132a78/ (Sam Brukhman) and the lead project manager for this creative endeavor, https://www.linkedin.com/in/erin-s-thompson/ (Erin Thompson).  They are the secret sauce (pun intended) behind the execution of this project, and it was exciting to see the large team they brought to help support https://www.linkedin.com/in/daniellekimble/ (Dani...

Remarkable Results Radio Podcast
Paul Scanner Danner: His Life, His Brand, His Impact [RR 791]

Remarkable Results Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 29:38


For my 5th episode with Paul ‘Scanner' Danner, we sat in the ASTE studio and caught up on his life, his world. There are some great pictures if you watch the video version of the episode of him in 1994 and now. He reminisces about his Dodge Power Wagon, his family, and the Scanner Danner Brand. Paul was at ASTE to learn and continue to hone his craft. Paul has his son working with him in the creative process to keep ‘Scanner Danner' relevant and up to date. Paul Danner, https://www.scannerdanner.com/ (ScannerDanner). Listen to Paul's previous episodes https://remarkableresults.biz/?s=paul+danner (HERE). Key Talking Points When you teach you learn and you have to continue to learn Ask yourself why when you come across problems as a technician and learn the answer Video editing- 40 hours for 4-hour video  Started filming for his students that would reinforce the topic of his training  ScannerDanner- one of his female students called him that from having scanner in his hands  Teaching at Rosedale Technical College- he is a substitute and guest speaker   Interested in teaching? The industry needs enthusiastic and young trainers to teach the younger generation. If you are burned out, teaching isn't for you Paul works out of his brother's shop- the original shop owners opened in 1993, and it was the first shop paul worked for. A year later, Paul got his brother a job at the shop. Now his brother is the owner.  In 1994 Paul had a dodge power wagon- found another one, and now has his ‘old girlfriend back' and is enjoying taking rides down memory lane with his wife Connect with the Podcast: https://aftermarketradionetwork.com/ (Aftermarket Radio Network) http://youtube.com/carmcapriotto (Subscribe on YouTube) https://remarkableresults.biz/episodes (Visit us on the Web) https://www.facebook.com/RemarkableResultsPodcast (Follow on Facebook) https://remarkableresults.biz/insider/ (Become an Insider) https://www.buymeacoffee.com/carm (Buy me a coffee) https://remarkableresults.biz/books/ (Important Books) Check out today's partner: Learn more about NAPA AutoCare and the benefits of being part of the NAPA family by visiting http://www.NAPAAutoCare.com (www.NAPAAutoCare.com) https://aftermarketradionetwork.com () https://remarkableresultsradio.captivate.fm/listen ()

Influencing Entrepreneurs
Episode 403 Part 1 - Jeff Conway [Ruth's Chris Steakhouse Charlotte/Napa on Providence]

Influencing Entrepreneurs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 14:39


Episode 403 Part 1 - Jeff Conway [Ruth's Chris Steakhouse Charlotte/Napa on Providence] by Nexagy Education

Influencing Entrepreneurs
Episode 403 Part 2 - Jeff Conway [Ruth's Chris Steakhouse Charlotte/Napa on Providence]

Influencing Entrepreneurs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 17:58


Episode 403 Part 2 - Jeff Conway [Ruth's Chris Steakhouse Charlotte/Napa on Providence] by Nexagy Education

Italian Wine Podcast
Ep. 1132 Matt Fowles | Uncorked

Italian Wine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 34:48


Welcome to episode 1132, in which host Polly Hammond interviews Matt Fowles, this week on Uncorked. This week, we welcome Matt Fowles, a former lawyer who became a winemaker. He is an avid food and wine man. While his chief responsibility is the business of wine, he spends much of his time feeding his connection to the Strathbogie Ranges. Whether that is time in the vineyard, playing with wine or hunting for his table – he truly understands this land. In 2007, Matt was selected as part of the ‘Future Leaders' program aimed at fostering the next generation of wine industry leaders. The program is run by peak industry bodies; the Winemakers' Federation of Australia and Wine Australia. Matt now sits with the Winemakers' Federation of Australia. To learn more visit: https://www.fowleswine.com/ Instagram: fowles_wine Linkedin: linkedin.com/in/matt-fowles-423ba22b More about the host: Polly is Founder and CEO of 5forests. She splits her time between Barcelona, Auckland, and Napa, consulting, writing, and speaking about the trends that impact today's wine businesses. She's an advisor to New Zealand Trade & Enterprise, host of Uncorked with the Italian Wine Podcast, cohost of the Real Business of Wine with Robert Joseph, and, occasionally, a knitter. Polly is a graduate of the University of Southern California, where she earned degrees in International Relations and French. Those studies led to a deep and abiding love affair with behavioral Economics, and her wine work is based on insights into all the crazy and irrational reasons consumers engage with brands. With over 20 years' experience in growing successful companies, Polly knows first-hand the challenges faced by independent businesses. She approaches each client experience with empathy and understanding for what it takes to adapt and thrive in the real world. To learn more visit: Twitter: @mme_hammond Instagram: @pollyhammond_ website: https://5forests.com/ Let's keep in touch! Follow us on our social media channels: Instagram @italianwinepodcast Facebook @ItalianWinePodcast Twitter @itawinepodcast Tiktok @MammaJumboShrimp LinkedIn @ItalianWinePodcast If you feel like helping us, donate here www.italianwinepodcast.com/donate-to-show/ Until next time, Cin Cin!

Deep Leadership
#0155 – Caring to Lead with Phillip Kane

Deep Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022 43:10


Today I'm joined by Phillip Kane. Phillip is an author and business leader. He has more than 30 years of experience leading people at some of the world's best-known corporations like Goodyear, Pirelli, Rothschild, and NAPA. He is the author of a new book called The Not So Subtle Art of Caring: Letters on Leadership. In this book, he shares how being a caring leader can unlock the power of people. I'm excited to have another leadership practitioner on the show to talk about the tools and methods he used to lead teams successfully. Show resources: The Not So Subtle Art of Caring: Letters on Leadership Phillip Kane on Twitter Sponsors: Jeremy Clevenger Fitness The Fraternity of Excellence ____ Order my latest bestselling book, You Have the Watch: A Guided Journal to Become a Leader Worth Following Order my bestselling leadership book, All in the Same Boat - Lead Your Organization Like a Nuclear Submariner Order my bestselling leadership book, I Have the Watch: Becoming a Leader Worth Following Become a leader worth following today with these powerful resources: Subscribe to my leadership newsletter Follow Jon S Rennie on Twitter Follow Jon S Rennie on Instagram Follow Jon S Rennie on YouTube The Experience of Leadership book   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The OCD & Anxiety Podcast
Episode 228 - A Chat About Anxiety, Stress, Meditation & Parenting With Therapist Madhur-Nain Webster

The OCD & Anxiety Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022 46:57


Book your free session directly through my Calendly, visit: www.robertjamescoaching.com   In today's podcast I talk with the amazing Madhur-Nain Webster.   Madhur-Nain is deeply committed to helping others expand their potential. As a licensed marriage and family therapist, she often encourages the use of yogic technology — including mindful meditation — to support clients as they bring polarized thoughts into harmony.   The integration of eastern and western therapeutic methods inspired her to release her first book, The Stressless Brain (2018), along with several meditation music albums focused on breath-work and chanting. In addition to running a successful private practice out of Napa, California, she is currently writing her second book.   You can find her website with the following link:   http://www.madhurnain.com   Disclaimer: Robert James Pizey (of Robert James Coaching) is not a medical professional and is also not providing therapy or medical treatment. Robert James Pizey recommends that anyone experiencing anxiety or OCD to seek professional medical help straight away to get a medical opinion and rule out other conditions or illnesses. The comments and opinions as written on this site are simply that and are not to be taken as professional medical opinions. Robert James Pizey provides coaching, education, accountability and peer support around Anxiety through his own personal experiences.  

The Zandbergen Report
Bart Zandbergen Talks with Cure Duchenne Founder Debra Miller

The Zandbergen Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 27:35


Host Bart Zandbergen was joined in the studio virtually by Cure Duchenne Founder and CEO Debra Miller. If you have ever had the pleasure of meeting Debra, her husband Paul, or their son Hawken, you know how inspiring their journey has been. Debra's son Hawken was diagnosed with Duchenne, which is a rare form of Muscular Dystrophy, at the age of 5. Today, he is 25, a USC graduate and a successful journalist. Debra founded Cure Duchenne about a year into Hawken's diagnosis. Through the organization's fundraising efforts, which have funded important research, the life expectancy for those with Duchenne has increased by nearly 10 years. In this special episode, Debra shares details about her journey, her hopes for the future, and her goals for the 2022 Napa in Newport Gala. In this episode learn more about: - What Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy is and who it impacts - How Cure Duchenne is funding research to hopefully find a cure - How Hawken is doing as he manages this condition daily - What transpired to bring Napa in Newport to fruition with 2022 being its eighth year - What the record breaking amount was that Napa in Newport raised last year and what Debra's fundraising goal is for this year's event - How a Donor Advised Fund can play a pivotal role in charitable giving To learn more about Cure Duchenne, please visit: https://cureduchenne.org/ *** The Zandbergen Report, where wealth strategies and investment wisdom collide, is led by host Bart Zandbergen. The show is also available on Apple Podcasts, Google Play Store, Podbean and Spotify. Interested in being a guest on The Zandbergen Report? Email podcast@bartzandbergen.com. Learn more about Bart by visiting www.BartZandbergen.com *** NO OFFER OR SOLICITATION: The contents of this podcast episode: (i) do not constitute an offer of securities or a solicitation of an offer to buy securities, and (ii) may not be relied upon in making an investment decision related to any investment offering Axxcess Wealth Management, LLC, an SEC Registered Investment Advisor. Axxcess does not warrant the accuracy or completeness of the information contained herein. Opinions are our current opinions and are subject to change without notice. Prices, quotes, rates are subject to change without notice. Generally, investments are NOT FDIC INSURED, NOT BANK GUARANTEED and MAY LOSE VALUE.  

The Cocktail Guru Podcast
The Napa Chef with Ken Frank - TCGP S2 E2

The Cocktail Guru Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 50:45


On this episode of THE COCKTAIL GURU PODCAST, the pioneering—and truffle-loving—Ken Frank, Owner-Chef at legendary La Toque restaurant, shares his California culinary journey, from the glitz and glamor of LA's Sunset Strip to vibrant and wine-rich Napa Valley, with hosts Jonathan & Jeffrey Pogash. Plus enjoy the show's two new spirited features: Tipple Time and Top Off! All brought to you by Citadelle Gin and The Perfect Purée of Napa Valley. THE COCKTAIL GURU PODCAST is produced by 1st Reel Entertainment and distributed by EatsDrinksTV, a service of the Center for Culinary Culture—Home of The Cocktail Collection, and is available wherever fine podcasts can be heard. The Center for Culinary Culture—Telling the Story of Food & Drink…One Taste at a Time. To learn more about Chef Ken Frank and read the show notes, visit The Cocktail Guru Podcast website. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thecocktailgurupodcast/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thecocktailgurupodcast/support