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Latest podcast episodes about sonoma county

Business as Unusual
EP 88: Purple People Eater

Business as Unusual

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 88:03


I said Mr. Purple People Eater, don't eat meI heard him say in a voice so gruff"I wouldn't eat you 'cause you're so tough" Thank you Sheb Wooley for the visual, but @deacon_ayurveda has something else to say about it. Also, this week we do another deep dive into a listener question, and it prompted us to dream up a new, much-needed app. Listen in to find out more. Also, if you want us to talk about something that you wonder about, email us at info@imnotgonnalie.comTopics covered:-Girls night out recap-The "Boyfriend Experience"-Who doesn't love The Chase?-There's no place for slut-shaming-What is between pain and joy?This episode was produced by audio ephemera. I'm Not Gonna Lie is a proud member of the NorCal Pods podcast network.

Art2Life
The Art of Trees, with Adam Wolpert - Ep 5

Art2Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 48:10


Today I'm excited for you to meet an extraordinary artist from Sonoma County, California. His name is Adam Wolpert. For quite a few years, Adam has been involved in painting the local landscape, but lately, which caught my attention, his art shifted. Not only did it become bigger, but it became simpler. Now it is mostly just about trees.  Every time his work takes a quantum leap forward, I am always excited to catch up with him to learn why. What just happened? How is it possible these paintings have become so so powerful?  At first blush, if you are just listening, the subject seems fairly straight up but not once you see these paintings. They have been realized from countless hours standing beneath trees, paying attention, listening, thinking, and quietly observing. So it turns out; trees have a lot to teach us about art, resiliency, and life. Join me as Adam shares all he is learning and discovering in the pursuit of his remarkable tree paintings. Listen if you are interested in... My good friend, Adam Wolpert, and his recent focus on trees [0:05] Adam's path, from college to his present interests and work [2:16] How inquiry has played a part of Adam's practice of art [8:47] The way in which Adam's work uses the power of perspective and space [11:41] Using deep observation to create a new series of tree paintings [23:32] How Adam's paintings honor the subjects he's representing [35:29] Contemplation of the universal dimensions of the work Adam creates [40:12] Resources & People Mentioned Adam's mentor/teacher, Ciel Bergman: https://www.legacy.com/us/obituaries/santafenewmexican/name/ciel-bergman-obituary?pid=183725239  Erickson Fine Art in Healdsburg, CA - https://www.ericksonfineartgallery.com/ - Adam's will exhibit there the Spring of 2022 The SFMOMA Gallery - https://www.sfmoma.org/exhibitions/ - in San Francisco Connect with Adam Wolpert Adam's website: www.adamwolpert.com Adam on Instagram: @Adam_Wolpert - https://www.instagram.com/adam_wolpert/ Connect with Nicholas Wilton Like on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/art2lifeworld Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/nicholaswilton?lang=en Follow on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/art2life_world/?hl=en Subscribe on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCe8dJWKgPKkW4W3fsb1vLeg Follow on Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/art2life_world/_created/

Citizens' Climate Lobby
CCR 66 Hospitality in a Time of Climate Change

Citizens' Climate Lobby

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 30:00


We live in a world with stronger and more frequent extreme weather events. As a result, giving and receiving hospitality is becoming the new normal for humans. Citizens' Climate Radio host Peterson Toscano speaks with public theologian Jayme R. Reaves and public health expert Dr. Natasha DeJarnett. What are the risks leading to more displacement? What are the dilemmas and challenges of housing, feeding, and creating more space for people uprooted from homes during extreme weather? And what are some of the creative ways communities provide protection to those temporarily or permanently unhoused?  Jayme R. Reaves is the director of academic development at Sarum College in Salisbury, England. She teaches in areas such as biblical studies, and feminist and liberation theology. Over the last 20 years, she has worked as a consultant, researcher, lecturer, and facilitator in the U.S., former Yugoslavia, Northern Ireland, and Great Britain. Her focus internationally has been on the intersections between theology and public issues such as peace, conflict, hospitality, memory, and gender.  Jayme discusses the roles that scarcity and abundance play in making sure that those most impacted by the environment in the community around us are cared for. She calls on churches to work in their own communities to make congregations aware of sharing with those who don't have as much.  Jayme regularly speaks, leads retreats, conducts workshops, and acts as “theologian in residence” with communities who wish to dive deeper into understanding theological frameworks for social justice activism. She's the author of Safeguarding the Stranger: An Abrahamic Theology & Ethic of Protective Hospitality (Wipf & Stock, 2016) and co-editor of When Did We See You Naked?: Jesus as a Victim of Sexual Abuse (SCM, 2021).  Additionally, she co-hosts the podcast Outlander Soul, which looks at the Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon with a theological, religious, and spiritual lens and takes seriously the role fiction plays in fans' lives as a sacred text. Jayme lives in Dorset, England with her partner and two dogs. Dr. Natasha DeJarnett is an assistant professor in the Christina Lee Brown Environment Institute at the University of Louisville Division of Environmental Medicine, researching the health impacts of extreme heat exposure and environmental health disparities. Additionally, she is a professorial lecturer in Environmental and Occupational Health at the George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health. Previously, Dr. DeJarnett was the interim associate director of Program and Partnership Development at the National Environmental Health Association, leading research, climate and health, and children's environmental health.  She also previously served as a policy analyst at the American Public Health Association (APHA), where she led the Natural Environment portfolio, including air and water exposures along with climate change. Dr. DeJarnett is a member of the EPA's Children's Health Protection Advisory Committee, is chair of the Governing Board of Citizens' Climate Education, a member of the Board of Directors of Physicians for Social Responsibility, chair-elect for APHA's Environment Section, member of the Advisory Board of APHA's Center for Climate, Health and Equity, a member of the Board of Trustees for the BTS Center, special advisor to the Environmental Health and Equity Collaborative, and the Steering Committee of the International Transformational Resilience Coalition. Dr. DeJarnett emphasizes that more than ever before, people are being displaced as a result of severe weather phenomena caused by climate change. In 2018, 16 million people were displaced due to climate, 1.2 million of which were American. She points out that in 2020, more hurricanes and tropical storms made landfall than ever before, to the point where letters in the Greek alphabet were being used to name them, as the list of hurricane names had been used up. Dr. DeJarnett says that church communities are presented with the opportunity to provide hospitality more than ever by turning churches into cooling centers, and by educating the community about staying safe through weather phenomena. To learn more about building community resilience see the US Climate Resilience Toolkit or see how you can get involved with establishing a local or regional Climate Resilience Hub.  The Art House Joining us in the Art House is Dr. Krista Hiser with The Ultimate Cli-Fi Book Club. The purpose of the book club is to look at climate-themed literature and consider how it can help us engage differently with interdisciplinary topics and existential threats related to the planetary predicament of climate change.  In this episode, Krista reflects on Deena Metzger's novel A Rain of Night Birds.  Dr. Krista Hiser is Professor at Kapiʻolani Community College. Her Ph.D. is in Educational Administration from the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. She has published works on community engagement, service-learning, organizational change, post-apocalyptic and cli-fi literature.  In this month's episode, Krista tells us that the protagonist of “A Rain of Night Birds” is a scientist that also relies on feeling to gauge the environmental phenomena around her. With themes of spiritualism and indigenous culture, this “literature of restoration” focuses on the concept of doing no harm, based on the importance of the world around us. You can read a written version of Krista's essay at The Ultimate Cli-Fi Book Club for Sustainability in Higher Education on Medium. You can hear standalone versions of The Art House at Artists and Climate Change. Good News Report Our good news comes from Anthony Leiserowitz at Yale Climate Connections. In tune with the theme of hospitality, Anthony discusses a disaster resiliency program geared toward Spanish-speaking residents in Sonoma County, California. Whether people lose power or work as a result of climate and weather disasters, many nonprofits are developing plans and guides to help Spanish speakers in the west prepare. These programs help residents sign up for emergency alerts, prepare for emergencies, and make financial arrangements needed to safely leave during severe weather. We always welcome your thoughts, questions, suggestions, good news, and recommendations for the show. Leave a voicemail at (518) 595-9414 (+1 if calling from outside the U.S.). You can email your answers to radio @ citizensclimate.org   You can hear Citizens' Climate Radio on iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher Radio, SoundCloud, Podbean, Northern Spirit Radio, Google Play, PlayerFM, and TuneIn Radio. Also, feel free to connect with other listeners, suggest program ideas, and respond to programs in the Citizens' Climate Radio Facebook group or on Twitter at @CitizensCRadio. Photo by furkanfdemir from Pexels

Citizens Climate Radio
Ep 66 Hospitality in a Time of Climate Change

Citizens Climate Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 30:00


Citizens' Climate Radio host Peterson Toscano speaks with public theologian Jayme R. Reaves and public health expert Dr. Natasha DeJarnett. Jayme R. Reaves is the director of academic development at Sarum College in Salisbury, England. She teaches in areas such as biblical studies, and feminist and liberation theology. Jayme discusses the roles that scarcity and abundance play in making sure that those most impacted by the environment in the community around us are cared for. She calls on churches to work in their own communities to make congregations aware of sharing with those who don't have as much. She's the author of Safeguarding the Stranger: An Abrahamic Theology & Ethic of Protective Hospitality (Wipf & Stock, 2016) and co-editor of When Did We See You Naked?: Jesus as a Victim of Sexual Abuse (SCM, 2021). Dr. Natasha DeJarnett is an assistant professor in the Christina Lee Brown Environment Institute at the University of Louisville Division of Environmental Medicine, researching the health impacts of extreme heat exposure and environmental health disparities. Additionally, she is a professorial lecturer in Environmental and Occupational Health at the George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health. Previously, Dr. DeJarnett was the interim associate director of Program and Partnership Development at the National Environmental Health Association, leading research, climate and health, and children's environmental health. Dr. DeJarnett emphasizes that more than ever before, people are being displaced as a result of severe weather phenomena caused by climate change. In 2018, 16 million people were displaced due to climate, 1.2 million of which were American. She points out that in 2020, more hurricanes and tropical storms made landfall than ever before, to the point where letters in the Greek alphabet were being used to name them, as the list of hurricane names had been used up. Dr. DeJarnett says that church communities are presented with the opportunity to provide hospitality more than ever by turning churches into cooling centers, and by educating the community about staying safe through weather phenomena. The Art House Joining us in the Art House is Dr. Krista Hiser with The Ultimate Cli-Fi Book Club. The purpose of the book club is to look at climate-themed literature and consider how it can help us engage differently with interdisciplinary topics and existential threats related to the planetary predicament of climate change. In this month's episode, Krista tells us that the protagonist of “A Rain of Night Birds” is a scientist that also relies on feeling to gauge the environmental phenomena around her. With themes of spiritualism and indigenous culture, this “literature of restoration” focuses on the concept of doing no harm, based on the importance of the world around us. Good News Report Our good news comes from Anthony Leiserowitz at Yale Climate Connections. In tune with the theme of hospitality, Anthony discusses a disaster resiliency program geared toward Spanish-speaking residents in Sonoma County, California. Whether people lose power or work as a result of climate and weather disasters, many nonprofits are developing plans and guides to help Spanish speakers in the west prepare. These programs help residents sign up for emergency alerts, prepare for emergencies, and make financial arrangements needed to safely leave during severe weather. We always welcome your thoughts, questions, suggestions, good news, and recommendations for the show. Leave a voicemail at (518) 595-9414 (+1 if calling from outside the U.S.). You can email your answers to radio @ citizensclimate.org

The Official Project Censored Show
Local Journalism Matters: Democracy Needs ‘More Muckrakers and Fewer Buckrakers' (as Project Censored founder Carl Jensen used to say)

The Official Project Censored Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021


Should a political lobbyist and real estate investor also be the owner of a major regional newspaper that happens to have bought up the most of the competition? Northern California's Sonoma County provides a case study: lobbyist/investor Darius Anderson is also a principal owner of the county's largest and primary daily newspaper for all of Northern California (and most of its other print media too). Today's guests are longtime independent, investigative reporters Will Carruthers and Peter Byrne. They return to the program to discuss their recent reporting which further examines some of Anderson's ethically-questionable activities, and why the people of the area are likely to be kept uninformed about them. Then Peter Byrne stays for the second half of the program, and explains the now-widespread and dubious practice of "native advertising:” advertisements in the format of news stories, sometimes written by the newspaper's own reporters, thereby pulling down the traditional 'firewall' between the editorial and business sides of journalism. Notes: Will Carruthers is a staff reporter for the North Bay Bohemian and Pacific Sun weekly newspapers, serving Northern California's Marin, Sonoma, and Napa counties. He has two recent articles on Darius Anderson's dealings involving a local rail agency; they can be read here. Peter Byrne is an investigative journalist who has written on a wide array of topics, from science and medicine to public finance. Byrne's work can be found here.

California Now Podcast
Holiday Travels in California

California Now Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 44:53


On this episode of the California Now Podcast, host Soterios Johnson learns about a few jolly ways to enjoy the holidays in the Golden State, from embracing the snowy vibes of the High Sierra to taking in the sparkling lights—and sparkling wines—of Sonoma County. First, Johnson talks to Sonoma Magazine Dining Editor Heather Irwin, who highlights four distinctive towns that boast all sorts of holiday fun. In Santa Rosa, for instance, visitors can skate on Snoopy's Home Ice and then nosh on a seasonal favorite: tamales. Healdsburg, on the other hand, is a fantastic place to shop for hard-to-please people on your list and Petaluma is a Mayberry-like city that features abundant craft fairs and festive decorations. Next, Johnson connects with Vincenzo Giammanco, who is bringing actual snow—and more than one million twinkling lights—to Ventura and Del Mar. The producer of the Snow n Glow Holiday Festival says 70-degree temps and sunshine won't melt the fun, so visitors can enjoy traditional winter activities like snow tubing and sledding, and they can even reserve a private igloo. Finally, Johnson chats with Brendan Madigan, who owns the Tahoe City outfitter Alpenglow Sports. Madigan notes that though downhill skiing and snowboarding reign supreme in the region, there are plenty of other activities to consider—from window shopping in quaint villages to snowshoeing in the back country.

Líderes del Futuro
A Good Start in Vaccination of Children - Sonoma County

Líderes del Futuro

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 13:25


Marcos Mejia from the County of Sonoma updated us on the positive progress in vaccination after one week. Children are getting vaccinated and families are invited to reach out to the their pediatricians if they have any questions. #covid #togethertowardhealth #juntxshacialasalud --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rafael-vazquez7/support

Líderes del Futuro
Sonoma County Redistricting - The Need for Participation

Líderes del Futuro

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 10:56


Ms. Manieri worked on the most recent draft of the districts for Sonoma County. The county has until December 15th to vote on the final map and the community is invited to participate. The outcome of this process will affect the lives of community members for at least the next 10 years. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rafael-vazquez7/support

Wine Road: The Wine, When, and Where of Northern Sonoma County.
Katie Bowman Co-Owner of Bowman Cellars

Wine Road: The Wine, When, and Where of Northern Sonoma County.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 25:50


Wine Road Podcast Episode 138 Sponsored by Ron Rubin Winery Episode 138 | Katie Bowman Co-Owner of Bowman Cellars in Graton. Katie Bowman joins us to tell the great story about how Bowman Cellars got started, the experience and vibe you'll find at the Bowman tasting room in Graton, and her favorite spots to take out of town visitors. Wine of the Day – Bowman Petillant Natural of Sauvignon Blanc & Bonus wine—Bowman Chardonnay Wine Book of the Day – Wine Doors of Florence by Robbin Gheesling Wine Word of the Day – Barrique Podcast Sponsor – Ron Rubin Winery SHOW NOTES 1:03 Find Bowman Cellars in tiny town of Graton on a corner location—you can't miss it! 2:20 Wine of the Day Bowman Petilliant Natural / Pet Nat Sparkling Wine and the Bowman Chardonnay –double flavor, double the fun today. 3:35 Chardonnay has so many expressions -- try it you'll like it! 5:00 Pet Nat something new and delicious. 5:54 Bowman is one of the most Instagramable tasting rooms, look for the cute Airstream trailer out front. 7:33 Reservations accepted but also can accommodate walk-ins with space indoors and outdoors. 8:25 Story of how Bowman came to be. Katie's husband Alex began making a Sauvignon Blanc got great feedback and launched Bowman in 2017. Katie's Grandfather is Andy of the famous Andy's Market.   12:58 Where Katie takes friends visitors from out of town – Sonoma Coast, The Casino (restaurant) in Bodega, the redwoods and all the great dining spots. 15:55 Wine Word of the Day—Barrique 17:00 Book of the Day – Wine Doors of Florence, a pictorial book of the wine doors. 18:58 New section on the Wine Road Web site –featured members. Changes each week. Check it out. 19:40 Varietal of the Month goes out third Thursday of the month and you can sign up for the newsletter on the website. 21:00 Reach out to Bowman via their Instagram, by phone on via the website. 21:30 One More Thing—we need podcast reviews on iTunes please! Beth reads the reviews on air so leave a review and we may read yours on the show. 24:38 Get a 2 for 1 Tasting at Bowman if you say you heard it on the podcast!   Links Bowman Cellars https://bowmancellars.com/ Wine Doors of Florence-- www.winedoorsofflorence.com Podcast Sponsor: Ron Rubin Winery -- https://ronrubinwinery.com/ Wine Road https://www.wineroad.com Wine Road Podcast Instagram -- @wineroadpodcast Credits: The Wine Road podcast is mixed and mastered at Threshold Studios Sebastopol, CA. http://thresholdstudios.info/            

Amber & Tanner On Demand
173 - Cheetos and the CMAs

Amber & Tanner On Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 27:13


November 10th, 2021 -- Tanner and his girlfriend had their first argument. Plus, Sonoma County selected their choice for CMA Entertainer of the Year.

Business as Unusual
EP 87: Chivalry Is Not Dead

Business as Unusual

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 102:52


In this week's episode:Join us this week as we take our first opportunity to answer listeners' questions. Nina, Danielle and Deacon take some time to dive into a listener question and it really did allow us to explore from multiple directions. Moving forward we will be taking time during each episode to address a question or comment from our loyal listeners. If you have any questions or comments that you would like us to share, email us at info@imnotgonnalie.comTopics covered:Catching up after life got in the wayChivalry: Dead or Not?Slow burn or hot and spicey?Do you have clear boundaries or feel comfortable operating in grey areas?Listen...Enjoy...SUBSCRIBE in your fave podcast player.

Queens of the Mines
Lotta Crabtree

Queens of the Mines

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 40:11


   Firmly gripping the hand of her five year old daughter Charlotte, Mary Ann Crabtree scanned the sea of men that crowded the docks, in San Francisco, looking for a familiar face. Her husband John, who had finally sent for them in New York,  was nowhere to be seen and Mary Ann was nearly a professional when it came to accepting anxieties. Queens of the Mines features the authentic stories of gold rush women who blossomed from the camouflaged, twisted roots of California. In this episode, we meet the Nation's Darling and The Golden West's Gift to Vaudeville, California's 19th Century Queen of Captivation. I am Andrea Anderson, This is a true story from America's Largest Migration, The Gold Rush. This is Queens of the Mines. John Crabtree had left his family and position as a bookseller in New York and left for California in the search for gold in 1851, two years prior. His wife and daughter dutifully waited for his call, and when it had finally come, she sold the bookshop off Broadway, and made the exhaustive journey here to the Isthmus of Panama, crossing by land before picking up a second ship to California. Now, John Crabtree was nowhere to be found. Charlotte remained secluded while her and her mother were given a temporary home with a group of popular actors of the 19th century, including the Chapmans, and the child actress Sue Robinson, whom Mary Ann had befriended. In the Presidio of San Francisco, Mrs. Crabtree kept up with the trends and all of the glamourous and disheartening stories from the rough mining camps. The gossip finally came and Mary Ann heard that John had been seen living in a little town in the Sierra.  People were becoming rich all around her, and she was raising Charlotte on her own. The wheels began to turn for Mary Ann. It was a brand new environment for the shrewd and thrifty woman, who was small in figure with an unshakeable will. Here, among the theatrical crowd and actors in San Francisco, a most tantalizing scene had presented itself. She zeroed in on the theatre gossip and dreamt up a career of stardom for her cheerful, animated daughter, Charlotte, or, like her mother called her, Lotta. Lotta had hair that was an even brighter red than Mary Ann's, and she was sturdy with roguish black eyes and an unquenchable laughter, yet she seemed far off from stage ready.   During a celebration at her school near the Presidio, it was requested that Lotta sang Annie Laurie for the crowd. She barely made it to the platform before the young girl, to her mother's dismay, lost control and broke down, sobbing. She wept so hard and for so long, Mary Ann had to take her daughter home. That night in bed, Mary Ann went over her daughter's chances of success singing and dancing at the mines.  The next morning, an optimistic letter vaguely mentioning a project involving gold, came from her husband John in the high Sierra's, from a town called Grass Valley. Although the letter had no mention of any progress, it was requested that Mrs. Crabtree and Lotta proceed to him at once. In California, anyone could make a dazzling fortune overnight. Mary Ann, battling skepticism and the prospect of a bonanza, packed their belongings.   At dawn, Lotta stood by the luggage as her mother procured a place for two in a rickety, yet affordable stagecoach. The young girl slept much of the journey, but she awoke as they rolled past embers of a few dying fires where men were waking up. They moved into a torch lit shadowy settlement and Lotta observed the intimidating shapes that danced across the scene, cast by the torches. She was excited to see her father, it had been over two years since she had last seen him. She wondered if she would recognize him as he went to hug her? There was no embrace, John patted Lotta's head and took them to a hotel where they all shared a small bed for the night.  That next morning, the family took a walk, admiring what the Sierra spring had to offer. Nestled in the rich green slopes, and fertile deep gullies they saw the promise of luck, as, towards the valley, melting snow fed the clearest streams they had ever seen.  Already, men were attending their claims in an air of conquest, working tirelessly digging tunnels, sinking shafts, bridging gorges, and piping water in flumes across the foothills. John told his family stories of men literally stumbling upon rich mines, pulling gold out of the earth with a knife, and how he once left a claim prior to the "big strike." But luck had not been with John Crabtree. With all the excitement around them, John Crabtree only offered Mary Ann disappointment. Passing by peddlers with sealing wax, baubles and trinkets, and luxurious fabrics, Lotta approached a cart that held paperbacks, and ran her finger down the spine of a Dickens novel. She noticed if a vendor was not prosperous enough to possess mules, they carried their goods strapped into a pack that was worn on the shoulders. As Lotta looked at the books, John asked his wife “Why not keep a boarding house? Everyone spends lavishly here, and rich merchants in town need homes! We could do no less than get rich”. Mary Ann was disappointed, she was not familiar in the kitchen. In New York, she worked in upholstery and had a servant who did the household work and cooked. Yet, she still agreed.  To Mary Ann's surprise, she did a fantastic job maintaining the boarding house and not to her surprise, John's participation quickly diminished as he wandered away to prospect, and Mary Ann continued her duties, and saved her money, in a pure atmosphere of rebellion.  Two doors down from the Crabtrees, that summer in 1853, a famous showgirl moved in. It was not long before the woman had transformed the home into a true salon that was constantly abrupting with singing and laughter. Lotta soon attracted the attention of the eccentric woman who had a pet parrot and a monkey! Typically, Mary Ann would always keep her daughter Lotta under her watchful eye. By doing so, Lotta's life had been incredibly innocent. Yet Mary Ann was entirely lenient while Lotta was in company with this new, exotic companion, whose name was Lola Montez.      The unlikely  pair of Lola Montez and Lotta Crabtree became fast friends. In the parlor of the Montez home, Lola gave Lotta daily dance lessons and it was apparent that Lotta had a better sense of rhythm than Lola. Lotta learned fandangos and intricate ballet steps. Lola taught her the jigs reels and the Irish flings from her own childhood. She gave the young child singing lessons, teaching her ballads and Lotta was allowed to play in Lola's trunk of stage costumes, and play Lola's German music box. Lotta fit right in as she mingled with the trolling players, entertainers and witty theatrical company visiting the star. Lola Montez had recognized genuine talent compared to her force of personality and encouraged Lotta's enthusiasm for the performance. They did not stop at the indoors, Lola also taught Lotta to ride horseback. On one sunny morning, the two went for a ride, Lola on a horse and Lotta on a pony. They ended up in the town of Rough and Ready, where huge fortunes were gambled away, recklessly. The street was lined by gaming houses and saloons with bullet-riddled ceilings. Lola and Lotta sauntered in to one.  Lola stood Lotta on a blacksmith's anvil, and they young child danced for the group of miners that sat at the bar. It was a refreshing change for the men, who considered the small child a hit. Irishmen made up a sizable fraction of the miners, Lotta's jigs had reminded them of home. They threw a more than generous amount of gold nuggets at her feet. Lola brought the gold home to Mary Ann and declared Lotta should go with her to Paris. The next morning, John reappeared. With the news that they were again moving, forty miles north of Grass Valley, to Rabbit Creek. Mary Ann was not happy, compared to the somewhat civilized, law-abiding Grass Valley, Rabbit Creek was a small but busy and violent camp where murders were as frequent as each pocket of gold was found and exploited. When the family arrived, John found the hardier characters had found the ground first, and he eventually found nothing. There was an intense drought that summer which affected the prospectors, who needed water for washing gold. John chose to spend his time drinking in the saloons and rambling away mysteriously on quote unquote prospecting missions. Without his support for months, Mary Ann's only option was to open another boarding house, which she did, that winter. That is when the italian Mart Taylor, a musician and dancer arrived in Rabbit Creek. He was tall and had a graceful figure, with long hair and piercing black eyes. He opened a saloon with a connecting makeshift theatre. When the business slowed in the saloon during the afternoons, Taylor conducted a dancing school for children.  His first prerequisite was music and he was impressed by the 8 year old red-haired girl. Her eyes would flash as her small feet traced the intricate steps he taught her. She looked six years old, and he knew she could be a sensation with the audiences who were eager for child performers. Taylor gave her a place to exhibit her talents before the miners. He played the guitar and hired a fiddler and Mrs. Crabtree played the triangle.  Lotta Crabtree had become a nightly attraction, dressed in a green tail-coat, knee breeches, tall hat and brogans her mother sewed. Lotta would often get stage fright, and it would show when she shoved her hands in her pockets. So Mary Ann, sewed them shut. She danced jig after jig only pausing to change costumes. At the finale, she would return to a storm of applause to then sing a ballad. Lotta Crabtree would shake the house with emotion. Gold nuggets shone at her feet.  She completed the repertoire for the company, and her family now had more money than ever. Naturally, Mrs. Crabtree became her daughter's manager. Few child stars had training, and Lotta, was trained by Lola Montez. She would be a gold mine.  Once the roads had reopened in the spring, Lola Montez rode over to Rabbit Creek to see her protege. Lola was to go on tour to Australia and wanted to bring little Lotta with her. Mary Ann saw a future for Lotta with Mart Taylor, who she had become fast friends with, and declined. Mary Ann then made the most of her refusal to Lola's request to take the child to Australia, this even furthered Lotta's growing reputation.   That summer, Mary Ann discovered that she was to have another child and Lotta's baby brother, John Ashworth, was born, just as John Sr. returned home. Lotta continued to work for Taylor while her mother recovered.  After years of performing in Rabbit Creek, the next move seemed obvious to Mary Ann, Lotta should tour the mines. On a late spring morning in 1856, Mary Ann left her husband John three loaves of fresh bread, a kettle of beans and a goodbye note. They left with Taylor's troupe, traveling by wagon, Lotta sat next to her mother with her baby brother in her arms.  As they toured in the California mining camps, Lotta started to make a name for herself as a dancer, singer, and banjo player in saloons. For an audience of men,  whom she had never seen before, on a makeshift stage set up on sawhorses with candles stuffed into bottles served as footlights arranged along the outer edge.  Mary Ann never had a moment to relax, traveling the dangerous higher Sierra by horseback, trees snapping and blocking their path, and boulders, rolling down mountain sides, after being loosened by mining operations. The 8 year old Lotta, watched as a lone rider, far ahead, plunged into the bottom of an abyss in front of her eyes. Once she lay ducked on the floor after one performance, in their room, as bullets burst through the canvas walls while a brawl from the opposite side of the hotel commenced. Yet Mary Ann remained cool, and kept Lotta in good spirits. Mary Ann would coax Lotta, telling her funny stories and persuading her for an hour or more and even when it was time for the stage, Mary Ann always had to give Lotta a little push to get her on the stage. Once onstage, Lotta would perfectly execute her Irish jig. At every performance's conclusion, Lotta would appear angelically. A face scrubbed clean, hair smoothly combed,  a white dress with puffed sleeves while Mary Ann, exhausted from costuming, coaching, and playing the triangle, collected the gold in a basket, scraping every fragment of dust from the boards.  Mary Ann Crabtree was her daughter's mentor. Using the knowledge she had picked up by observing the actors she met in the Presidio and at the home of Montez. She distrusted theatre folk at heart but would listen to every word, resisting its attraction. But if she mistrusted its people she did not mistrust the theatre itself.   As busy as Mary Ann was, she still found time to become pregnant again, with another younger brother for Lotta. Taylor's company was then forced to break up in Weaverville. Mart Taylor took Lotta's brother, Ashworth jr. to San Francisco and Lotta was sent to stay with the family of James Ryan Talbot, who was a pioneer, in Eureka. In the Talbot household in Eureka, Lotta thoroughly enjoyed life, and would go through her acts as in a game for the other children and would frolic and song the stage Irish song Barney Brallaghan," I've a howl in my heart big enough to roll a cabbage round in". Mary Ann's health had finally permitted her to go to Lotta in Eureka in the spring of 1856, where she gathered her and her belongings. Mary Ann, Lotta and her newest brother, George then caught a schooner to San Francisco.  In San Francisco, gamblers crowded the halls, natives rode on spirited horses through the streets, and silk lined carriages dashed around. The city had become legendarily violent. Charles Cora had just been hanged for the murder of the United States Marshal Richardson by the second Vigilance Committee, yet the days of lawlessness were not yet gone. The exuberant scene was exciting for Mary Ann, and Lotta was more than impressed. San Francisco had grown to bold proportions, with longer wharves, and elaborate buildings and it did not seem to be the same city Mary Ann left years ago. Lotta followed her mother into the Bella Union, eyeing the women in lurid clothes who were dealing cards to a group of shady men. Taken backstage quickly, Lotta performed, Mary Ann got paid, and took her away before the wild atmosphere of the saloon could leave a lasting impression. At least that's what she hoped for. Mary Ann was booking Lotta all over the city, enforcing the hard bargains she drove, hungry for gold yet still protecting Lotta passionately. When Lotta appeared in The Dumb Belle, Lotta was to carry a bottle onstage, place it on a table and exit, there was an older actresses who insisted on having the role but Mrs. Crabtree was sure to not let it happen. Mary Ann instructed Lotta to do an elaborate pantomime that in itself, became its own act.  The audience showered the stage with money and roared with laughter. Lotta wasn't going anywhere. She was an instantaneous success with great audience-drawing power. The family started touring, first traveling by schooner across the bay, then up shallow Petaluma Creek, carrying Lotta's costumes in champagne baskets, and all of Lotta's earnings in gold, in a large leather bag. The shrewd Mary Ann did not trust banks nor paper money. When this became too heavy, it was transferred to a steamer trunk. When the steamer trunk became too heavy, she invested Crabtree's earnings in local real estate, race horses and bonds.  She made good profits in Sonoma County. Lotta was then in demand in the Sacramento and San Joaquin Valleys. She gained a new skill in Placerville when a skilled black breakdown dancer taught Lotta a vigorous and complicated soft-shoe dance. She also began smoking small, thinly rolled black cigars like her dear friend Lola. It was considered to be not a very lady-like thing yet it became a trademark for Lotta. She often, on stage and off, wore male clothes. The fact that Lotta smoked cigars kept her out of the prominent ladies social group, Sorosis. This infuriated Mary Ann. Lotta could also laugh at herself. She once slipped in the street and called out “prima donna in the gutter“. By 1859, she had become "Miss Lotta, the San Francisco Favorite", who mastered the suggestive double entendre long before Mae West.  She played in Virginia City, and the famous Bird Cage Theater in Tombstone, Arizona then toured the east coast, acting in plays in theaters, a favorite for her portrayals of children due to her petite size. Her youthful appearance led The New York Times to call her “The eternal child” with "The face of a beautiful doll and the ways of a playful kitten, no one could wriggle more suggestively than Lotta." They also said in reference to her skills as a dancer, “What punctuation is to literature, legs are to Lotta”. By the end of the decade the "Lotta Polka" and "Lotta Gallup" was quite the rage in the United States. When Lotta sat down to write a letter to a friend in San Francisco in 1865 she wrote "We started out quite fresh, and so far things have been very prosperous. I am a continual success wherever I go. In some places I created quite a theatrical furor, as they call it. I have played with the biggest houses but never for so much money, for their prices are double. I'm a star, and that is sufficient, and I am making quite a name. But I treat all and every one with the greatest respect and that is not what everyone does,  and in consequence I get my reward."  In 1869 Lotta purchased a lot, on the south side of Turk street, east of Hyde, paying $7,000, a portion of her earnings at a recent show which would be 132k today. She began touring the nation with her own theatrical company in 1875, hitting the height of her success for another decade. Still a teenager she was shocking audiences by showing her legs and smoking on stage. Mary Ann was still managing her career, finding locations, organizing troupes of actors and booking plays,for the then highest-paid actress in America, who was earning sums of up to $5,000 per week, nearly 155K today.  In September of 1875 she gave the city of San Francisco a gift of appreciation to the people, a fountain modeled after a lighthouse prop from one of her plays at the intersection of Market and Kearny streets. Politicians, respectable citizens and even hellions gathered to dedicate the city's new public drinking fountain.  Lotta had many admirers, including the Grand Duke Alexis of Russia, and Brigham Young. She was proposed to many times but never married. From newspaper boys, European royalty, to lawyers and well known actors, Lotta time after time turned them down saying “I'm married to the stage”. Some said her mother would not allow it as it would end her ability to be considered forever young, and her career left little time for a social life. Some say she was only interested in women. It was whispered in the backstages of the theatres tha Adah Isaacs Menken ws Lotta's secret lover. Lotta was a bit of a rebel in her day,advocating women's rights and wearing skirts too short that she shook  while laughing at society matrons.  Lotta had many celebrity friends she was close with, including President Abraham Lincoln and his wife, the great Harry Houdini, President Ulysses S. Grant always made it a point to visit her whenever she was performing in Washington DC while he was president, and actor John Barrymore, who referred to Lotta as “ the queen of the American stage”. In New Orleans Lotta had “ The Lotta Baseball Club”. When Lotta came to visit they presented her with a gold medal and a beautiful banjo Lotta traveled to Europe with her mother and brothers, learning French, visiting museums and taking up painting. The people of San Francisco missed their very own star while she was away. After her tour ended, she went home to San Francisco to perform at the California Theatre.  In 1883, The New York Times devoted much of its front page to "The Loves of Lotta." In 1885, Mary Ann had an 18-room summer cottage built in the Breslin Park section of Mount Arlington, New Jersey, as a gift for her daughter Lotta. It was a Queen Anne/Swiss chalet style lakefront estate on the shores of Lake Hopatcong. It sat on land that sloped down to Van Every Cove. It is 2-1/2 stories on the land side and 3-1/2 on the lake side. She named it Attol Tryst (Lotta spelled backward). They gave parties, rode horses, and pursued her painting. It's "upside-down" chimneys had corbels that flared outward near the top. There was an expansive porch, including a semi-circular section that traced the curve of the parlor, wrapping around three sides of the house. Inside, there was a wine cellar, music room, library, and a fireplace flanked by terra cotta dog-faced beasts. The billiard room's massive stone fireplace once featured a mosaic that spelled out LOTTA in gemstones. After a fall in the spring of 1889 while in Wilmington, Delaware, Lotta recovered lakeside and decided to retire permanently from the stage, at age 45. later resisting calls for a farewell tour. She was the richest actress in America and  made quite a spectacle as one of the first women to own and drive her own car that she called “Red Rose”. She got out on top. During her retirement, Lotta traveled, painted and was active in charitable work. One final appearance was made in 1915 for Lotta Crabtree Day in San Francisco at the Panama-Pacific Exposition. Lotta was a vegetarian for years and took time to visit inmates in prisons.   Mary Ann died and Lotta's serious side emerged. After Mary Ann's death, Lotta seriously wanted to have her sainted. But she eventually settled on having a $20,000 stained glass window decorated with angels made for her, which is today in St. Stephen's church in Chicago.   The last 15 years of Lotta's life was spent living alone at the Brewster Hotel, which she had purchased in Boston, a dog at her feet, regularly traveling to Gloucester to paint seascapes, with a cigar in her teeth.  She died at home on September 25, 1924 at age 76. She was described by critics as mischievous, unpredictable, impulsive, rattlebrained, teasing, piquant, rollicking, cheerful and devilish. Boston papers recalled Lotta as a devoted animal rights activist who wandered the streets, putting hats on horses to protect them from the sun. She was interred at the Woodlawn Cemetery in Bronx, New York.  Lotta's Fountain still stands at the intersection of Market and Kearny streets in San Francisco. It is the oldest surviving monument in the City's collection. After the earthquake, it was a known gathering place and one of the only locations to get potable water in the city. It is the site of the anniversary of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake every April 18. She left an estate of some $4 million in a charitable trust for “anti-animal experimentation”, “trust to provide food, fuel and hospitalization for the poor”, “help for released convicts”, “support for poor, needy actors”,” aid to young graduates of agricultural colleges”, and “relief for needy vets of WWI”. Over 59 million today. The trust still exists today. The estate ran into complications when a number of people unsuccessfully contested the will, claiming to be relatives, and a woman claimed to be Lotta's adult child. A long series of court hearings followed. The famed Wyatt Earp even testified at one of the hearings, being a friend of the family. A medical exam was conducted at the autopsy and it was confirmed that Lotta Crabtree died a virgin.  Lotta's legacy is not preserved as well as entertainers that came after her, no video or audio of her performing. She was the queen of the stage, but retired before the days of Hollywood.  Lotta's influence is all around us today in the domino of effects from the money and support she has given to farmers, animals, prisoners, soldiers, and actors. Her style was groundbreaking, and helped shape modern entertainment. Her strong influence on animal rights, women's rights, and human rights have forever shaped society and she left a legacy of love  with fountains, paintings, and by promoting the arts. Crabtree Hall, a dormitory at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, is named for Lotta. The Attol Tryst stands today and in recent years it has been restored. Lotta started the tradition of daytime performances for women and children, now commonly known as the afternoon matinee. Lotta was against wars, but very supportive of the members of the military, and America. Lotta has been credited as being an influence on Mary Pickford, Mae West, Betty Hutton, and Judy Garland. The Academy Award nominated 1951 movie musical “Golden Girl” was based on Lotta's exciting life, starring Hollywood Walk-Of-Famer, Mitzi Gaynor as Lotta. I am Andrea Anderson, thank you for taking the time to listen today,  let's meet again when we continue the story of Lotta Crabtree, The Queen of Captivation Chapter 8 Part 2, next time, on “Queens of the Mines.    In light of the BLM movement and the incredible change we are seeing, I would like to mention a quote said by Marian Anderson. "No matter how big a nation is, it is no stronger than its weakest people, and as long as you keep a person down, some part of you has to be down there to hold him down, so it means you cannot soar as you might otherwise."   Until recently, historians and the public have dismissed "conflict history," and important elements that are absolutely necessary for understanding American history have sometimes been downplayed or virtually forgotten. If we do not incorporate racial and ethnic conflict in the presentation of the American experience, we will never understand how far we have come and how far we have to go. No matter how painful, we can only move forward by accepting the truth.  Queens of the Mines was written, produced and narrated by me, Andrea Anderson.  The theme song, In San Francisco Bay is by DBUK, You can find the links to their music, tour dates and merchandise, as well as links to all our social media and research links at queensofthemines.com                    

Líderes del Futuro
Racism in Public Service - Sonoma County

Líderes del Futuro

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 8:39


Recently, a few African American administrators or soon to be administrators left or declined job offers with the County of Sonoma as a result of the racist experiences. While many individuals like to believe that this county is a progressive one, it is in-fact a very conservative one. Susan Gorin who heads the Board of Supervisors appears to not know or ignore the problems taking place in the county. Santa Rosa Junior College continues to have similar issues of racism and discrimination in hiring. #sonomacounty #SCBOS #sonomacountyboardofsupervisors #SRJC --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rafael-vazquez7/support

Gardenerd Tip of the Week
Health and Gardening with Jeff Pierce

Gardenerd Tip of the Week

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 27:30


This week on the Gardenerd Tip of the Week Podcast we're chatting with Jeff Pierce, an urban homesteader in Sonoma County, California. Jeff and his wife raise bees, veggies, fruits, and mushrooms. The post Podcast: Health and Gardening with Jeff Pierce appeared first on Gardenerd.

People Doing Good
Football Talk with Jerry Robinson

People Doing Good

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 40:12


In this episode of People Doing Good, we talk all things football with Jerry Robinson, and get down to the nitty gritty about his team loyalty to his hometown team vs. the team that drafted him. --Please help keep People Doing Good going! Support us by becoming a Patreon Patron... visit our page and be regular supporter if you can. --We've launched a new You Tube Channel! Be sure to find us on youtube (People Doing Good Podcast) and watch our first video with Carson Pforsich of EP29, during his workout at Langermann's Health Club. --To stay up to date with Myriah & Jerry, be sure to subscribe to the podcast and follow People Doing Good on social media: Facebook, Twitter & Instagram: @1GoodPodcastEmail: PeopleDoingGoodPodcast@Gmail.comPeople Doing Good is made possible in part by Shoes4Kidz: www.Shoes4Kidz.comThis Podcast is Produced & Edited by Charlene Goto of  Go-To Productions

The Final Straw Radio
Asheville Survival Program

The Final Straw Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 81:54


Asheville Survival Program is an autonomous mutual aid network formed in early 2020 at the start of the Covid-19 pandemic in so-called Asheville, NC. They are building mutual aid with oppressed communities, promoting solidarity and sharing outside the bounds of State structure through their street-side camping gear, food and solidarity distro and their “Until We're All Free” Store, holding a distribution space open a few days a week walk-up visits and delivering groceries through a network of drivers. For the hour, I spoke with Fern and Ducky, two members of ASP affiliated with the Free Store, about the history of the group, challenges its faced, challenging charity dynamics and working to reach outside of subculture and across racial and cultural lines. You can reach ASP on Instagram at @AvlSurvival, on fedbook via @ASPDonate, find more links, including how to donate, at https://linktr.ee/avlsurvival. You can also reach them at their email if you have further questions at ashevillesurvivalprogram@gmail.com. And here's the segment that Sean Swain references the FBI emailing VADOC about from April 11th, 2021 Announcements KPCA-LP Now Broadcasting TFSR! We're excited to say that starting on the evening of Halloween, Sunday October 31st 2021 we'll be airing on KPCA-LP, community access radio in Petaluma, CA! If you're on occupied Coastal Miwok and Pomo territories of southern Sonoma County and looking for a 10pm political radio show, tune in to 103.3 FM! Check out https://TFSR.WTF/Radio to see our other radio broadcasts around the so-called US as well as ways to get us on your local airwaves and spread the anarchy! BRABC Prisoner Letter Writing for November If you're in the Asheville area, check out the Blue Ridge Anarchist Black Cross letter writing night on Sunday, November 7th from 5-7pm at West Asheville Park at 198 Vermont Ave. More details on the BRABC instagram, fedbook or their website at BRABC.BlackBlogs.Org. No letter writing experience required, they provide stationary, names and addresses of prisoners with upcoming birthdays or facing repression. New Website to Support 2020 Uprising Prisoners Comrades have started up UprisingSupport.Org to help track prisoners who went in last year after the murder by police of George Floyd and other instances of racist, police violence in the so-called US. If you're involved in supporting someone facing charges or in prison, get in touch with the site to get your friend listed. If you and your crew want to support folks, check it out and get involved! And now a couple of prisoner-related updates: Bo Brown, Presente! Revolutionary anarcho-communist, urban guerrilla member of the George Jackson Brigade, white working class butch dyke lesbian anti-authoritarian, anti-imperialist, ex-political prisoner passed recently after a long battle with Lewd Body Dementia. She will be remembered by her many comrades, including in the prison abolitionist communities of Oakland, CA, where she was active in her later life. To see a beautiful poster designed by Josh MacPhee of Just Seeds collective, downloadable and printable for free: https://justseeds.org/graphic/bo-brown-rest-in-power/ Bo's loved ones are raising funds to help cover her funeral expenses via a Go Fund Me entitled “Show Up For Bo Brown”: https://www.gofundme.com/f/pfspu-show-up-for-bo-brown Russell Maroon Shoatz Is Out! Dedicated community activist, founding member of the Black Unity Council, former member of the Black Panther Party and soldier in the Black Liberation Army and now-former political prisoner, Russell “Maroon” Shoatz has been given “compassionate release” after years of medical neglect in the Pennsylvania prison system. Maroon has been released to an outside hospital to coordinate palliative and likely hospice care as he's in stage 4 of colorectal cancer. While it's great that Maroon gets to be near his family, this is 49 years too late and the victory rings a bit hollow to receive this fighter back into our midst after such mistreatment. There is a fundraiser at Go Fund Me entitled “homegoing Service For Richard Shoates”: https://www.gofundme.com/f/homegoing-service-for-richard-shoates And you can learn more about Maroon at https://russellmaroonshoats.wordpress.com/ David Gilbert Paroled! Finally, some really good news. After decades of pressure, notably by Releasing Aging People in Prison (RAPP), former Weather Underground & May 19th Communist Organization political prisoner David Gilbert is expected to be released in November of 2021. He was granted partial communtation by outgoing NY Governor Cuomo, and the parole board announced that it was granting him parole. David was arrested after the Brinks armored car robbery in 1981, led by a Black Liberation Army unit. Free Them All! . ... . .. Featured Track: Σιγά Μην Κλάψω by Giannis Aggelakas Σιγά μην κλάψω, σιγά μη φοβηθώ by Killah P from Ni Oubli Ni Pardon Vol. 1 (Action Antifasciste Paris-Banlieue

KQED’s Forum
The Personal Toll of ‘Chronic Catastrophe' Caused By Climate Change

KQED’s Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 35:29


Sonoma County has seen a 100-year flood, a historic drought and six major wildfires that have left death and destruction in their wake, and subjected residents to months of bad air days and routine power shut-offs -- just in the last four years. What does living with chronic catastrophes like these do to people? How does it affect their minds, bodies and spirits? The four-part podcast, “Chronic Catastrophe,” led by journalism students at Santa Rosa Junior College, takes up that question, interviewing experts and local residents about the real impacts of climate change on people's lives. We'll talk with the podcast's producers about the series and their own personal experiences coping through “chronic catastrophe.”

WhiskyCast
Whiskey from California's Wine Country

WhiskyCast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 59:45


Northern California is known for its wines, but distillers have been quietly making excellent whiskies there for many years. Now, Sonoma County's Redwood Empire Distillery is releasing its first bottled in bond whiskies: Grizzly Beast Bourbon and Rocket Top Rye, named for some of California's legendary redwood trees. Distillers Jeff Duckhorn and Lauren Patz join us on this week's WhiskyCast In-Depth along with CEO Aaron Webb. In the news, the Heaven Hill strike is over after six weeks, and you'll hear from the union leader who led 420 workers out on strike and back to work starting this week. We'll have the latest whisky news, tasting notes, and another comparison between wine and whisky in our Behind the Label segment.

Amber & Tanner On Demand
162 - Floods and Being Scared

Amber & Tanner On Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 31:58


October 25th, 2021 -- We hope you stayed safe during the major flooding and storms across Sonoma County this weekend. We give updates on the floods, open up Amber's dream journal, and more.

Resistance Radio
Resistance Radio: Guest Keli Hendricks

Resistance Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 49:37


Keli Hendricks is the Ranching with Wildlife Coordinator for Project Coyote. Keli and her husband Dean live and work on a cattle ranch in Sonoma County where Dean has managed the cow/calf operation for over 25 years. Keli is a long-time volunteer with Sonoma County Wildlife Rescue where she fosters orphaned wildlife, and she also serves as the VP of Little Trooper Ranch, a non-profit animal rescue.

The San Francisco Experience
Forced Sterilizations: Sonoma County's shameful history.

The San Francisco Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 7:40


California legalized involuntary sterilizations in 1909. Between 1919 and 1952, 5500 such procedures were performed, representing 25% of the involuntary sterilizations which occurred in California. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/james-herlihy/message

Good Food Hour
Celebrations and Seasonal Sparkling Drinks

Good Food Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 55:34


GUESTS: Octavio Diaz Diasde los Muertos (Day of the Dead Celebrations around Sonoma County) https://museumsc.org/2021-dia-de-los-muertos/ Adenna Sussman Author: Gazoz: The Art of Making Magical, Seasonal Sparkling Drinks https://www.adeenasussman.com/

On The Wine Road Podcast
The Passion of the Industry - revisited

On The Wine Road Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 38:09


Apparently, I've been absent for a while. For now, I'd like to reach back to share a version of this previous post. It's been an extreme pleasure to meet many fascinating personalities in the wine business. This recording highlights those who have expressed their passion about the wine industry, from Napa Valley and Sonoma County to Hopland and places in between. The winery owners, winemakers and growers I have chosen speak eloquently, philosophically, poetically, and often spiritually about wine and vineyards. I'm confident that if you listen it will make the wine you love taste even better. Cheers! Guests include Greg LaFollette of Alquimista Cellars, Julie Johnson of Tres Sabores, Ulysses Van der Kamp of Van der Kamp Vineyards, Mark Topel of Topel Wines, Jean-Charles Boisset of Boisset Family Estates, the late George Macleod of MacLeod Family Vineyard (who we lost earlier this year), Delia Viader of Viader Vineyards and Winery, Gary Breen of Campovida, and Randy Ullom of Kendall-Jackson/Jackson Family Wines.

19Stories
19Stories:Episode 33 Cheryl Holling SPL! Recap

19Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 8:19


From Santa Rosa, CA, this is 19 Stories, I'm Cheryl Holling For those of you who may be joining me for the first time, 19Stories is about women and men from all walks of life doing the extraordinary in their everyday. Their will to live, press-on & press-through their personal fears and move into a future filled with hope. So Hello and welcome to a brief recap of the She Podcasts Live! Conference that I attended last week in Scottsdale AZ For those of you who do not podcast you may be wondering why I would do a recap on an industry event that may not apply to your lives or business.  Well for one, it was the first time in almost two years that I had engaged with really anyone outside of a very small circle and certainly on the scale that I did last week. Given the pandemic you may have been living a similar existence and with more people getting vaxed and life beginning to open up once again, god-willing for real this time, you may be looking to enlarge your circle and engage with more people as well. I have to say that getting on a plane, being in closed quarters and that close to a couple of hundred people just to get to my destination, raised some fear and anxiety for me and I actually had a bit of a panic attack.  So much so that when my cousin picked me up at the airport in Phoenix, I all but walked right past him directly into his car without barely saying hello...thankfully he understood and saw that I was operating out of my normal comfort zone than what I've been used to for the past 20 months and graciously forgave me for what otherwise could be construed as a bit rude. I got to the conference a couple of days early as I had the pleasure of working with She Podcasts for the better part of the past 5 months in putting together their SWAG bags for the event and I was to be working with a team of people, some known and others that became new friends, to coordinate the bags, check-in and registration materials and get settled before the conference began.  I had never been to Scottsdale and to say that the desert during the Fall is magical is an understatement!  To add to the majesty, the property where the conference was held was absolutely gorgeous with pools, walking trails, close to Camelback Mountain and my favorite coffee shop that no longer exists in Sonoma County within an almost 2 mile walking distance allowing me to get out and walk my almost 4 miles each morning and take in the beauty of the desert at sunrise.  Just Spectacular! Another apprehension about gathering with so many others after only getting to know a fraction of the 400+ women via Zoom, is that it is always different meeting people in person than getting to know them online.  Also, and I'll speak for myself, how do I behave after not really having live, in-person conversations for so long, will we be supportive of one-another, allow that not all of us will be comfortable being fully present right out of the gate? Well, the organizers of She Podcasts LIVE! Handled that with great aplomb by not only having badges that designated if you were an extrovert, introvert, etc...but giving color-coded lanyards that also let others know if you were comfortable with close physical contact such as hugs or did you need your space or something in between.  Systems that prior to the pandemic would seem silly but ones that made perfect sense as we came together after being apart for so long. The beauty of the women I worked with on the event was that we were all sympatico in our personalities, humor, and our mutual desire to serve and to also get the most out of the time we were there.   Given I am still relatively new to podcasting, I went with an open heart and mind to learn all that I could in making my podcast better, how to expand my audience and learn what I could about monetizing it so that I can continue producing content on a weekly basis.  Podcasting, although very rewarding can be really hard and I wanted to meet with like-minded women who've been doing it a lot longer than I have and have learned to be really successful and some very profitable form it. Although I launched my podcast as a passion project,  there are hard-costs associated with podcasts and rather than come out of pocket for those expenses I'd like to be able to cover them. I share that with you so that if you do have an idea or dream of producing your own podcast that you're aware of some of what's involved with doing so. Speaking of which, after almost 4 days of back to back panels, speakers and podcasts representing every genre, age and racial diversity, networking at the parties or a small while out on a walk or sitting by an intimate fire in the courtyard, my major takeaways is: Everyone has a unique voice and story that if you have the desire, drive and passion to tell it then podcasting is a perfect medium to do so. You need partnerships; other people, in this case women, to walk this journey with you, help you in your challenges, hold you accountable and to celebrate your victories. Your brand, if you will, is your own unique personality and voice and thus your podcast, business, fill in the blank is not going to be the same as someone else so for gosh sakes learn from others but stop comparing your progress or success to someone else Find what is and what is not working for you, change what you can and then change your mindset about what you can't Just because you can do it all doesn't mean you should!  This is a big one for me as for now I am a one-person show when it comes to both producing my podcast and pursuing my voiceover work.  Thus one of the reasons that I would like my podcast to be self-sustaining and make a bit of money so that I may actually begin farming out some of the work. And finally, with the following pearl of wisdom courtesy of the Satellite Sisters, “what women do, think and say should not be dismissed by the news of the day”?  Meaning we are more than news bites and what is deemed important on the local news.  OUR VOICE MATTERS And I believe that by being willing to be vulnerable, share our stories, our fears, our bravery and tools to overcome those fears, can we live into the hope of a healthier future. One of the mixed blessings of attending a conference in a beautifully relaxing and inspiring environment, with equally empowering and beautiful people, is coming down the other side of the “contact high” so to speak. My heart and mind are full and grateful and yet sad to not be around the energy and acceptance found in a brief moment of time, camaraderie and connection. It is my desire that by continuing to share people's stories on 19 Stories: from Fear to Hope is that I'm able to present a common thread of hope that will help you for a moment of time as well. I want to share that the very next day upon returning from my immersion into the world of podcasting, that I received notification that my little podcast that could was nominated for a SOVAS Award (aka The Society of Voice Arts and Sciences) for Best Podcast.  To say that I'm honored would be an understatement and I'm so very grateful to all of my guests who have trusted me enough to share their stories.  I look forward to being able to do so for as long as you, my listener, want to hear them. Until the next episode, stay Healthy and Hopeful. If you liked this, or any of the other episodes, make sure you like, review and share.  You can also leave a recorded review via my website at: https://www.soundsatchelstudios.com/19stories-podcast Thank you ; - )

Líderes del Futuro
Sonoma County Domestic Violence Prevention

Líderes del Futuro

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 10:15


Rocio Torres-Murphy, Senior Victim Advocate, for Sonoma County District Attorney's Office speaks with us about October being Domestic Awareness Month and the need to empower individuals to make the call for support. There are many services available for victims and we need to support them through this process of finding an end to the violence. #covid #togethertowardhealth #domesticviolenceprevention --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rafael-vazquez7/support

Líderes del Futuro
Sonoma county Mask Update and Child Vaccination

Líderes del Futuro

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 10:33


Marcos Mejia from the county of Sonoma came over to give us an update as to the possible changes for vaccinated individuals and whether or not they will be required to wear a mask. He also gave us some information about vaccination for 5-11 year olds and to start by reaching out to their doctors. #togethertowardhealth #juntxshacialasalud --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rafael-vazquez7/support

Wine Road: The Wine, When, and Where of Northern Sonoma County.
Sarita Cheaves—Author, Vine Me Up, Swirl Suite Podcast, & Wine Influencer (the good kind!)

Wine Road: The Wine, When, and Where of Northern Sonoma County.

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 25:50


Wine Road Podcast Episode 136 Sponsored by Ron Rubin Winery   Episode 136 | Sarita Cheaves of Vine Me Up— Author, Podcaster, and Wine Influencer (the good kind!) Wine of the Day – 2018 Ron Rubin Chardonnay Wine Book of the Day – Vine Me Up Activity Book Podcast Sponsor – Ron Rubin Winery SHOW NOTES 0:54 Meet Sarita Cheaves--- Author of Vine Me Up activity book, Podcaster, and Instagram food & wine pairing maven. Started out working in a local winery, discovered he love of wine and then got her WSET certification. 6:45 Wine of the Day 2018 Ron Rubin Russian River Chardonnay  9:15 How Sarita came up with the idea for the Vine Me Up –An Activity Book Celebrating the Melanated Wine Enthusiast, filled with word puzzles and other games related to wine and black wine makers. 12:50 Sarita, an accomplished home chef, tells us what she would make and pair with Chardonnay. 14:20 Check out Sarita's food and wine Instagram at @VineMeUp 16:05 Book of the Day- Can you guess? It's Vine Me Up, once again. 18: 30 Todd O'Leary VP of Marketing and Communications for Sonoma Tourism joins us to tell us all about -- The Sonoma Sound! A soundtrack for Sonoma County made locally recorded at White Whale studio, and written, produced and performed all by local Sonoma musicians. Check out the link to see the video and hear the recording. 22:50 One More Thing –Wine and Food Affair will be held November 5,6, 7 last day for ticket sales on Tuesday October 26th. NOTE: Wine & Food Affair is now SOLD OUT! 23:50 New! The Varietal of the Month Reviews will now be coming direct to your inbox as we revive the program with Marcy writing tasting notes of 5-8 wines from our Wine Road members. October Varietal of the Month is Viognier. Sign up to get the Varietal of the Month newsletter at www.wineroad.com Links Vine Me Up Website - https://www.vinemeupdc.com Vine Me Up Instagram @vinemeup Swirl Suite Podcast Vine Me Up Activity Book Wine of The Day – 2018 Ron Rubin Chardonnay, Russian River Valley Sonoma Sound Podcast Sponsor: Ron Rubin Winery Wine Road Wine Road Podcast Instagram -- @wineroadpodcast Credits:The Wine Road podcast is mixed and mastered at Threshold Studios Sebastopol, CA. http://thresholdstudios.info/

California Wine Country
Bob Cabral Returns

California Wine Country

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 37:18


Bob Cabral is our guest today on California Wine Country with Steve Jaxon. Harry Duke and Barry Herbst from bottle barn are also in the studio. Bob Cabral has been on California Wine Country twice before, on this episode from June 21, 2017 and again on this other episode from September 4, 2019. Before we start with Bob Cabral's wines, Dan Berger has brought a bottle from his cellar. It's a 12 year old Columbia Valley Riesling. Seven Hills is a small producer. This is only a little sweet, and the acidity held it together. Without the sugar it might be too bitter, but as it is, you can still taste the fruit. The acidity and vibrancy is what makes an older Riesling interesting. Dan Berger points out that Riesling is one of the only white wines that will age. Rieslings go well with Thai food, which sometimes uses sugar to temper the spices. Bob Cabral's name is synonymous with great pinot noir. He spent several years at Williams Selyem. He grew up in Escalon outside Modesto where his father grew grapes. He was strong in chemistry and biology. He thought of vet school but went to study viticulture at Fresno State and started working in 1980. This was his 42nd harvest in California and 35th in Sonoma County. Now Bob Cabral is working at Three Sticks. After two decades at Williams Selyem, he left on good terms, wanting to do something else. They have access to some of the best fruit in Sonoma County. Ryan Pritchard is their winemaker, who was on this show last week. Bob is working in the vineyards, making sure they are healthy and that he is getting a good crop. Then in the winemaking process he wants to keep things simple. But today we will taste Bob Cabral wines, of his own production. 2017 Cuvée Wildflower, a Riesling which comes from two vineyards, one just outside of Occidental and another near Petaluma. It is fermented in a large concrete amphora. He uses no commercial yeast. He pays the growers extra to use as many sustainable practices as possible without losing the crop. This wine is dry, there is no residual sugar in it. Dan says this is a baby and needs a lot more time. Grapefruit, kiwi and kumquat flavors make it like a red wine. Bob Cabral wines are available at the website and in a few fine local restaurants, such as Underwood in Graton. Dan Berger says that Bob Cabral's wines are distinctive. He only makes about 140 or 150 cases of the Riesling. Bob describes how he dedicates his wine company's profits to local charities and he also works with many other local charities like the Boys and Girls Club. For all the wine he makes, Bob Cabral does not own any vineyards. It's because he focussed on winemaking and taking care of other people's vineyards. Such as, he planted the first three estate vineyards for Williams Selyem. He is still active in the winery but after all these years he knows it's a young man's game. The 2016 Chardonnay is next, there were only 4 cases of it. Dan says it has two things going on, one is the aromatics, like a high-end French Burgundy, but the acid level reminds you of Chablis. The name of the wine is Cuvée Anne Rose, the names of his wife and daughter. It will be released probably in March or April of 2022. Dan Berger says the acid in this wine needs a lot of years in the cellar. Most people are already selling their 2020 Chardonnays, and this 2017 hasn't even been released yet. Dan Berger would keep a Chardonnay for at least 7 years. Bob Cabral had a 60 year old wine that was great, because it had enough acid in the structure. Bob Cabral Wines dot com includes Bob's Cellar Playlist. You can listen to the Spotify playlist while you peruse the site. On the back of every label there is a coded song, written backwards. This is similar to what is in Clark Smith's new book about wine and music. The last wine is the Pinot Noir, the 2017 Troubador Pinot Noir, comes from four vineyards in the Russian River Valley, all in the area with the rich Goldridge soil,

Newsy Jacuzzi
Kid News This Week: Flying microchips, Kerala exodus, California “snake-mare,” airport pig patrol

Newsy Jacuzzi

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 19:25


Millionaire Car Salesman Podcast
EP 4:29 How Call Tracking & Reinforcement Training Helps An Auto Group Sell Over 1,000 Car Per Month

Millionaire Car Salesman Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 54:15


This week on the Millionaire Car Salesman Podcast, Sean V. Bradley, CSP interviews David Long, the Executive GM of Hansel Auto Group, an eight rooftop auto group with locations in Sonoma County, CA.  They discuss the evolution of the automotive industry.   The retail automotive industry today is a people business.  It is all about customer service, the customer experience, and taking a customer first mentality.  It is also about your people; training, developing, leading, and mentoring them to be successful, personally and professionally, while putting the customer first.   David discusses how having the proper dealer-vendor relationships helps to achieve this.  One of his favorite vendor relationships is CallSource.  CallSource records and tracks all inbound and outbound phone calls.  He receives DealSaver Alerts from CallSource, which are email updates on every call where his staff did not ask for the appointment or the customer did not commit to an appointment.  Additionally, Call Source aids Jeff and his team with their DealSaver Recovery Alert Program, where CallSource's call center returns a call to the customer to go for the appointment that his team failed to get. CallRevu Acquired CallSource's automotive division in September 2021.  However, CallRevu does not intend to eliminate any of CallSources technology, people, or services.  Instead, CallRevu plans to combine the best of both businesses to advance its technology and provide a higher level of service to automotive dealerships. About David Long David Long has been in the automotive industry for 30 years.  He started working in a detail department in FL until he made the transition to the sales floor.  As a sales associate, his work ethic and dedication resulted in him being the #1 one sales rep in the country for the #1 automotive group in the country.  He climbed his way up to management and eventually bought his own store.  He had a great run with his Ford store and then sold it right before the last recession.  Today, he runs Hansel Auto Group, an eight rooftop automotive group in California that sells over 1,000 cars per month. Resources Dealer Synergy & Bradley On Demand: The automotive industry's #1 training, tracking, testing, and certification platform and consulting & accountability firm. The Millionaire Car Salesman Podcast: is the #1 resource for automotive sales professionals, managers, and owners.  Also, join The Millionaire Car Salesman Facebook Group today! The Against All Odds Radio Show: Hosting guests that have started from the bottom and rose to the top.  Also, join The Against All Odds Radio Show Guests & Listeners Facebook Group for the podcasted episodes. For more interactivity, join The Millionaire Car Salesman Club on Clubhouse. Win the Game of Googleopoly: Unlocking the secret strategy of search engines. The Millionaire Car Salesman Podcast is Proudly Sponsored By:  CallRevu & Callsource: The industry leader for call tracking, lead management, and business analytic solutions.  AutoWeb: Visit AutoWeb.com/dealers for help in revolutionizing your business to help you sell more cars. CarNow: Sell more cars now!  Not only is CarNow.com. the market leader in tailored digital solutions, but they are built to help dealers sell more cars.

Marcus & Sandy ON DEMAND
"What's Your Favorite Scary Movie?"

Marcus & Sandy ON DEMAND

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 47:20


What's the movie you refuse to watch cause it's way too scary? ...and why is producer Jason way too into this stuff? Plus, 100 snakes in a Sonoma County house, and the risks of taking a secret day off.

Líderes del Futuro
Peter Morales and Services for LGBTQ Youth

Líderes del Futuro

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 9:32


Peter Morales works with LGBTQ youth in Sonoma County with the hope of creating healthy spaces for them. Peter coordinates services for youth who often just need someone to listen. LGBTQConnection is a non-profit organization in Sonoma and Napa counties that provide support for the youth and their families. for more info www.lgbtqconnection.org #lgbtqconnection #sonomacounty #napacounty --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rafael-vazquez7/support

Líderes del Futuro
Sonoma County COVID, Vaccines, and Renter's Support

Líderes del Futuro

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 6:57


The county of Sonoma has had an increase in the number of individuals who are getting the vaccine. Unfortunately, people are still dying from the virus and many are choosing to not vaccinate. There are millions of dollars available for rental and utility assistance. 211 is where individuals can begin looking for support. #COVID #sonomacounty #togethertowardhealth #schools --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rafael-vazquez7/support

PolitiFact California
Can You Handle The Truth: Fact-checking false claims about COVID-19 vaccines and children

PolitiFact California

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021


By Randol White The overwhelming evidence, as reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, shows the COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective, both for adults and children 12 and up. Also, the FDA is expected to authorize a COVID-19 vaccine for younger children in the coming weeks. But false claims are circulating on social media saying the COVID-19 vaccines are harmful to children and caused the death of a Sonoma County teenager.   CapRadio's PolitiFact California reporter Chris Nichols fact-checked those claims in this week's Can You Handle the Truth segment. He spoke with anchor Randol White. Interview Highlights There are false claims spreading on social media saying the vaccines are harmful. You found one high-profile example. Tell us about that.  A story went viral on Twitter and Facebook after the tragic death of a 15-year-old boy in Sonoma County this summer.  He had received the second dose of his vaccine within 48 hours of his death, and some anti-vaccination groups used that information to make the false claim that the vaccine caused his death.  I contacted Sonoma County spokesperson Paul Gullixson about this. Here's what he told me:   “The case was thoroughly investigated by the Sonoma County coroner's office in partnership with the California Department of Public Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention," Gullixson said. "Forensic experts from all those agencies have concluded that there was no evidence the vaccine caused the death.” So, there's no evidence the vaccine caused the death. Were the experts able to determine what did cause his death? They concluded he died of what is called stress cardiomyopathy, or heart failure with coronary artery inflammation.  The CDC says there have been rare cases where young people developed heart inflammation after receiving the Covid 19 vaccines, correct? That is correct. And the agency says people should seek medical care if they have symptoms such as chest pain or shortness of breath or feelings of having a fast-beating, fluttering, or pounding heart. They say most patients respond well to medicine and rest, and feel better quickly.  But again the experts who looked at this Sonoma County case said they could not find a link to the vaccine. They described this as a perplexing case: the boy did not have a history of heart problems.  Here is Gullixson:  “We had cardio forensic pathologists, we had pediatric cardiologists looking at this case and they all agree it's a very rare and tragic and complicated case. But they could find no direct link between the death and the vaccines," Gullixson said. In response to the posts circulating on social media, the family of the boy who died provided a message to the public. What did they say?  They did. They told the Press Democrat newspaper in Santa Rosa, that “We feel strongly that everyone should have their children vaccinated.” They went on to say:  “We believe vaccines are safe and effective. Families should recognize that complicating factors can occur with any vaccine and, because of that, we encourage parents to closely monitor their children ... following vaccination regardless if they have symptoms or not.”

Brew Ha Ha Podcast
Stone Brewing and Seismic Brewing

Brew Ha Ha Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 28:51


Stone Brewing brewer Steve Gonzales and Seismic Brewing Company brewer Andy Hooper are both on Brew HaHa Craft Beer Radio on the Drive today w/ Mark Carpenter and Herlinda Heras. Harry Duke is sitting in for Steve Jaxon. Steve Gonzales is up in Sonoma County from San Diego, since he also brews at the Napa Stone Brewery. Andy Hooper is the head brewer for Seismic, and also for Tremor, a brewer that won a Gold Medal at the Great American Beer Festival. Brew Ha Ha is sponsored by the Santa Rosa branch of Yoga Six located in Coddingtown Center. Herlinda attended the keg un-tapping of a special Seismic beer, that is the most local beer probably ever done in Sonoma County. Andy tells that Sonoma County grows barley and hops, and in a 12 mile radius there is also a malting facility. So they can do it all in Sonoma County. They brought their entire team to harvest the hops for this beer. It was a fun event in the taproom on Oct 1. They finished off a barrel of that beer. Their hop harvesting machine at Scott Bice's Capricopia, is an amazing machine. It's imported and needs a converter to run on local power. The vines bite, they can give you a rash. There is a Sonoma County company that invented a hop harvester. The company moved to Yakima decades ago, following the growers. Seismic is a relatively young company dedicated to local sustainably sourced ingredients and water conservation practices. They are the first place you see when you enter the Barlow in Sebastopol. They can't operate a restaurant in their own facility, but people can order food from any restaurants right nearby, and have the food delivered right to the taproom. Andy Hooper brought a taste of a limited edition beer. It uses fresh hops, but in order to optimize the flavoring process, instead of using them fresh, they froze them with liquid nitrogen, then shattered them, to break them up and get more surface area on the pieces, to get more of the flavor out. It also didn't clog the equipment as whole hops can. Then they did half the maturation in Sauvignon Blanc barrels. It's a beer they can only make once a year. Herlinda just brought a Seismic beer into a restaurant in Napa, called Tremor. It's all organic, made with California ingredients, it's 120 calories a can and sells for $12.99 a 12-pack. It won a gold medal at the Great American Beer Festival. To do an organic beer, you have to get the whole facility certified organic. It was 200 pages of application materials. They look into the origin of all ingredients. They used to make this beer just for themselves, not it is catching on. Tremor California Light Lager. Stone Brewing's beer cans are all upside down. Leave no Stone unturned! Stone has been around for 25 years. It has its origins in the music business. One founder was in a band, and was recording in the studio with one of the other founders. They took a class together and recognized each other from the music business. Their headquarters is in San Diego. They have the big brewery in Escondido in north San Diego County, the place in Napa and a brewery in Richmond, VA. Stone and Seismic also have done a second collaboration. The second one is called Seismic Stone “Ain't That A Kick In The Red” Red India Pale Lager. Stone makes lots of other beers, like Zubin Pils named after his friend Dan Zubin. He also brought Enjoy By 10-31. It was supposed to be a one-off, when they had some extra hops. So they make a beer so hoppy that it would only last 35 days. Tbe Napa Stone brewery is in an old stone mill house right on the river. It's a BBQ themed restaurant. He also brought Hop Engineer, they are located near a train depot. This uses South African hops, called Southern Star. Southern Tropic and Southern Sublime are two other new ones that are "really awesome" and every time they use it, the brew is sold out in a few weeks. Bitterness used to be what hops were for, but now, aroma is king.

The Morning Show with Nikki Medoro Podcast
October 14, 2021: Nikki Medoro - Snakes! Why'd it have to be snakes?!!?!

The Morning Show with Nikki Medoro Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 13:17


The Morning Show with Nikki Medoro welcomes the Director of Sonoma County's Reptile Rescue, Al WOLF, who pulled almost a hundred snakes from under a Santa Rosa area home and has relocated over 17,000 reptiles in his career. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

California Wine Country
Petaluma Gap wines: Three Sticks and Barber Cellars

California Wine Country

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021


Ryan Pritchard, winemaker at Three Sticks Wines and Mike Barber of Barber Cellars are our two guests on California Wine Country with Steve Jaxon and Dan Berger. Barry Herbst from Bottle Barn and Harry Duke are also in the studio. First, a cellar dweller from Dan Berger's extensive personal cellar. It's a 2010 Riesling from Arroyo Seco. It is very sweet but probably about three years past its prime. Ryan Pritchard's take is that the nose is better than the palette. Dan says the screw cap helped it from being completely gone. It would have been better after only 4-5 years in the cellar. Ryan Pritchard has a Three Sticks Chardonnay that they will taste. Steve notices the nose and Dan Berger says, “the secret to these wines is cool climate.” Ryan Pritchard grew up in northern California and his first memories of wine are of being a student at Cornell University where they tasted wines in hospitality studies. He fell in love with wine, then worked in tech but his love was always wine. He spent all his time traveling and studying wine. He worked for Bob Cabral at Williams Selyem, where he learned a lot. Three Sticks started when Bill Price bought the Durell Vineyard, which had been providing grapes since the '70s for some great wines. In 2002 he decided to make some wine himself, starting with one, two or three barrels. Over the years they continue to find great fruit in the area and do different bottlings. Their goal is to develop and farm from some of the best vineyards in Sonoma County. They have vineyards in all the different areas in Sonoma County, so they can do some single vineyard wines and some blends. Notable among them is Gap's Crown vineyard in Petaluma Gap, which has been called the crown jewel of cold climate wine growing. Bill Price had the good sense to hire Bob Cabral, who did a brilliant job of establishing a style that Ryan is continuing to produce. Three Sticks has a tasting room right off the square in downtown Sonoma in an original 1842 adobe building. They do sit-down tastings and reservations are suggested at least on weekends. Our second guest today is Mike Barber from Barber Cellars. They have been making wine for fifteen years. They didn't start with a lot of money. Barber Cellars tasting room is in the Hotel Petaluma, a 100-year-old building recently renovated. Reservations are recommended but not required. They highlight local cheese makers and are super casual. Inspired by the book Big Macs and Burgundies, they offer a tasting menu of popular foods that go well with nice wines. It is a very enjoyable space, open Thursday through Sunday 1-7 PM. Today's selections of Petaluma Gap wines are intended to show the qualities of this new AVA in southern Sonoma County. The fruit comes from Gap's Crown vineyard and it delivers consistent Pinot Noir character. The Petaluma Gap, where the fog rolls in early in the afternoon, and the wind, toughening the skins making the great tannin profile. The fog tempers the heat, even in hot year. It can 10 10-15 degrees cooler at Gap's Crown on a hot day. Dan Berger says that Petaluma Gap is one of the finest AVAs in America for Pinot Noir. It has only been approved for three years, but the difference between Russian River Valley and Petaluma Gap, if you want to compare them, you're getting the equivalent of two different Burgundian styles. Barry Herbst notes that there are good Syrahs coming from Petaluma Gap. People come into Bottle Barn asking for Petaluma Gap. Every single crop that comes from the 85-acre Gap's Crown vineyard has been excellent. Harvest this year has been difficult. They brought their Pinot Noir in about 3 weeks ago. Yield was light. There are some vineyards that got no crop at all, due to the drought. Even though this year's yields are light, the quality is perfect by every measure. They saw a combination of small berries, which means intense flavors, and the acidity and sugar levels were maintained by cold nights....

California Now Podcast
Essential Tips for California Road Trips

California Now Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 51:59


In this episode of the California Now Podcast, host Soterios Johnson interviews three travel and lifestyle influencers and gets them to share their top tips and must-dos while road-tripping across the state. First, Johnson connects with Amber Mamian, a Temecula-based mother of six and the founder of the family travel website Global Munchkins. She talks about her family's recent journey from Hollywood to Oceanside, with a fun-filled stop in Huntington Beach. Whether it was indulging in a cotton candy dessert in the shape of Marie Antoinette's wig, or exploring the California Surf Museum, she says the whole family was enthralled (and behaved admirably) from start to finish. Next, Johnson talks to Francesca Murray, the travel writer and influencer behind One Girl One World. Murray recently embarked on road trips in Southern California and the Central Coast, and she offered fresh insights from both. From the luxurious shops of Laguna Beach to the chill vibes of Catalina to the breathtaking vistas of Big Sur, Murray says you feel like you're traveling the world within the state's borders. Finally, Johnson chats with Henry Wu, a San Francisco–based photographer and co-founder of This Life of Travel, who recently took a mini-break in Napa Valley and Sonoma County. Wu tells Johnson about a few must-visit places in wine country, and also shares some expert-level tips for taking stunning, Instagram-worthy photos of it all.

The Bay
Sonoma County Vineyard Workers are Demanding More Protections

The Bay

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 17:14


Vineyard workers already have hard jobs that usually don't pay high wages. And as wildfire season increasingly overlaps with harvest season, their work has gotten even more dangerous. Now, advocates and farmworkers in Sonoma County are demanding that wine businesses provide stronger protections for the laborers who make the industry possible in the first place. Guest: Nashelly Chavez, Diversity, Equity and Inclusion reporter for the Press Democrat Follow The Bay to hear more local Bay Area stories like this one. New episodes are released Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 3 a.m. Find The Bay on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, NPR One or via Alexa. This episode was produced by Alan Montecillo and Adhiti Bandlamudi, and hosted by Ericka Cruz Guevarra.

Líderes del Futuro
COVID & Vaccine Update Sonoma County

Líderes del Futuro

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 13:20


Marcos Mejia from Sonoma County Govt. came to update us on the number of individuals vaccinated and the changes on who can get the booster shot of Pfizer. Additional information was provided about rental assistance. #COVID #togethertowardhealth --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rafael-vazquez7/support

Amber & Tanner On Demand
147 - Time Change & Engagement Parties

Amber & Tanner On Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021


October 6th - 2021 -- Amber shares that she is going back to Georgia and having an engagement party! Speaking of being out of town, Tanner is having a hard time adjusting back to the time change from Hawaii to Sonoma County.

Inner Voice - Heartfelt Chat with Dr. Foojan
Beyond Triggers Toward Success- Dr. Foojan Zeine chats with Robert Riopel and Dr. Susan Campbell

Inner Voice - Heartfelt Chat with Dr. Foojan

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 57:47


Inner Voice – a Heartfelt Chat with Dr. Foojan on KMET 1490 AM / ABC News Radio.  In this segment-Beyond Triggers Toward Success - Dr. Foojan shares the Tip of the Week about how we insist to keep our magical or wishful thinking which can hurt us more. Dr. Foojan brings you Robert Raymond Riopel is an international best-selling author, App Designer, Entrepreneur, and Trainer who has spent the past 18+ years traveling around the world sharing his passion with more than half a million people. He has also shared the stage with and trained many of the top trainers and thought leaders in the world today. With his high energy and heartfelt style, Robert draws on his journey from humble beginnings to financial freedom at the age of 32, to inspire individuals into tapping into their greatness. Realizing that he is not the only person that struggles, Robert's “Clues” open individuals up to the possibilities that lie within them and that is why he is a highly sought-after presenter. He is the author of “Success left a Clue”. www.robertriopel.com Dr. Foojan answers your question of what do I do when I eat to stuff down my fear in the Ask me Segment. Dr. Foojan chats with Dr. Susan Campbell, is the author of eleven books on relationships and conflict resolution. She leads seminars internationally and has appeared on CNN's NewsNight and Good Morning America. Dr. Campbell has also directed a think tank, run nonprofit organizations, consulted to Fortune 500 companies, and guest lectured at the Harvard, Stanford, and UCLA business schools. She works with private clients through her relationship coaching practice and lives in Sonoma County, California. Today we will be talking about her latest book “From Triggered to Tranquil”.www.SusanCampbell.com Check out my website: www.foojan.com

People Doing Good
Bryan Clement of Dovetail Learning & Elizabeth Smith of Sonoma County ACEs Connection

People Doing Good

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 33:36


This week on the show, Myriah and Jerry chat with Bryan and Elizabeth on the topic of helping youth in the community during the difficult time of COVID. For more from Bryan and Dovetail Learning, CLICK HERE. For more from Elizabeth and Sonoma County ACEs Connection, CLICK HERE. --Please help keep People Doing Good going! Support us by becoming a Patreon Patron... visit our page and be regular supporter if you can. --We've launched a new You Tube Channel! Be sure to find us on youtube (People Doing Good Podcast) and watch our first video with Carson Pforsich of EP29, during his workout at Langermann's Health Club. --To stay up to date with Myriah & Jerry, be sure to subscribe to the podcast and follow People Doing Good on social media: Facebook, Twitter & Instagram: @1GoodPodcastEmail: PeopleDoingGoodPodcast@Gmail.comPeople Doing Good is made possible in part by Shoes4Kidz: www.Shoes4Kidz.comThis Podcast is Produced & Edited by Charlene Goto of  Go-To Productions

Líderes del Futuro
COVID and Vaccination for 5 Year Olds

Líderes del Futuro

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 14:06


Marcos Mejia from Sonoma County came to talk with us about the process that will be followed to provide booster shots and the steps being taken for children 5 and up to get vaccinated for the first time. #covid #togethertowardhealth #juntxshacialasalud #sonomacounty --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rafael-vazquez7/support

Our Mom's Favorite Podcast
To think We couldn't get an Olympian on the Pod feat. Stephen Tomasin

Our Mom's Favorite Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 59:20


#9 in the program but #1 in the hearts of these podcast hosts, Scuba Steve joins this episode to chat all things Olympics, Rugby, and the culture around the two. As a product of Sonoma County's rugby scene, Steve is the type of guy we all root for and are proud of the success he's been able make in his rugby career. In this sit down chat it's great to hear from him directly about the triumphs, the challenges and ultimately the adventure he's been able to have while on his pursuit of rugby. We hope you enjoy this conversation with a longtime friend of the pod.  USE CODE: SCUBASTEVE at checkout for 20% off and free shipping on your purchase of a Lawnmower 4.0 from MANSCAPED, Steve highly recommends 

Inside Froggy 92.9
70 - Tanner Went to a Wedding, Dano's Greenlight

Inside Froggy 92.9

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 61:09


Amber saw a famous person in Sonoma County, Jenn had a moment that made her feel old, Dano gives us a book report, and Tanner talks about his first wedding he went to as an adult.

The Tom and Curley Show
Hour 4: Sonoma County Wine Auction in-person again, with some changes

The Tom and Curley Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 30:03


Behind Enemy Lines: Greg Coleman, Sideline Analyst for the Minnesota Vikings Radio Network  // In Push to Tax the Rich, White House Spotlights Billionaires' Tax Rates  // Sonoma County Wine Auction in-person again, with some changes See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Long Story Short with Megan and Wendy: The Podcast
Girls Gone Hallmark: Raise a Glass to Love

Long Story Short with Megan and Wendy: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021


Megan and Wendy find themselves annoyed with the amount of swirling and sniffing in Hallmark Channel's newest movie Raise a Glass to Love. Listen in as they rate and review the second movie from Hallmark's Fall Harvest line up starring Laura Osnes and Juan Pablo Di Pace. What did you think this movie? Email us at meganandwendy@gmail.com. Raise a Glass to Love premiered on the Hallmark Channel on September 18, 2021. News and Notes About Raise a Glass to Love Raise a Glass to Love was filmed in British Columbia, Canada. The Okanagan Valley, a region in the Canadian province of British Columbia, was chosen to replicate Sonoma County's wine country.This movie wrapped filming on July 25, 2021.Laura Osnes is a two-time Tony Award nominated actress and singer.Page Six reported in August, 2021 that Laura Osnes was terminated from the Broadway show called "Crazy For You" because she refuses to be vaccinated for COVID.The Broadway League requires audience, performers and backstage staff to be vaccinated (via New York Post).Open letter to Laura Osnes from OnStage Blog and Javier Muñoz. View this post on Instagram A post shared by Javier Muñoz (Javi) (@javiermofficial) Forbes says that the Master Sommelier Diploma exam is the world's hardest test.So much that there was a massive Master Sommelier cheating scandal. California's peak "fire season" is from July - October. Who is Jennifer Huether? Jennifer Huether is Canada's first female Master Sommelier and appeared as herself in Raise a Glass to Love. You can visit her website here. Not One Fall Decoration We're not really sure why this movie is in Hallmark Channel's Fall Harvest line up. There weren't any fall elements that would indicate that this movie was made specifically for the 2021 Fall Harvest schedule. Instead, we think it's one of those non-specific movies Hallmark can slide into any line up when they need a movie. Did Raise a Glass to Love leave you wanting more? We suggest watching Roadhouse Romance starring Tyler Hynes and Lauren Alaina and then listen to our review!

Wine Road: The Wine, When, and Where of Northern Sonoma County.

Wine Road Podcast Episode 134 Sponsored by Ron Rubin Winery   Episode 134 | Stacy Rafanelli—A. Rafanelli Winery Stacy Rafanelli, Operations Manager (and everything else that needs to be done) at A. Rafanelli Winery tells us all about the four generations of family behind the name, their winemaking program and wine portfolio including their flagship A. Rafanelli Zinfandel. Wine of the Day – 2019 A. Rafanelli Zinfandel Wine Book of the Day – Vine Me Up by Sarita Cheaves  Podcast Sponsor – Ron Rubin Winery SHOW NOTES 0:45 Wine and Food Affair is on for November 5, 6, & 7 – visit wineroad.com for tickets and details. Tickets ARE LIMITED! 1:33 Wine of The Day-- 2019 A. Rafanelli Zinfandel, the flagship wine of A. Rafanelli. 4:00 History of the winery originated with the matriarch of the family, Leticia. And the growth of winery in Dry Creek Valley. 7:45: How Stacy got involved in the family business. From Law to Wine! 10:00 Who is the A in A. Rafanelli? Stacy's grandmother designed the awesome woodcut label on the bottles. 11:50 Tasting room open by appointment only booked on every hour to half hour. Closed on Tuesdays. During Harvest only booking from 12-4pm. 13:44 Cooking demos with Stacy's mom over Zoom. 15:00 Stacy's gives her favorite places to go with her friends from foodies to outdoor enthusiasts. 17:10 Book of the Day –Vine Me Up Activity Book by Sarita Cheaves. 19:30 Listeners of this show that visit A. Rafanelli in the month of October will get a complimentary tasting for two. Mention Wine Road Podcast when you call. Call for an appointment at 707-433-1385 21:40 Go to Ron Rubin Web and click on the link “Trained For Saving Lives” to learn about the defibrillator program spearheaded by Ron Rubin. Links Rafanellli Winery https://www.arafanelliwinery.com/ Vine Me Up Activity Book https://www.vinemeupdc.com/ Stacy's Dining Recommendations: Campo Fina https://www.campofina.com/ Dry Creek Kitchen https://drycreekkitchen.com/ Vallette https://www.valettehealdsburg.com/ Noble Folk https://www.thenoblefolk.com/ Russian River Valley Wine Growers -- https://russianrivervalley.org/ Sponsor: Ron Rubin Winery -- https://ronrubinwinery.com/ Wine Road https://www.wineroad.com Sonoma County Winegrowers -- https://sonomawinegrape.org/ Wine Road Podcast Instagram -- @wineroadpodcast Credits: The Wine Road podcast is mixed and mastered at Threshold Studios Sebastopol, CA http://thresholdstudios.info/  

Reveal
Fighting Fire with Fire

Reveal

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2021 50:49


Year after year, wildfires have swept through Northern California's wine and dairy country, threatening the region's famed agricultural businesses. . Evacuation orders have become a way of life in places like Sonoma County, and so too have exemptions to those orders. Officials in the county created a special program allowing agricultural employers to bring farmworkers into areas that are under evacuation and keep them working, even as wildfires rage. It's generally known as the ag pass program. Reporter Teresa Cotsirilos investigates whether the policy puts low-wage farmworkers at risk from smoke and flames. This story is a partnership with the nonprofit newsroom the Food & Environment Reporting Network and the podcast and radio show World Affairs. Then KQED's Danielle Venton introduces us to Bill Tripp, a member of the Karuk Tribe. Tripp grew up along the Klamath River, where his great-grandmother taught him how controlled burns could make the land more productive and protect villages from dangerous fires. But in the 1800s, authorities outlawed traditional burning practices. Today, the impact of that policy is clear: The land is overgrown, and there has been a major fire in the region every year for the past decade, including one that destroyed half the homes in the Karuk's largest town, Happy Camp, and killed two people. Tripp has spent 30 years trying to restore “good fire” to the region but still faces resistance from the U.S. Forest Service and others. Twelve years ago, the Forest Service officially changed its policy to expand the use of prescribed burns, one of the most effective tools to mitigate massive, deadly wildfires. But Reveal's Elizabeth Shogren reports that even though the agency committed to doing controlled burns, it hasn't actually increased how much fire it's using to fight fire.The Forest Service also has been slow to embrace another kind of good fire that experts say the West desperately needs: managed wildfires, in which fires are allowed to burn in a controlled manner to reduce overgrowth. To protect the future of the land and people – especially with climate change making forests drier and hotter – the Forest Service needs to embrace the idea of good fire.