Podcasts about sonoma county

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Latest podcast episodes about sonoma county

Stable Connections the Podcast
Episode 53: Jordan Rohanna

Stable Connections the Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 53:22


Jordan Rohanna opens up about her experience starting her Dressage program in Sonoma County and some struggles she's had along the way. Enjoy! Jordan's Links: https://www.facebook.com/Rohan-Dressage-168893993181650/ https://www.instagram.com/rohan_dressage/

Gather in Growth
020 | What's the Best that Could Happen? with Hilary Richards

Gather in Growth

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 34:08


Today I have the honor of chatting with my friend, Hilary Richards. From the power of unconditional community, to trusting your intuition and never giving up on your dreams, in today's episode we answer the question of “what's the best that could happen?”   Hilary is the founder of the SHE CAN CLUB, the fastest growing female empowerment movement in Sonoma County, California. After years of people telling her what she should do with her life, she dug deep and figured out what she was meant to do with her life. She is now on a mission to smother her local community of women with support until they have the confidence to take action on whatever it is that they feel called to do.    In this episode, we cover:  What the SHE CAN CLUB is and who it's for  What to do if you're stuck in the “shitty should cycle”  Going against the grain and disrupting the norm  The power of perseverance Permission to change and pivot from where your dream began How to handle jealousy and turn it into something that serves you and others    Connect with Hilary:  Hang out with her on Instagram  See what fun stuff SHE CAN CLUB is up to on Instagram  Check out the SHE CAN CLUB website  Follow the movement via her podcast, SHE CAN CLUB   Resources & Links: Learn more about my speaking Get your YouDoYou32 tracker! (82's little sister!) Get your #YouDoYou82 tracker and join the Facebook community! Gather in Growth podcast produced by: Jill Carr Podcasting   Connect with Emily: Follow on Instagram and Facebook Join my email list Check out my website Connect with on LinkedIn Be sure to hit subscribe so you never miss the latest episode! Reviews help us reach more rockstar rural women, and are always greatly appreciated! Find the complete show notes here: https://www.emilyreuschel.com/020-whats-the-best-that-could-happen-with-hilary-richards

Stable Connections the Podcast
Episode 56: Emily Eyles

Stable Connections the Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 57:30


Emily Eyles talks to us about what brought her to Sonoma County from Michigan, her experience with being a saddle fitter, how breaking her neck and getting a bad case of vertigo drastically changed her life and what her recovery journey has been. Enjoy! https://www.facebook.com/emily.lanceeyles https://www.instagram.com/eyles_saddle_service/

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
Is It Ethical To Eat Fish If They Feel Pain?

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 24:56


Is It Ethical To Eat Fish If They Feel Pain? Hope Bohanec • https://www.onegreenplanet.org/author/hope_bohanec/• Book - The Ultimate Betrayal: Is There Happy Meat?#HopeBohanec  #Vegan #AnimalCruelty #Freshwater Hope Bohanec has been active in animal protection and environmental activism for 30 years and has published the book The Ultimate Betrayal: Is There Happy Meat? The Ultimate Betrayal lifts the veil of secrecy surrounding animal farming, offering a rare look inside the world of alternative animal agriculture.People are becoming increasingly aware that farmed animals are living in misery, their physical and emotional well-being matters, and they deserve to live a happy life. Concerned consumers are discovering that animal agriculture is one of the leading contributors to climate change, fresh water scarcity, deforestation, and air pollution. They are demanding compassionate and sustainable alternatives with their consumer dollars and the industry, eager to capitalize on an emerging market, is responding. But are these new products based on misleading buzzwords designed to deceive unsuspecting customers who are endeavoring to make ethical choices?Hope is also the Executive Director of Compassionate Living, a Sonoma County, California based vegan advocacy organization.  To Contact Hope Bohanec go to (https://compassionate-living.org/ Disclaimer:Medical and Health information changes constantly. Therefore, the information provided in this podcast should not be considered current, complete, or exhaustive. Reliance on any information provided in this podcast is solely at your own risk. The Real Truth About Health does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, products, procedures, or opinions referenced in the following podcasts, nor does it exercise any authority or editorial control over that material. The Real Truth About Health provides a forum for discussion of public health issues. The views and opinions of our panelists do not necessarily reflect those of The Real Truth About Health and are provided by those panelists in their individual capacities. The Real Truth About Health has not reviewed or evaluated those statements or claims. 

Sonoma County : A Community Portrait
SOCO Pod Episode 13 Jenny Phan and Sean Quan Romantic and Business Partners at Second Staff Pop Up

Sonoma County : A Community Portrait

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 144:52


   Sean Quan & Jenny Quan, who as partner and partner and man and wife, own and operate quick moving and adaptive SECOND STAFF - a restaurant pop-up here in Sonoma County.The ever changing set up allows them to test locations, dishes, save money, and incubate fun restaurant concepts such as Asian street food custom car nights and Michelin-technique discount small bites - with all ingredients sourced from Costco!   This episode is about their love of food and their love story which intertwines it, and it contains many lessons for those of us who would like to work for our partners or families.   Listen, nibble, learn, and enjoy some hot takes on haut cuisine in Sonoma County!WEBSITE: @_secondstaff on Instagram

The Wiggin Sessions
Investing In Health Care with Dr. David Eifrig

The Wiggin Sessions

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 55:12


"We're in the platinum age of healthcare," - Dr. David Eifrig In the age of technology, healthcare is moving at the speed of light, with new research leading to the development of cures for everything from hair loss to new cancer therapies. In the coming years, your genetic code will be the key to unlocking your life potential to be over one hundred. With all of these advancements, there are emerging opportunities for investors in the healthcare market. Dr. David Eifrig started his career trading derivatives at Goldman Sachs for over a decade. In 1995, he decided to switch careers and left Wall Street to become a medical doctor becoming a board-eligible eye surgeon before landing at Stansberry Research, where he launched his Retirement Trader, Retirement Millionaire, and Prosperity Investor newsletters. He is also the author of five books, including The Living Cure: The Promise of Cancer Immunotherapy. He owns and produces his own wine at Eifrig Cellars LLC in northern Sonoma County, California. On this episode of The Wiggin Sessions, Dr. Eifrig joins me to discuss the platinum age of healthcare and the science of rapidly developing new therapies for everything from Alzheimer's to new genetic therapies for cancers. We discuss his predictions for where he sees healthcare going in the coming years and why your genetic code is the key to unlocking your potential to live to be one hundred or more. Listen in to learn insider secrets on what you should pay attention to as an individual and an investor to take advantage of this new era's rapid pace of discovery. Plus, he shares 2 of his healthcare picks for investors now and the biggest opportunity he's seen in any market. Key Takeaways Dr. Eifrig shares his journey from Wall Street to medicine, to combining health information with financial information through his newsletters Dr. Eifrig shares the most innovative things in the healthcare field right now How genetic profiles are helping doctors to create cures at a rapid-fire rate Where Big Pharma is focusing its attention right now Why genetic editing is the key to changing the average healthy lifespan of individuals How to use your genetic profile to stay up to date on the latest cures as they happen Dr. Eifrig shares how he and his team evaluate a healthcare company in order to determine its investment potential  How macroeconomic turmoil affects the healthcare industries How The Living Cure works by using your own cells to cure diseases Dr. Eifrig shares how he got into the wine business Connect with Dr. David Eifrig Dr. Eifrig on the Biggest Opportunity He Has Ever Seen in Any Market Dr. Eifrig on LinkedIn Connect with Addison Wiggin Consilience Financial Be sure to follow The Wiggin Sessions on your socials. You can find me on— Facebook @thewigginsessions Instagram @thewigginsessions Twitter @WigginSessions Resources Stansberry Research Retirement Trader Retirement Millionaire Prosperity Investor The Living Cure Eifrig Cellars LLC Illumina Editas Medicine Bill Bonner— The Crisis That Could Bring Down the American Empire Share the Wiggin Sessions on Apple Podcasts

The Regenerative Real Estate Podcast
Rainwater Harvesting with Jesse Savou

The Regenerative Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 70:58


Jesse Savou is the founder of the BlueBarrel Rainwater Catchment System. Her company offers people across the United States the opportunity to restore the natural hydrological  cycle that modern developments and hard pavements have disrupted. They provide a kit with all the parts and instructions that anyone can use to build their own system.  And, most critically, they connect customers with suppliers of recycled blue barrels used to store rainwater. Jesse and show host Neal discuss her path to starting BlueBarrel, including a false start in the corporate world which did not share her values, a formative experience in the AmeriCorps program, and a chance encounter with surplus 55 gallon blue drums sitting on a farm in Sonoma County, California. With so much attention placed on decarbonization, electrification, and energy efficiency, Jesse's company is placing a spotlight on an essential, and sometimes forgotten aspect of sustainability—water. For more information, visit bluebarrelsystems.com.

The Black Wine Guy Experience
Funny girl. How Morét Brealynn is Having Fun Making Serious Wines.

The Black Wine Guy Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 92:45


MJ's guest today is the Owner and Winemaker of Morét Brealynn Wines, Morét Brealynn. A boutique winery in Sonoma County with a focus on Pinot Noir and supporting animal shelters. In this episode, MJ and Moret discuss growing up in the Central Valley. Work-life in the non-profit sector. Animal rescue and Catceanera's. Tina Fey, Pete Buttigieg, and making world-class Pinot Noir along the California Coast. A huge thank you to Morét Brealynn! Follow her on IG at @moretbrealynnwinesCheck out her website: https://moretbrealynnwines.com/This episode's in studio wines:2021 Morét Brealynn Russian River Valley Sonoma County Pinot Noir 2021 Morét Brealynn Lakeview Vineyard Russian River Valley Pinot Noir_____________________________________________________________Until next time, cheers to the mavericks, philosophers, deep thinkers, and wine drinkers! Don't forget to subscribe and be sure to give The Black Wine Guy Experience a five-star review on whichever platform you listen to.For insider info from MJ and exclusive content from the show sign up at Blackwineguy.comFollow MJ @blackwineguy Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Stable Connections the Podcast
Episode 54: Dustin Smart

Stable Connections the Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 32:06


Dustin Smart, a local Sonoma County farrier and musician talks to us about how he successfully does both. Enjoy! Dustin's Links: https://www.facebook.com/dustin.m.smart https://www.instagram.com/dustin.m.smart/

ON THE ROAD with Chuck Cramer
A Sonoma County Girl, Russian River Valley Pinot Noir, Father knows best, the Peace Corps and interview with Heidi von der Mehden, winemaker, Merry Edwards Winery & Vineyards, Russian River Valley in Sonoma.

ON THE ROAD with Chuck Cramer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 51:41


A Sonoma County Girl, Russian River Valley Pinot Noir, Father knows best, the Peace Corps and interview with Heidi von der Mehden, winemaker, Merry Edwards Winery & Vineyards, Russian River Valley in Sonoma. ON THE ROAD with mrCAwine is about California's cool, aspirational lifestyle and awesome wines hosted by Chuck Cramer, a California native, living in London and is the Director of European sales & marketing, Terlato Wines. This is a wine journey covering the hottest topics in the business of California wine, chatting along the way with the people who work in wine, and make it all happen. This week's episode includes an interview with Heide von der Mehden, winemaker, MJeff Hinchliffe, winemaker, Hanna Winery & Vineyards, Russian River Valley in Sonoma. 

SLOW FLOWERS with Debra Prinzing
Episode 583: Farm and Studio Visit with Farmer-Florist Daniele Strawn of JoLee Blooms & Design in Sonoma County, California

SLOW FLOWERS with Debra Prinzing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 34:11


Today you will hear my interview with Daniele Strawn of JoLee Blooms & Design. In addition to our Q&A conversation, you are in for a treat, because Daniele shared two video tours that you’ll see in the YouTube video above. The video episode begins with a field and studio tour, recorded by Emma Wood and […] The post Episode 583: Farm and Studio Visit with Farmer-Florist Daniele Strawn of JoLee Blooms & Design in Sonoma County, California appeared first on Slow Flowers Podcast with Debra Prinzing.

Italian Wine Podcast
Ep. 1150 Kayla Winter | Get Us Market Ready With Italian Wine People

Italian Wine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 39:44


Welcome to Episode 1150 in which Steve Raye interviews Kayla Winter, in this installment of Get US Market Ready With Italian Wine People, on the Italian Wine Podcast. About today's guest: A Sonoma County native, Kayla Winter has a Bachelor of Science Degree in Enology and Viticulture from Cornell University. After 10 years in traditional wine at reputable wineries such as Chalk Hill, Raymond, and Paul Hobbs, she was hired by BevZero to apply traditional winemaking skills to the, at the time, struggling no and low alcohol segment in the US. Since then she has helped over 20 brands bring products into market through dealcoholization and product development services. In her spare time Kayla loves gardening, tending to her chickens, and playing Dungeons and Dragons. To learn more visit: Website: www.bevzero.com Instagram: @thenonalcwinemaker Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kayla-marie-winter/ More about the host Steve Raye: Steve Raye of Bevology Inc originally joined our weekly lineup with narrations from his book “How to get US Market Ready” - but everyone just loved him so much, we brought him back with this series of interviews that informs and inspires! Each week he speaks to industry professionals; guests who have gained valuable experience in the Italian wine sector and have insightful tips and stories that can help anyone who wants to learn about getting US Market Ready! To learn more visit: Website: www.bevologyinc.com/ Let's keep in touch! Follow us on our social media channels: Instagram @italianwinepodcast Facebook @ItalianWinePodcast Twitter @itawinepodcast Tiktok @MammaJumboShrimp LinkedIn @ItalianWinePodcast If you feel like helping us, donate here www.italianwinepodcast.com/donate-to-show/ Until next time, Cin Cin!

The Accelerators Podcast
"Small Virus": On Community Practice with Anna Paulsson

The Accelerators Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 57:51


The Accelerators (Dr. Anna Laucis, Matt Spraker, and Simul Parikh) use a "small viral" tweet as a seed for discussion about technology, inequity, and community practice.  This week, we host Dr. Anna Paulsson, a community Radiation Oncologist practicing in Sonoma County, California. Recently, she wondered whether the celebration of technology in #RadOnc is furthering inequity in our field. We discuss messaging from societies and conferences to the general public, the role of industry, the PPS-exempt cancer hospitals program, and how medical education might improve with greater access to community practice physicians. Podcast art generously donated by Dr. Danielle Cunningham. Intro and Outro music generously donated by Emmy-award winning artist Lucas Cantor Santiago.The Accelerators Podcast is a Photon Media production. 

Santa Rosa Press Democrat podcasts
Five years after Tubbs Fire, Mark West Springs neighbors forced to flee united by grief, change

Santa Rosa Press Democrat podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 23:18


Press Democrat reporters Mary Callahan and Kerry Benefield talk about the survivors' harrowing stories from the Mark West neighborhood during the Tubbs Fire in Sonoma County 2017 and how you move on from that. They talk about gaining trust as a reporter with people who have gone through the most devastating experiences. About dispatchers working through the night of the fire knowing their own homes were burning down and stories from first responders still wishing they could have done more.     

Transform It Forward
Dousing the flames: reducing wildfire risk | John Clarke Mills

Transform It Forward

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 20:24


Most entrepreneurs will agree that the best ideas are born out of a genuine need to solve a problem. Necessity is the mother of invention, and if you're facing a challenge, there's a good chance there are others who have encountered the same issue. For John Clarke Mills, CEO and Co-Founder of Watch Duty, it was the need for more information about the wildfires that were raging around the ranch he had just bought in Sonoma County, California. It was this pain point that led him to launch the company, which is operated by experienced fire reporters and many other collaborators who diligently monitor radio scanners and other data sources 24 hours a day to keep people updated in real time. In this episode, Paul sits down with John to pick his brain on Watch Duty, how it works, and the company's plans for the future. During their conversation, they discuss everything from how to keep an edge against the competition to finding your purpose in life as an entrepreneur. Interested in learning more about the show? Check out our website: https://www.transformitforward.com/

Stable Connections the Podcast
Episode 53: Jordan Rohanna

Stable Connections the Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 46:07


Jordan Rohanna opens up about her experience starting her Dressage program in Sonoma County and some struggles she's had along the way. Enjoy! Jordan's Links: https://www.facebook.com/Rohan-Dressage-168893993181650/ https://www.instagram.com/rohan_dressage/

Vino101
VinoWeek - Episode 71 - Wine Tastings Making a Comeback

Vino101

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022


A recent article by Colman Andrews titled Paradise Lost: The Flame Out of Napa Valley's Iconic Wine Country raised a number of eyebrows in Northern California. The article's main themes being that the Valley's growth has lessened its charm and that corporatization has made visits to Napa Wineries too expensive for most people.I just recently attended the 18th annual Wine & Spirits Top 100 tasting at the City View at Metreon in San Francisco. This was the first public wine tasting I have attended in several years (we all know why) and that reluctance to attend public events was the sentiment of so many other attendees that I met and talked with over the evening. I offer some observations of how public wine tastings are changing and for the most part for the better. Peg Melnik pens a nice piece highlighting pioneering Italian winegrowers in Sonoma County. Not everybody is selling out. It's refreshing to see these families holding onto their traditions and successfully passing the business of winemaking onto their descendants. Bill and I discuss these items and more in this week's addition of VinoWeek. Thanks to everyone for listening. Cheers! Our wine recommendation this week is the 2017 Vigneti Massa Derthona. Derthona is the age-old name of Tortona, a village in southeast Piedmont, in the northwest region of Italy. Derthona is Timorasso, a grape that had all but been abandoned until Walter Massa recognized its potential to make compelling wines. Up until the eighties Timarasso vines had been pulled and replanted with Cortese and Chardonnay which were easier to sell and more popular at the time. Massa began working with Timorasso vineyards he could find and also began planting new Timorasso vineyards in the eighties and nineties. This 100%Timorasso is a mix of several vineyards around the village of Monleale, although it should be noted that Massa also produces three vineyard designated Timorasso bottlings. It's fermented using indigenous yeast, receives skin contact for 48 to 60 hours beforehand and battonage after fermentation in stainless steel and concrete vats. He holds the wine for six months after bottling as Timorasso can be quite shy and unexpressive when young. With bottle age it comes around and begins to display its powerful and concentrated flavors. In the glass the color is a bright vibrant gold. The aromas show yellow fruit, honeyed almonds and beeswax. On the palate more of the afore mention flavors the wine is intensely rich and unctuous with surprising freshness and acidity and a medium length finish. Given the substantial structure of this wine I suggest you pair it with rich chicken and pork dishes or fondue. When Massa started this rediscovery of Timorasso there were just a handful of hectares planted. Today there are more than 150 hectares planted in the Colli Tortonesi DOC (Tortona hills). This is a wine you will probably have to hunt down. Unless you're working with a specialty wine retailer you'll have to source it over the internet. Having said that if your your looking for a new distinctive high quality wine to experience and learn about then don't miss out on Walter Massa's Derthona. 13.5% alc 5,000 cases $32 - $39

Grab A Glass With David Thomas

On this episode of 'Grab A Glass', DT chats about how he subconsciously spoke this career into existence and details the power of the tongue and thought.

Sonic Artifacts
Interview Series: Dan Ford Drums

Sonic Artifacts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 43:46


We are very excited this week to sit down with Dan Ford of Dan Ford Drums for our Interview Series!  The first drum builder we have had on, Dan builds out of Sonoma County, California.  Combining his lifelong love of drums and 20 years of woodworking he makes beautifully articulate sounding and looking handmade kits. Danforddrums.com@danforddrumsSupport the show@sonic_artifactslinktr.ee/sonicartifactsSonicArtifactsShow@gmail.com

Líderes del Futuro
COVID and Info on Elections

Líderes del Futuro

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 7:19


We provide an update in COVID cases in Sonoma County and break the numbers of unvaccinated individuals by ethnicity and age. Lots of individuals are still unvaccinated and therefore, we must use our mask, wash our hands frequently and keep our distance during indoor activities. #covid #covid19 #togethertowardshealth #juntxshacialasalud #sonomacounty --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rafael-vazquez7/support

Helping Families Be Happy
Grandparents During the Holidays with Lindsey McDivitt

Helping Families Be Happy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 25:22


On today's episode of the “Helping Families Be Happy” podcast, host Dr. Carla Marie Manley, talks with Lindsey McDivitt about her enchanting and fabulous new book – “Christmas Fairies for Ouma”. This book shares Christmas joy and celebrates the love between a grandparent and a grandchild.   Episode Highlights 01:35 – Lindsey says that this is her first fiction book however previously she was a healthcare professional where she worked with stroke survivors and their families to provide education and support. 03:45 – “Christmas Fairies for Ouma” is all about loving, kindness, connection, long distance, and the importance of really embracing our loved ones. 06:00 - For Lindsey, spending Christmases far away from loved ones resonates so much with her that in this holiday season it is time to reach out as real letters are so precious. 10:30 – Lindsey recalls how they used to celebrate Christmas in South Africa stating they used to sit around the Christmas holiday dinner table while two people used to pull on the paper crackers. Then she also reminisces how everybody had to wear those paper crowns at the table and they all looked ridiculous. 11:30 – Dr. Carla asks Lindsey about what they ate on Christmas day in South Africa. 15:34 – “You're making me think of another way to communicate with grandparents is the old thing of sending thank you cards right after Christmas.”, says Dr. Carla. 17:00 – Dr. Carla tells Lindsey to give the listeners an idea of other than the back matter what is inside of “Christmas Fairies for Ouma” looks like. 18:25 - The grandmother in this story has a personality, mainly through the art illustrations. 20:30 – Lindsey says that we should, especially at Christmas time not just be talking about the message of kindness but sitting together the adult and a child, and reading a picture book is such a loving engrossing activity on its own. 21:00 - This book more than qualifies as a most precious book for parents, aunts, uncles, grandmas, and grandpas. 22:00 – Dr. Carla says, talking about the power storybooks definitely when you have someone in your life who has suffered from a stroke just sitting down and reading with them, or receiving a card in the mail, makes all the difference in stroke recovery. 23:44 – Dr. Carla states that she was listening to a podcast the other day where the millennial generation is already feeling the pressure of aging and they're all 30 years old. Three Key Points Lindsey says that nowadays long-distance grandparents have a lot more tools like video and telephone calls but they never had any of that. They just had letters and occasional visits so that bond is so strong. The target audience for this book is around ages four to eight. Lindsey thinks it will reach a broader audience because she knows that many of her friends are new grandparents and they're all very taken with the story whether they live close to their grandchildren or live far away. During Christmas, this message of kindness, reaching out, and connecting with loved ones is important.  One part of this book that most people don't realize is there's also a learning aspect apart from learning the power of kindness. The book is based partially in South Africa where Lindsey's grandparents were and some talks a little bit about South Africa and the way Christmas is celebrated there. Since South Africa is in the southern hemisphere, so it's Christmas in the middle of summer. it's quite different from where she spent most of her growing-up years and snowy Minnesota. So the book just juxtaposes those two parts of the world and those two seasons. Although this is a picture book for a very young age, it gives a little bit of information about how South Africa has changed and transitioned from a very racist apartheid society where the racists were kept separate by the white government, and how that changed after President Nelson Mandela became the first democratically elected president by all races back in 1994.   Tweetable Quotes “I was in healthcare for a long time but started writing children's books about 10 years ago.” - Lindsey McDivitt “So many people could benefit from more support around stroke because it is a life-changing situation.” - Dr. Carla Marie Manley “Even though I only saw my grandparents about every three years, I remain close to them, thanks to letters.” - Lindsey McDivitt “I don't know if it's the same in your area but our blue mailboxes in Sonoma County have all but disappeared, they've taken them off of streets, corners, downtown, and sidewalks.” - Dr. Carla Marie Manley “I'm going to share some information about South African celebrations.” - Lindsey McDivitt “Even though it's middle of summer, at least my family would still have a hot meal like roast beef, potatoes, and big Christmas pudding like the steamed pudding.” - Lindsey McDivitt “Whether or not we received a gift from somebody what a perfect opportunity to send a card, especially a handmade one that says thanks for being in my life.” - Dr. Carla Marie Manley “To see the title of Christmas fairies for Omen comes from the actual card has fairies on it, and it goes all the way across the world.” - Lindsey McDivitt “It hardly matters what the book is exactly, but I know that as adults at Christmas time, we want to read cozy Christmas tales.” - Lindsey McDivitt   Resources Mentioned Helping Families be Happy Podcast  Apple Lindsey McDivitt: Website Instagram Twitter    Podcast Editing

Essential Ingredients Podcast
016: Plant-Based Probiotics for a Healthier Gut and a Happier Planet with Ryan Johnston

Essential Ingredients Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 27:36


"We, as food brands, can do better. We can deliver higher quality products. We can work with fresher ingredients that are better sourced." -Ryan Johnston   The trend of going plant-based is powerful for many reasons. For one, it promotes gut health. Our gut microbiome is made up of trillions of bacteria that play a crucial role in digestion, immunity, and overall health.    Diet is a major modifiable factor that influences the composition of the gut microbiota. Unfortunately, the modern diet and lifestyle are major contributing factors to an imbalanced gut microbiome. On the other hand, a plant-based diet is rich in fiber and phytonutrients, which promote a healthy gut microbiome.    Biotic Ferments is a company that was built for this reason. Being a social purpose company, Biotic Ferments have taken their game to the next level by using USDA Certified Organic ingredients that are regeneratively sourced. They also use renewable sources in their production, practice zero food waste, use 70% recycled glass with BPA-free lids, and avoid using refined sugar in their products. Most importantly, they do not sacrifice taste as they believe that food should be a source of joy and satisfaction.    In this episode, Justine sits with Biotic Ferments co-founder and CEO, Ryan Johnston. Justine and Ryan discuss how to weave tradition into innovation, what regenerative agriculture means and how to practice it at home and in business, how to run a food brand that touches people, what it takes to run a family business,  and the secret to creating products with better flavor and higher quality. Meet Ryan: Ryan is the co-founder and CEO of Biotic Brands, a family-owned social purpose beverage company. He grew up in west Sonoma County where his love for living systems had grown over the years.    Ryan also serves as the Strategic Advisor at Landscape Carbon Calculator, Orchard Manager and Cidemaker at Ethic Ciders, and the Chair of the Board of Directors at Daily Acts Organization, where he also met his lovely wife, Kellen.    When he's not working, Ryan spends his time fly fishing, backpacking, foraging, gardening, and cooking. Ryan and Kellen now live in Sebastopol.    Website Instagram LinkedIn Connect with NextGen Purpose: Website Facebook Instagram  YouTube Linkedin Episode Highlights: 01:20 Expanding KVASS 05:29 Building Relationships Around Food 09:14 What is Regenerative Agriculture 13:35 The Role of Food Brands 18:49 Passion for Flavor and Quality 25:12 Catering to People's Tastes

Santa Rosa Press Democrat podcasts
Generation Disaster

Santa Rosa Press Democrat podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 24:49


Sonoma County children who were in kindergarten when the 2017 wildfires blazed have barely known a school year without major disruptions, such as the pandemic and the wildfires. In our ongoing series, Press Democrat Deputy Editor Brett Wilkison and Senior Investigative Reporter Martin Espinoza talk about Generation Disaster, and the impact of the 2017 wildfires on these children who are now fifth graders.       

The Black Wine Guy Experience
Eyes Of The World. Sam Coturri on Family, Farming and Life on The Mountain.

The Black Wine Guy Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 98:50


MJ's guest today is Proprietor of Sonoma's Winery Sixteen 600 and co-host of the highly regarded The Winemakers Pod Sam Cotturi. In this episode, MJ and Sam talk about Sam's early days growing up in the Moon Mountain District of Sonoma County. His life as the son of an organic farming pioneer. Joining the family business and launching a boutique label with an industry legend. They discuss everything from Hippies, Hip-Hop and Podcast Host Life. Go ahead and grab a glass and get ready to see grapes from a different view. A huge thank you to Sam Cotturi! Follow him on IG at @grapeswithaview and @sixteen600 @winemakerspodCheck out his website: https://www.winerysixteen600.com/Check out his podcast: https://radiomisfits.com/podcasts/thewinemakers/This episode's in studio wine:2018 Á DEUX TÊTES Rossi Ranch Sonoma Valley Grenache2021 Sixteen 600 Mixed Whites (Cans)2021 Sixteen 600 Primitivo Rosé (Cans)_____________________________________________________________Until next time, cheers to the mavericks, philosophers, deep thinkers, and wine drinkers! Don't forget to subscribe and be sure to give The Black Wine Guy Experience a five-star review on whichever platform you listen to.For insider info from MJ and exclusive content from the show sign up at Blackwineguy.comFollow MJ @blackwineguy Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Helping Families Be Happy
Healing Together with Matthew Winner

Helping Families Be Happy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 48:51


In today's episode of the “Helping Families Be Happy” podcast, host Dr. Carla Marie Manly, a practicing Clinical Psychologist, Wellness Advocate, and Author based in Sonoma County, California talks with guest Matthew Winner, a Head Podcaster for A Kids Book Company where he leads the company in creating a podcast network dedicated to helping kids. They talk about his journey as a kid and what it takes in the circumstance to repair the harm that was caused to him Episode Highlights 01:40 – Matthew says he is a great fan of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - CBT and loves that he can reflect and see where he was in his childhood and applies it to where he is now. 04:00 – Dr. Carla says that they are not blaming or shaming anyone, they are simply saying, there are things that you can do in your life to ensure yourself or your family are happier. 05:15 - The breakthrough for Matthew was a book that his therapist introduced to called Hold Me Tight by Dr. Sue Johnson. 07:00 - The beauty of attachment is that we can create secure attachment. We can create it no matter how old we are. 10:40 – Matthew mentions that wherever we are, in our life journey, it's liberating to say that the class was doing the best they could, just that they didn't know better.  12:40 – Dr. Carla asks Matthew to explain ‘Restorative Justice' to the listeners. 15:20 -  Restorative Justice work is to repair the harm so that we can look at the action that happened and say that it was wrong, but the individual is not a good or bad person. They are a person who committed this action while being aware of it. 17:10 – Dr. Carla tells Matthew that he mirrors what he said, he looks at the harm done, no blame, no shame but he addresses the person injured so that they can come from a place of empowerment and cure for the long-term. 19:20 – Matthew thinks that there's a lot of value there to healing together for them to say, that both the persons that were harmed and the person that is responsible for the harm can both be hurting and both need to heal. 21:24 - When Matthew takes that thing that he practices with Dr. Cara and applies it to talk to his parents or wife or kids or colleagues. He can start breaking down the fear or resistance around them because he has already got a notch on his belt from doing it in therapy. 22:39 - If we're practicing healthy loving skills in a safe family, then we can go out and practice them, at school, in friendships, or at work too. 25:30 – Matthew thinks that the reason why he has been working with children for so long is that it is incredibly humbling where he just learns and learns. They are exceptional at exposing his insecurities. 27:40 - A way we protect ourselves is by pushing others away, fighting, and by trying to make sure that no one causes us further harm. 29:40 – Matthew reveals that their kids' podcasts have a podcast on emotions in coalition with young children and their grownups in part about destigmatizing therapy but also about allowing ourselves to feel big emotions. 31:00 - The work that they do in their Kids Co. is they say kids are ready and they make things for kids to talk about, says Matthew. 32:00 – Matthew mentions that the fact that he can see adults trying to protect him in his life, is what draws him to different hosts about the different podcasts that we have. 34:10 – Matthew suggests empowering children by giving them the language that they understand. If this is the word for that thing, then explain it to them, but don't call it something else. That is a piece of currency that they'll use to navigate the world, so deny them that tool. 35:55 – Dr. Carla does love all of the principles that Matthew has been bringing about on how to empower children and see them as unique individuals who are innately wise. 36:50 – Matthew says all the adults that maybe weren't there for him, how would they have ever known that 30 years later he would be an adult that could be here for him? 38:30 – Matthew wants to make sure that we all agree to learn together and to take on that position of learner. Three Key Points Matthew says that this indigenous practice of repairing harm, where harm was caused not seeking to punish but seeking to acknowledge that we are part of a community and as a community, we all need to be able to move forward together so being able to ask what it takes in this circumstance to repair the harm that was caused for Matthew. Between that repairing harm and working hard to see the best in people, to be able to love his parents and say, they were doing the best. They could and love them in a different way now and say he needs them to continue to do the best that they can and Matthew also will try to do the best that he can. In the classroom community, they all become much more self-aware, as well as class aware that they are an ecosystem that they are all feeding off one another. Similarly, in the justice system, all of us in this community/society are just part of a fishbowl we're all part of a singular ecosystem that affects everything. We must recognize that we siblings can heal each other and also that it can go upward that my kids can heal me, making sure that I am communicating with them. Dr. Carla says that when we look at Maslow's hierarchy of needs, first and foremost comes Safety. We want to be safe, and we want to be loved because we are truly and deeply loved in the most beautiful sense of the word. We know we are safe because someone who truly loves us might make mistakes, but they won't purposefully harm us. Let's talk about sexual abuse from the age of five because around two to five children by the age of 5 or 10 will have an experience with it and the number is huge. So instead, why wouldn't we talk about this? Matthew states that he was a victim of sexual abuse, and it took him up to the age of 36 to be able to through therapy and notify authorities. It was past time, there was nothing that the state of Pennsylvania could do at that point. Tweetable Quotes “I think that I've really pushed up against this notion that our parents did the best they could.” - Matthew Winner “We didn't have parents who knew anything about attachment. They didn't know how to create secure attachment.” - Dr. Carla Marie Manly “I'm not judging any of the pupil's choices, it's just realizing that sometimes in life we don't do our best.” - Dr. Carla Marie Manly “You can't change other people; you can only change yourself.” - Matthew Winner “You said one of my favorite words Fishbowl and another favorite, which is Ecosystem, right?” - Dr. Carla Marie Manly “Children are exceptional in exposing our shortcomings, and our sensitivities.” - Dr. Carla Marie Manly “We have a kids' podcast about current events and about big topics like school shootings and racism and things like that and all of it.” - Matthew Winner “I have come to understand that there's no way in my childhood that I wasn't communicating to my parents my needs.” - Matthew Winner “Don't talk down to your children, talk up to your children. It is such a beautiful statement.” - Dr. Carla Marie Manly

Sonoma County : A Community Portrait
SOCO Pod Ep 11 Owner Of Hot Couture Vintage Marta Koehne

Sonoma County : A Community Portrait

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 104:48


Comfortably dressed Marta Koehne has stood as a pillar of the Sonoma County fashion scene for 40 years, nearly as long as the vintage business has existed. Most days you can find her in her store Hot Couture Vintage on Rail Road Square where she has collected one of the smartest sets of vintage clothing to be had in the whole North Bay. This despite rapid turn over of her stock and the ever turning fashion and business cycles. Hear how she has survived and thrived as a local small business owner and vintage buyer, about assessing clothing, the modern history of fashion, assessing fashion trends, the transformative power of fashion, the surprisingly tender moments in both buying estate clothing and dressing people,  shop parties, and mentoring and supplying generations of Sonoma County's hippest denizens. Listen and appreciate this true Sonoma County Legend!WEBSITE : https://www.instagram.com/hotcouturevtg/

THE WONDER: Science-Based Paganism

Remember, we welcome comments, questions and suggested topics at thewonderpodcastQs@gmail.com   S3E36 TRANSCRIPT:----more----     Yucca: Welcome back to the Wonder Science Based Paganism. I'm one of your hosts, Yucca  Mark: I'm the other one, Mark. Yucca: and today we are talking about ancestors. So it's an appropriate time of year for that, I think any time of year, but as we approach what some people call Halloween Hollow sa. This is something that's on a lot of people's minds. Mark: Right, Right. This is the time of year when we think about those who are departed, who are no longer with us. And as well as contemplating our own mortalities we talked about last week. Yucca: Mm-hmm. Mark: And it's a good time to sort of sit with who are our ancestors? Who do we, you know, who do we feel connected to in the way of ancestry? And then of course to have observances at this time of year. Vary from culture to culture, but it's very frequent that at this time of year people are doing some sort of the des MUTOs or some other kind of acknowledgement of relatives who have passed on or, or other ancestral recognitions. So the next thing for us to think about really is what do we mean when we talk about an ancestor, right? I mean, it's kind of a fuzzy word. Maybe we should start by exploring how ancestor. Observance veneration recognition fits into paganism as a whole. And maybe where some of that comes from. I mean, one of the theories that I find pretty credible, honestly as a non theist Pagan one of the questions we have to ask ourselves is, where did these ideas of Gods come from, Yucca: Mm-hmm. Mark: Because they're all over the place. and one of the prevailing theories for where the Gods came from is that they were originally stories about ancestors. They were stories about heroic activities or other other personality traits of particular figures from history that were actually real people, right. And then their stories got more and more embellished over time until, you know, the guy who did a great job on the Mastodon hunt ends up throwing lightning bolts from the sky. You know, that's kind of the way, it's the way human storytelling works. Yucca: Yeah. And I think that it's, it's easy for us to forget how long we've been around for. Mark: Yeah. Yucca: On the one hand it's very short in, in kind of the grand scheme of things, but how many generations of humans there's been, And then of course we'll get into this later, but the, you know, before we were even humans, so how many, you know, 20, 30, just for that transformation, The Mastodon hunt to, you know, lightning bolts, but there's, we're talking hundreds, thousands of generations of people telling stories. Mark: Right, and it's not like they only tell them once a generation, This is one of the reasons why culture and technology. Evolves so much more quickly than biology does, right? Because those are informational and information can, can morph really quickly. Yucca: Did you ever play the the game telephone? Mark: Oh yeah. Yucca: Right. That's a really fun one to do, and you, that's, you watch that happen every day, with in real time, real life. But it's just such a great, even with a small group of people for anyone who's not familiar, you have one person tells somebody, whisper. This is great with a group of kids, whisper something to the next person and then they whisper it to the person next to them, next to them, and then at the end, the last person says it out loud. And you see how much it changed from the first person to the last person. Mark: Right, and this is when they're trying to get it. Right. Everybody is trying to transfer the information correctly, and even with a small group, a small little circle of people, what comes out at the end can be really hilariously different than what was originally said to the first person. Yucca: Right. Mark: You know, Yucca: what you're, with, what you're talking about, when we do it on lifetimes with stories that have emotional meanings to people, you know, It's going to change based on the teller, but what's happening in the lives of these people at the time, the stage of their life. I mean, so much changes over just a lifetime. But then over cultures, as those cultures evolve and change, Mark: Sure, Sure. Yeah. I mean, when you think about it, it's like maybe the guy with the Mastodon who turned into the hurler of lightning bolts from the sky. Maybe that particular figures story doesn't have anything. It doesn't have anything particular to do with getting through times that are hard and adversity and that kind of thing. But when there are times of adversity, you can bet somebody will make up a story about that figure that has to do with how they survived hard times because people need that story then, and we create the stories we need in order to get through the times we. Yucca: Right. Or not even, you know, just completely make it up, but slightly shift a little bit of the interpretation of the previous version of the story and not even know that they're doing it Mark: Sure. Yeah, exactly. And, and there's nothing there's nothing devious about it. It's, it's not like anybody, you know, ever probably intended to deceive anybody. But these stories evolve. They evolve to become the stories we need. Right? And that, that's the nature of human storytelling. You know, we can see that in the kinds of movies that get produced. We can see it in the kinds of books that are popular. They are, they are the stories that are needed at that particular time. Yucca: Yeah. So I like that idea a lot. I think it's probably not the only part to it, but I think it's a, an interesting component, right. Mark: Mm-hmm. Yucca: I think that there's also a that this, the honoring of, of ancestors and even as far as ancestor worship is something very common throughout the world. There's lots of different groups that do it, and I think some of that comes from simply a place of originally of, of gratitude and recognition of how much we have received from. Whoever ancestors are, which we should talk about in a moment, but that, you know that we come from them and they worked hard, and without their hard work, we wouldn't be here. Mark: Right, Yucca: Literally, very, very literally would not be here, Mark: Sure. So that gratitude in that veneration is deserved. Yucca: Mm-hmm. Mark: There are also darker aspects to it, For example, Plugging people into a system of ancestor veneration is a pretty good way to keep them obedient to their family. Yucca: It is. Mark: It's a way, it's a way for their, their particular clan group or familial structure, whatever it is, to have a lot of influence over their lives. And what ends up happening in cultures that have very strong traditions of ancestor veneration is of course, that the elderly hold tremendous amounts of. Yucca: Mm-hmm. Mark: they're on their wage boards becoming ancestors. Yucca: Mm-hmm. or are depending on how you are looking at an ancestor. Right. They're not, they're not gone yet, but they are those who came before. Right. You know, I don't know if you, I'm guessing you probably were told many times as a kid, respect your elders. Right. That's something pretty common in our, our culture. Mark: I don't know that I was encouraged to respect anybody rather than my father when I was a kid. But I'm, I'm an Yucca: you didn't, didn't have any, you know, folks who lived on the same street as you, who got mad when you. You know, doing something loud or talking back to a teacher or something like that. And we're told to respect, We're told to respect your elders. Mark: Oh, I imagine. I probably was, I just can't think of an example right now. Yucca: We just didn't take it serious. They just forgot it. Mark: Well, yeah, it's, for whatever reason, I'm just not, I'm not remembering an instance of that right now. Yucca: Maybe it's a regional thing as well. Mark: Could be. Yeah, it could be. But when I was a kid you still called adults, Mr. And Miss and Mrs. And that's how you were introduced to them. Yucca: Well, that's still a regional thing though. Mark: is it? Yucca: Yeah, that's, I think that has to do with what part of the, at least, at least within the United States, what part of the country you're in.  Mark: So ancestors very important part of the practice of many Pagan traditions particularly at this time of year. But we should talk more about what we think of when we individually, what you and I think of when we think of ancestors and what our orientation to those is. You wanna start? Yucca: Yeah, I mean this is, this is a. Interesting area cuz we can go in a couple of different directions with it. One is you know, my line of the people who made me right. So we can start with, Okay. My parents, their parents, their parents on and on back. And I tend to think of my ancestors as being anyone who was in that line. There's only. Who's alive out of that? So my father's alive my mother and all four grandparents, et cetera. You know, they're not but I kind of still think of my father as being, you know, one of my ancestors. I wouldn't, I wouldn't say necessarily he's one of my ancestors, right? One of the ancestors but I also think about that going beyond. The humans Mark: Mm-hmm. Yucca: if we go far enough back then my grandmothers weren't human, Mark: Mm-hmm. Yucca: We go back and we were, some were still apes, some other kind of ape. Before that we weren't apes and keep going, you know, we were little furry creatures curring around when the asteroid hit and keep going back and back and fish. Mark: fish. Yucca: And all the way back to what gets called Luca, right? The last universal common ancestor. But actually that's the last universal. That doesn't mean that that was the start, right? And I, I just really love thinking about how there is an unbroken chain of life. You know, there's all of these arguments going on about when life starts and all of that and, but life hasn't stopped. I mean, it will eventually. Right. We talked about that. Right? Like it's gonna stop in me, but the, but, but the cells that are me were made out of the cell. Out of a cell that was in my mother. That and her cells were made and her mother made in another and just keep, It's just so amazing to think about. It's just kept going and going and it's not had my consciousness in it, Mark: Right. Yucca: but it's been there. Mark: It's like a relay race lighting torches, right? You know, you run a certain distance with this torch and then you light the torch of the next runner, and that runner keeps going until they get to the next runner. So asking the question, when is, when did the fire start? Becomes a really thorny issue, right? It's like, well, my fire started in 1962, but the fire started a long, long, long, long way before that. Yucca: But did it start in 62? Like that's, you know, because what is the, you that started, I mean, you were born in 62, right? But what is the you part of that? Like, are you, you know, was you the, the egg that was in your grandmother? Right. The egg that you, that ended up becoming you. Your mother was born with that. Mark: That's right. Yucca: Right. You know, so going back with that, but, but that was her right? Or was it you? You know, all of that. But that's where I love that, how blurry it becomes where the identities just a blur. And I know some people are gonna have very strong feelings about the answer to that. About, no, you are this moment or that moment, or you know, and in Mark: mostly out of a desire to control people and take away women's autonomy. Let us Yucca: yeah, let's be that, That's definitely one of the, the major factors right now. But, but for me, setting all of that whole very important side of it aside for a moment, there's this blurry line of this, this continuation of. Life and beings who, who have come to this moment. That's me. But it's also, I, I get very inspired and kind of delighted thinking about, oh, well I'm part of that though. I'm a, I'm gonna be an, I'm gonna be one of the ancestors, right? Life continues and. We know long after I'm gone, there's presumably, right, We never know what, what the future actually holds, but presumably there's gonna be thousands of people, millions that I'm an ancestor to, and that's kind of inspiring. Mark: Yeah. Of course that isn't true of me because I'm not having children.  Yucca: Well, that. On a genetic level. But on a cultural level, that's another thing to explore with the idea of ancestor, right? Mark: Right. Yucca: ancestors, not necessarily dna. Mark: right. And that's, that's something that is very true of my practice when I, when I think about, you know, venerating. People or features of the past. I, for one thing, I go directly to what you talk about in the way of thinking about, you know, very early evolution and you know, the tetrapods that flopped up onto land and, you know, all those kind of wonderful steps that life has made on its way and venerating all of that, but also about, Figures from history that I find admirable and worthy of emulation. And I may not be in any way related to them on a genetic level, but I still feel like culturally they've influenced me. And so they qualify as ancestors and I certainly hope to be. Seen that way. You know, with the development of atheopagan and that kind of thing, I mean, it, it it doesn't need to circulate around my name at all, but if, if the ideas are worthy and people find them useful and they perpetuate, then to me that's something that's really valuable and I would feel like I was an ancestor of. Yucca: Yeah. Mmm. and the idea of ancestors. Some of us know the actual names of people going back for many generations, and some of us don't. But, but the, the concept of ancestor doesn't necessarily have to have a name attached, Right? Yeah. Mark: Right. Yeah. I mean, on my father's side, I actually know. the way back to almost the 16th century because I descend from people who are on the Mayflower and those people have been heavily researched. There's a lot of information about them. But as it happens, the particular people that I'm descended from, Were the daughter of two people who died almost instantly upon reaching the the Americas and an indentured servant So they were sort of not particularly impressive people. And as I've studied the history of the people who descend from them, there's just been this tremendous. Uninteresting nature of my family for 12 generations in the Americas. Yucca: But you. We, we often focus on, in history on like these, what we call great people, right? The great men of history, but most people simply are people and the amazing, beautiful moments in our lives. Those, those don't get written down and have stories told about them, but they're still, that's what we get. Those are the things that really, that I think really matter, right? Not necessarily that they were some great businessmen or you know, they led a war or you know, anything like that. Mark: no, I, I, I don't disagree at all, although I do find it a little appalling that nobody in my family bothered to go west. Yucca: Hmm. But do you know that? Well, nobody in your direct line, Mark: Nobody in. Well, Yucca: it branches off Mark: of course it does. Yeah. And there's a, there's a giant volume called the Greens of Plymouth Colony that, that actually goes as far as my grandfather as a baby. Yucca: Oh, Mark: in, it was published in 1913, and my grandfather is in the book as a. Yucca: Hmm. Mark: And so it has these, all these lines, all these lineages of, of the, the various greens and boswick and all the people who, you know, got involved with them. And it's just really remarkable to me. These people showed up in New England and just kinda stayed my, my grandparents made it as far as New Jersey. And then in retirement moved to Colorado and that's where my father was raised. And then he came to California. But all of that happened just in the last generation. Yucca: Mm-hmm. Mark: And it surprises me, not that I think that, you know, manifest destiny and colonialism and settling and all that kind of stuff was good cuz I don't, But were a lot of people that were taking advantage of those opportunities at that time, and none of them seemed to find it. They, they either didn't have the courage or they just didn't, They were happy where they were. Yucca: It. It seems to me like it might be tricky. I've impressed at how much you've been able to do because you do have a more common last name. So there, I would imagine that there are multiple different groups of that. All the greens in the states aren't one big family. Right. They're actually lots and lots of different families because that's a, you know last names that are colors seem like a pretty common kind of name to go to. Mark: right. I'm very fortunate that this book was published in 1913. This, this gene who was a part of the family. He researched all the birth records and the marriage records and the death records and the, I mean, he just did this exhaustive work that must have taken him decades and then published this book, and it was available as a, as a free PDF download. The whole thing was scanned as a part of what is it? Google. Google Library? Is that what it's. There's a, there's a huge free archive of books that Google has that are like, Yucca: That are in the public Mark: that are in the public domain. This book probably didn't have more than a hundred copies printed cuz it was a privately published thing. But Yucca: somebody scanned it and put it up. Mark: and there it is. And I have the pdf so I've been able to piece together a lot of things from that there. Yucca: Hmm. Mark: But it stops abruptly because there's not very much known about the first William Green. Who first who first came, He was not on the Mayflower, but he came like four years later or something like that, and then married into the Mayflower families. Yucca: Oh, cuz it the because of the changing of the names, Mark: Right, Yucca: Right? Okay. Yeah. The paternal line. Hmm. Mark: so, well, anyway, there's your tension for the day, the, the bland vanilla history of Mark Green's ancestry. The but so why don't we talk a little bit about how we fold this stuff into our observances. Yucca: Hmm. Now I, before we do, I do wanna add one other angle that we can come at Ancestry from. So we've been talking about the, the, you know, who came before. Whether that's a, like a cultural or genetic ancestor. But I think that this is a place where we can also add in the idea of what other life came before that made ours possible that isn't, you know, genetic line. That isn't something that we inherited from, but all of the life. Makes life now possible, right? When Mark: All the, the food that Yucca: the food Yeah. Every, you know, the, how many millions upon millions of living things that we have consumed, regardless of whatever your dietary choices are, we all. Other living things, right? Nobody lives on salt alone. So , that's how many lives those were. And for those lives to be the lives that had to come, that supported them. That supported them. And when, when we look around at Earth, and, and we'll talk more about this when we talk about the decomposition, but when we look out, we're used to seeing soil, right? Mark: Right. Yucca: Soil is kind of a new thing. This planet is a big rock. So soil is a mixture of, yeah, it's got rock in there, but it was made by living things and it's the bodies of living things. And from that other living things came up. And just knowing that, that the moment in life that we are in this moment of being part of Earth is. Because of, and now we're talking about the trillions upon trillions of life that each had their little moment before us to create the system that we are now part of and continuing on. Mark: Right? Yeah. And all of that to think about. It's really kind of all inspiring. As you say, we'll talk about this when we talk about decomposition in a couple of weeks, but the, the miraculous thing that life does is it takes dead stuff and turns it alive. It assembles it into things that are alive. It's alive itself and it takes dead stuff and it assembles it into stuff that's alive. And that sounds pretty simple, but when you think about it, we are still not able to do that. We, Yucca: well we do Mark: we're working on it. Yucca: we can't do it outside of the context that already is happening. Right? Because we certainly as living creatures, That's what we do. That's what we're doing when we're eating and breathing and Mark: I meant like in a laboratory, we, you know, we, we can't artificially create organisms. We can tinker with organisms, we can do all kinds of genetic modifications now. Yucca: Mm-hmm. Mark: But it still has to have that initial operating. Quality of life. Yucca: Yeah, which is just pretty amazing. Mark: It is. Yucca: And even the tinkering that we're doing is just kind of borrowing other life that does it anyways to do it Mark: Right, right. Yeah. It's, it's not like we're starting with jars of, of raw, pure chemicals and assembling. Maybe someday we'll be able to do that. Maybe someday we will be able to, Yucca: Figure that out and Mark: to assemble DNA chains from nothing. You know, just, just from plain peptides. You assemble the peptides and then you, you know, put the nucleotides with the peptides and, you know, put them all together into the proper ladder and create something. But considering how much can go wrong in genetic design, probably the thing we'll be doing more than anything else is just copying copying life that already exists rather than actually making something new. Yucca: Yeah. Mark: So, let's talk about rituals, cuz we like to talk about ritual. This is, this time of year is a great time for it. I see you have a little pumpkin back there in the back of your room, so Yucca: I do, I love penins. They, I love 'em so much. Yeah. On a tangent note, we have a trampoline and we're going to try to grow. Pumpkins underneath the trampoline in this coming year, and the kids are really excited about that. Mark: that's cool. So keeps the sun from beating on the. Yucca: yeah. And we can, we can fence it in Mark: Oh yeah. Keep all the Yucca: the Yes, because we, we'd like to you know, we want to grow to share with them as well, but they, you have to cover it up to give it long enough so that the, the Sprout can actually. Do anything. If you don't cover it up here, you know the moment those first little baby leaves poke out, then you, you come back and they're gone. So, Mark: We actually have something like that here, just on my back patio. We had a whole patch of basil and the rats love the basil, so they come and they eat all of it. We see rats out there. And Amaya gets really annoyed even though she had pet rats for years and loves the rats. But But that's outside. It's not inside. There's nothing we can do about trying to control the rat population of the greater Sonoma County area. Yucca: Hmm. Well, we, I thought, Okay, I will plant some stuff in the yard and we have to water everything. Like planting is a big commitment. And I went, Well, what am I gonna plant that the squirrels and chipmunks and all of that aren't going to eat? So, okay, I'll plant something that has a real strong smell like min. Mint is often used to keep rodents away. So we plant it, we grew 'em inside and we transplant them outside. And then like an hour later we look outside the window and they have ripped the mint up and are eating the roots and throwing away the leaves. So, Well, Okay. Mark: Barbara Yucca: we'll, we'll have to cover it. Mark: Barbara King solver writes a wonderful story about how. She and her family moved to somewhere in the southwest. I think it may have been, it may have been in New Mexico, actually. And she was putting in a garden and she had this idea that, well, okay, I'm I'll, I'll over plant everything so that there's some for the wild critters that are gonna get it, but I'll get some too. And of course all of it went. Yucca: Right Mark: Because they don't make that deal. Yucca: They don't, No. I mean, I still plant like that. What is the old, There's a whole lovely little rhyme about, it's like one for the rabbit, one for the house, one for the something, one for the mouse, or, you know, So you're supposed to plant four or five times. But yeah, you, they'll, there's just so little That is that lovely herbacious, fresh green. They just want it. Mark: Yeah. Yucca: So if you're gonna plant outside, you cover it. You have to put your little pins on it. So we still love them though. They're wonderful. We love their little drama, but that is not a ritual. So let's return to Mark: let's, Yes. Okay. This has been your tension Yucca: Yes. It's been your tangent for our episode. Yep. Mark: So. I actually have an, it may be sort of a surprise because I am not particularly invested in my personal recent lineage ancestors, but I have an underworld focus. That's a part of my, my, my focus. My alter is a bookcase, and the bottom two shelves are full of supplies, you know, lots of fancy jars and incense. Toro cards and stuff like that. The and above that is a shelf that is the underworld, and there are pictures of people that I've known who have died and cave paintings from France, you know, the old Paleolithic Cave paintings and bones, and a very high quality cast of a human skull. And my human femur. And other sort of deaf imagery, you know, stuff, skulls and bones and all that kind of stuff. And then above that I, there's a, a double high shelf. I took out one of the shelves to make kind of an open area where, which is the upper world, which is the world and the cosmos and all the beautiful, amazing, cool stuff. Yucca: That's where like the seasonal things will go and the, Yeah. Mark: the seasonal things go. The little section for evolution and the section for science and the section for music and creativity and all that kind of stuff. So I have this underworldy space that I celebrate all year round. And I have, I have, there's a thing on there that belonged to my grandfather and. Something, some fossils that sort of speak to deep time ancestry. And I find particularly at this time of year that lighting the candle on there and acknowledging the Sacred Dead is really an important, meaningful thing to me. I, I find it more impactful this year than. Around the rest of the time of year. Yucca: Mm, It's beautiful. Mark: So how about you? How about the kinds of things that you do with ancestry in your observances? Yucca: Hmm. Well, like a lot of things, we really try and integrate it into our whole lives, right? The, the holidays are, are special and extra to, for an extra focus to help us kind of remember about it. But you know, with the naming of the children, they, they have names that. That are, you know, tied back to old, you know, I have an old family name and we gave an old family, you know, old family name to the kids. Their last names are actually a, a mixture, like a port man toe of our last names because we didn't wanna do. We didn't want to continue what felt like a weird kind of tradition of like the wife and children belonging to the husband kind of thing. Right. Mark: And Hyphenation just doesn't work for more than one generation. Yucca: it doesn't, and it, it just ends up with the same problem that you're still having to choose from one family or the other, Which do you pass on? Right. So we just, and we just mixed it together and it's a lovely name and it completely sounds like. You know, and like a name from the, the kind of heritage that we come from, or the ones that we look cuz we're extremely mixed mixed background. But, but there are certain sides that we kind of identify more with. But like a lot of families, we have you know, photos up of the, the recent family members that we have photos. So there's in the kitchen we. My let's see. So my mother, grandmother, and great grandmother. So a line of, of all of them together. So we've got that, that kind of thing. But this time of year is also the time where we're thinking about ancestry and, and we make a point of kind of changing what sorts of documentaries we're watching. We like to put documentaries on in the evenings. Not every night, but that's the sort of thing that, you know, maybe three nights out of the week there'll be a documentary that we all watch together. And so we'll watch things about, you know, early humans or neanderthals or evolution and that kind of stuff. This time of year. addition to all of the wonderful halloweeny looking things, Mark: Yeah. Yucca: But we'll talk, we'll get more into that. So, but really it's a, just a normal remembrance of them. Mark: Mm-hmm. . Mm-hmm. . Yeah. That's great. So I, I know that for for. A lot of people, they don't have a sort of standing recognition of their ancestors. And so this time of year becomes a time when they'll set up a focus with pictures of ancestors and, you know, offerings. Yucca: of theirs. Mark: Things that belong to them. Offerings of things like flowers. Depending on their tradition, sometimes alcohol sugar, you know, candies and cookies, things like that.  Yucca: Buy them a pack of cigarettes, you know that if they were smokers kind of thing. Yeah. Mark: Well, yeah, and that kind of gets into a whole other tradition around offerings of tobacco, which is a whole other, Yucca: That too. Yeah, that's a Mark: that, that that's a huge thing. So, be interesting to hear from our listeners about how they are acknowledging ancestry and what kinds of things they're putting into their seasonal celebrations this year. I mean, obviously we're still, you know, on the long tail end of a very serious global pandemic and a lot of people have gone Over the course of the last two years or so. And so there's been a lot of loss. There's been a lot of grief, and this is the time of year when we, we tend to kind of face up to that and, and recognize recognize our mortality as we talked about last week. So, drop us a line. We're at the Wonder Podcast Qs. The Wonder Podcast cues at gmail.com and send us your questions, send us updates on, you know, send us a picture of your, your ancestor altar. We'd love to see it. Yucca: That's always fun. Yeah. So, and we really do love preparing from you, so thank. Mark: Yeah. We're, we're so grateful for our listeners. There's still this part of me that's very, very skeptical that every time I look at these, the download figures, I'm like, Geez, are people actually listening to this thing But it appears that a lot of you are, and I could not be more pleased. I'm, I'm so glad that this is something that you choose to have in your life because your time, as we talked about last week, is the most precious thing you have and that you choose to spend some of it with us is really a great gift. Yucca: Yeah. We're just so grateful for all of you. Oh, thank you, Mark: So we'll be talking about Halls or Halloween or Saan whatever you want to all Saint Steve whatever you want to call it next week, and talking about rituals for that and all that sort of wonderful spooky celebration stuff. Yucca: Yeah. Mark: And we look forward to talking with you again then. Yucca: All right. Mark: Have a great week. Yucca: Bye everyone.    .

Angel Face Magic Hour
2:9 Human Design and The Inner Yew Interview with Trieste

Angel Face Magic Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 98:25


This week on the podcast we're talking with Trieste, an Arizona based intuitive using Human Design, Astrology and other spiritual tools to educate, inspire and assist clients in both the magical and mundane aspects of their lives. To find more of Trieste follow along on Tiktok and Instagram @theinneryew  Tiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@theinneryew  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theinneryew/ In this episode we go over some basics around Human Design, what is Human Design?  A little about the origins of this modality and what influenced it, breaking down the different design types and what that might mean for you. Defining some Human Design terms like authority, strategy, centers, channels and conditioning. How we experience each other's energy and how our energy influences each other. We talk about how Trieste was introduced to this modality and what she found it useful for, and how these tools can bring personal healing. For beginners to Human Design Trieste breaks down where to look first and what to focus on as you're exploring a new modality. Trieste using Grace's chart to explain how to look at and “read” a Human Design Chart, what to look at first and how to continue exploring these ideas and connections on your own. Talking about the lines, colors and shapes in the chart, what they mean and how to understand how a chart is set up. What the difference between the conscious and unconscious self is, and how Human Design shows us how to operate in our authentic self and how that helps us navigate day to day life challenges. Trieste also shares some helpful information and insights about Grace's personal chart, so lucky me, I kinda get a reading too! If you wanna know a little more about my design type we get into that too! If you have any specific questions around Human Design you would like to me discuss on a future episode with Trieste please email me: grace@gracelannon.com  Enjoy the episode !!!  This episode is pretty heavy on the visuals so watch the video verison here: https://youtu.be/njsTZMsKWPU Join me IN PERSON in Sonoma County, CA Oct.22 for Hike and Heal, get your tickets here: http://www.gracelannon.com/workshops-om Donate to the Show: https://www.paypal.com/donate/?hosted_button_id=Q4QMJ5P2CVXP2 For 1:1 sessions and classes please visit Gracelannon.com Use special discount code “POD” for 15% off your first 1:1 session To Book A Session with Grace: https://angelface.as.me/?appointmentType=18465155 Follow us on Tiktok and IG @angelface.grace Follow the podcast IG @angelfacemagichour Subscribe to our Youtube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMmrpT5oCPY8HIwJt4isoxQ Join the Mailing List to Stay Up To Date on Classes and Workshops! https://www.gracelannon.com Join our Meet Up Group to stay up date on our upcoming workshops Cosmic Seekers: https://meetu.ps/e/KT6rp/SsHpx/i --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/angelfacemagichour/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/angelfacemagichour/support

Santa Rosa Press Democrat podcasts

Press Democrat staff writer Austin Murphy and deputy editor Brett Wilkison talk about the fire survivors victimized by bad contractors in the wake of the 2017 wildfires that swept through Sonoma County.  Austin Murphy calls what the survivors have dealt with "a cosmic one-two punch."   

The Wine Makers on Radio Misfits
The Wine Makers – Duskie Estes & Jerome Cunnie

The Wine Makers on Radio Misfits

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 60:34


This week on the show we went to Haystack Farm in Sonoma to talk with Farmer Jerome Cunnie and Chef Duskie Estes. Farm to Pantry is a gleaning non-profit organization that rescues produce from farms and backyard gardens in Sonoma County that would otherwise go to waste, and delivers it to families in need—one in three people in Sonoma County is facing food insecurity. They glean produce from over 250 properties, with the help of over 350 volunteers, and deliver it to 85 community partners. The food is out there and Farm to Pantry goes and gets it—they are the bridge between abundance and need. In the case of Haystack Farm Jerome Cunnie and his team farm the ranch which was established to raise fruits, vegetables and flowers to be given away to those that are in need. Wait till you hear the numbers of how many people they are feeding. This is an inspiring show, get inspired, get involved in your community and help feed people. It feels really good to be part of a community like this. [EP252] www.farmtopantry.org www.instagram.com/farmtopantry twitter.com/farm_to_pantry www.instagram.com/duskie_estes www.blackpigmeatco.com www.twitter.com/duskieestes www.instagram.com/thegardenkeeper/ www.instagram.com/haystackfarmsonoma/

Dragon Talk - An Official Dungeons & Dragons Podcast
Dragon Talk: Kelly "Socks" Galten

Dragon Talk - An Official Dungeons & Dragons Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 72:51 Very Popular


Kelly “Socks” Galten (she/her/they) is the Runemaker at Goblin Bros. Games and Gear in Petaluma, CA. She is a player and Dungeon Master, and she works hard to bring Dungeons and Dragons to a new generation. Goblin Bros. hosts Beginner's D&D workshops for kids in their back garden game space. Socks runs a special adventure for young parties ages 12-16, where they learn the basics of the greatest role playing game. Socks and the Goblins have made every effort to embody the Friendly Local Game Store model - community supported them, they support community. They work with local schools, organizations, and charities to ensure that Sonoma County and beyond know that these Goblins play side-by-side with all humans. For general inquiries or show messages, please email dragontalk@sirensound.co Dragon Talk is executively produced by Greg Tito, Shelly Mazzanoble & Wizards of The Coast. Show production by Lisa Carr & Ryan Marth of Siren Sound. Podcast recording, editing, mixing and mastering by Ryan Marth & Siren Sound.Here's your guide to when each segment begins:Show open with Greg Tito and Shelly Mazzanoble - 0:00Interview - 10:35Outro - 1:00:23Greg Tito Twitter - twitter.com/gregtitoShelly Mazzanoble Twitter - twitter.com/shellymooKelly's Twitter - twitter.com/badgerpride96Kelly's IG - instagram.com/badgerpride96Goblin Bros. - www.goblinbros.comWelcome To Dragon Talk Pre-Order - https://uipress.uiowa.edu/books/welcome-dragon-talkSpelljams - https://pocp.co/spelljamsDragon Talk Show Page - https://dnd.wizards.com/dragon-talk/podcast-hubSiren Sound - www.sirensound.coRyan Marth - bio.site/ryanmarthLisa Carr - twitter.com/yelizavetacarrLatest D&D Products - https://gtly.to/SVs8W_2f8D&D Newsletter - dnd.wizards.com/newsletterDragon + - https://dnd.wizards.com/content/dragonD&D Official Discord - https://discord.com/invite/dnd

Angel Face Magic Hour
2:8 Steady as a Rock: October Energy Reading + Regathering your Roots Guided Meditation

Angel Face Magic Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 91:43


In this week's episode Grace shares an energetic reading for October plus some messages from the Oracle Cards. Ending this week's episode with a guided Shamanic Journey Meditation to connect with your honorable loving ancestors, inner child and focus on releasing emotions attached to past mistakes.  Reflections on the energy of October, talking about themes of steadiness, standing your ground and spending a little time in the realms of nostalgia and inner child exploration this month. We are remembering our destiny and dreams for the future that we held as a child and reigniting our sense of possibility. Your personal desires are not trivial, it is not silly to to care for yourself. Creating steadiness and permanence within, even as the world around you is constantly changing and shifting. Reconditioning your inner sense of safety. Building and growing the ability to invision yourself grounded. Who you were doesn't have to be who you are now, you are the rock in the stream my babes, root where you are planted. Connecting with the root center is about building and creating structure and stability within.  We are also talking about connecting with the energy of the season, Halloween time, and how it can be a great time to explore your fears, to face them, embody them and release them, asking yourself what is scary to you? what are you afraid of? Using horror movies and costumes as a way into tune into that energy, and also as a indicator to show you what you are afraid of? and what is the root cause of that fear?  We discuss letting go and releasing resentment, it's okay to change your mind and remembering you cannot force others to heal, you cannot force others to change. Ending our conversation with a brief explanation of what is the inner child and what is a journey and  how does a shamanic journey meditation work, before Grace guides us through a healing meditation.  Incorporating visualization and energy healing this meditation is centered around connecting with your honorable loving ancestors, regathering your roots and remembering aspects of yourself that are connected to them, connecting with your inner child and remembering your destiny, remembering who you wanted to be and allowing yourself to play with some of those ideas in your every day life, how can you show up more as the person your inner child wants you to be? and how can you heal parts of yourself to see you already are?  Join me IN PERSON in Sonoma County, CA Oct.22 for Hike and Heal, get your tickets here: http://www.gracelannon.com/workshops-om Check out our Free Chakra Meditation Series on Youtube: https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLVTCCSXWkWZL-Jx4eXpcG8Xt6MMbOncaI Donate to the Show: https://www.paypal.com/donate/?hosted_button_id=Q4QMJ5P2CVXP2 For 1:1 sessions and classes please visit Gracelannon.com Use special discount code “POD” for 15% off your first 1:1 session To Book A Session with Grace: https://angelface.as.me/?appointmentType=18465155 Follow us on Tiktok and IG @angelface.grace Follow the podcast IG @angelfacemagichour Subscribe to our Youtube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMmrpT5oCPY8HIwJt4isoxQ Join the Mailing List to Stay Up To Date on Classes and Workshops! https://www.gracelannon.com Join our Meet Up Group to stay up date on our upcoming workshops Cosmic Seekers: https://meetu.ps/e/KT6rp/SsHpx/i --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/angelfacemagichour/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/angelfacemagichour/support

Líderes del Futuro
Accused, David Stubbers in Custody

Líderes del Futuro

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 3:13


David Stubbers was accused of the death of a motorist on the 101 in October of 2021. David left the county and never came back. San Diego Police arrested David at about 9pm on October 8, 2022 as a result of a tip that was sent to us. David is awaiting for Sonoma County to retrieve him from San Diego County Jail. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rafael-vazquez7/support

Líderes del Futuro
COVID Sigue Causando Muertes en Sonoma County

Líderes del Futuro

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 9:41


En las pasadas 24 horas, dos mas personas perdieron la vida como resultado de COVID. En septiembre perdimos mas de 6 personas y en la primera semana de octubre perdimos ya 2 más. Usemos las máscaras, lavemos las manos y la vacunación es la mejor forma de proteger a nuestras familias. #COVID #COVID19 #togethertowardshealth #juntxshacialasalud --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rafael-vazquez7/support

Líderes del Futuro
COVID Continues to Take Lives in Sonoma County

Líderes del Futuro

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 3:25


Two more community members have passed away in the last 24 hours as a result of COVID. Vaccination, hand washing, and wearing masks are our best defenses against the virus. We must protect our community. #covid #covid19 #juntxshacialasalud #togethertowardshealth --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rafael-vazquez7/support

Santa Rosa Press Democrat podcasts
What's Wrong with the Fire Victim Trust?

Santa Rosa Press Democrat podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 9:59


The Press Democrat shares its October 2022 series marking 5 years since the 2017 wildfires. Those who lost everything say the deck was stacked against them from the start. In this episode, Press Democrat "In Your Corner" columnist Marisa Endicott and Press Democrat enterprise and investigative reporter Andrew Graham talk about the frustration that's been building as fire victims wait for compensation some five years later.  

The Nanny Endorsements
Episode 18: Jeny Lynn

The Nanny Endorsements

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 15:36


This week I spoke with Jeny Lynn a nanny from Sonoma County. She had so many great book recommendations of different ages, and I am seriously intrigued by the historical card game Chrononauts! Book recommendations: Little Blue Truck series, Pout Pout Fish, Pete the Cat series, Wings of Fire series (a graphic novel great for older children!) Class recommendation: Attachment Theory Listen to The Nanny Endorsements each week wherever you get your podcasts! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thenannyendorsements/support

Helping Families Be Happy
ABCs of Adoption with Linda Cutting

Helping Families Be Happy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 24:14


In today's episode of the “Helping Families Be Happy” podcast, host Dr. Carla Marie Manly, a practicing Clinical Psychologist, Wellness Advocate, and Author based in Sonoma County, California talks with Author Linda Cutting who talks about Adoption and her book – ‘A is for Always'.  Episode Highlights 01:21 – Linda was professionally a Concert Pianist for many years and wrote a memoir in 1997, which was published by HarperCollins. 03:10 – Dr. Carla asks that in terms of adoption and how it impacted Linda and her children's lives, what are some of the biggest gifts for her and her children? 05:40 – Linda says that she tried to address some of the harder and more challenging aspects of adoption in this book – ‘A is for Adoption'. 07:05 - There are many issues with exploring adoption, it's been a wonderful way for Linda to have her family, especially after she had two pregnancies and miscarried. She then adopted as she knew kids in the world needed families.  09:30 - Whether it's an adoptive family or, a DNA family, nobody wants to be left out. We all want to feel safe, loved, and secure. 11:40 - One of the things that I was very serious about addressing was the difficulties that each of my kids had about adoption in school. 13:20 – Linda mentions that America has one of the most mixed race, mixed ethnic groups, cultures, and populations of any country on Earth which gives the message of inclusiveness. 16:00 -  Linda refers to one of the scenes from a Chinese film where the father explains to her adopted daughter through a metaphor of a tree that has two families and they're both very important families and both are real. 17:50 - The other important aspect of adoption Linda thinks is to talk to your kids about and it can be painful but they need to hear it from you is the identical letter K. 21:10 - Fortunately, we now live in a world where we are far more inclusive and we are far more willing to talk about things that we didn't talk about 20 years ago. 22:10 – Linda tells where listeners can reach her, they can find the book on the Familius Publishing Website or the Workman Website or Amazon, and your local independent bookstores. Key Points Linda says she is very grateful to her children's birth parents because they gave them life but she thinks the truth is that every adoption begins with loss. So eventually she realized that the bringing up of birth parents brought up the loss, and that's probably why they didn't want to hear it quite as much because they don't want to be reminded of that. Linda thinks one of the reasons she has brought this topic up so much is because one of the problems with adoption has been the secrecy around it and a sense of shame. She didn't want that to be part of her kids' story or their lives. So in this book – ‘A is for Always', Linda is trying to promote openness and conversations with adoptive parents and their kids. Dr. Carla says that the reason you need to pick up this book is that the illustrations are so beautiful, as well as the energy of the text, which is very loving and welcoming. Whether you're reading it to a newborn, an infant, a five-year-old, to a 10-year-old it would really carry a lot of love and meaning. Tweetable Quotes “We adopted him as a newborn in the States and our daughter's 17 and we adopted her as a one-year-old in China.” - Linda Cutting “I didn't want my kids to feel ashamed about questions they might have. So, Q was for questions you may want to shout.” - Linda Cutting “Transparency and curiosity, those sound like very good places to be in any parenting but particularly in adoptive parenting.” - Dr. Carla Marie Manly “My daughter really wants animal illustrations so any child can relate.” - Linda Cutting “Makes sense that your book is doing so well because ‘A is for Always' will resonate with the family that wants to really say we are inclusive.” - Dr. Carla Marie Manly “Inclusivity is so important in an overall way not just for adoptive families, but for all of us. Invite and include others in our lives.” - Linda Cutting “It is about connection and it's about growing together.” - Dr. Carla Marie Manly Resources Mentioned Helping Families be Happy Podcast:  Apple Familius Publishing: Website Workman Website LinkedIn Instagram Facebook Linda Cutting: Website Twitter Instagram Podcast Editing

So Can I
Surviving Fires + Making Wine in Sonoma with Elizabeth Pollock

So Can I

Play Episode Play 41 sec Highlight Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 47:24


Today I am joined by Elizabeth Pollock. Elizabeth is the owner of Adelaide Thomas Wines, a boutique, family-owned winery in Sonoma County, California. Adelaide Thomas produces three different wines every year - a Rosé of Pinot Noir, a Sauvignon Blanc, and a Cabernet Sauvignon. Elizabeth's wines are made from organic grapes, and with a low-intervention, clean, wine-making style. In this episode we talk about how Elizabeth and her husband stumbled upon a beautiful property in Sonoma...that just happened to have a winery on it, how she transitioned from an attorney in the corporate world to the owner of a winery, and how she rebuilt her life after the devastating Glass Fire in Sonoma county engulfed her home. Drink Katy'sAdelaide Thomas Winery WebsiteAdelaide Thomas Winery InstagramSonoma Ecology CenterBest Friends Animal Society

Santa Rosa Press Democrat podcasts
The Press Democrat Podcast: A Walk in the Ashes

Santa Rosa Press Democrat podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 30:40


In this first of a series of podcasts throughout October 2022 to accompany reports in print and online, The Press Democrat examines five years since the 2017 wildfires.  Deputy editor Brett Wilkison talks with senior reporter Phil Barber about the fires, what we've learned since, and views on how climate change plays a role. 

EcoJustice Radio
Reclaiming Land, Culture, & Narrative Through Black, Indigenous, & Queer Stewardship

EcoJustice Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 59:17


On this show we explore the world of Shelterwood Collective [http://www.shelterwoodcollective.org], a Black, Indigenous, and LGBTQ-led community forest and retreat center that seeks to heal people and ecosystems through active stewardship and community engagement. Recently they took on the role of stewards for 900 acres of forest in Sonoma County, California, on Unceded Kashaya and Southern Pomo territory. Our guest is Layel Camargo, Co Founder & Co Executive Director of Shelterwood Collective. We explore what it means and why it is important to heal self and environment through land management, shaping culture change, and narrative shifting (also sought by story telling). Shelterwood Collective believes that ecosystem health can only be achieved by communities who are in deep relationship with the Earth and with one another. The work of Shelterwood Collective extends beyond the forest edge through training & programming focused on antiracism, decolonizing conservation, inspiring resilient leadership, promoting artistic expression, and community health. For the extended interview, click here: https://www.patreon.com/posts/extended-with-72808679 Layel Camargo is a non binary and trans person uses they/them pronouns . They are an indigenous descendant of the Yaqui and Yoeme tribes of the Sonoran Desert. Co founder and co executive director of Shelterwood Collective, a land stewardship project building a retreat center and artist residency. In the last 10 years they have been a champion of Zero Waste, veganism, and a cultural organizer and producer for podcasts such as 'Did We Go Too Far?' & 'Climate Woke'. In 2020 they were named on the Grist Fixers List of Climate Activists to follow. Jessica Aldridge, Co-Host and Producer of EcoJustice Radio, is an environmental educator, community organizer, and 15-year waste industry leader. She is a co-founder of SoCal 350, organizer for ReusableLA, and founded Adventures in Waste. She is a former professor of Recycling and Resource Management at Santa Monica College, and an award recipient of the international 2021 Women in Sustainability Leadership and the 2016 inaugural Waste360, 40 Under 40. More Info: Grist: https://grist.org/fix/arts-culture/2021-intersectional-future-for-the-climate-movement/ Cultural Power: https://www.culturalpower.org/stories/trail-ahead-layel-camargo/ Podcast Website: http://ecojusticeradio.org/ Podcast Blog: https://wilderutopia.com/ecojustice-radio/reclaiming-land-culture-narrative-through-black-indigenous-queer-stewardship/ Support the Podcast: https://www.patreon.com/ecojusticeradio Guest: Layel Camargo Host and Producer: Jessica Aldridge Engineer and Original Music: Blake Quake Beats Executive Producer: Jack Eidt

Angel Face Magic Hour
2:7 EnergyBody 101: Into the Roots (part 1)

Angel Face Magic Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 68:41


Enter Body 101 Part 1: Into the Roots Welcome to our new Series here on the Angel Face Magic Hour: Energy Body 101, where we will be discussing the Energetic Body, Energy Centers, and much more beginning with today's episode, Into The Roots where we will talking about the Base Energy Center, The Root Chakra. In this conversation we will be Beginning with the Beginning, What is the Energy Body? What are Energy Centers? What Is the Root Chakra and why is this information valuable to us? We will be examining the root center and its associations and correlations, Grace shares her psychic perspective on the energy body, and some of her experiences on perceiving the energy body with intuitive sight and psychic feeling. What is the importance of Foundations? + How we can connect with and use these energy centers to deepen our understanding of our emotional and physical well-being. The Root is all about our sense of stability and security, when imbalanced its all about learning to feel comfortable in your body and learning to create a sense of safety within yourself. The Root asks us Do we understand who we are? Do we understand our purpose? Do we understand our desires? What is your connection to desire? & How the energy body interacts with our physical and emotional body. How to "read" energy centers, how your personal codex/ language with spirit informs your ability to perceive information about the energy body and how you may perceive it. The Root is about building a state of inner permanence in an impermanent world, while maintaining a sense of stability as change happens around you and eventually within you. How do imbalances in the energy body show up? + Grace shares some affirmations and some crystal connections associated with the Root that can be used for personal healing. Ending the show with an Angel Intention Card to explore this coming week or whenever you listen to this episode. Enjoy, learn, take notes, and experience and play with these concepts on your own, the most you can learn is from experience !!!! Join me IN PERSON in Sonoma County, CA Oct.22 for Hike and Heal, get your tickets here: http://www.gracelannon.com/workshops-om Check out our Free Chakra Meditation Series on Youtube: https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLVTCCSXWkWZL-Jx4eXpcG8Xt6MMbOncaI Donate to the Show: https://www.paypal.com/donate/?hosted_button_id=Q4QMJ5P2CVXP2 For 1:1 sessions and classes please visit Gracelannon.com Use special discount code “POD” for 15% off your first 1:1 session To Book A Session with Grace: https://angelface.as.me/?appointmentType=18465155 Follow us on Tiktok and IG @angelface.grace Follow the podcast IG @angelfacemagichour Subscribe to our Youtube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMmrpT5oCPY8HIwJt4isoxQ Join the Mailing List to Stay Up To Date on Classes and Workshops! https://www.gracelannon.com Join our Meet Up Group to stay up date on our upcoming workshops Cosmic Seekers: https://meetu.ps/e/KT6rp/SsHpx/i --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/angelfacemagichour/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/angelfacemagichour/support

Brew Ha Ha Podcast
Bear Republic, Grace Bros. plus Tara Nurin & Harry Duke

Brew Ha Ha Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 36:47


Richard Norgrove and Josh Grace Bear Republic brewer Richard Norgrove and Josh Grace of Grace Bros. Brewing join Herlinda Heras in studio. Peter Lopez is sitting in for Harry Duke who will call in later and Tara Nurin will also call in to talk about the award her book just won. Tara Nurin was a guest on Brew Ha Ha on this episode of October 21, 2021, and talked about her book. First, Tara Nurin calls in to talk about about her book about women in brewing winning an award. Tara has been on Brew Ha Ha many times including this October 21, 2021 episode where she described the recently published “The Woman's Place Is In The Brewhouse.” The book has just won the first prize from the North American Guild of Beer Writers. She really likes hearing stories from readers who identify with the many successful women in brewing. It was also a great experience to do the research interviews and meet a lot of her heroes. Tara has some stories coming out on the Food Network website too. Richard and Josh tell the origin story of the Grace Bros. Beer, which was making beer in the early 1900s. He works in the business of buying and selling wineries, which often includes trademarks. In the course of another business deal, he found the Grace Bros. Beer trademark was available. He describes the process of recovering the trademark, which is on the beer that they are tasting today. Grace Bros. was one of the largest breweries 100 and more years ago, in Sonoma County. They stopped making beer in the 1960s and now they are relaunching the beer with Bear Republic. A portion of the profits go to the historical society and to veteran's assistance. Russian River Brewing Co. is open in Santa Rosa on 4th St. and at their big Windsor location. Visit their website for up-to-date hours, menus, beers and more info. Russian River Hop Time Harvest Ale made with 100% Sonoma County hops and barley, and malt from Admiral Malting. They are canning it now at Russian River Brewing Co. Where the Hell is Harry? Harry Duke is calling in for an installment of “Where the Hell is Harry?” this time from Flatonia, Texas, which is between San Antonio and Houston. He was at the Alamo earlier and posted pictures on The Drive's face book page and ended up at the oldest saloon in Texas, The Buckhorn, in San Antonio. When he asked for a local beer he had one called Texican from Blue Star Brewing Co. of San Antonio, a light Mexican style lager, which was perfect for the hot weather there. Harry describes seeking out Classic Rock stations while driving across the southwest. At one point, at night, doing 80 MPH (the speed limit there) Freebird came on... And gas is $2.85 a gallon, but the tradeoff is, you've got to be in Texas. Grace Bros. Beer They had a big release party for the new Grace Bros. beer. They sold out in the first day. The beer is a classic, light easy-drinking beer (under 5%), as it was originally. They tried to imitate the ingredients and process and they got to experiment as home brewers in order to get the recipe right. Grace Bros. started brewing in 1897 and apart from Prohibition, it was idle from 1953 to 1958, then again until 1967. But in the heyday of the 1940s, when it was most popular, this was the beer. They were careful to use just the right hops, which is California Cluster. It's a Bavarian type lager, even if in those days, it was basically just called beer. The pub is in Rhonhert Park on Roberts Lake Road and the beer is on tap. They might release it in Spring or earlier in Summer next year.

Wine Road: The Wine, When, and Where of Northern Sonoma County.
Lynn Fritz Owner, Lynmar Estate Winery

Wine Road: The Wine, When, and Where of Northern Sonoma County.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 35:05


Wine Road Podcast Episode 159 Sponsored by Ron Rubin Winery   Episode 159 | Lynn Fritz Owner, Lynmar Estate Winery   Lynn Fritz is living his passion and tells us about the many splendors of the Lynmar Estate, being a steward of the land, and his philosophy behind building a community around people and place. Plus he shares a bottle of the 2018 Lynmar Pinot Noir from Quail Hill Vineyard. Our Fast Five Recipe is Ahi Poke form Carole Shelton. Wine of the Day: 2018 Lynmar Pinot Noir, Quail Hill Vineyard Fast Five Recipe: Ahi Poke from Carol Shelton Podcast Sponsor: Ron Rubin Winery SHOW NOTES 1:00 Wine of the Day – 2018 Lynmar Pinot Noir form Quail Hill Vineyard. A great vintage made with14 clones of Pinot. It's Light and opulent with a dense fruity nose, and lingering finish. Like a chord! 5:22 Lynn's philosophy on the perfect size business and the growth or (non-growth) of Lynmar which is kept at a 12-15,000 case level to keep it optimal for quality and service. 7:28 Seeking harmony in all aspects of the business and the winery food and wine program. Beth feels it's a spiritual place at Lynmar. 9:30 Lynmar serving 4 course lunches and have expended the gardens that include the edible gardens with heirloom varieties used by the chefs for the food pairings. Carrying on the Luther Burbank torch. 13:40 Winery started after Lynn sought a peaceful getaway from San Francisco in the country and found the ideal spot in Sebastopol. Originally sold the grapes grown on the property then started making their own wine. 17:09 It's all about community at Lynmar-- the customers and the winery personnel and the extended community of families they encompass. 19:00 Sonoma County has a certain something, a vitality and abundance that makes the area special. 20:45 Lynmar making Balsamic vinegar now for over 22 years. 22:33 Beautiful guesthouse, The Bliss house on the property for use of Wine Club members and families. 24:20 Fast Five Recipe –Ahi Poke– From Carol Shelton of Carol Shelton Wines Ingredients: Fresh Sushi grade Ahi tuna, sesame oil, ponzu, brown sugar, ginger, (green onions, cilantro and lime) Directions: Cube the Ahi then add sesame oil one part to two parts of ponzu mixed together with brown sugar and table spoon of minced ginger add a little squeeze of lime and scallions serve with rice crackers add avocado on the side. Enjoy with Carol Shelton Rendezvous Rose. 27:27 All winery workers are full time employees which gives Lynmar great control over harvest and are ready to go when the pick date is chosen. Makes for a calm and orderly harvest. 30:00 ONE MORE THING—Wine and Food Affair tickets are now on sale! And No Reservations needed this year! Links Lynmar Estate Winery Carol Shelton Wines Ron Rubin Winery Credits:The Wine Road podcast is mixed and mastered at Threshold Studios Sebastopol, CA. http://thresholdstudios.info/

Everyday Wine with Kris Levy
Ep. 53: Discovering the Passion in the World of Winemaking with Jesse and Aaron Inman

Everyday Wine with Kris Levy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 47:56


Welcome back to another episode of The Everyday Wine Aficionado Podcast! Today let me introduce you to Jesse and Aaron Inman, Owners and Winemakers at Lucky Rock Wine Co. Jesse Inman had what one might euphemistically refer to as humble beginnings. After wandering around California and Europe in search of inspiration outside of art and drinking, he joined August Briggs Winery in 2006. After nearly 16 years of making wine for several different brands, including a few of his own. Aaron Inman was introduced to Sonoma County when he visited his winemaker uncle in Calistoga, Napa Valley. During his visits, he realized he would move to Santa Rosa and attend the Junior College there during his teenage years.He became passionate about winemaking and considered pursuing an enology degree at UC Davis or Fresno State. Instead, he enrolled at Santa Rosa Junior College. Jesse and Aaron have decided to make great wines with an emphasis on inclusivity rather than exclusivity. In other words, making wine less intimidating while providing a product that people can support is the driving force behind Lucky Rock Wine Co. Let's dive into their wine story!   [00:01 – 7:22] Opening Segment Aaron and Jesse shares their wine origin story Catching the winemaking bug and starting a winemaking company   [7:23– 17:13] The Origins of Lucky Rock Wine Co. Creating a specialized brand that caters to high-end wine enthusiasts Rebranding the business to reflect what personal mission and goals Knowing why you are different and what make you unique    [17:14 – 40:18] Our Wines Show Our Uniqueness Maintaining quantity of sales without sacrificing the quality of the wine  Discovering vineyards that are the gems in the rough Customers might feel more connected to what they're buying if they know the vineyard and wine's history Wine is supposed to make people happy as they drink it  Be clear in your marketing and message so customers understand why they should buy your product   [40:19 – 42:59] Closing Segment Learn everything you need to grow your wine, business, or brand with Wine Business Bootcamp where I help other wine producers master the fundamentals of digital marketing, nail their customer experience, and convert more wine tasters into their wine clubs and other offers. Just send me a dm or email at kris@krislevy.comwith the subject: Wine Business Bootcamp Favorite Wine Sauvignon blanc Edmunds St. John Bone-Jolly Gamay  Favorite go-to pairing Gumbo with a good Pinot Napa with steak and ribeye Wine Resource Wine Seminars Self learning through wine magazines and other resources  Connect with Jesse and Aaron Instagram: @luckyrockwineco, @messybob Youtube: Lucky Rock Wine Lounge Website: https://luckyrockwineco.com/   Let's continue the Everyday Wine Conversations and connect with me through Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn, or feel free to shoot me an email at kris@krislevy.co. You can also check out my website at ​www.​klevywineco.com. TELL US WHAT YOU THINK! LEAVE A REVIEW + help us get the word out there! Share this podcast to someone who wants to join the wine conversations. Go ahead and take a screenshot, share this to your stories, and tag me on Instagram!  JOIN THE CLUB through this link and handpick wines every month, from up and coming wineries, winemaker owned brands and wineries with unique stories while supporting those wineries directly. You can also join our Facebook Group to connect with other wine lovers, get special tips and tricks, and take your wine knowledge to a whole new level.   Tweetable Quotes: “My advice to people is make sure you know why you're different.” - Aaron Inman “It's not supposed to be the most sophisticated wine in the world. it's meant to make people happy while they're enjoying it.” - Jesse Inman      

Helping Families Be Happy
Bonding through Reading with Apurva Shrivasta

Helping Families Be Happy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 28:40


In today's episode of the “Helping Families Be Happy” podcast, host Dr. Carla Marie Manly, a practicing Clinical Psychologist, Wellness Advocate, and Author based in Sonoma County, California talks with guest Apurva Shrivasta about her life as a Book Reviewer.   Episode Highlights 01:38 – Apurva is a UX Designer by profession, and works for a Credit Card Company. Other than that, she's also a book reviewer on Instagram. 03:13 – Apurva's professional work is very similar to what one does in their day-to-day life and in motherhood. 05:09 – Just being their (Children) biggest cheerleaders is all about parenting and all these intricacies of reaching the child, states Apurva. 07:17 – Apurva's children believe in the power of reading, and she's so fascinated to see this valuable trait naturally emerge in her family, highlights Apurva. 09:23 – Dr. Carla about Apurva, no matter the child's age when she's reading with them, she has created sort of a bubble or cocoon in her own world where the two of them are exploring whatever's in the book together. She's on an adventure in her own world. 11:10 - It does take a lot, not just cognitive energy but also emotional energy to tune into a child that way, says Dr. Carla. 13:25 – Dr. Carla enquires about how can toddlers learn problem-solving. 14:38 - It's very important to see how our kids react to certain things, and how do they carry themselves with confidence because that's important, says Apurva. 16:49 – Apurva highlights that just being in that moment present with them and not thinking about anything else and giving that undivided attention is important. 18:10 - Just being there with the kids is the most important thing without the intervention of technology, says Apurva. 20:34 - Kids have a brain where they can wander. So, why not be a model for them to display what the world is like and how it is so beautiful, states Apurva. 22:00 – Apurva shares her opinion on which book is better in certain age ranges. 23:20 – Apurva wrote a book which is, about how does a child's brain works? 25:00 – They do like a lot of Montessori education for both her daughters.   Three Key Points Apurva highlights - reading in itself creates that bonding and it's really important. We can really like read aloud or let them (Children) read on their own if they are a little elder, but when we're reading with them, we're creating our own world. It's significantly benefitted our child's brain and ours as well and we can see that wire but then it goes from our child to our brain and then naturally it prepares them for their academic success. Apurva says - reading is one way where we express our affection and gratitude. We're given the opportunity that we can read it to them. It's like we should be really grateful for that and keep developing that habit little by little, even if it is like five minutes, 10 minutes. She thinks it's more than enough and when we see that smile on their face when we're together and not busy in our phones or doing other things and ignoring them, it's blissful. Apurva shares what makes a really great children's book - first the story the characters that we bring in, what is the story depicting and also the ups and down. There's not a story that wouldn't have a down and then how do they shine up and brings out the moral out of that. So, all those milestones are really important in a story.   Tweetable Quotes “Being the child's advocate or cheerleader, is really important.” – Dr. Carla Marie Manly  “The more books, the better it is.” – Apurva Shrivasta “You are creating your own world when you're reading with a child.” - Apurva Shrivasta “You can get creative with reading.” - Apurva Shrivasta “It is joyful, but sometimes it is tiring.” - Apurva Shrivasta “5 to 10 minutes of reading can make a difference in a child's life.” - Apurva Shrivasta “Integrate practical life along with that. I think that's really important.” - Apurva Shrivasta “Empathy and compassion are a theme that we really put more emphasis on.” - Apurva Shrivasta “We also encourage a lot of unstructured day time too.” - Apurva Shrivasta “That bond between your children and yourself, you wouldn't even know how far along that can go.” - Apurva Shrivasta “A child who grows up with tuned parents, generally have really good self-confidence, high self-esteem.” - Dr. Carla Marie Manly  “Just imagine, there is no fear in imagining things.” - Apurva Shrivasta “What a strong power to have the gift of imagination and to pass that on to your children.” - Dr. Carla Marie Manly    Resources Mentioned Helping Families be Happy Podcast Apple Dr. Carla Marie Manly Website LinkedIn Twitter   Instagram Podcast Editing

Fifth & Mission
How Sonoma County Is Leading a Movement to Ban New Gas Stations

Fifth & Mission

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 17:21


By 2035, all new cars sold in California will be zero-emission. Sonoma County environmentalists have proposed one of the most aggressive policy ideas yet to help the state's transition to electric cars: Ban construction of new gas stations. Activist Woody Hastings joins host Cecilia Lei to explain the local effort that is quickly spreading across the state and beyond. | Unlimited Chronicle access: sfchronicle.com/pod Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Bay
'Welcome Black to the Land'

The Bay

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 19:34


In California, less than 1% of farmland is Black-owned, according to the 2017 Census of Agriculture. One such farm is in Sebastopol in Sonoma County.  EARTHseed farm is Sonoma County's first Afro-Indigenous permaculture farm. It's a place for Black and brown people to reconnect with indigenous land stewardship and to build community, at a time when the effects of climate change are challenging us to change our relationship to the earth. Guest: Ariana Proehl, KQED culture reporter Links: An Example of 'Land Back' in Northern California 'Welcome Black to the Land': Inside Sonoma County's First Afro-Indigenous Permaculture Farm This episode was produced by Alan Montecillo and Maria Esquinca, and hosted by Ericka Cruz Guevarra. Your support makes KQED podcasts possible. You can show your love by going to https://kqed.org/donate/podcasts.

The Bay
In Sonoma County, Cities Are Banning New Gas Stations

The Bay

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 17:51


Sonoma County is trying to set a trend for other cities in banning the construction of new gas stations. In 2021, Petaluma became the first city in the whole country to do so. Now nearly half of the county has followed suit, including Santa Rosa. For the residents who've pushed this forward, these bans are a small but important step to fighting climate change, in a county that has experienced some of the worst wildfires in the state. Guest: Paulina Pineda, Santa Rosa Press Democrat city hall reporter This episode was produced by Alan Montecillo, and hosted by Ericka Cruz Guevarra, who also produced. Your support makes KQED podcasts possible. You can show your love by going to kqed.org/donate/podcasts.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day
panache

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 2:22 Very Popular


Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for September 6, 2022 is: panache • puh-NAHSH • noun Today, when we say that someone has panache, we are saying that they have energy, spirit, and style. Originally, the word referred to an ornamental tuft or plume of feathers, and especially one affixed to a helmet. // Ever the showman, he not only caught the ball, he made a diving catch and caught it with panache. See the entry > Examples: “Down home and upbeat, the Bloomfield Bluegrass Band is an all-Sonoma County ensemble of veteran performers whose primary musical obsession is the traditional bluegrass repertoire played with verve, panache, polish and pluck.” — The Argus-Courier (Petaluma, California), 28 July 2022 Did you know? Few literary characters can match the panache of French poet and soldier Cyrano de Bergerac, from Edmond Rostand's 1897 play of the same name. In his dying moments, Cyrano declares that the one thing left to him is his panache, and that assertion at once demonstrates the meaning of the word and draws upon its history. In both French and English, panache (which traces back to Late Latin pinnaculum, “small wing”) originally referred to a showy, feathery plume on a hat or helmet; our familiar figurative sense debuted in the first English translation of Rostand's play, which made the literal plume a metaphor for Cyrano's unflagging verve even in death. In a 1903 speech Rostand himself described panache: “A little frivolous perhaps, most certainly a little theatrical, panache is nothing but a grace which is so difficult to retain in the face of death, a grace which demands so much strength that, all the same, it is a grace … which I wish for all of us.”