Podcasts about The Californians

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Best podcasts about The Californians

Show all podcasts related to californians

Latest podcast episodes about The Californians

KQED's The California Report
Governor Newsom Proposes Ban on Oil Drilling Near Neighborhoods

KQED's The California Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 11:28


Governor Gavin Newsom wants to ban new oil drilling near schools, homes and many businesses, proposing a rule aimed at improving the health of millions of Californians. The rule would bar new drilling within 3,200 feet of houses, schools and businesses open to the public. Reporter: Marisa Lagos, KQED   The Bay Conservation and Development Commission has adopted a Bay Area-wide plan for adapting to rising seas. Scientists project the bay could rise by several feet by the end of the century, a result of warming temperatures.  Reporter: Ezra David Romero, KQED  In response to its homelessness crisis, the city of Los Angeles has opened the country's largest so-called tiny home village. It's located in northeast Los Angeles and more than 200 people will be able to live there. Guest: Amy King, CEO of Pallet, a company building many of these homes 

Crazy Sh*t In Real Estate with Leigh Brown
299 - What You Didn't Know About The California Housing Market with Kaajal Shahani

Crazy Sh*t In Real Estate with Leigh Brown

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 38:31


With over 18 years of experience in real estate, Kaajal Shahani has seen a lot of craziness, and today she is here to tell you all about it. If you want to know how the California housing market is doing and listen to 3 stories that include weapons, ferocious dogs, a financially stressed seller, and adult films, this is the episode you've been looking for. Key takeaways to listen for Evolution of the California housing market over the last years House prices in the bay area and the timing for purchasing Why people prefer to buy instead of renting in California Places where Californians are migrating to and the reasons why The ethical way to handle complicated situations with clients About Kaajal Shahani Kaajal Shahani is an award-winning realtor featured on HGTV, Top Agent Magazine, and a Newsweek Real Estate Expert Forum. With over 18+ years of experience, Kaajal Shahani is a premier California licensed real estate agent who has served over 200 clients with integrity and diligence. A career in real estate was a natural choice for Kaajal, given that she emanates from a family of real estate gurus. Kaajal's extraordinary knowledge of the real estate market and unparalleled transaction experience (responsible for over $100+ million in residential transactions) makes her the most sought-after realtor. In addition to her day-to-day real estate transaction, she coaches new real estate agents and mentors women entrepreneurs. Connect with Kaajal Website: www.kaajalshahani.com Instagram: @kaajalshahanirealestate Facebook: Kaajal Shahani LinkedIn: Kaajal Shahani YouTube: Kaajal Shahani E-mail: kshahani@intero.com Phone: 510-304-6754   Connect with Leigh Please subscribe to this podcast in iTunes or in the Podcasts App on your phone, and never miss a beat from Leigh by visiting https://leighbrown.com. DM Leigh Brown on Instagram or on Twitter or any social networks by clicking here. Subscribe to Leigh's other podcast Real Estate From The Rooftops! Sponsor If you're tired of doing real estate alone, enroll in  Leigh Brown University and be sure to use your special “CSIRE” discount code at checkout for $10 off your subscription.

The News & Why It Matters
Ep 888 | Is In-N-Out's COMMON SENSE Enough to RED PILL California? | Guests: Gothix & Jason Buttrill

The News & Why It Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 45:01


In-N-Out Burger refused to be the “vaccination police” after San Francisco closed a location for not enforcing the city's vaccine passport policy. Is this enough to get Californians to wake up to their growing dystopia? Meanwhile, Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot accused a police union of trying to “incite an insurrection.” An elementary school told parents to dress their kids for cold and rainy weather due to COVID lunch protocols. The CDC wants you to keep masking your kids even after the FDA allows them to get vaccinated. Netflix's Co-CEO backtracks slightly in his defense of comedian Dave Chappelle's new special as employees stage a protest. Will any of them get fired? The Grammys are doubling down on ‘equity and inclusion' and the State Department has a special message celebrating International Pronouns Day. Note: The content of this episode does not provide medical advice. Please seek the advice of local health officials for any COVID vaccine questions & concerns. Today's sponsors: Candid can help you get the straighter, brighter smile you've always wanted! Go to https://CandidCO.com/WHY and use code WHY to take advantage of a limited time offer to save $75 on your starter kit. You didn't start your business because you wanted to spend time on HR compliance. Let Bambee help. Go to https://Bambee.com/MATTERS right now to schedule your FREE HR audit. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Takeaway
Deep Dive with Dorian Warren: Child Care 2021-10-20

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 47:38


Deep Dive with Dorian Warren: Child Care In this installment of The Takeaway Deep Dive, we tackle the very personal system of child care. Affordable child care is often inadequately addressed in the United States. That was laid bare during the height of the pandemic which exposed the inequities of a system that is in need of drastic changes and repair. Joining our hosts to discuss what changes need to be made to the child care system is Aqeela Muntaqim, Michigan Deputy Director of Mothering Justice, and Karen D'Souza, a writer at Ed Source, an organization that works to engage Californians on key education challenges with the goal of enhancing learning success. Sept. 16, 2021, file photo Pre-K teacher Vera Csizmadia teaches 3-and 4-year-old students in her classroom at the Dr. Charles Smith Early Childhood Center in Palisades Park, N.J. (Mary Altaffer/AP Photo) The Shadow Pandemic: Covid Creates Population of Orphaned Children A devastating number of children have lost a parent or caregiver to Covid, and they lack the financial and emotional support they need. Federal statistics are not yet available on how many U.S. children went into foster care last year; however, researchers estimate COVID-19 drove a 15% increase in orphaned children. JoNel Aleccia, senior correspondent at Kaiser Health News, discusses the impact of Covid on our children and the need for more support. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.     

The Takeaway
Deep Dive with Dorian Warren: Child Care 2021-10-20

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 47:38


Deep Dive with Dorian Warren: Child Care In this installment of The Takeaway Deep Dive, we tackle the very personal system of child care. Affordable child care is often inadequately addressed in the United States. That was laid bare during the height of the pandemic which exposed the inequities of a system that is in need of drastic changes and repair. Joining our hosts to discuss what changes need to be made to the child care system is Aqeela Muntaqim, Michigan Deputy Director of Mothering Justice, and Karen D'Souza, a writer at Ed Source, an organization that works to engage Californians on key education challenges with the goal of enhancing learning success. Sept. 16, 2021, file photo Pre-K teacher Vera Csizmadia teaches 3-and 4-year-old students in her classroom at the Dr. Charles Smith Early Childhood Center in Palisades Park, N.J. (Mary Altaffer/AP Photo) The Shadow Pandemic: Covid Creates Population of Orphaned Children A devastating number of children have lost a parent or caregiver to Covid, and they lack the financial and emotional support they need. Federal statistics are not yet available on how many U.S. children went into foster care last year; however, researchers estimate COVID-19 drove a 15% increase in orphaned children. JoNel Aleccia, senior correspondent at Kaiser Health News, discusses the impact of Covid on our children and the need for more support. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.     

One More Thing Before You Go
That Thing About UFO's Lizard People And Hybrid's Among Us

One More Thing Before You Go

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 47:05


Hey one more thing before you go in This Episode: UFOs, lizard people, and hybrids among us.! And Because this is October 2021 and in keeping with the tradition of the spooky, the paranormal, the spiritual, and the unusual between now and Halloween, we're going to bring you a fantastic series of interviews that are going to scare you spook you and make you think. In our first in a series of four, we talk to a woman who was enjoying an evening dinner with her husband who claims to be an intergalactic ambassador, and was visited by a UFO not once but twice? We are also going to learn what's it like to be married to an inmate, and how that helped her to be interested in UFOs, elementals, magic, and the paranormal? I'm your host Michael Herst and this is that thing about UFOs, lizard people, and hybrids among us. My Guest in this episode is Jo Ann Richards she is a native Californian. She has Associate of Arts degrees in film production and Accounting. She is the mother of a successful grown daughter and is the proud grandmother of three. An international speaker on the topics of UFOS, extraterrestrials, and military involvement with such topics. An active member of the Mormon Church for nearly 30 years before leaving it behind to fully embrace the world of UFOs, elementals, magic, and the paranormal which had long spoken to her soul. She has just published her first book, Midlife Magic, that ties it all together.FIND out MORE and how to contact JoAnn at https://beforeyooutopodcast.com Disclaimer: the views of this guest or any of my other guests aren't necessarily the views of this host or One More Thing Before You Go Podcast, nor One More Thing Productions LLC. This is a conversation about life, is meant to inform, educate, inspire, and entertain.

Cooking In Mexican From A to Z
CalMex or MexCal?

Cooking In Mexican From A to Z

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 42:22


On today's show, Aarón and Zarela are joined by Neal Fraser, the chef and owner of  Red Bird in Los Angeles.  Neal is a lifelong Angeleno, and longtime friend of Aarón's, and together they explore the modern intersections of Californian and Mexican cuisine. They explore a number of unusual ingredients from insects to corn fungus, as they map out regional influences from San Cristobal de las Casas to The Valley. For more recipes from  Zarela and Aarón, visit zarela.com and chefaaronsanchez.comHeritage Radio Network is a listener supported nonprofit podcast network. Support Cooking in Mexican from A to Z by becoming a member!Cooking in Mexican from A to Z is Powered by Simplecast.

The Mark And Melynda Show
10-18-21 Hour 3 Podcast

The Mark And Melynda Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 37:59


We discuss the increase in mental health cases in schools, demands in the climate summit, and are Californians really moving to Austin? All that and more? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KQED’s Forum
Colin Powell, First Black Secretary of State, Dies From COVID-19 Complications

KQED’s Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 21:00


Colin Powell, 84, died on Monday due to complications from COVID-19. Powell was one of the largest figures in American public, political and military life of the past four decades. As a former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, secretary of state and national security adviser he helped craft modern U.S. foreign policy, including his controversial role in the lead up to the Iraq war in 2003. Born in Harlem, N.Y., to Jamaican parents, Powell was a pioneer in a number of his public service roles, including his time as the first Black Secretary of State and first Black chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. When he endorsed Barack Obama for President in 2008, it was one of then-Senator Obama's most significant endorsements, particularly because of Powell's military credentials. We remember Powell's impact on American life, and how his role affected Californians of all political stripes.

The Passing Shot Tennis Podcast
The Indian Wells Catch-Up: Norrie notches new heights in title triumph; Badosa seals dream win on debut in MOTY epic; Murray's wedding ring hunt; Reality check for Raducanu; Dimitrov + Ostapenko roll back the years

The Passing Shot Tennis Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 51:27


In the latest episode of The Passing Shot, Joel and Kim catch up on the past two weeks at Indian Wells, which saw both the 21st seeds claim the titles in somewhat unexpected fashion.With Cam Norrie coming from a set down to win the biggest title of his career out in the Californian desert, and Paula Badosa edging Victoria Azarenka in a three set thriller, there is plenty to round up from the Finals weekend as the rescheduled Indian Wells event comes to an end.Meanwhile, with Grigor Dimitrov having a resurgent week, Andy Murray losing his wedding ring and Su- Wei Hsieh rocking an awesome dragon hat, Joel and Kim catch up on all the key talking points from the Masters 1000 event, as well as looking ahead to the European tournaments this week.Share your fan thoughts on the week with the #passingshotpod on social media.______________DOWNLOADTENNIS.COMTo stay up to date on all tennis around the world including ATP, WTA and Challenger tours, download TNNS Live Scores.Download on Apple PodcastsDownload on Google PlayFollow  TNNS Live Scores on TwitterAnd check out the TNNS Lives Scores website at www.downloadtennis.com______________SOCIAL MEDIAShare your fan thoughts on the week with the #passingshotpod on social media.Twitter: @passingshotpodInstagram: @passingshotpodWebsite: thepassingshot.co.ukWritten, presented and produced by Joel Girling and Kim MackenzieCrowdfunded by our listeners.Recorded on 18th October 2021

City Church (LoveHopeCity.com)
Episode 167: Are You Growing?

City Church (LoveHopeCity.com)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 39:36


We are continuing our series titled 1st Californians with Pastor Obie in 1 Corinthians 3:1-9. Open up a bible and follow along!

The Solarpreneur
How to Find the "Lay Down" Customers

The Solarpreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 19:32


Visit Solciety.co now!Speaker 1 (00:03):Welcome to the Solarpreneur podcast, where we teach you to take your solar business to the next level. My name is Taylor Armstrong and I went from $50 in my bank account and struggling for groceries to closing 150 deals in a year and cracking the code on why sales reps fail. I teach you to avoid the mistakes I made and bringing the top solar dogs, the industry to let you in on the secrets of generating more leads, falling up like a pro and closing more deals. What is a Solarpreneur you might ask a Solarpreneur is a new breed of solar pro that is willing to do whatever it takes to achieve mastery and you are about to become one.Speaker 2 (00:41):Hey, Hey, Hey, what's going on Solarpreneur? Taylor Armstrong back with another episode and as usual here to help you close more deals, generate more leads and referrals, and hopefully have a much better experience in the solar industry. So before we jump into today's topic, have two little announcements and one's kind of an ask. So number one, we are launching our new Solciety app. It's going to be coming out. Um, it should already be on the Google play store for those weirdos that are still using Androids. You can probably actually go get it already if you want to check it out. And for the normal people, the iPhone users, um, you're going to have to wait a little bit, I guess that's the downside with apple. They're a little more strict when it comes to, uh, you know, approving apps. So anyways, we're going to be dropping an episode soon about what's going on with that, but just wanted to give you a teaser.Speaker 2 (01:41):If you're wanting to get first exclusive access to that, be checking the app store, go to the Solciety.co And you can get first access first dibs on what we're going on, what we got going on with the soul side of the app, but it's gonna feature, you know, top training, exclusive discounts and a whole lot of other things. So definitely go get on that. When you have the chance, then number two, I'm thinking about actually to start charging a price on the podcast. No worry it's not money, but what I mean by that, I've been listening to a lot of, uh, Andy Frisella, his podcast it's called real AF, highly recommended. Um, he talks about right now, you know, mostly just issues that are going on in the U S for all of our, uh, listeners here in the USA. Um, but he starts out almost every one of his podcasts.Speaker 2 (02:37):If you listen to it with an ask and that ask, is it instead of paying them money to listen to it, you go share it with a friend you post on social media. You, uh, I don't know, help promote it somehow. And that's his price for the podcast and he, this guy's, he's got, I think like number one, business podcasts in the world, and I'd go check. But one of the most popular podcasts doesn't advertise on it at all, which he's probably the only top podcast like that, that I listened to, that doesn't have ads on it. He could be making seven figures, easy a year, popping ads on that thing, but that's his. Is it? You just go out and share it with someone. You talk about it. So I'm like, maybe I should start making that ask on my podcast. So we're trying to grow the Solarpreneur movement.Speaker 2 (03:28):So I want to make the same as to you. If you got value from this episode or any of our previous episodes, please go send it to someone, help us spread the word. We're doing all this for free. And to be blunt, I know I could be selling probably an extra deal a week with the time I spend on the podcast, but I choose to spread some value and help my peeps close more deals, because that's what it's about. And it's helped with me. The more I share what I learned. I know I, I get a lot of value from that too, and connecting with other people. So it's not like I don't want to be doing this, but anyways, that's my ask. If you got value from this podcast, please go share it with someone. And as always, you can leave a review to you if you feel so inclined.Speaker 2 (04:15):So with that being said, let's jump into today's topic. And this topic comes from just last week's experience, just like a lot of episodes do. So what happened last week? I was having a rougher week up until Friday. So how many of you have had a tough week? You're just grinding it out. You're knocking lots of doors. You're calling lots of leads, referrals, whatnot, and you're not getting anything. And I don't know about you, but if Friday comes around and I haven't closed the deal, I start feeling a little sick inside. I'm like, man, I need to get at least a few deals closed this week. I've gotten nothing. So that's why if you can get the deal closed early in the week. For me, it takes a lot of pressure off knowing that I have a deal closed thing going on the weekends, um, with some wins, if you will, but last week I didn't have any wins.Speaker 2 (05:08):Didn't have any closes. So I was getting a little stressed with it. I'm like, man, what's going on here? What do I need to do to get my few closes at least on the week? And so here's what I did. I looked, I looked for the low-hanging fruit. Hey, what do I mean by that? I looked for deals that I thought would be a lay down. And I've talked about this a little bit in the podcast. If you want to go back and listen to the podcasts around when we have Laney Dray, Mr. Door-to-Door millionaire on the show, we go into a few topics that have to do with this, but specifically in solar, what I mean is you go find people that potentially have not been talked to hardly the at all, if ever, Hey, and so I'm going to talk about how you do, and especially here in San Diego or in saturated markets, I think that's one of the keys to having success in these saturated markets is you got to look under the rocks for the deals you got to look and all the hiding places for these homeowners.Speaker 2 (06:14):Because if you're just going to cookie cutter neighborhoods, knocking all the typical stuff, yeah, you can have success. But for me, I like to have success and be able to get more quality leads and not necessarily be sifting through, you know, a hundred people that have been talked to 20 times, which sometimes is the case, especially here in San Diego. Okay. Now you might not have this issue as much. If you're in newer markets, maybe your issue there, just getting people to believe that solar works. But if you're in California, pretty much anywhere in California, you gotta be good at finding these people that have not heard as much about solar gain. The other benefit to this too. If you can find those people that haven't, um, you know, been hit up a million times about solar, that haven't really checked it out, then it's a lot easier to price the deals.Speaker 2 (07:11):What's your worth. Okay. None of this, what drives me nuts is when a homeowner has 10 quotes already and I go, okay, price me at, uh, two, five a watt. I'll buy it from you, whatever, some ridiculous number. And they're just trying to drive the pricing to the bottom. Now we seen still close those people. You just got to build value, but I love it when I can just build value and not have to sit in, pull teeth and fight on price. Okay. Makes it easier when you find these people that are quote unquote. Laydowns right. So let's talk about how do you find these people? Okay. Some of this again is going to sound familiar, but I'm going to refresh your memory. And for those, maybe you haven't heard this before. Okay. But number one thing is go off the beaten path. And I brought up Lenny grey.Speaker 2 (08:02):If you haven't read his book yet, it's called more door to door millionaire. Um, he also has his door to door millionaire, original book, two books he wrote, and he has a section on this. The entire book is super valuable. So I definitely recommend you go check it out and buy it if you haven't already. But on page one 14, if you have the book he talks about, he calls the strategy off the beaten path. And just to kind of summarize it, he talks about how he was knocking with, um, one of his rookie sales reps and where they were just hitting up this cookie cutter neighborhood. And every single person was like, Hey, you're the third guy. That's come by this week. And they were just getting hammered out. They're not having success. So after, I don't know, an hour or something, he goes onto the main highway where always the cars are speed and buying everything.Speaker 2 (08:57):And there's houses also along the main highway. But these are the houses that the longer driveways that, um, maybe they add some, I don't know, farm animals out front Barnes, whatever. They'll have bigger properties, things like that. So he says, Hey man, let's go try these houses. So they go to these houses on the main highway, instead of just talking to the cookie cutter neighborhood ones. And he says, within 15 minutes, they are sorry. You said the first house they sold that one. Then 15 minutes later, they sold the other one. And this was like, you know, just around the corner from this cookie cutter neighborhood, they'd had been knocking. It's the point of this is, and the point that he makes is that sometimes you need to go the strategy of call the over quantity. Hey, and he calls this like the low-hanging fruit.Speaker 2 (09:49):Hey, these people, they're not going to be talked to as much. You can, you know what I'm talking about. If you go to any neighborhood where they have super long Dre ways, if there are more smaller towns, if they're super spread apart, all homes like these they're way more likely to have been hit up a million times versus your cookie cutter neighborhoods. So that's the first strategy, make sure when you're out knocking. And I know some people are with, you know, the bigger companies, maybe you're with the Sunrun's, the legacies, maybe you're assigned areas and you're not supposed to be knocking different places, but even if you're assigned an area, make sure you look for those houses that are spread apart. Try to look for houses where maybe they're tough to access. Um, maybe they're they have gates in front of them. I don't know.Speaker 2 (10:42):Just anything you can note, any clue you can pick up on that. Maybe it would have been tough for any other newbie sales rep or sales rep that hasn't been listening to the Solarpreneur podcast to get access to. So make sure you do that. So that's number one. Look for those houses that are off the beaten path. Okay. And tip number two, make sure you are conscious of new move-ins is another big strategy that I've implemented. Okay. And I didn't even finish my story at the beginning, but I was having a rough week when I started out, like I said, didn't have anything and Friday that's exactly what I did. I went to a place where I didn't think many people would have knocked yet and sure enough books, like one out of every three people I talked to in this neighborhood. Okay. It was a condo slash townhome neighborhood.Speaker 2 (11:35):That's another thing that's I would classify in the, off the beaten path. And depending on your area, depending on what state you're knocking in, maybe like shared roof spaces or condos, town homes, maybe they're not allowed to get solar. I don't know. You'd have to look at what the regulations, all that in your state, but here in California, you can basically put solar on anything, even if it has a shared roof space. So keep that in mind, these like places that maybe even look like apartment complex, sometimes these places are townhomes or condos. So be wary of that and make sure you're paying attention. And that's another, I would say classification that's off the beaten path. Okay. And then the second point, um, was, um, sorry to finish my story. I ended up closing two last week on Friday and Saturday, knock on those town homes, but lay down sells low-hanging fruit.Speaker 2 (12:36):And then the second point that I was getting into before I started rambling, there was make sure you're conscious of the new move-ins. And I've talked about this multiple times as well on the show here, but make sure you're going on to Zillow, make your spreadsheet of your new move-ins. If you're assigned an area, go look up all the new people that moved in. This is the way you can target those people. You can bring up specifics in your door approach and Hey, we're just letting all the new move-ins know what's going on in the neighborhood. You guys, you probably didn't hear yet. You guys just moved in, right? Because what's super cool is you can see literally when people moved into their house right on Zillow. Okay. And I know there's a lot of other apps. Um, I'll have to put some in the show notes, but there's apps.Speaker 2 (13:23):You can get that realtors use where you can see like way more data than this. You can see, like if it's in a trust, the homes, um, like who is on the title of the home, things like that. No, there's a couple paid apps out there. Make sure you're doing that. And the best reps I know in the industry, um, are you using the strategy third going, of course, they're going to go like train reps and cookie cutter neighborhoods. They're going to knock and cookie cutter neighborhoods themselves, but they're mixing it up. Okay. Some days they're going to just the new move ins and goals. And if you're doing this strategy, make sure you're knocking around the new move ins too. You don't want to be driving for miles. And then only knock one door. I would suggest knocking all the way around, um, you know, the two neighbors on the side and then the three neighbors across the street minimum.Speaker 2 (14:17):And hopefully you have a name to drop where you can bring up the fact that you're, um, letting the people are in and say, Hey, do you know, the people just moved in next door? It's a good opener for their neighbors. Hey, but anyways, so the top guys are using all these strategies. They're going to the off the beaten path. They're doing the cookie cutter neighborhoods and then they're doing the new move-ins. Okay. And then the last point with all this is target the homes that already have solar too. Guess what? Especially here in San Diego, in California, there's a lot of homes. I've had solar for a long time. A lot of these people are getting huge, true bills where their solar is not covering everything they're using for their energy. So be conscious of that, make sure you're knocking these homes, especially if you know, maybe they have a pool or maybe if it just seems like, okay, this house is huge.Speaker 2 (15:14):They should have more than 10 panels up there. Especially those homes knock them. Cause you're going to get lots of people that either number one, they're being super conservative still. Cause they don't want to have those huge true-up bills or number two, they're paying huge, true bills. The utility that's not being covered. And these people, they already have solar. You don't have to sell them on the idea of solar. You just have to sell them on adding more panels, which is usually a super laid down low-hanging fruit sale. So that's the three tips guys, make sure you're knocking off the beaten path, including condos and town homes, depending on which state you're in and the laws and regulations around that number to make sure you're knocking the new move-ins. And even if your assigned areas, make sure you're looking those up and being aware of who maybe just moved in then number three, make sure you're also knocking the true-up systems that people that already have solar and another thing out here in California, a lot of all the new homes have to be built with solar.Speaker 2 (16:22):So for us Californians, that's another strategy that's our team has implemented go to those homes that are being built with solar because none of these homes that are being built with the systems already are sized to what the homeowners are using. So if you can find that out, you can go and look at this data. You can see how long people have been in the home and you can target maybe the people that just moved in, but also keep in mind target the people who've been there for a year because the new movements that's typically the one objection they have is that, oh Taylor, yeah, we don't want to do it. We want to see what we're using in the home. So in that case, make sure you're keeping these people in your follow-up list. And then also targeting people that have been in their homes, you know, six months to a year because they do have some data on what their electric usage history is.Speaker 2 (17:12):So that's what helped me this last week. That's how you turn a bad week into a good one as well. Make sure you're mixing it up, go off to that low-hanging fruit, but more importantly, just make sure to grains. Cause even if you're going after the low-hanging fruit, that's not an excuse to work less. And I'll be honest. Sometimes I've gotten a couple of deals from that and I've, and I've, uh, not worked as many hours as I should have. So make sure if you're using these strategies, use them with responsibility. Okay. Work just as hard as if you're grinding out in a cookie cutter neighborhood and you're only booking one out of every 10 appointments. Cause if you keep that same mindset, that's how you're going to have a lot more success is doing a combination of these strategies. So I hope that helps go share it with someone that could use the tips that's having a slower week, get out there and close some deals.Speaker 2 (18:05):Hey, Solarpreneurs quick question. What if you could surround yourself with the industry's top performing sales pros, marketers, and CEOs, and learn from their experience and wisdom in less than 20 minutes a day. For the last three years, I've been placed in the fortunate position to interview dozens of elite level solar professionals and learn exactly what they do behind closed doors to build their solar careers to an all-star level. That's why I want to make a truly special announcement about the new learning community, exclusively for solar professionals to learn, compete, and win with top performers in the industry. And it's called the Solciety, this learning community with designed from the ground up to level the playing field to give solar pros access to proven members who want to give back to this community and help you or your team to be held accountable by the industry. Brightest minds four, are you ready for it? Less than $3 and 45 cents a day currently Solciety is open, launched, and ready to be enrolled. So go to Solciety.co To learn more and join the learning experience. Now this is exclusively for Solarpreneur listeners. So be sure to go to solciety.co And join. We'll see you on the inside. 

KQED's The California Report
Alisal Fire Continues to Grow, Threatens Homes

KQED's The California Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 17:47


The Alisal Fire has burned more than 13,000 acres in Santa Barbara County. That's prompted evacuation orders in rural areas and forced the shut down of parts of Highway 101. Reporter: Rachel Showalter, KCBX Los Angeles continues its push to dismantle large homeless encampments in the city and move people into temporary shelters. It's already happened in the city's Echo Park and Venice neighborhoods. Now, the unhoused who are living in a section of MacArthur Park west of downtown, will be required to move by the end of this week. Reporter: Saul Gonzalez, The California Report In the Coachella Valley, desert cities are passing laws restricting or banning short-term rentals. And that's squeezing supply in the city of Palm Springs. Reporter: Benjamin Gottlieb, KCRW California's committee on reparations met again Tuesday to discuss housing and environmental inequities that have specifically disadvantaged African Americans. The committee looked at how reparations could be given in the form of direct payments and other methods to correct decades of racist policies and actions.  Reporter: Sarah Mizes-Tan, CapRadio Among the more than 700 bills Governor Gavin Newsom recently signed into law are several that aim to fix problems at the state's unemployment department. The changes come in the wake of a parade of problems that jeopardized much needed help for jobless Californians. Reporter: Mary Franklin Harvin, The California Report

H.E.R. Story
HBCU Royal University Queens 2nd Edition: Featuring Olivia Turner

H.E.R. Story

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 28:10


This episode is in partnership with The HBCU EXPERIENCE MOVEMENT, LLC--The HBCU Royal University Queens 2nd Edition. Its so important to share Black stories and experiences! Listen, as I chat with Olivia Turner who is a native Californian who pursued her dream of attending an HBCU. Ms. Turner, without a campus visit, decided that Texas Southern University would be her home after graduating from Perris High School. Currently, Olivia is a Senior Cyber Engineer for Deloitte--- a multinational professional services network with offices in over 150 countries and territories around the world. #HERstory is meant to be shared! Lets take a listen.

Bill Handel on Demand
Handel on the News [EARLY EDITION]

Bill Handel on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 30:05


Bill Handel is joined by KFI News Director Chris Little, who's filling in for Jennifer Jones Lee. The two provide updates on news topics that include: The Dodgers are on the brink of elimination after losing to the Giants 1-0 in game 3 of the NLDS, power shut-offs loom for tens of thousands of Californians amid gusty winds, and Southwest Airlines has experienced a slew of cancellations and delays nationwide.

True Myths, One Lie with Culter35
Dark Watchers ft. Ryan McCauley, Austin Murphy, and Christopher Mennella

True Myths, One Lie with Culter35

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 41:42


There's a Californian folklore regarding figures named "dark watchers," shadowy entities that seemingly follow hikers and travelers, and people have sworn to have seen them in other parts of the country. This week, Culter35 and guests debate 3 stories regarding these mystic figures, but one story is totally fake. Story 1: A man gets a radio call from a coworker who frighteningly tells him he sees something strange. The man goes to investigate and sees a 7-foot-tall shadow creature approaching him. The figure eventually catches up to him and they have a face-off. Story 2: A family is traveling to their campsite. The girl in the family keeps seeing figures in the trees, but the parents chalk it up to an active imagination. Eventually, the car slams to a stop when there is a dark watcher in the middle of the road. Story 3: 2 friends are driving around some haunted barns when their car breaks down. They decide to just stay in the car overnight until sunrise. Eventually, they're surrounded by large shadowy creatures that never move an inch. Plus, the guys play a version of "Mad Libs" where some words of a creepy story are filled in by the guests with silly words. Want to submit a truth or a lie? Send in your submission to truemythsonelie@gmail.com! Follow Culter35 on YouTube Follow Culter35 on IG   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Voices: River City
192 - Gavin Hancock (10.12.2021)

Voices: River City

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 65:25


A note to all of our listeners: VOICES: River City is moving back to its weekly format, given that all four hosts are working full-time and the world is becoming a terribly busy place again. We will be providing some patron perks in the future, including meet-ups, so we hope you'll continue to support our work! We also take a moment to mention the alarming rise in far-right groups putting up flyers doxxing members of the Sacramento community, and threatening physical harm. For the meat of the show, we're discussing Governor Gavin Newsom's final bill signings of the year:   The big one that stood out to us was how many huge L's the state's law enforcement lobby took this session, with the following new legislation:   - Cops now cannot legally block journalists from covering protests - The state's Commission on Peace Officers Standards and Training can now decertify officers for wrongdoing, effectively kicking them out of the profession - Californians now have increased access to police misconduct records - There are new massive restraints on when cops can shoot protesters with rubber bullets   Newsom only vetoed some 8% of the bills that crossed his desk, but there were a few doozies in that mix. Take, for instance, freshman Assemblymember Alex Lee's bill to keep virtual public comment options for the state's large cities and counties. What the hell, man?

San Diego News Matters
Controlled burns for California

San Diego News Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 10:45


Low intensity burns or prescribed fires are necessary to keep a forest healthy and to prevent large wildfires, many forest managers now believe. A new law in California is encouraging more controlled burns in the Golden State. Meanwhile, Californians can continue to take their favorite cocktails to-go also under a new law. Plus, one former military interpreter from San Diego is rebooting his life after a harrowing escape from Afghanistan.

Elevate Your Grind
Nicole Redler, Senior Manager of Community Affairs and Internal Communications at Eaze

Elevate Your Grind

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 40:59


Nicole Redler is Senior Community Affairs Manager at Eaze, California's largest legal cannabis marketplace and the state's largest cannabis employer. Nicole leads Eaze's patient and veteran advocacy programs, building meaningful relationships to amplify community voices on important policy issues across California. To date, Eaze has completed over seven million deliveries, breaking own barriers to access and building community through industry-leading social impact and equity programs. With a focus on supporting marginalized communities, Nicole works closely with the Social Impact team to bolster Momentum, Eaze's business accelerator for BIPOC, veteran, LGBTQ and female founders. Nicole was instrumental in building public and industry support for Senator Scott Wiener's SB 34, which restored compassionate care programs in California; today, she leads Eaze Compassion, which provides free medical cannabis to low-income Californians fighting cancer, glaucoma, chronic pain, PTSD, and other debilitating health conditions.

Start Here
Kures 4 Kids

Start Here

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 24:46


Pfizer asks the FDA to approve its child-sized COVID vaccine. The oil company whose pipeline ruptured has precious few answers for Californians. And former NBA stars are accused of a scheme to defraud a medical fund.

KQED’s Forum
Two Californians win Nobel Prize for Research on How We Sense Touch, Temperature and Pain

KQED’s Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 37:27


Two California scientists, David Julius from UCSF and Ardem Patapoutian from San Diego's Scripps Research, have won the 2021 Nobel Prize for medicine. In their work, which focuses on the biology of our senses, Julius and Patapoutian identified receptors that allow the cells in your body to sense touch and temperature. Their findings hold potential medical applications for better treatment of chronic pain. We talk with the prize-winning researchers about their work.

Reasonable Doubt
RD - Domestic Terrorism at School Board Meetings & LA's Covid Mandates

Reasonable Doubt

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 57:17


Adam and Mark link up as Mark remains in quarantine to discuss the recent expansion of the definition of terms like 'domestic terrorism' and 'hate crimes' and how those changes are coming to a school near you. They also discuss the recently passed Covid rules for the city of Los Angeles and what Mark as a restaurateur sees as the implications of those rules. Mark also makes a bold prediction about what we'll be seeing as Californians in the next thirteen months. Watch this episode on YouTube at YouTube.com/ReasonableDoubtPodcast and subscribe to that channel, the exclusive home of Reasonable Doubt Please Support Our Sponsors: BetterHelp.com/ReasonableDoubt Geico.com FightCamp.com/Doubt

The GHOLE Podcast
California's Nightmare & R. Kelly w/ Mike Feeney & Kerryn Feehan

The GHOLE Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 64:51


I love Mike Feeney even though he hates Fall Out Boy, he's hilarious, we talk music and what's wrong of my music taste. Kerryn Feehan joins in after walking her talk and we discuss whoever the Californian nightmare who is on AM radio in Central Pennsylvania. We also talk about Van Gogh, Picasso, and Only Fans, fun times! follow Mike & Kerryn on twitter at @IamMikeFeeney & @KFreeHams

KQED's The California Report
Massive Oil Spill off Orange County Coast Called Potential Ecological Disaster

KQED's The California Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 14:18


Crews are working to contain a massive oil spill off the coast of Huntington Beach. The oil spill has closed many beaches in the area, and environmental groups are working frantically to save wildlife that has been impacted by the spill. In surveys, half of Californians say they have to wait too long to see a mental health provider when they need one. A new bill currently on the governor's desk would require health insurers to reduce those wait times to no more than 10 business days.  Reporter: April Dembosky, KQED  California's statewide eviction moratorium has expired. And now many tenants are looking for rent relief and legal guidance.  Reporter: Molly Solomon, KQED 

Ingrained
Episode 26: Water Planning in the Sacramento Valley

Ingrained

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 25:19


Water has long been a contentious subject in California.  As the nation's most populous state, leading the nation in farm production and a state dedicated to environmental protection, it's easy to understand why. The severe, ongoing drought only puts a greater focus on water. While there's hope for a wet fall and winter, Sacramento Valley water managers and other stakeholders are doing what they can to prepare for all outcomes. Teamwork and coordination are invaluable, especially during difficult times. “We are really fortunate in the Sacramento River Basin,” said Northern California Water Association President David Guy. “We have a real cohesive set of leaders that work very well together. Our managers and counsel work well together. That's critical, particularly as we head into these next years that could be very challenging. I think every river system in the valley works together. We realize we're all invested in the same types of actions and need to do the same types of things to be able to make sure that we have water supplies for the farms, cities and refuges.” Guy said he hopes more robust scenario planning this fall will further bring the region together, to be unified and best prepared for whatever 2022 holds for our water supply.  While the drought took its toll in our region, including a 100,000 acre reduction in rice planting, the familiar fall activities of harvest and the Pacific Flyway wildlife migration are welcomed. This year has been an uphill battle for those safeguarding water for all who need it and for future generations. “It's a daily, weekly, monthly and annual balancing act,” remarked Thad Bettner, General Manager of the Glenn-Colusa Irrigation District, the largest water district in the Sacramento Valley. “We're always making those sorts of decisions about how best to manage and use our supplies. A lot of environmental assets sit in our backyard, so we want to make sure we are meeting those needs as well. As a district, we're very transparent in all of the things that we do and we'd love to have other partners come alongside us in helping us make these key decisions.”  Harvest of America's sushi rice is nearing its peak, with growers reporting good quality and production from the fields they were able to plant. Grower Don Bransford in Colusa said he planted about 25 percent less acreage this year due to the water cutbacks. Bransford has long  been a leader in this region on key issues, and water is no exception.  He said planning and coordination for 2022 must be a priority. “The challenges are great, as they were this year,” he said. “There obviously is not enough water to go around, so the environment was shorted and farming acreage had to be reduced because of the curtailments. Urban areas had a little better supply situation, so they have not experienced what agriculture has. Moving forward, I believe we have huge challenges in this coming year.” Those who know and love the Sacramento Valley understand the need to preserve this unique and essential part of California. “We are all very proud of our little communities in the Sacramento Valley, many of which are dependent on a viable rice industry,” Bransford said. “What other commodity can you grow that has over 200 wildlife species inhabiting a growing crop, and then once that crop is harvested, then you have the migratory waterfowl moving in for a winter feast. Here we have land that's producing food and habitat – and they coexist wonderfully.” Michael Anderson: This past year is ranking up there in the top five of our driest years, and you pair it with last year, 2020, which was also dry, and now you're looking at the second driest since '76, '77. Very extreme pair of drought years there. Jim Morris: California state climatologist, Michael Anderson, describing our greater climate variability, which has contributed to this highly disappointing year for rain and snowfall. Michael Anderson: We're a lot warmer now than we were in '76, '77. April, May and June, that was the warmest and the driest in 125 years of record. The narrative of climate change for California is that we see a warming in temperatures, more rain, less snow, and more extremes. And we're seeing that play out in this last decade. Jim Morris: Drought impacts are being felt far and wide, including 100,000 fewer acres of rice planted here in the Sacramento Valley. What lies ahead for 2022? Only time will tell, but there's already a lot of thought being put into water management for the next year. Welcome to Ingrained, the California Rice Podcast. I'm your host, Jim Morris, proud to have worked with California farmers and ranchers for more than 30 years to help tell their stories. This year has been extremely dry with significant impacts. There is widespread hope that fall and winter will be wet, but of course that's far from guaranteed. So I think it would be helpful to hear from regional leaders about this critical subject. Jim Morris: David Guy is president of the Northern California Water Association. He's been NCWA's president for 11 years. He also served eight years as their executive director. We spent time together a long time ago at the California Farm Bureau, and he and his family were in Yosemite living in the park from 2007 to 2010 as David was CEO of the nonprofit, Yosemite Association. And I will be forever jealous of that opportunity you had. So looking ahead, David, what can water managers do to prepare for the possibility of another dry year? David Guy: Well, I think that as we look forward to 2022, there's still some work that has to be done on 2021. And I think the Pacific Flyway programs that are underway right now with the Rice Commission, with the water suppliers, with the conservation organizations are really, I think, stage setting for next year. The birds are so important and the species are so important. We'll be doing some more of that in the floodplain later in the winter for fish. And then as we start to go into the fall, obviously we need to start thinking about precipitation. And if there is going to be any precipitation this fall or early winter, we want to be able to capture that precipitation. David Guy: So I think that's what the water managers in the Sacramento Valley and throughout the state do really well. So I think we want to pull as much water into storage as we can. I think we want to be able to recharge groundwater as much as we can, and we want to be able to get water out on the ground for birds and fish as much as we can. So I think there's going to be a real concerted effort to help make sure that we utilize our water this fall and winter the best we can because everything we do this fall and winter will set the stage for next year. Jim Morris: To effectively do the most with such a precious resource, you need a lot of people with common goals. How would you describe the cohesiveness of water management in our region? David Guy: Well, I think we're real fortunate in the Sacramento River basin and we have a real cohesive set of leaders that work very well together and our managers and council and everybody else work really well together, and I think that's critical particularly as we head into these next years that could be very challenging. I think every river system in the valley works together. We realize that we're all invested in the same types of actions and that we need to do the same types of things to be able to make sure that we have water supplies for the farms, cities, refuges. So we're going to be doing some scenario planning this year in the fall to start planning for 2022 in a way that we've really never done before, and I think that will even further bring the region together, hopefully to unify around some planning for next year, and then the actions that will be necessary. Jim Morris: Northern California Water Association has a ridgetop to river mouth holistic water management approach. For someone not fully immersed in the water world, what does that mean? David Guy: Well, I think is what it really means is that the water obviously starts in the mountains and then it flows down through the valley. And the bottom line is this really calls on the managers in this region to manage the water the best they can. And they already manage water in this way. A lot of our agencies manage water from ridgetop to river mouth. And I think the other couple things that it does is water obviously flows from one area to the other, and we try to utilize that water the best we can and sometimes that water's used multiple times as it goes through the system and we want to be able to continue that. David Guy:The other thing of course, that it really allows is that we know that salmon, for example, which is a big part of the region, you need to address every salmon life stage for them to be successful, and that means from the ridgetop to the river mouth. And then of course, we can't control what goes on in the ocean, but we can sure help influence what goes on from the ridgetop to the river mouth. And I think that's really just calling on the best of our managers to do what they really do well. Jim Morris: There is some criticism that comes up on how much water is used by farms and ranches, and my belief on this is it's really not an either or that that water can help in many different ways. And taking rice, for example, that water is used to grow a crop that's America sushi rice. It also helps rural communities and our economy, and it also helps the Pacific Flyway migration of millions of birds. And now salmon are benefiting from rice farming too. So when you look at the collaboration, the multiple uses of water, what thoughts do you have about how effective that is going on right now in the Sacramento Valley? David Guy: The Sacramento Valley does this better than anybody. Quite honestly, they use water for cities and rural communities. We get water out for the farms. We get water out for the refuges. And quite honestly, it's a lot of the same water. It's a lot of synchronized water management that happens in the region. So yeah, I find that when people want to say that one use is being used at the sacrifice of others, that's usually just a false choice. So we find that you can do all of that. You just have to be creative and you just have to get the leaders in the region to want to embrace that. David Guy: And we do that in the Sacramento better than anybody. This last year, for example, most agriculture in the state really received zero surface water. And there were some areas that received maybe about 50 percent of their supplies, and I think to their credit, these water suppliers utilize that water to their benefit and they not only use the water for the farms, but they're now working to use that water for the birds and will be using it for water for the salmon later in the year. And I think there's a sequence there that could actually work well in the Sacramento Valley as well. Jim Morris: And I'm glad you mentioned those surface water cutbacks because there was an incredible news cycle this past year, and maybe that was lost, but there were very significant, huge reductions in the amount of surface water available in our region. We've had dry years before and certainly will again. So what can be learned from our most recent dry year this year? David Guy: Well, I think we just have to call on everybody's creativity and working together. I think that's what we've learned. We have a program, our dry year task force, where we've worked with state and federal agencies, and I think having that communication is just essential. We're going to be doing this scenario planning going into next year and really focusing on what are the scenarios that we may see in 2022? And let's be honest, some of those scenarios are fairly ugly for the region and some of those scenarios may involve a wet 2022, which we're all hoping for, but the bottom line is we have to be prepared for all of those scenarios and I think having the managers thinking about that together, I think we'll be really effective. David Guy: I think there's also to a lot of actions that can be taken in the meantime that are not as high profile, but again, some of the things we talked about moving water into storage, moving water out on the floodplain, moving water out into the refuges, I think those are the kind of things that are happening and are really important as we head into 2022. Jim Morris: Moving water out on the floodplains, that is a growing area of emphasis in our region, and talk a little bit about that. What does that look like and how does it help? David Guy: Well, I think we've seen in the last 50 years in California, that we've used the same formula. How much water do we put into the Delta and who has to give up that water to flow into the Delta? Well, that path has led to declines in fish. That path has led to declines in water supply reliability. So I think a lot of people are saying, "Why don't we try something different?" Well, fortunately the scientists over at the University of California have been pointing to the floodplain for some time now and saying, "This is where we can get the best benefit for fish and wildlife." So I think there's a real concerted effort, big coalition, the Floodplain Forward Coalition, is working on how do we reactivate our floodplain? And of course, there's a whole lot of things that have gone into that, but I think we've seen that there's been success with waterfowl on the Pacific Flyway. David Guy: We've seen that there's been success with spring run salmon on Butte Creek. And a big part of both of those efforts is this idea of reactivating the floodplain. So, we think that's the new approach and the best part about it is that we can do that in synchronicity with the farming and all the things that we do in the region, and we can also do it probably with a lot less water than just putting a bunch of water into the Delta that doesn't seem to be providing any benefits for anything. Jim Morris: And it's interesting when you talk about reactivating the floodplain, it may sound like this incredible amount of water, but really it's a shallow amount of water that does get a lot of benefit from it. And we've seen that in the rice fields of the Sacramento Valley. So some of the issues in this past year we've had include voluntary agreements, water transfers, and groundwater. They came up a lot and those are pretty big topics. How do you feel those issues or maybe others may fit into 2022. David Guy:Groundwater of course is the resource that people go to when they don't have surface water, and I think that will continue. Obviously there's a concerted effort through the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act and the plans that are coming early next year to really manage our groundwater basin sustainably. So I think there's a real concerted effort at the local level to do that. So we'll hopefully get that in place and people can start taking some of those actions as soon as possible to protect the groundwater for future uses. The voluntary agreements, I think are really just essential for the region. We need stability in that Bay Delta process. And without that stability, we're just going to keep having supplies in Northern California threaten in various regulatory processes. So we need that stability and I think there's some interest in the Administration in moving that forward. So I think 2022's got a lot in store, but I think we're going to be prepared for the year no matter what it looks like with respect to precipitation. Jim Morris: And you mentioned the word stability. How does that factor in when we look at the water rights system that is in place? David Guy: I think the water rights system in California works quite well and it works very well in the Sacramento River basin. It's painful for some, because some get their waters curtailed and other there don't, but I think everybody knows how that works. I think people have certain expectations. They've built their business models around that. So in our view, the water system works really well. We're going to continue to work with the State Water Board to make that process even better, but I really think that making the water rights system obviously work is really important. And we know there's going to be critics and some academics and others who are going to want to suggest that we have to rewrite our water rights system, and obviously that would destabilize California water immensely. So we need to make the water right system work, and then we need to be able to put water into storage and let the managers do what they do best, which is obviously a big part of the water rights system as well. Jim Morris: I am really impressed when I see the meetings in the Sacramento Valley. There are members of the environmental community, there's urban representatives, agriculture, water officials, of course. So what is your assessment on the willingness to find water solutions in our valley? David Guy: You're right, Jim. I mean, we have an amazing group of folks who are working hard out on the ground to really implement solutions. And again, they're for cities, they're for rural communities, they're for farms and ranches, they're for the environment. And I don't think anybody's done that better than the Sacramento Valley. Kudos to the leaders and the rice community in the valley for really step up and doing all the work that you've done. I think as we go forward, we're going to continue to work with that group and I think that work is really proving fruitful. David Guy: Unfortunately, we also know there's a group of litigators that are sitting out there, who their business model is not to solve problems. Their business model is to file lawsuits and to try to disrupt what we're doing in the Sacramento River Basin. So unfortunately we're going to need to be part of that process as well, to make sure that they can't in fact disrupt the Sacramento River Basin. And in the meantime, let's keep working with those who show up and get their nails dirty and want to work out on the ground, because that's how this is going to get better. Jim Morris: What is at stake here? I've spent my entire life in the Sacramento Valley. Absolutely love it. But I think for a lot of people that are driving on I-5 or Highway 99, and they're just heading from one place to the next and don't understand the full beauty and importance of it. So what's at stake here in making sure this region stays whole? David Guy: Well, Jim, you started off by mentioning my time in Yosemite and of course, I just have wonderful memories of Yosemite and our national park system is beyond equal in this world. But I think the Sacramento Valley is on that level as far as the grandeur and as what it is, it's just so vast and big, but we have what? 2 million acres of farmland, some of the best farmland in the world. We have seven national wildlife refuges, 50 state wildlife areas, four runs of salmon. We have cities and rural communities that really sparkle and have wonderful people in them, and I think it's water that really brings this region together in a special way, and I think that's what's at stake and I hope that we can all roll up our sleeves, continue to work together to make sure that we have water for this region for all of those purposes. It's not and/or. It's how do we do both? And I think that's what this region really excels at. Jim Morris: I'm in Willows at the headquarters of Glenn-Colusa Irrigation District, the largest water district in the Sacramento Valley, covering 175,000 acres, much of it farmland. There are communities and several wildlife refuges here, as well. There were fields that went unplanned this year, including rice, the underground water table has been pressured, and they've had to deal with severe surface water cutbacks. Thad Bettner has been head of this water district since 2006. Of course, that's included several dry years. And as we get through this year, Thad, how taxing has it been? Thad Bettner: I have to say that you have been here for 15 years and doing this water thing for over 30. I would say this has probably been the most challenging year I've ever experienced in my career. I look back and I've talked to other people about the COVID year of last year and how challenging that was, but honestly this year has been even more challenging than that. So just given the constraints, the challenging hydrologic conditions, the internal needs that we have for trying to meet water for our growers, for the environment, for the refuges that we serve, and then also the concerns about trying to protect salmon in the river, and just trying to balance all those competing needs has been very challenging this year. The good thing is we've kind of gotten through it. We're here in the fall, so that's good news, but certainly, we have another challenging year ahead of us going into next year. Jim Morris: What are some lessons that might be learned from this year as we head into a potentially dry 2022, which could magnify all of these impacts? Thad Bettner: I think certainly the challenge is just from a surface water standpoint, how do we manage the system to one, get water where it's needed for people, for the different crops that we grow, for certainly protecting fish and I'm not minimizing them at all by same fish. Thirdly, but just, I think in terms of just the environment, it's broader than just fisheries. We have birds that we're trying to manage for right now, et cetera. So I think the broader environmental needs are very significant. And then the other thing we're facing here in the Sacramento Valley is a lot of these groundwater sustainability plans are getting adopted in January. So we'll also be going into next year, once those plans are adopted, actually starting to implement them. So how we also manage our water supply for the benefit of maintaining our sustainable groundwater system here in the Sacramento Valley is going to be vitally important as well. Jim Morris: How important is coordination and cooperation among all of the stakeholders? Thad Bettner: It's very important. I mean, honestly I spend most of my day just working with other agencies, other managers, groundwater folks, talking to different regulatory agencies about operations, talking to our environmental partners on restoration projects, and then just trying to meet our own internal staff needs. We have about 75 employees here in the district. So just trying to make sure that just as an entity, as a company, we continue to have good bonds internally. So it's been most of our days, just trying to foster sorts of relationships. Jim Morris: Longer term, it would be great, I think to have more water storage like Sites Reservoir, and how would that help in the long term for all Californians? Thad Bettner: We've been an advocate for Sites for decades. It's right next to our district and certainly parts of our facilities would be used both to fill and drain sites. I think one of the most significant benefits of Sites, not just of the water supply, it would provide to those folks who are investing in the project, but the project would provide just a lot more flexibility to some of our backbone infrastructure like Shasta, like Oroville, which I'm sure everybody has heard are historic lows this year. So having additional storage up in sites could help some of these dry years to provide more water into the system and ultimately provide more water for environmental benefits. Jim Morris: The purpose is not to try to get Sites filled in a dry year, but when we have those abundant rainfall years, to take advantage of that in a better way than we're doing now. Thad Bettner: One of the things about the Sacramento Valley that a lot of folks don't recognize at least on the Sacramento River, is that it's really more of a rain-driven watershed than a snow-fed watershed. So, under climate change, a lot of the forecasts are saying actually that more rainfall will fall in the Sacramento River system, which could lead to more runoff, which, again, Sites Reservoir would be relying on those really wet years, high runoff years to fill Sites and then draw that water out of storage in the dryer years. Jim Morris: What responsibility do you feel you're trying to have as much reasonable water to all the needs here in your district, but you also have to safeguard this resource for down the road? What kind of a balancing act is that? Thad Bettner: Well, I would say it's a daily, weekly, monthly, and annually balancing act. I mean, we're always making those sorts of decisions about how best to manage and use our supplies and also looking for just broader from... A lot of these assets, like environmental assets sit in our backyard. So how do we make sure we're also providing and meeting those needs as well? So I would say for us as a district, we're very transparent in all the things that we do and would love to have other partners come alongside us and helping us make some of these key decisions. Jim Morris: It's harvest time in rice country, including here in Colusa, the largest rice growing county in America. I'm visiting with grower Don Bransford, who in addition to farming is extremely active in his community and with statewide service. Don, first of all, how is harvest going this year and how has the drought impacted your farm? Don Bransford: Well, so far harvest is going pretty well. This has been one of those years where we've had a few more breakdowns than we'd like, but we're progressing well and the moisture's holding up. As far as the drought goes, we fallowed about 25 percent of our ground due to our reductions in supply, according to our contracts. Jim Morris: Thanks for taking time during such a busy time. It is windy today, but the harvesters and the bankout wagons are going and things are looking great. So how important is it when we look ahead to 2022, that there is some planning and coordination in terms of water? Don Bransford: I think the planning and coordination is extremely important. For this cropping year, we started planning in early February for the potential of a drought. We worked with the regulators, NGOs and other water districts to see how we might adapt our systems to meet a lot of needs of the environment, the farms and the urban areas. So it was a challenge. Jim Morris: What kind of pressures are there on water supplies? It's always challenging in California, but it seems lately to be exceptionally so. There will always be discussion, debate, and dispute. So what kind of challenges from a farming perspective, do you see on the water supply? Don Bransford: The challenges are great as they were this year. There obviously is not enough water to go around. So the environment was shorted. Farming acreage had to be reduced because of the curtailments. Urban areas had a little better supply situation. So they have not experienced what agriculture has, but moving forward, I believe we have huge challenges in this coming year. A number of wells were used to make up for deficient supplies. I think moving into the new year, there's going to be concern about how much groundwater's available, which puts more pressure on surface supplies. And then you have urban areas who were able to get through this past year with... Their supplies are short. Don Bransford: We've been contacted by a number of urban districts about the potential for water transfers. And then obviously, those growers south of the Delta that have contracts are most likely going to be very short of water. It's going to be tremendously challenging. We are going to start planning and actually this next month up here in the north state, we're going to work with NGOs, the state and federal regulators and the other irrigation districts to figure out how to best use every drop of water that we have available and hopefully some of that water can be used two or three times to achieve or meet needs of any number of demands. Jim Morris: This is a really special area. The communities, Colusa, I love Gridley, Biggs, Marysville, Yuba City, Richvale, on and on. The farms, the environment, the unique communities, how important is it to have these discussions and try to maintain this special thing that we have in the Sacramento Valley? Don Bransford: I think it's very important. We are all very proud of our little communities in the Sacramento Valley, many of which are dependent on a viable rice industry. We're here at harvest this year and the wildlife are everywhere. I mean, where else... What other commodity can you grow which has over 200 species of wildlife inhabiting a growing crop? And then once that crop is harvested, then you have the migratory waterfowl moving in for a winter feast. Just this morning, I also saw some sandhill cranes. They arrive about this time every year. In the same fields, the geese have started to move into the fields at night to forage the rice that's left behind by harvesters. About 50 percent of the feed for all migrating waterfowl are located in these rice fields. These fields are ecosystems and the only way to replace those ecosystems would be to build wetlands, which would cost hundreds of millions of dollars, but here we have land that's producing food and habitat and they coexist wonderfully. Jim Morris: Another sign of fall in our valley, the ducks and geese are coming back. I'm at the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge in Willows, a great place for your family to visit. If we are fortunate to have abundant rain and snow in the coming months, perhaps everyone can exhale a bit, but at the moment, next year looks like it will be a major test. Hopefully with collaboration, cooperation, and creativity, we will persevere. Thank you to our interviewees, David Guy, Thad Bettner, Don Bransford, and Michael Anderson. We will, of course, keep you updated on this issue as we get farther into fall and winter. You can go to podcast.calrice.org to find out more. Please subscribe and spread the word. And thanks for listening.

Talk Chineasy - Learn Chinese every day with ShaoLan
274 - Birthday in Chinese with ShaoLan and Super Chineasian Charlie Hoffs

Talk Chineasy - Learn Chinese every day with ShaoLan

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 7:41


Learn how to wish your friends happy birthday in Chinese in this special episode with Californian student Charlie Hoffs. ShaoLan shares the varying birthday customs in China and Charlie talks about how she likes to celebrate her birthday.

KQED's The California Report
Smoky Air From Wildfires Impacting Parts of California Differently

KQED's The California Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 13:24


As part of our continuing investigation, “Dangerous Air,” NPR's California Newsroom found out how some Californians are coping with all the smoke created by wildfires in the state, and why the smoke hits some parts of California harder than others.  Reporter: Caleigh Wells, KCRW With so much social media inundated with vaccine misinformation, YouTube has announced it's cracking down on it, again. The company said it would remove videos claiming that vaccines do not reduce rates of transmission or contraction of disease, and content that includes misinformation on the makeup of the vaccines.  Reporter: Rachael Myrow, KQED The L.A. City Council was supposed to vote on a sweeping municipal ordinance Wednesday that would require people to show proof of full COVID-19 vaccination before entering many indoor public spaces. But the council had to delay action after one councilmember withheld his vote. Reporter: Benjamin Gottlieb, KCRW 

Insight with Beth Ruyak
Sacramento Biz Journal Update / Subminimum Wage Bill / Work Hotline for Employees With Disabilities / Apple Hill Highlights

Insight with Beth Ruyak

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021


Latest local business headlines from historic sales and sudden closures. A new law ends the subminimum wage, impacting thousands of Californians with disabilities. The first-ever hotline for employees and employers with disabilities. The highlights of Apple Hill. Today's Guests We get an update on the latest local business headlines with Real Estate Reporter Ben van der Meer and Managing Editor Sonya Sorich of the Sacramento Business Journal, including the latest plans for the old Campbell's Soup plant and the sudden closing of de Vere's Irish Pub. Bridget Kolakosky with the State Council on Developmental Disabilities discusses a bill signed into law that ends the subminimum wage, impacting thousands of Californians with disabilities who have been paid below the minimum wage as employees.  Leah Burdick with PRIDE Industries, one of the nation's largest employers of people with disabilities, discusses the first-ever hotline for employees and employers.  Chris Delfino, President of Apple Hill Growers Association, helps us explore Apple Hill during harvest season.

Balancing Cultures
Ep. 59: Choosing to Stay Abroad – Life with a Blend of Cultures, outsider Benefits & Creative Pursuits

Balancing Cultures

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 46:01


ANCHOR FULL SHOW NOTES with links on BalancingCultures.com/episode-59/ ….. Episode 59: Choosing to Stay Abroad – Life with a Blend of Cultures, outsider Benefits & Creative Pursuits ….. I can't tell you how many times I've been asked: Why did you leave California? California is great. I will always be Californian. When people ask where I'm from, I still say California. But I did not leave my heart in San Francisco. I packed it up, brought it to Europe and now it belongs to Munich. And I'm not the only one. Eleanor Mayrhofer is here to chat about her Californian upbringing with a blend of cultures that showed her the benefits of being an outsider and opened her up to international life. Despite the headaches of expat life: From visas and taxes to quitting corporate life and starting a business. Eleanor is still choosing to stay abroad. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/balancingcultures/message

THE VALLEY CURRENT®️ COMPUTERLAW GROUP LLP
The Valley Current®: Will Silicon Valley (and California Generally) Transcend the Current Post-Pandemic Post-Recall Vote State of Affairs? - Part 2

THE VALLEY CURRENT®️ COMPUTERLAW GROUP LLP

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 33:03


The price of real estate keeps climbing and the price of money is staying low, but the inflation on goods is getting quite worrisome. Thankfully prime lending rates are safe for now as the Feds have announced we probably won't see a move on prime lending rates until next year; though there are plenty of other factors that could cause the market to shift and change that projection. To figure out what is going on in California, Jack Russo asks Joe Cucchiara if things are getting better now that Gavin Newsom has been reaffirmed as governor or if Californians are content with getting beat up by the state.  

Gun Sports Radio
The Fenrir USA Story with Christian Rodriguez

Gun Sports Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 93:39


TIME CODES: 0:00 - Intro 1:15 - Laura Lothian - Candidate for La Mesa City Council 9:50 - The Fenrir USA Story 35:40 - US Senate Campaign 56:30 - Civilian Dissent 1:18:00 - Stump My Nephew: What's the difference between a Gunsmith and an Armorer? 1:30:00 - Outro   Laura for La Mesa! Laura Lothian is IN STUDIO and we're going to be chatting with her about her campaign for La Mesa City Council! Endorsed by San Diego County Gun Owners, Laura is a strong Second Amendment supporter and is focused on cleaning up the streets, supporting small business, saying NO to the mileage tax, and supporting our law enforcement officers. http://www.lauraforlamesa.com   We have a local San Diego business owner, Christian Rodriguez, to talk about Fenrir USA and a better PLATE CARRIER! http://www.fenrirusa.com Use code GUNOWNERS15 for 10% off!   Members get 25% off! Not a member yet? Join today! https://www.gunownersradio.com/join   Mark Mueser is running for US Senate! Find out why Californians should vote for him! Mark also touches on the topic of election integrity. http://www.markmeuser.com   In this segment, we're getting to know one of Joe's fellow authors on substack, Aaron Kenney!   https://civiliandissent.substack.com/p/you-are-part-of-a-cultural-insurgency   Stump My Nephew: What's the difference between a Gunsmith and an Armorer? -- The right to self-defense is a basic human right. Gun ownership is an integral part of that right. If you want to keep your rights defend them by joining San Diego County Gun Owners (SDCGO),  Orange County Gun Owners (OCGO) in Orange County, San Bernardino County Gun Owners (SBCGO) in San Bernardino County, or Riverside County Gun Owners (RCGO) in Riverside. Support the cause by listening to Gun Owners Radio live on Sunday afternoon or on the internet at your leisure Join the fight and help us restore and preserve our second amendment rights. Together we will win. https://www.sandiegocountygunowners.com https://orangecountygunowners.com/ https://sanbernardinocountygunowners.org/ https://riversidecountygunowners.com/ https://www.firearmspolicy.org/ https://www.gunownersca.com/ https://gunowners.org Show your support for Gun Owners Radio sponsors! http://scottvinson.com https://365glacierpayments.com https://www.primeres.com/alpine https://dillonlawgp.com https://www.uslawshield.com https://www.nationalconcealedcarryassociation.com https://conservativeeconomy.com/gunownersradio

Psychic Dolphin Garage
Episode 120: Dead Māo Bounce

Psychic Dolphin Garage

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 71:06


That's right folks. We dove deep into the toxic waters of the old abandoned content mine and dredged up another whole episode of Psychic Dolphin Garage! While waiting for our Superfund cleanup money, Bo, Charlie, and Denis discuss such poisonous news as... Tech-addled Californians continue lustfully eyeing Texas. "Based daddy" (Bo said it and he can't un-say it) Xi Jinping outlaws Bitcoin and screws over housing speculators. University researchers have a sudden influx of extremely specific data on 20-year-old Tik Tok women. And Denis starts off the episode by slowly growing to resent their parents. As always, be sure to check out our other content like GIGO, Dolphins & Garages and Sonic High School. Patreon Redbubble Our Signal Sticker pack vol. 1 All our other links Follow the hosts on Twitter: Artemis Bo Charlie Denis Kelton Zach --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/psychicdolphingarage/message

THE VALLEY CURRENT®️ COMPUTERLAW GROUP LLP
The Valley Current®: Will Silicon Valley (and California Generally) Transcend the Current Post-Pandemic Post-Recall Vote State of Affairs?

THE VALLEY CURRENT®️ COMPUTERLAW GROUP LLP

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 34:11


The price of real estate keeps climbing and the price of money is staying low, but the inflation on goods is getting quite worrisome. Thankfully prime lending rates are safe for now as the Feds have announced we probably won't see a move on prime lending rates until next year; though there are plenty of other factors that could cause the market to shift and change that projection. To figure out what is going on in California, Jack Russo asks Joe Cucchiara if things are getting better now that Gavin Newsom has been reaffirmed as governor or if Californians are content with getting beat up by the state.

Insight with Beth Ruyak
Booster Shots / California NPR Wildfire Air Quality Investigation / Sacramento Zoo Moving to Elk Grove?

Insight with Beth Ruyak

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021


The state updates Pfizer COVID-19 booster shots now available to eligible Californians. A California NPR investigation about air quality due to wildfires, breaking down the data by zip code. The Sacramento Zoo explains potential plans to move to Elk Grove. Today's Guests California Department of Public Health epidemiologist Dr. Erica Pan provides an update on Pfizer COVID-19 booster shots available to eligible Californians.  Data reporter Alison Saldanha with NPR's California Newsroom, and KQED reporter Farida Jhabvala Romero, join us with their investigative project surrounding air quality due to wildfires. Elk Grove Mayor Bobby Singh-Allen, Sacramento Councilmember Katie Valenzuela and President of the Sacramento Zoological Board of Trustees, Elizabeth Stallard, discuss the future of the Sacramento Zoo and the potential plans to move it to Elk Grove.

Sounds Good with Branden Harvey
Meet the App That Helps People Find Public Benefits

Sounds Good with Branden Harvey

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 38:32


Growing up in the racially and economically segregated suburbs of Maryland, Patrice Berry found herself wanting to work in U.S. policy making after experiencing firsthand how hard it is for marginalized folks to finish school, get assistance, and provide for their families. She now works for the mayor of Oakland, California, working to improve local and state laws. It was there that she was inspired to found Assist Hub, an app that helps Californians access any public benefits they may be eligible for. As it turns out, there's a ton of unclaimed public benefits that's available to everyone: $60 billion to be exact — and AssistHub is working to change that. Finding the intersection between technology and public good is something Patrice has done successfully. In this episode, Patrice talks about her work with Oakland's local community-based organizations, the inspirations that drive her goals, and the misconceptions of what public benefits are — and how Patrice is working to deconstruct those misconceptions. Guest: Patrice Berry, founder of Assist Hub Visit Assist Hub's website, www.assisthub.org Sponsor: For purpose-driven brands and organizations looking for an agency specializing in collaborative problem solving and expert craftsmanship — learn more about Moon March moonmarch.com. Sponsor: Listen to the podcast Breaking Glass at breakingglasspodcast.com/good. → Get more Good Good Good at the all-new https://goodgoodgood.co → Join 30,000 weekly Goodnewsletter readers at https://goodgoodgood.co/goodnewsletter → Become a subscriber and get the Goodnewspaper at https://goodgoodgood.co/subscribe

KFI Featured Segments
@GaryAndShannon (09/27) - What's Happening

KFI Featured Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 5:00


Pfizer has started testing a pill that could help fight Covid-19 infections // 5.8 magnitude earthquake hits the Greek Island of Crete and leaves one person dead // Californians who haven't filed a 2020 tax return are at risk of missing out on another stimulus payment // LA County is going to dismiss thousands of marijuana convictions // Karen Bass has confirmed she is entering the race for major of LA // Bay Area school rescue 4,000 endangered salmon from the drought.

Money Circle
Why Abortion Access Is Imperative to Financial Security

Money Circle

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 53:21


Related Links:Access Reproductive JusticeLearn more about Texas' SB8Donate to Texas abortion fundsThe Turnaway StudyNational Network of Abortion FundsLearn about the EACH ActLearn about the Women's Health Protection ActThe Taco or Beer Challenge--Jessica Pinckney is the executive director of ACCESS REPRODUCTIVE JUSTICE, a Reproductive Justice organization funding abortion and other reproductive healthcare. ACCESS removes barriers and builds the power of Californians to achieve reproductive justice. Jessica oversees the organization's work to combine direct services, community education, and policy advocacy to promote real reproductive options and access to quality health care for people in California. No other organization in the state provides the same range of support for people considering or seeking an abortion.She returns to her home state of California after living for nearly a decade in Washington, DC, where she previously served as vice president of government affairs at In Our Own Voice: National Black Women's Reproductive Justice Agenda, a national/state partnership with eight Black women's reproductive Justice organizations, lifting up the voices of Black women leaders on national, regional, and state policies that impact the lives of Black women and girls through strategies such as leadership development, advocacy and policy change, and movement building. Jessica previously served as government relations manager for YWCA USA, one of the oldest and largest women's organizations in the country and as the legislative analyst at the University of California (UC) Office of Federal Governmental Relations, representing one of the most recognized and renowned public institutions of higher education in the country.Jessica holds an M.A. in Government with a concentration in Political Communications from John's Hopkins University and a B.A. in Political Science with an emphasis in Public Service from the University of California, Santa Barbara. She serves on the Board of Directors for URGE: Unite for Reproductive and Gender Equity, SPARK Reproductive Justice NOW!, and Guttmacher Institute and on the Advisory Boards for the Constellation Network of Black Feminist Futures and the California Abortion Alliance. She previously served as the Vice-Chair on the Board of Directors for Planned Parenthood of Metropolitan Washington and the Chapter Co-Director for New Leaders Council DC and remains a relentless advocate and activist in her spare time. She is an avid reader, a newly found peloton enthusiast, and a loving pet parent to her 8-year old American Bulldog, Pitbull Mix rescue, Apollo.--To learn more about Maggie and her coaching and speaking services, visit www.maggiegermano.com.The theme music is called Escaping Light by Aaron Sprinkle. The podcast artwork design is by Maggie's dear husband, Dan Rader.

The LA Report
The A.M. Edition: Skid Row ruling overturned; Smoky skies over L.A.; Booster shots for seniors; BLM leader accuses LAPD of 'swatting'

The LA Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 8:00


Here's your morning news: L.A. won't have to find housing for people on Skid Row by next month after appeals court strikes down ruling; All that smoke in the air is sticking around for the weekend; Gov. Newsom announces more than $1B in new spending to prevent wildfires; One more step before booster shots are mad available to Californians; Oversight committee subpoenas Sheriff Villanueva's second in command; BLM leader accuses LAPD of 'swatting'; Support the show: https://support.laist.com/laistnav

The Big Life Kids Podcast
Play the WAITING game in the Wicked Wild West!

The Big Life Kids Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 16:03


Episode 55: Play the WAITING game in the Wicked Wild West! Sheriff Zara is headed to the Wild West, investigating a series of strange cases aboard the Smokey Plain Steam Train. Find out how to be PATIENT for things that are just out of reach and meet the Californian musician who used patience to overcome big obstacles.Additional show notes available at biglifejournal.com/podcastCredits:Produced by Alexandra Eidens and Big Life Journal team. Written and directed by Sarah Cyrano. Sound design and original music by Elettra Bargiacchi. Sound mixing by Mattia Marcelli. Characters played by Sean Chiplock and Ryan Bartley. Managed by Laura Maloney. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Patrick Madrid Show
The Patrick Madrid Show: September 20, 2021 – Hour 3

The Patrick Madrid Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 51:06


North Face gets caught virtue signaling and the CEO of an energy company calls them out on it Fully vaccinated Californians can shed face masks in most settings starting June 15 Sam – When Jesus says you will go to hell for calling someone a fool, is he speaking literally? Mike – Natural Gas and […] All show notes at The Patrick Madrid Show: September 20, 2021 – Hour 3 - This podcast produced by Relevant Radio

The Rubin Report
Voting for Disaster. Dave Rubin Discusses California's Future | Direct Message

The Rubin Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 22:24


Dave Rubin of The Rubin Report talks about the fallout from the California recall. Now that Californians have decided not to recall Gavin Newsom, what does the state's future look like? There is no reason to think the failed policies of the Democrats will suddenly start working. Is it safe to assume the business exodus will continue? That California's homeless problem will only get worse? Will high crime rates stay high or get higher? What are Dave's plans? Will he stay and fight, or is it time to move on? Dave also does a special “ask me anything” question-and-answer session on a wide-ranging host of topics, answering questions from the Rubin Report Locals community. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis
Progressive Governor Keeps His Job, Religious Exemptions Are Allowed In New York State Vaccine Mandates and Instagram's Negative Effects on Teenagers

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 45:57


Tonight's rundown: Californians have decided and they clearly don't care that their state has the largest poverty rate, they still want to keep Gov. Gavin Newsom Bob Woodward's latest book alleges that Donald Trump was so unhinged that one of his military generals needed to call China to reassure them that the U.S. would not attack  A judge blocks a New York state vaccine mandate for health care workers who claim a religious exemption to the rule  Why do African Americans have the lowest rate of vaccination? Social media, specifically Instagram is harming teenagers' mental health  This Month in History, 1254: Italian explorer, Marco Polo is born  Final Thought: Tribute to comedian Norm Macdonald Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Chad Prather Show
Ep 509 | Gavin Newsom Recall Falls Short & Californians Are F*cked

The Chad Prather Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 46:58


Sadly the California recall didn't happen and Gov. Gavin Newsom survived. Is California REALLY ready for a change? What will happen to GOP candidate Larry Elder? Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is in hot waters after conservative watchdog group filed an ethics complaint against her. AOC attended the Met Gala wearing a dress with the words “Tax The Rich.” AOC hit back saying she was a “guest of the museum.” Did AOC violate any ethics rules? President Biden great-great-great-grandfather is on the news after a genealogist finds that he own slaves. According to Alexander Bannerman and Gary Boyd Roberts Biden's family member was a slave owner in Maryland in the 1800s. Is Black Lives Matter and CNN Don Lemon going to hold this President accountable for his family past? Today's Sponsors: Visit https://CowboyWines.com and get three bottles of wine for 50% off while supplies last. Get 20% off your 1st monthly box when you sign up at http://BoxOfAwesome.com and enter the code WATCHCHAD at checkout. Visit https://ReliefBand.com and use PROMO code WATCHCHAD for 20% off and free shipping.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Rubin Report
Californians Make Their Recall Election Choice. Dave Rubin Responds | Direct Message

The Rubin Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 28:00


Dave Rubin of The Rubin Report talks about the results of the California recall. The effort to recall Gavin Newsom has failed, and Larry Elder will not be the next governor of California. The California exodus will continue, and high crime rates and homelessness will also continue to increase. The business exodus will continue. When will voters make the connection between bad outcomes and bad policies? Dave Rubin gives his thoughts on the California recall election and where to go from here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Relatable with Allie Beth Stuckey
Ep 489 | My Response to Brenè Brown's Toxic Post

Relatable with Allie Beth Stuckey

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 51:12


We start today by talking about the California recall election, in which current Governor Gavin Newsom was not recalled. It's a shame, but realistically, we all knew it was a long shot. What's really sad is that the majority of Californians signaled their satisfaction with the leadership that's running their state into the ground. Then, we discuss a recent Instagram post by self-help influencer Brené Brown. She basically came out of the closet as a far leftist, and her post was an unhinged and baseless rant about the state of politics in Texas. --- Today's Sponsors: Good Ranchers has traveled the US, meeting with actual farmers that raise the livestock to ensure the product they're sending you is the very best American craft beef and better-than-organic chicken. Go to GoodRanchers.com/ALLIE & use code 'ALLIE' at checkout to save 20% on each box of mouth-watering meals, plus get an additional $20 off & free express shipping! Fundrise provides access to diversified portfolios of private real estate to ALL investors with their industry leading, easy-to-use platform. Go to Fundrise.com/RELATABLE to get started! Alliance Defending Freedom has been standing up for religious liberty, the sanctity of life, freedom of speech, marriage, and parental rights in America's highest courts. Go to ADFLegal.org/ALLIE & join the growing number of Americans pledging their support for freedom and liberty. --- Buy Allie's book, You're Not Enough (& That's Okay): Escaping the Toxic Culture of Self-Love: https://alliebethstuckey.com/book Relatable merchandise: https://shop.blazemedia.com/collections/allie-stuckey Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Morning Wire
Tuesday | September 14, 2021

Morning Wire

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 14:05


Californians vote on whether or not to recall Gavin Newsom, governors push back on Biden's vaccine mandates, and NYC's schools reopen under strict Covid restrictions. Get the facts first on Morning Wire.

Timcast IRL
Timcast IRL #370 - Republicans Told They ALREADY Voted In Recall, Trump Claims Its RIGGED w/Dan Hollaway

Timcast IRL

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 136:06


Tim, Ian, and Lydia join Dan Hollaway, US Army veteran and host/managing director of Drinkin' Bros and American Party podcasts, to discuss the Californian voters who were shocked to discover it appeared they had already voted in the recall election, the deep rot that's set in to the American military institution, the White Houses' decision to cut Joe Biden's feed when he attempts to ask a question at a news conference, the demoralization of the younger generations, and Claire Lehman of Quillette's choice to defend Australia's insanely tyrannical lockdown camps. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Devin Nunes Podcast
RECALL SPECIAL: Can Californians Defy the Radical Marxists?

The Devin Nunes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 16:05


Morning Wire
Monday | September 13, 2021

Morning Wire

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 14:47


The legal implications of Biden's vaccine mandates, inflation reaches record levels, and Californians prepare for Newsom's recall election. Get the facts first on Morning Wire.