Podcasts about Felt

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard

Textile made from condensed fibers

  • 3,204PODCASTS
  • 4,168EPISODES
  • 38mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 13, 2022LATEST
Felt

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about Felt

Show all podcasts related to felt

Latest podcast episodes about Felt

Testimony A Musician's Story - Testimony
From Foster Care to Adoption Female Rapper, A.I. The Anomaly, Felt Like God's Only Mistake

Testimony A Musician's Story - Testimony

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022


She was 20 yrs old and single when she had her son. She knew she needed God in order to love her son, and through loving her son, she learned how to love herself. In this episode of Testimony: A Musician's Story, rapper and multi-hyphenated artist, A.I. The Anomaly, shares her Christian testimony. She discusses growing up in the foster care system, her passion for philanthropic work in underserved communities, and being the first woman signed to Bizzle's God Over Money Records. Additionally, she breaks down “Grown Woman”, “Facts”, “Relentless” feat. Bizzle, and “Freedom's Palace” feat. Jered Sanders in the 4-song-breakdown.

Piano Meditations Podcast
Episode 186, 1-12-22

Piano Meditations Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 41:23


Felt like stretching harmonically tonight, which was fun. Hearing two different chords simultaneously helped to open my ears to some new directions. Enjoy!

HEALTHY FAMILY CONNECTIONS
I Always Felt Unloved

HEALTHY FAMILY CONNECTIONS

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 23:21


In this episode, Neil responds to a mother who as an adult, continues to feel unloved with an empty feeling inside. She's looking to understand why her parents would indulge her younger sister and her children, and slight her and her children. 

The Direct Podcast
Boba Fett Ch2 Review, Morbius Delayed and The Flash Drama, Best Comic Book Movie Years (w/ Klein Felt)

The Direct Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 151:01


Happy New Year from The Direct Podcast!We kick this year off with a flurry of top news. Sony Pictures has delayed Morbius again, but there might be a bright side to this one. Looking at you, Andrew Garfield.Thor: Love and Thunder and Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness both have received new promotional art highlighting the lead characters' new suits! We break down what this means for the sequels and also dive into the IP rights issue that may be effecting Doctor Strange 2.Big rumors have swirled around Ezra Miller's The Flash, and how this movie could change the trajectory of the DCEU forever. We analyze both sides to this speculation and what it means for the DCEU's future.The Book of Boba Fett continues! We review Chapter 2 of Star Wars' latest Disney+ installment and speculate where this series is heading next.Finally, we welcome on The Direct's Klein Felt to give a commentary on his Best Years in Comic Book Movie History article. We go through ten years of comic book movies and shout out the good, the bad, and the elite.Thank you all for your continued support of The Direct Podcast! We have a lot of fun things planned for 2022. The more iTunes reviews, Spotify ratings, and love on socials we see, the quicker we get to bringing you more content!TIMECODES2:05 - The Direct Awards Reminder!3:12 - Quick Question10:14 - Sizzle Reel12:29 - Morbius Delayed19:23 - Thor 4 Updates22:13 - Doctor Strange 2 Updates30:48 - The Flash / Snyderverse Drama41:48 - The Book of Boba Fett Ch2 Review1:17:05 - Best Years in Comic Book Movie History (w/ Klein Felt)2:26:06 - Weekly Recs

Givs and the Bank
Big News from Columbus felt all the way down in San Antonio

Givs and the Bank

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 15:06


Givs and the Bank is still rocking it in San Antonio with the All-American Bowl as a backdrop. It was day three of practices for both the West and the East and we had the chance to take in all of the events from the West at the Alamodome. Overshadowing much of the on-field action was the news out of Columbus that the Buckeyes have moved on from offensive line coach Greg Studrawa and what that means for the Buckeyes. We just happened to be in the same building as a pair of future Ohio State offensive linemen with George Fitzpatrick already signed and Carson Hinzman just committed to the Buckeyes. Obviously, it was a less than ideal situation for the pair, but we talked to them and share our thoughts. Plus, with the game just a couple of days away, who is poised to have a breakout game? We make our picks. All of that and more with Givs and the Bank, with Marc Givler and special guest Kevin Noon pinch-hitting for Bill Greene.

The Phil Hay Show - A show about Leeds United
Has the FA Cup ever felt less relevant?

The Phil Hay Show - A show about Leeds United

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 63:19


The Athletic's Phil Hay returns for 2022 as a rejuvenated Leeds United face West Ham in the FA Cup. Phil mulls over the cup's importance to Leeds United with Dan Moylan and Michael Normanton of The Square Ball.

Social Anxiety Solutions - your journey to social confidence!
"I finally felt understood" [Social Confidence Club Testimonial]

Social Anxiety Solutions - your journey to social confidence!

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 28:59


In today's episode... Hear Jessica as she shares her experience being a member of the Social Confidence Club She'll be sharing the healing process she had gone through... ...the memories she made during that process... ...and the journey she had to overcome her Social Anxiety. Pre-register now by going to https://bit.ly/socialconfidenceclub _____________________________ Do you feel awkward socially? Struggle to be yourself around others? And do you fear being judged, being seen anxious, and embarrassing yourself? You're not alone. I've been there. It sucks. Big time. But there is great hope. I've been fortunate enough to overcome it (thanks to a powerful, scientifically proven emotional release technique, and the help of some brilliant therapists)… … and I've helped hundreds of socially anxious clients overcome their struggle too. Here are some video testimonials as proof. Thankfully, here is gentle, powerful, and effective solution to beat your social anxiety. It won't happen overnight, but with certain techniques and strategies you can reduce your social anxiety quickly. And with persistence, you can become completely anxiety-free. Without needing to force yourself to awkwardly face your fears. Ready to get started on your journey to social confidence? Here are your first steps: 1) SUBSCRIBE to this channel. I release weekly videos to help you understand and overcome social anxiety. bit.ly/SAS-YT 2) Join the FREE 30-day Social Confidence Challenge and massively reduce your social anxiety ... from the comfort of your own home bit.ly/socialconfidencechallenge You will learn about a powerful, scientifically proven emotional relief technique. And you will apply this technique to release your social anxiety. NO NEED to awkwardly face your fears. And like thousands of others, you will significantly reduce your social anxiety. Learn A Powerful Emotional Release Technique - I've used this technique to overcome my own social anxiety. And I've helped hundreds of clients do the same. You'll learn how to use this simple, powerful technique. So you can apply it to overcoming your social anxiety. Discover The Blueprint To Social Confidence When you've suffered from social anxiety for a long time... transformation won't happen overnight (though progress happens rapidly). To become completely anxiety-free requires a journey: #TheJourneyToSocialConfidence This roadmap makes the journey crystal clear. You'll know exactly how to go from social anxiety to effortless social ease. Massively Reduce Your Social Anxiety You'll be guided through simple lessons and powerful exercises. Day by day you'll start feeling less anxious. More confident. More at ease. And step-by-step you begin breaking down your social anxiety challenges. 3) TUNE IN to my Social Anxiety Solutions Podcast. https://www.social-anxiety-solutions.com/sas-podcast/ You'll hear me (an ex-social anxiety disorder sufferer) interview the superstars of the WESTERN therapy and ENERGY psychology world as they share their most effective techniques, empowering solutions, and unbelievably inspiring stories of transformation. 4) LET'S CONNECT! https://www.facebook.com/socialanxiet... https://www.instagram.com/socialanxietysolutions/ https://twitter.com/socialanxietysb All the best on your journey to effortless social ease. Warm regards, Seb

The Lessons in Real Estate Show
Episode 94: Exchanging Deep Facts About 1031 Exchanges with Greg Schowe

The Lessons in Real Estate Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 49:14


Welcome to the Greg Schowe! Greg Schowe is an advanced real estate specialist with over 20 years of experience. His expertise is real estate transfer tax planning, specializing in the not-so-well-known tax code that is Section 1031. Greg combines his knowledge of real estate and tax laws to help individuals plan the most advantageous way to execute exchanged property dispositions under Section 1031 Exchanges in order to minimize taxes, reduce liabilities and plan for future investment success. He has coached over 5,000 real estate professionals all over the state of Missouri. The best part about a 1031 exchange is that it is structured as a deferral of capital gains tax. This allows investors to receive the proceeds from their exchange, eventually deferring their taxes on any gains until the sale of their new property. That makes it one of the most powerful and valuable financial tools available to real estate investors. Greg Schowe will provide you with a vast overview of his knowledge base of 1031 exchanges and the various strategies he uses for his clients. Watch Greg get ‘show-y' as he goes on a deep dive with us in this episode. Click here on the link below to find how you can begin a success story just like this. pintocapitalinvestments.com. In this episode, we explore: Greg's prolific Navy career Commercial deals to 1031 exchanges Pursuing the lifestyle you want The 1031 Exchange is a process Oil, gas, minerals, easements, and DSTs Case study: Multifamily and capital gains tax Timeline process of 1031 Exchanges Delayed and reverse exchanges Qualified intermediary and fund security How 1031 Exchanges with syndications Questions asked: What is your number one failure in real estate? - Sold all multifamily units 10 years ago As AD investor, what advice do you have for other military investors to be successful? - Just go for it. Knowledge is not doing, so if you're going to do it, do it. What inspired you to serve your country? - Felt like I had a calling thanks to generations of military family members What is your dream? - Creating a lifestyle where I don't have to worry; help people get what they want, and you'll get everything that you've ever wanted. Connecting with the Guest Email: gregschowe1031@gmail.com Phone: (314) 369-8766 Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/greg-schowe-97b0a49/ #1031exchange #taxcode #realestate

The TMossBoss Show
S:88 EP:3 || Grand Theft Auto

The TMossBoss Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 25:11


Felt like I needed to talk about some things involving the video game. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/tmossboss/support

Cougar Sports with Ben Criddle (BYU)
1-5-21 - Christopher Brooks, BYU RB - Why he felt like transferring from Cal to BYU was best for him.

Cougar Sports with Ben Criddle (BYU)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 19:02


Today's Co-Hosts: Ben Criddle (@criddlebenjamin) Subscribe to the Cougar Sports with Ben Criddle podcast:Apple Podcastshttps://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/cougar-sports-with-ben-criddle/id996764363Google Podcastshttps://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuc3ByZWFrZXIuY29tL3Nob3cvMTM2OTkzOS9lcGlzb2Rlcy9mZWVkSpotifyhttps://open.spotify.com/show/7dZvrG1ZtKkfgqGenR3S2mPocket Castshttps://pca.st/SU8aOvercasthttps://overcast.fm/itunes996764363/cougar-sports-with-ben-criddle-byuSpreakerhttps://www.spreaker.com/show/cougar-sports-with-ben-criddleStitcherhttps://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=66416iHeartRadiohttps://www.iheart.com/podcast/966-cougar-sports-with-29418022TuneInhttps://tunein.com/podcasts/Sports-Talk--News/Cougar-Sports-with-Ben-Criddle-p731529/

Könyv-Kult Bibliopod
2020 Filmodüsszeia - Mátrix: Feltámadások kritika

Könyv-Kult Bibliopod

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 55:19


Weboldal: 2020 FilmodüsszeiaFacebook: 2020 FilmodüsszeiaInstagram: 2020 FilmodüsszeiaYouTube: 2020 FilmodüsszeiaE-mail: 2020filmodusszeia@gmail.comKönyvkultúra Magazin

Reddit Explains Conspiracy & the Unknown
r/AskReddit; What Is Your Most Terrifying ‘We Need to Leave NOW' Rush of Fear You've Felt?

Reddit Explains Conspiracy & the Unknown

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 8:58


Kyler21, a touring musician, said his car broke down in some random place in Mississippi. His friend received an airdrop request and as they were getting into their car to leave, he opened the airdrop. There were 7 pictures of dead bodies, and the last two pictures they received were of them repairing the car in the parking lot. Submit your stories: popmediaagency@gmail.com

Transforming Together
Transforming Boundaries—Somatics & Felt Sense with Anne Eckman

Transforming Together

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 58:41


What if we transformed the way we thought about boundaries from the watered down and single lensed discussion of boundaries you might see popularized in social media, to an understanding of Boundaries that encompasses the entire self, including and centering our Felt Sense? What if we learned how to start connecting with our bodies so that we could actually feel and respect our bodies sensations as a way to understand our boundaries? In this Episode of Transforming Together the HopeWorks Podcast, key host, MC Carey (they/them) is joined by HopeWorks Clinical Therapist, Anne Eckman (she/her) who helps to guide the conversation of boundaries through the lens of Somatic Therapy and mind-body healing. MC & Anne go through exercises to help start the work of connecting to our own felt sense, discuss the reasons why this may be so hard and new for folks, and offer knowledge around how boundary setting helps to heal our relationships to self/partners and also helps to heal our community. Boundary setting is a transformative act, and starting from an embodied place, a place of safety, can help us connect with boundaries in a more authentic and whole way. More felt sense exercises here: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1r43S2OEhVtOwFAe2qAdxquKM5WnhujvE/view?usp=sharing 

Locked On Predators - Daily Podcast On The Nashville Predators
Josi's absence being felt as Preds lose second straight

Locked On Predators - Daily Podcast On The Nashville Predators

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 34:33


The Nashville Predators brought a C-effort into Columbus, and as a result, fell to the Blue Jackets 4-3 in a shootout. Nick and Ann break down the ways Roman Josi's absence has impacted the Preds during their two-game skid. Plus, in our last show of 2021, we have New Year's resolutions for Mattias Ekholm, Dante Fabbro, John Hynes, Phil Tomasino, and others! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Tournament Poker Edge Podcast
December 31, 2021 - Variance on and off the felt with Matt Stout

The Tournament Poker Edge Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 66:33


Audience favorite Matt Stout returns to the podcast to catch us up on the latest with his life, his poker career, and The Charity Series of Poker!For the best in tournament poker strategy, visit www.tournamentpokeredge.com

Filmbarátok Podcast
Filmbarátok Podcast #224

Filmbarátok Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 362:28


Filmbarátok Podcast #224 (December 2021) 380 perc Beszélgetnek: Gábor, Blacksheep, Sorter, Gergő, freddyD Téma: -Pókember: Nincs hazaút [SPOILERES] (00:24:22) -Mátrix: Feltámadások [SPOILERES] (01:30:30) -Ne nézz fel! (02:31:00) -Évösszegzés 2021 (03:15:32) +++Az adás eredeti hossza 380 perc volt, ezt nem engedte feltölteni a Soundcloud, úgyhogy egy minimálisan gyorsított verzióval engedte csak. A hiba jelezve van feléjük, addig vagy ez a verzió van, vagy éljetek a Youtube/direkt letöltés lehetőségéve

Raise Your Vibration
200: If You've Felt Lost In 2021 This Might Be Why

Raise Your Vibration

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 21:33


In this episode Shelby breaks down the collective energy of 2021 and why we all may have been feeling a little lost. She also shares: ∆ How to use this energy to catapult you forward ∆ The integration of polarities ∆ How to refocus in 2022 Offerings: ∆ The Portal (The Rebirth Masterclass) ∆ Quantum Healing Session ∆ The Frequency 1-1 Mentorship ∆ Energetic Mastery: The Mastermind Connect With Shelby: Shelby's Instagram Shelby Rose Shops TikTok Website Donate To The Show

The Steve Matthes Show on RacerX

Former Yamaha, Honda, Suzuki and Kawasaki factory mechanic Jim Felt talks about all those years on the circuit, meeting Johnny O'Mara, working with the works bikes, the Suzuki years, how started building bicycles, selling that company, what he thinks of E-Bikes, KTM buying his brand now and more

The Sick Podcast with Tony Marinaro
Habs Talk #102 - A Loss That Felt Like A Win!

The Sick Podcast with Tony Marinaro

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 22:30


On this episode of The Sick Podcast, Jared Book from Habs Eyes On The Prize joins Tony Marinaro following the Canadiens 5-4 loss to the Lightning to discuss how the Habs put up a good fight with such a depleted lineup. Don't forget to follow The Sick Podcast on iHeartRadio, Instagram, Facebook, YouTube, and all other podcast platforms!

Raiders Podcast Network
Steve Mariucci on John Madden: 'His impact will be felt for a long time' | RPN

Raiders Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 8:51


Raiders.com's Eddie Paskal is joined by NFL Network's Steve Mariucci to discuss John Madden's impact on the football world, their friendship and more.

Klubfiller & Friends
Klubfiller - Never Felt

Klubfiller & Friends

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 2:05


Klubfiller - Never Felt Release Info TBC

Father Brian Park's Podcast
Episode 113: Christmas - The Soul Felt its Worth

Father Brian Park's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 7:43


The Ken Carman Show with Anthony Lima
Derek Rackley: Stefanski still felt Baker Mayfield gave team best chance to win

The Ken Carman Show with Anthony Lima

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 11:51


Derek Rackley of Westwood One joined Anthony Lima on The Ken Carman Show with Anthony Lima to breakdown the Browns 24-22 loss to the Green Bay Packers, as well as Baker Mayfield and officiating. Listen to The Ken Carman Show with Anthony Lima weekday mornings 6-10am on Sports Radio 92.3 The Fan and the Audacy App! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Slouch Theory by Andre D. Thompson
BURGAH! I aint never felt so American

Slouch Theory by Andre D. Thompson

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 42:36


Burger and fries !!! Follow: @AndreDThompson Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Cultivate Church
Thrill of Hope // Wk4 - The Soul Felt Its Worth

Cultivate Church

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 18:00


The wise men set out on a journey to find Jesus. In the process they found so much more. Discover what searching brings to your life.

Shandon Presbyterian Church
December 24, 2021 -- The Soul Felt Its Worth (Christmas Eve)

Shandon Presbyterian Church

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 16:17


Isaiah 40:1-11 // Rev. Jenny McDevitt preaching // Sermon Series: The Thrill of Hope

SAPC Sermons
...and the soul felt its worth...

SAPC Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 29:28


Sermon by The Rev. Jenna Meyers, recorded for virtual worship on Christmas Eve, December 24, 2021.

Sermons
The Soul Felt Its Worth

Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021


Christmas Eve service in St. Charles, Illinois

Young Adult Movie Ministry
Vol. 2, Episode 12: Felt Loss

Young Adult Movie Ministry

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 65:07


Details, credits, errata: Merry Christmas! This week’s episode is about The Muppet Christmas Carol, NOT A Muppet Christmas Carol, or Carol. Or Scrooge. Or Scrooged. There are lots of versions of the Charles Dickens novella, which you can see in its original manuscript form here. You can also visit it in person at the home, now museum, of real-life Scrooge JP Morgan! This is a free episode, so please consider subscribing!or buying your hosts a coffee using ko-fi.com/samthielman. Thank you for listening! We love you!Our theme song is Louis Armstrong and His Hot 5’s Muskrat Ramble, made freely available by the Boston Public Library and audio engineering shop George Blood, LP through the Internet Archive. The Muppet Christmas Carol is copyright 1992 Jim Henson Productions; brief audio excerpts from the film are used here for purposes of review. All other material is copyright 2021 Sam Thielman and Alissa Wilkinson. This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at yammpod.substack.com/subscribe

Hurdle
5-MINUTE FRIDAY: The One Thing I've Never Felt Good About Doing Alone

Hurdle

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 7:09


In today's episode of 5-MINUTE FRIDAY, I'm talking about where my head's at with an upcoming hurdle; a reminder that just because you've conquered similar #hurdlemoments in the past doesn't mean that you won't feel uneasy about new ones as they come. SOCIAL @emilyabbate @hurdlepodcast On-Demand Goal Setting Workshop JOIN: THE *Secret* FACEBOOK GROUP SIGN UP: Weekly Hurdle Newsletter ASK ME A QUESTION: Leave me a voice message, ask me a question, and it could be featured in an upcoming episode! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/hurdle/message

Damascus Road Community Church
The Soul Felt its Worth

Damascus Road Community Church

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 40:15


The weary world rejoices! We've been living that statement all month. Scripture teaches us that a great light has appeared in the darkness (Isaiah 9:2) and Jesus said anyone who follows Him will never walk in darkness (John 8:12). In a world full of uncertainty, pain, and suffering, we declare hope; where there is darkness, we share light; where there is fear, we infuse courage; where there is despair, we stand by faith. And so now, a weary world can indeed rejoice. We can experience the thrill of hope that comes from knowing Jesus. His offer of peace is available to everyone who is willing to receive it. And every soul can feel its worth.

Off the Couch
Episode 50: I Felt Like I Was Walking Into a Dark Room

Off the Couch

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 25:46


Attaching our identity to the labels and expectations handed to us, like “good wife” and “loving mom,” can cause us to lose our sense of self.    It wasn't until this week's podcast guest, Brittany Churchill, went through her divorce that she realized just what she had been giving up in her marriage. As Brittany puts it, she was placed on this earth to be Brittany. If she couldn't actively live into who she was unmistakably made to be, she was denying the very reason she was given life. Though it was hard for her to envision what her future would look like outside of her marriage, she knew it would be harder for her to stay.    Brittany Churchill is an author, speaker, entrepreneur and single mom of two kids with a big heart to help women awaken to their worth and tap into their personal power. While getting divorced, moving states, and going back to work full-time, she wrote her first book called Tap In Not Out: How overwhelmed moms can reclaim peace, cultivate a better life and thrive. She has developed her own TAP IN Method based on her book and divorce healing which she guides women through their inner blueprint to ignite a more fulfilling life.   Learn more about Brittany Churchill by visiting her website at https://www.thebrittanychurchill.com/  and learn more about the TAP IN Method here https://bit.ly/TAPINMethodIntroVideo.

The Red Agenda - A show about Liverpool FC
"The League Cup has never felt so European"

The Red Agenda - A show about Liverpool FC

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 37:23


The Athletic's Caoimhe O'Neill and sports writer David Anderson join Steve Hothersall to reflect on Liverpool's incredible Carabao Cup win over Leicester City. The heroics of Caoimhín Kelleher as well as the futures of Joe Gomez and Neco Williams are put under the spotlight, plus will the semi-final with Arsenal be played over one or two legs?

The Sewers of Paris
That Really Felt Like Christmas Magic (Ep 367 - Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer/Jonathan)

The Sewers of Paris

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 49:28


I hope you're having a delightful holiday time, full of seasonal entertainment and sweaters and good cheer. For this week's episode, we're heading into the archives to hear my 2016 interview with Jonathan, who grew up in a deeply religious family and always found himself swept up in the pageantry of the season. These days, he's distanced himself from the faith, but unexpectedly Christmas has become spiritual for him in a far more personal way.We'll have that conversation in a minute. First a reminder to check out my YouTube channel where I post videos about queer pop culture. And head over to my Patreon to watch hours of bonus videos featuring stories of TV and film history.Check out my cute little newsletter where I share sneak peeks at what I'm working on at mattbaume.com.Big thanks to everyone who supports the Sewers of Paris at Patreon.com/mattbaume. And to everyone who's left a review on Apple podcasts or wherever you listen.

Dale & Keefe
Gresh & Keefe - Tom E Curran was stunned that Belichick even felt he needed to apologize

Dale & Keefe

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 14:33


Gresh is joined by Tom E Curran to talk Patriots vs Bills and Bill Belichick's apology to the media. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Only Three Lads - Classic Alternative Music Podcast
E91 - Top 5 Albums of 2021 (with Ducks Ltd.)

Only Three Lads - Classic Alternative Music Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 83:01


This is part one of our Best of 2021 extravaganza, wherein we step out of the O3L era to discuss the albums that we're digging this year.  We've cooked up something very special for you this week - direct from Toronto, our special guests are the magnificent Ducks Ltd.!  The duo of Tom McGreevy and Evan Lewis join us to talk about their own rising career, as well as their favourite new records.   The band has enjoyed a remarkable 2021, recently releasing their debut full length album Modern Fiction, and racking up a slew of "Best of 2021" accolades from the likes of AllMusic, Paste, Exclaim, Stereogum and more.  Their smart, infectious brand of jangly guitar pop harkens back to '80s indie bands like The Go-Betweens, Felt, The Chills and The Bats, yet is no mere nostalgia exercise.  This is pure pop for now people, to borrow from Nick Lowe.   Ducks Ltd.: Music | Ducks Ltd. (bandcamp.com)   Stay tuned next week for our Top 5 Songs of 2021!

I Survived Theatre School
Fresh and Fancy

I Survived Theatre School

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 70:07


Intro: Amtrak, you can't afford to live anywhere, where am I trying to go?, being of service, Legacy, Fresh and FancyLet Me Run This By You: We get feedback from Dave, talk about Jeff Garlin, NO ONE IS HIDING ANYTHINGCOMPLETE TRANSCRIPT (unedited):1 (10s):And I'm Gina Pulice. We went to theater school2 (12s):Together. We survived it.1 (14s):You didn't quite understand it. 20 years later, we're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense of it all2 (21s):Survived theater school. And you will too. Are we famous yet?1 (31s):Hello survivors. It is Gina. Just wanted to let you know that today, boss and I are guest lists. We are without a guest and we instead had a conversation, just the two of us, chickens about a ton of things, including the fact that nothing is a secret. Even the things that we think are and talking about legacy. This is a topic that boss has been really interested in recently. And I guess I'm starting to get interested in it too. At some point in one's life, one starts to think, Hmm, did it matter that I was here? What did I do? What, what proof or evidence of is there? What I did, or maybe you don't think that way, maybe your legacy is just that you lived a contented and happy life and, and it doesn't matter if it is written in the stars in any way, either way.1 (1m 22s):It's fine with me. Just interesting to learn about what people's philosophies or the thoughts are about legacy. And as we come to this end of the year and we're reflecting on, wow, we're reflecting on, I guess these last two crazy years, hopefully everybody is entering this time of reflection with a lot more clarity. Maybe I think the pandemic has been clarifying among many other things. And so hopefully you're feeling, I don't know, clear, and hopefully you are enjoying this podcast.1 (2m 4s):And if you are enjoying it, you are hopefully subscribed. And if you're subscribed, hopefully you have left us a review. Honestly, I don't even care what the review says. I think just having reviews is the thing that helps us with the king algorithm. And that's important only because we want to be able to keep doing this podcast. We enjoy doing it. We, we get a lot out of it. And we've heard from people that people are getting a lot out of it in return. So it's a mutually great thing that we'll be able to continue. If you are able to put your love for our podcast, not just in your heart, but in the world, tell the public, shout it from the rooftops.1 (2m 47s):I'm not going to stop you from shouting it from the rooftops. I'll tell you that much right now. Anyway, that's all for that. Please enjoy.3 (3m 10s):I'm going to take it to all those places. Cause those are like some of my favorite places in Southern California. And I didn't know that. So I'm learning a lot. And so I took it to San Francisco to Oakland and my cousin picked me up. But what is fantastic and sad about Amtrak for people that don't know? Like nobody knows shit about Amtrak, but Amtrak is a government funded. So rail is government funded. It was supposed to be like the thing of the future. It was supposed to be just rail. We weren't like flying and, and, and, and train travel was supposed to be comparable like it was going to be, but it just like, it has a lot to do. Someone was telling me like w who I met on the Amtrak.3 (3m 51s):Cause you eat in community eating. So these two amazing women that I met told me that like something with world war two and trains, the trains all had to be used for, for like ammunition, like the war Fs. And so then it became less of a, a passenger situation. And then when flying really anyway. So, but it's gorgeous. So w and what you can do is, so I bought a coach ticket, which is literally like, you know, I don't know, 50 bucks, a hundred bucks round trip from, but then you can bid to upgrade your seat because Amtrak has no money.3 (4m 32s):So what you can do is say, okay, well, like I'm willing to pay. They give you a range I'm willing to pay. And I did the lowest $20 more to go to business class, which is like super much nicer. Right. So I bid, and then they said, of course they accepted my bid because it's not a full train. Nobody trained travels by train. And so business classes dope. And it is like, you get two seats. It, they reclined almost all the way. There's, it's just, it's quiet. Like coaches, coaches, loud as hell, where people are eating, like, you know, Funyuns and like Takis chips the whole time. And like, you know, a lot of people like down on their luck and stuff like that.3 (5m 15s):Okay. So, you know, I did business class on the way there and lovely. I mean, there's wifi. I mean, it's like dope. And the bathrooms were relative are clean. I don't in business class anyway. All right. So it literally goes up the coast. And so you, you, you're on the ocean. It's the weirdest thing you're like, this is I'm, I'm traveling right next to the ocean. It's a long time. The whole time. Almost long as hell though. Okay. So like, you know, the flight is 45 minutes from Burbank to, to, to San Francisco. And the train ride is 10 hours. Like, that's just how it is. Like, that's, if you are in a hurry, you do not take the Amtrak.3 (5m 57s):You know what I mean? So there is like, I do have some shame, like, people think I'm ridiculous a little bit. They're like, I'm like, where am I going? I, it's not like I have pressing meetings. I am not. Yeah.1 (6m 9s):And for, for the life, so many of us are living right now, which is working from home or working remotely or making your own schedule. Why shouldn't you it's much better for the environment to take the train. Yeah.3 (6m 23s):It is it, you take the airplane. Yes. So, so it was amazing. And then I had a wonderful, wonderful time in San Francisco. Like I never really liked San Francisco. I don't know what my problem was. Like, I never really got into San Francisco even though like people cause1 (6m 41s):Your mom left you a spree for, oh3 (6m 43s):My God. Yeah. If you listen to this podcast, you know that like, you know, my mom was having an affair and, and, and we went to San Francisco and she literally left my sister and I at the esprit outlet, which thank God, had a restaurant in the outlet for like what felt like forever. But it, it was a work day. It was a full work day at a spree. It was like eight hours. So I just really, in the last couple years have really grown to love the shit out of the bay area. Like I know the tech bros have taken over. I know that you can't afford to live there. Okay. All those things are true. I still, because maybe I'm not from there.3 (7m 23s):I know I'm not so butt hurt about that. Like I, you know, and my aunt and uncle this beautiful, beautiful condo in north beach and my cousin lives in the inner inner Richmond, I don't know. Anyway. So she's on Clement street and it's gorgeous. And I walked everywhere and we went hiking in Moran and we drove to Marin. So I would live there. I would live. I mean, I, you know, who can afford to live there, but here's the thing that I think a lot of us too are, are, are really looking at. Most of us in my circle are like, we, we really literally can't afford to live anywhere. Like the, the world is becoming unaffordable on a, so many ways. And so many levels that the thing of like, oh, it's so expensive in blank.3 (8m 6s):City becomes less sort of exciting or like less sensational because it's like, look around what, what are you talking about? You can't live anywhere. It's all, it's all terrible. So, so all this to say, like, it was, it was a great trip. And then on the way back, I got smart and I was like, okay, well, let me see if I can upgrade to a room. You can bid on rooms on the train, right. Cause it's 10 hours or whatever. And I was like, okay, let me, and they took my bid of, you know, $40 or something to upgrade to a room. And that has all the amazing meals included. So two meals, which lunches, if you just paid for it is 25.3 (8m 49s):Dinner is 45. So I got lunch and dinner free. And I just tipped to the, and it was delicious salmon. I mean like this, and I got my own room and I wrote, and I, I like lived, lived my best life on the train1 (9m 5s):Girl. I need to do this, but I don't live in California. I mean, maybe I'll just pick a, maybe I'll pick it east coast version of that.3 (9m 16s):It doesn't matter. Like you could, you can also take it like they have specials. Like there's apparently a really beautiful ride between DC and New York. So1 (9m 29s):Yeah, no. So I also love or have loved the idea of train travel. And I always really wanted to take, there's a, there's a train that goes somehow through the Rockies. That's the one I really want to go on. But the first time I treated myself to a train trip. Oh, that's right. The worst possible3 (9m 53s):You were pregnant. Right.1 (9m 55s):I was the worst possible route to, we went from Chicago to Texas. So there's nothing to look at. The train was disgusting. It was so dirty and I was pregnant. So my, you know, my sense of smell, which is already very heightened was even, was just off the chain. And as a result of being on that train, I developed3 (10m 24s):Vertigo. I'm like, God, I mean,1 (10m 26s):It was coincidental. I never, we never did figure out what the deal was. But I developed a kind of vertigo when I was pregnant, where I had to crawl on the floor because I couldn't, you know, cause I couldn't walk and thankfully knock on wood that has not returned to me. And it also didn't return to my next two pregnancies, but yet it soured me and us on trains. But I think it's just the route we picked. We need to pick3 (10m 57s):It's the route and yeah, definitely don't have, don't be pregnant, but that's not going to happen for you again. So you don't have to worry about that. But like I'm all done with that. And so I had a great trip and I actually had like these huge realizations while I was there about, about working about money, about the entertainment industry, it was really, it was I, and I went with the intention of really looking at what is it that I'm going for in life? I mean, that's such a huge question, but like what, where am I trying to go? And, and the idea of service, right? So I always thought being of service was about other people, but really what it is for me is being of service in the way that I want to be of service is actually for me, like I didn't realize that I feel is good for my mental, physical, and emotional health when I'm being of service in a way that feels not to pleading, but all, but like really energizing and also like a, like thinking about legacy, I've also been thinking about legacy, like what is my, what is going to be my legacy?3 (12m 12s):And it tied into like, I was really, you know, I spend because the holidays are coming up way too much. It will not wait too much, but a lot of money on my nieces and nephew for Christmas gifts, right? Like thousands of dollars, right. Dish, I love giving gifts. It's my jam. But then I realized that like, and you probably, you know, I'd be so interested to hear what you have to say, but having children, but like a lot of this stuff, I got them, they outgrow, they don't care about very soon is cheaply made and is garbagey. And it has a very, very little lasting effect on their lives. And that's just the truth and I'm not judging it.3 (12m 52s):I'm just saying that seemed, that was the data I was picking up. And I'm like, that's literally like just throwing money away after a while year after year. So there's a, let me get smart about this. So we started a trust for each kid where we put that and I said to that shutter dude, I wish someone had done that for my ass. So I said to them, you can choose, we can keep going the way we're doing with gifts for Christmas and blah, blah, blah. Or you can, we can put donate every year and you could literally get very, very, very few gifts. But your huge gift is that each year we put a certain amount of money. And then basically by the time you're 30, you'll be millionaires.3 (13m 36s):I mean, just because of the way money grows, not even because we're putting that much in. And they were like, what? And so miles really educated me and them on the power of, of the investing money in a way that is with the interest and all that shit. And so that's what we're doing. And I, I got to say like, it tied into this idea of legacy and like, I would watch rather have those kiddos like be able to use it. And it's not like one of these things where they have to use it for college because fuck it, man, not everyone goes to goddamn college right away or ever, but they can't touch it until they're a certain age or they can choose to keep it in there and roll it over to another kind of account or whatever.3 (14m 17s):So, but I'm thinking about this shit differently in terms of legacy based on like, what do I want to leave this earth? Like, do I want to, you know, have, have my legacy be that I gave my, my niece to like a fake Dior ring that turned her finger green or right, right. It's fine. But it's so that's how we started it this Christmas. Cause I was like enough, enough, enough. Yeah. Yeah. Well, what you've just given us here in this conversation is like the center of a1 (14m 51s):Bicycle wheel by the goal wheel. And we have a, there's a bunch of spokes there. There's like talking about what's your purpose in life and where are you going? And there's talking about your legacy and then there's talking about consumption. And then there's talking about instant gratification that we give to kids in the form of gifts. And there's talking about that a lot, the pressures that we put on ourselves on Christmas, I mean just suffice it to say, I have been on the sometimes what feels like the circular journey of, you know, from, I mean, you know, when, when I first had kids, when we first had kids, it was really exciting to give the gifts.1 (15m 33s):It was exciting to create a Christmas that I remember from my childhood, the excitement of coming downstairs3 (15m 40s):And magic magic1 (15m 43s):1000%. And, and that sustained me for the period of time that the kids are literally happy to get whatever the minute it turned. And it turned when the oldest one was not that old. Yeah. I'm going to say like seven. Yeah. Yeah. And he, they had a bunch of presents and they opened everything up. And then he said, is that it? Yeah. And I went, oh damn, we're doing this wrong. We're doing it completely wrong. And so we've had a few Christmases and this is one of them where we're not doing gifts, which is to say, there will be stockings, you know, and maybe one little thing, but we're not doing the multiple presents under the trees.1 (16m 31s):We didn't do multiple Eddy presents for Hanukkah because of exactly what you said, toys is five to 15 minutes of joy for a lifetime, literally a lifetime of trash that I then, then it becomes my job to get rid of organized, find a space for a blood body block. And now the kids are pretty much almost all of them at an age where they don't want any of those things anymore. They want money, they want electronics. They want, so we have the way that we save money for them is not in the, for like Christmas, but that's actually a really good idea.1 (17m 12s):And something going to bring up with my husband and says,3 (17m 15s):Yeah, I mean, for those of us, I think it's a great idea. And also it's so much easier, not easy. Well, I don't know for miles and I don't have kids, so it's not in our face all the time. And we moved away from them. It's a different story when you're in under the same roof with being with children, with beings, small beings that, you know, are you so I, I am very aware that we have like the we're the aunt and uncle to different, it's a different deal. But like we just thought, wait a minute.1 (17m 44s):Yeah. And the thing that you're really after when you give a gift or at least I think is the joy that it brings to the person and, and that's great, but like you're saying most of the time, it's a, it's a very fleeting. And also like you don't want to teach kids that this is the way to direct your joy, right? Like from getting things, right. I'm not saying that that's, that's what you're definitely doing. If you give Christmas present, I'm not saying that. But you know, we just live in this very like consumer oriented culture,3 (18m 17s):The kid's fault. It's nobody's fault. It's a system, it's a systemic situation, but it hit me last. When I really, when I really was like, okay, I want to do this differently. It was last Christmas. My youngest niece wanted and got it is not knocking anyone involved, but it was very clear to me that we, it was really stark about what was going on. She wanted a claw machine, a mini Kalama machine from an arcade that literally just had candy in it, candy bars. And you made this loudest noise you've ever heard, took 10 batteries, 10 big ass batteries.3 (19m 7s):And literally there's candy in it. That's killing us all the sugar and look, you know, whatever. That was the least of my worries. But I was like, this is wait, what?1 (19m 16s):That's interesting. That has me3 (19m 20s):Wait. And it was a, probably a really expensive machine. It's not cheap, but that's what she wanted. My sister got it. And look, I'm not knocking anyone involved, but for me, I was like, it was so, so striking about what was going on. Cause it was so loud and obnoxious.1 (19m 39s):Let me ask you this. What do you remember getting for Christmas? Okay.3 (19m 42s):My favorite thing I ever got, this is so crazy in my life when I was a kid kid was okay. Two things I can tell the first gift that I like went Gaga, Google over was something, it was a makeup kit called fresh and fancy. And it had, it had perfumes. It had, and it was probably, you know, 9 99, 99 at Kmart. But like my sister and I each got one and it, what, what it was, was super fun, super adult, super smelled. So good. And I, there is a picture of me opening it up and in, in my I'm saying fresh and fancy.3 (20m 27s):And then I take the picture.1 (20m 30s):Do you have that picture accessible?3 (20m 33s):Yeah, I think so. I can send it, send it, send1 (20m 36s):It. Yeah.3 (20m 38s):I will send that and to fresh and fancy. Okay. That was number one. And then the second gift I remember as an adult getting that was really moving to was my mother who traveled all the time and who I really sort of labeled as a selfish, kind of a human at times gave my sister and I each a ticket, a plane ticket to go anywhere in the world because she had so many miles. But like the fact that she, she thought about us and the fact that her travel, which as a child brought so much grief to me because she was gone all the time that she was then turning it around and giving my sister and I each a plane ticket to anywhere was really moving to me and also was really abundant and felt like that's awesome.3 (21m 25s):You know, is that when you went to Columbia, that's when I went to Prague by myself for a week and a half, which was insane or two weeks, it was crazy, but1 (21m 34s):Oh yeah,3 (21m 37s):It was in, when I lived in LA, it was a long time ago. So, and I, I, I, it just, so I wish I had gone with somebody else. It was the most lonely, it was beautiful and Prague is crazy and, and fun, but I went alone, but that's like really just indicative of where I was at in my LA life. So it doesn't, that's not shocking to me. What about you? Like, what do you remember being like, oh my God,1 (22m 0s):I got to speak and spell. I, I really, I really coveted speak and spell. And for those of you who don't know a speak and spell is just, would be an app now. And it wouldn't be nearly as fun. This was a self-contained. It was like a really thick version, like a three inch thick version, maybe note or two of an iPad. And it was orange and it had a handle built into the top and it would say a word in a computerized voice, like structure, and then you'd have to spell it. And if you got it right, this is the, so this tells you a lot about my psychology, the high, I got that little sound telling me I spelled something, right.1 (22m 43s):I just felt like I could, I was vanquishing Rome. It was, I felt so powerful that I got a bike one year. That was amazing. And I kind of lip gloss that smelled like root beer.3 (22m 57s):Oh, I know that those1 (22m 59s):Are the things that just like off the top of my head. I remember just falling in love with, and, and being, you know, unequivocally joyful, happy with moments. And that's the thing that you're always after, like for yourself or the people that you love, you want to impart this joy. That's what I was going to get you. Like, you want to impart this joy and then there's this tacit thing about like, you better feel joy from this. At least that's what I find myself, you know, evaluate whether or not this person is feeling joy from it, because that's what I want. I want to give them joy of this present. And then I feel sad if it doesn't work out.3 (23m 38s):Yeah. And, and, and, and, and it, it usually doesn't work out like that only because people aren't mind readers people don't, everyone's different. And Joy's so, so personal. And so, so specific to that person. And it's like, it's just such a setup, but it's also, we keep trying and I'm going to still, I still love giving presents, but I now am like, oh, okay. Can't be for me, like the mass quantity of just, yeah. Crap. Like, it really hit me too. Like I bought one year, my niece was really into Shopkins.3 (24m 19s):Remember, oh yeah. I bought like $200 worth of Shopkins for her.1 (24m 23s): lasted for that year. And then she makes, never picked up shots.3 (24m 29s):Not even the whole year, maybe a month.1 (24m 32s):That's the thing, man. They get, and they get, and I, I, I was going to say, this is especially true for girls, but I'm, I'm going to re revise that because the boys did it too. When they love that thing, it's all they care about. It's their whole world. You know, my daughter said to me all, I, the only thing I want you to get me is just tons and tons of puppets. What's a3 (24m 58s):Pocket.1 (24m 59s):A pocket is a PLA silicone flat toy that has these half hemisphere, a half a hemisphere that you put, like you, it's a satisfying sensation to push it in. And then you flip it over and push it the other way. Shit.3 (25m 24s):What's in that what's in the pocket, like a little creatures,1 (25m 28s):Zero, nothing. It's in the shape of whatever you want it to be in the shape of it's a fidget choice. Essentially. I3 (25m 36s):Understand. It's like an ASMR founding,1 (25m 39s):Totally tile. It doesn't make a sound. It's all about it being tactile. Yeah. And, and, you know, go to the stores and they're everywhere. Puppets. You'll see if you start looking for now, you'll see that they're everywhere. And so that's what she wants. And a half of me completely wants to indulge that wish. And the other half of me says, I'll be throwing these all away in six months. And then I'll feel like an asshole because I spent a bunch of money on something that I knew was a fool's errand.3 (26m 10s):Yeah, I'm right. It's like so hard because they believe they really want it.1 (26m 18s):They really, it's3 (26m 18s):Not, it's not a joke. It's not a, it's not a joke. Like that's their jam.1 (26m 24s):Yeah. So this year we're going skiing for Christmas. That's3 (26m 27s):Our part of New Hampshire.1 (26m 29s):We're going to Vermont. And I think I've told everybody on the podcast I do. That's right.3 (26m 35s):You'd like the ski lodge into, right?1 (26m 38s):Yes ma'am. So I go and I get everybody off in the morning to their little activities and it's as, you know, a huge amount of work, then the gear and the schlepping. So I help everybody get to that. And I get back to my little cozy spot and read and write and just hang out that sound. So I'm really looking forward to it. Yeah. And honestly, that's the thing that people I I'm banking on. Cause this will be the third time we've done a trip instead of presence. And, and these are trips that we still talk about. So I think it is a good investment experiences are a better investment than3 (27m 14s):I absolutely agree. And I feel like that's the trust starting for these kids. It's like, we're gifting them with the experience of maybe like a down payment on a fricking home, a car to get them from here to there a education, like a real thing, like a thing that you need to like live your life versus a fricking fake Cuban Linx chain. I didn't even know what Cuban links were. I didn't know what was happening.1 (27m 42s):I don't know what that3 (27m 42s):Is. What is Cuban links? I oh, those1 (27m 45s):Big, Easy.3 (27m 51s):And it's just ugly. And it's also $6,006,000. What did Jackie about? Oh anyway,1 (27m 59s):I, you, you just did yourself, such a favor. I mean, you did them mostly a favor, but you did yourself such a favor because also the other thing is, you know, I have experienced, I go out shopping and I'm immediately overwhelmed and I'm trying, okay, now this one, I got this,3 (28m 14s):I asked who gets one and did, is it equal? And like,1 (28m 18s):Oh my God, it's just, it's like a, it's a hell3 (28m 33s):I thought we might start out with, I got some feedback on the, okay. So my, on the podcast from, so my, my parents' best friends, Nancy and Dave, they like helped raise me and blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. And they've really become like second parents. And, you know, they, they hadn't heard the podcast. So they were like, send us an episode. And I said, okay. And you know, it's always tricky because they really know me. They really know my parents. They really know my life in some ways in my childhood. So I was like, well, so I sent them an episode. I sent them the does small ocean Hooga knocker episode because Dave is a therapist and he works with people with addictions.3 (29m 13s):And I thought, oh, that might be interesting. And so the feedback is so interesting. The feedback I got was I'll read it on air because it's good. It's a podcast. Podcasts was good. Felt like a reunion. Sounds like David was deep into self-destruction before he recovered a talented guy was hoping to hear more from you. But that's for selfish reasons. I like how you identified the macro themes in your Roundup at the end. And then I wrote, thank you so much. We're we Gina and I are always aware that like, like, you know, we don't want it just to be us and we don't want to just to be guests.3 (29m 54s):So we're trying to find a mix. So his feedback it's so funny. He liked, he likes to give feedback. You know, if you and Gina are willing to talk about what life experiences brought you to embrace the arts and try and make a decent living, I liked the way you have reconstructed your family life so that you don't have to be an emotional casualty. There's a lot to talk about how you both learn to think from, from psychodynamic and systems orientation. I don't even know what that means. I'm not smart enough. The best stories are the stuff of good soap operas, good screenwriting can teach people how to better understand and navigate within their interpersonal worlds.3 (30m 36s):I'd like to hear another one, if you don't mind the feedback. So Loves our inter you know, he's, he's a therapist, obviously. So he loves that. But it was interesting. I mean, I seriously don't know what half of that means, but like,1 (30m 54s):No, he just means no, he just means like the thing, I mean here, here's this big secret that we've never told anybody, this podcast is not really about theaters. Right. And so what you saying is the, the, the psychodynamic for, you know, background that we have influences and informs our conversation so that we, we think about things dynamic and that's it. And that would be interesting to a therapist. Therapist thinks about things dynamically too. And yeah, I mean, honestly, it there's so much it's, so there's always so much to talk about. There's so much to talk about. Like, and I, well, the thing I, this ties into the thing that I kind of wanted to talk to you about, which is that when we first started recording a podcast, it was not, I survived theater school.1 (31m 44s):We were calling undeniable, right.3 (31m 46s):That's right.1 (31m 47s):And we had about eight, you know, hour long conversations that were about this concept of being undeniable. So I kind of wanted to clarify for people who may not know why is our company called undeniable? Why is not the website? Because when you told the great story about it, we didn't never air that till we did. So, no, because it was, it was for,3 (32m 20s):We never found and they tried to send to you and then it got1 (32m 23s):No, no, no, no, no. I'm just saying like, we recorded those and then we changed our mind about what the3 (32m 29s):Right. Yes. Okay. Yes. That makes sense. Oh, should we tell the story? Yeah. So it's so funny because I wonder if he ever heard this, if he would even remember, you know, it's so funny, like who remembers telling people what? All right. So the story is this. So I, well, first to say that, like you and I were talking about like, what, what is the thing of life? Like, what is again, where I'm at now, which is what are we going after, right. Like, what is the quality of life that I'm going after that you're going after that we're going after as a team. Okay. So it reminded me of this story of I did a solo show and it was called why not me love cancer and Jack White and the woman who was, and it was a solo show basically about cancer and about working for Nick cage and all kinds of things.3 (33m 19s):Just like I surprised theater school is not about theater. School is not really about Jack White, my show, you know, it's whatever. So, okay. So I'm doing this show. And my, the director of my show is this woman named Alison lion. And she happens to be good friends with the comedian and storyteller and actor, Jeff Garlin who I, I didn't know from Adam, like I wasn't a curb, your enthusiasm fan. So I didn't know, but I knew he of him. And I knew he's like a famous guy. Right. So she said, you know, how would you feel about Jeff? Garlin coming to see a dress rehearsal and giving notes. And I was like, oh, sure. Literally being like, oh, a famous person wants to come see my show.3 (34m 0s):That's cool. You know, not like, what can I glean from this artist? You know, just cause that's, that's where my mind went. I would've have been the same. I mean, I just am not mature enough for whatever, so, okay. So I do the, it was, it, it was real nerve and it was an empty house, but him, he and Alison were sitting up there at stage 7 73 on Belmont in Chicago. And so I did the show and whatever, and it was an okay show. I mean, I look, I don't know, but afterwards, if such an interesting story afterwards, he was giving notes to Alison, but not me. And I thought, well, that's weird, but he was really there for her.3 (34m 42s):That was her mentor kind of, you know, her comedy mentor. But then I came out of the house into the house and met and met Jeff and he was lovely. And he said, well, do you want notes? Or somehow it came up like, do I want actor notes? And I was like, of course, which is shocking to me because I never want notes. Right. And I always say, I would love feedback. And by feedback, I mean, compliments, like, that's my . I did say of course, because that's what you say when a fancy person wants to give you notes. And he gave me some great notes, which was stopped swearing so much. And he compared me to Robin Williams, which was amazing.3 (35m 22s):He said, because I could tell he called him by his first name. I do believe he was like, when Robin would swear a lot, I would know that he was, he was, was dying on stage, was off. Yeah. And I was like, that's fascinating or pushing, like I push when I'm swearing. Okay. Great note. I've I've kept that note and blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. All right. So then, then I have to tell us, because it's so interesting because I would have done the same thing. So then after he gave notes, which I kind of blacked out some of them, cause it was a lot, but then he, Alison, we're going to go out to eat at clerks on Belmont, but they didn't invite me. Right. And I was like, oh, and then I was in the bathroom and Alison called and she's like, I'm an idiot.3 (36m 5s):I didn't invite you. Do you want to come? And I was like, oh, of course. Yeah. She, and I think what happens is when you're around famous people, you forget, you1 (36m 13s):Lose your census. It's3 (36m 15s):Very weird. It's a weird thing. I think that's what happened for, so we went to Clark's on Belmont and he, we taught he's so what is he? He's he's a generous. No, he's, he's a big personality. So he takes over rooms. Right? So at clerks, he's the center of the show and it is not anything he's doing. It's just, that's how some people are like,1 (36m 42s):He's not trying to lay low. Right. He's3 (36m 45s):Not trying to lay low. And he also loves people I think, and loves human interaction. I mean, from what I know, as we got into this conversation and somehow, and he said, and he said to me, we were talking about acting and we were talking and he said, I'm going to make a movie and you're going to be in it one day. And I said, that's fantastic. I love that. That's great. That sounds great. And then we talked about other stuff and then he said, you know what you are? And I said, what? And he said, you are undeniable. And I was like, what is even happening? And I was like, okay, thanks. Great. He's like, no, no, no. You're undeniable. Like that show is undeniable.3 (37m 26s):And I was like, what does that mean? And he said, well, it just means that like eat exists in its truest form unapologetically. And I'm totally paraphrasing here, of course. But it was like, it exists in its truest form. It's just is you don't have to like it. You don't have to like, you, you don't have to like what you're saying, but there is a quality that cannot be taken away about the show. It's more than unique. It's more than that. It's undeniable. You don't have to like it. You don't have to dislike it, but it, it exists on its own. And it cannot be basically cannot be fucked with in, in, in that way, you know? And I was like, whoa, that is awesome. And that I feel like is what I'm going for in my life.1 (38m 10s):Yeah. And, and when you told the story before you also said that, that he said, you know, be undeniable continue to be undeniable because that, that is ultimately the only thing that lasts in terms of, you know, the industry or whatever. And as long as you're holding true to, you know, your own undeniable truth or whatever, you can, you know, you can't go wrong. It may not mean that you, whatever, get fame and fortune, but, but you'll be doing, you'll be on the right track.3 (38m 40s):You won't be led astray by your undeniable city. Like you, you won't be, it won't be, you won't go in the wrong direction for too long. If you use an deniability as your north star kind of a thing. And it really, and he, he later told Alison, you know, she's, you know, he kept reiterating like she's undeniable, she's undeniable. And he, and Alison had told me, and I, of course, because, you know, I just figure people say that about everybody analysis and no, he does not do that. And also he stands by his word. So you will one day be in a movie with Jeff Garlin and I was like, cool, great. That's fine. But I it's interesting looking back on the story, it's like, I wish everyone is so scared.3 (39m 24s):Like I wish that I would have used those quotes in my press, but Alison didn't want to use them because she felt she was already asking too. We're all, we always feel like we're asking too much. So she felt that she, she was asking too much just having him come to the show and having him give notes was enough and having him. And I remember at the time I had a musician as part of the show, you know, his name is Philip Michael scales. He's amazing. And he was like, we should totally use Garland's quotes to get more people to come to the show and both Alison and I, it's interesting, both Alex and I were like, oh no, no, no, no, like he's done enough.3 (40m 4s):You know, it's just so1 (40m 5s):Like, yeah. Like, and all I'll do to Alison I would've made probably the same choice, but you know, it's like, what are we so afraid of? What skin is it off of his nose? If you say that he said something that he said, you know what I mean? It's not like his reputation is living or dying on your show. It's just,3 (40m 25s):I mean, yeah. I would have done the same thing too. And I1 (40m 30s):That's the mentality that we've talked about so much on here, and it's definitely true for Hollywood entertainment, whatever, but it may also just be true for life that we kind of inherently have this idea that there's a finite pie. Sure. And you know, it's kind of like the people who think that only whatever 7,000 people are going to heaven, you know, what kind of cockamamie thing is that like you believe in heaven, you believe that all of this is God's plan and that people have been alive for millions of years and yet only 7,000 feet. Right. That to me is like a perfect evidence of the way in which we make ourselves and our, and the possibility so much smaller than they need to be.1 (41m 15s):Yes. So you think there's a finite amount of pie and you say, well, I can't take my one, one thousandths of a sliver, you know, that's Jeff Garlin because then there won't be any Jeff Garlin left. Like that's just simply not how it works. It's just simply, you know, anyway, the reason I said generous is because, I mean, you know, whatever, he has a friendship with her, but, but offering the feedback to you and then offering this truth about identifying your and deniability, which I'm guessing was one is one of the things that you carry with you. Okay.3 (41m 53s):Yeah. I mean, I do think, I do think that he's, that that was very generous of him. Like, and, and I do think that he and I do carry it with me and, and it obviously had an effect on me because I tell the story and because, you know, we, that you and I started a whole company around the idea of being undeniable, but like, and yeah, it, it really was like an affirmation, right. To just fucking pick a side already, like, like take a stand, like do something like th th th the gold boldly in one direction, because this sort of, this sort of, wishy-washy trying to please everybody, it, it, it not only does it not, it's not, it's a totally unpleasant, it actually doesn't work for the thing that you think you want.3 (42m 45s):Like, if you want notoriety power, fame, fortune, you have to pick a side at some point. Okay. But if you also want to feel good and be led, like we're saying by your north star, you could, you could use your, and deniability as a north star to eventually mean that sometimes quickly, sometimes slowly to get to a place where you really feel like you're doing right by yourself. If you follow your undeniable, whatever that means to you. So, yeah, he changed my life. Like that changed my life. I mean, the show did the sh you know, looking back on the show, I spent so much money. I would say, like, to be, if I'm completely honest, it was like a $25,000 investment I made over from 2012 to 2015 or whatever.3 (43m 31s):And, and I didn't bring in one dime, you know, I didn't make, make a dime, but it was, I would've done things differently, but I still I'm glad I did it. And, and that's one of the reasons stories. And one of the reasons I'm glad I did it was because I learned that lesson about being undeniable from Jeff Garlin. And yeah,1 (43m 55s):I don't think he went to theater school, but he needs to come on the podcast, you know, tell him that and, and, and hear more about his, his thoughts about, and deniability. So, so that you have shared that story with me, which really even moved me. I mean, it's, it's affected me. And then we linked it to this crooked, let's say path that we made, where we were pursuing this creative, creative career. And then we couldn't pursue it because we needed to make money. And we thought it would be okay to do else. And ultimately wasn't. And so the creative urge or whatever is undeniable in us.1 (44m 39s):And we're basically having to listen to it instead of, you know, pushing it away. And, and we also have a belief that many, many, many people are in that exact same position at this age in life, they were pursuing something. It wasn't financially viable. They had to do something else. And that when, what we're talking to a lot of people about these days is I think a lot of people who come on the podcast are reckoning with that question. Whether it be when we ask them to come on or while we're having the conversation or in the time after.1 (45m 21s):And we hear a variety of things from, from, you know, genuine like bridge equipment is a good example of somebody who went and did something else. And I think she found her thing. Yeah. I feel like therapy. She found the right thing for her. Yeah.3 (45m 37s):And she's now taking classes again, though. Acting classes, remember? Cause she wrote us.1 (45m 43s):Oh, that's right. Okay. Well, all right. So maybe, so maybe so maybe everybody, but what, we also talked to, a lot of people who I feel are trying to convince themselves, us, that they have moved on and you know, what, if that's true for you, I don't want to take that away from anybody, but it's hard for me to believe that's true for as many people as say it is true because if you, right, if you just, if you have, if you're born with this desire to express, and then you don't exp and you don't do it, it doesn't go away. And,3 (46m 19s):And here's the kicker too, is like the secret Willie, we can let everybody in a secret that you and I, because of our childhoods. And then on top of the childhood, the training that we received as actors, and then on top of that, the training we received as clinicians, we are able, here's the secret. We can see things in you that you may not be able to see in yourself or that you think you're hiding. Like that is just the secret.1 (46m 45s):And, and I'll say as a person who is fully does this all the time, nobody's hiding anything. I'm sorry to inform you. Nobody, you whoever's walking around. They're saying nobody knows that I, blah, blah, blah. Right? Yes, they do. I mean, they may not say it to you. They may not even have that thought in the front of their mind to everybody does truly know everything. And you're only kidding yourself, right? To, to hide behind, you know, dishonesty,3 (47m 20s):You're kidding yourself that you were hiding it and you're kidding yourself that other people can't see it. And you're kidding yourself that it's working for to hide it. But it's easier said than done to not hide it. I'm not saying coming out, coming clean about your truth is easy at all. But I just want to say like, cause people always ask like, and I, I run up against this a lot in Hollywood of like, how could you tell that? Like, so-and-so really, didn't like this script. I'm like, dude, body language. Blahbity blah, blah. And they're like, I didn't get that.3 (48m 0s):I'm like, dude, you just have to like, I have training. But also you just have to really, I always say this, but like you have to be sort of a neglected child that then decided that people pleasing was the way to freedom. Then learn that that is actually not true. But then use those skills to actually be like an emotional detective for other people. It's a whole process, but you could do it if you spent enough time, but I can tell like I can, I even at coworking, like I'm going to soundproof booth. So no one could hear me. But like I, I spent five minutes with somebody and I'm like, oh my God, they hate themselves. They hate themselves a passion they're pretending not to, but they hate themselves.3 (48m 42s):And that is unfortunate because I know they have redeeming qualities. I haven't talked to them for more than five minutes. So I don't know what that is. And I don't want to talk to them for more than five minutes because I'm not their therapist or friend, but I get it. I get it. It is a super power that I think people who really have trauma and then have chosen to work through the trauma. It's a super power that we have that we can, and it's also can be a burden, like any superpower to really see what the fuck is going on with people and call it out if need be. But we don't always call it out because it's not our job.3 (49m 23s):And you know, that is something we run into on this podcast too. It's like, there are times on the podcast where I want to be like, you know, this is just full transparency where I want to be like, you're full of shit. You're full of shit. Totally terrible. You, you, you hate blahbity blah, but you don't want to tell us you hate blabbity, blah. And I understand that because I've been in the same boat and I still am in the same boat, but just know that if you come on this podcast that it kind of behooves you to just tell the truth because what? Yeah. We all see it anyway. Right, right. We just do. We all see it anyway. Yeah. In your voice, we don't even have to look at your face.3 (50m 3s):Here's the other thing about human experience? So people think, I think because it's a podcast and it's not, we don't air the video that like, they can also hide shit. Well, your voice and the, and the PA I mean, I'm giving away all the secrets here, but there are no real secrets. Like the pauses in between watching the next person we have come on is gonna be like, okay, anyway. So I feel really bad about everything in my life. And I put the pauses, the pauses in between questions and answers. It's all part of the deal. And so I just encourage people. Like, I want you to come on this podcast and feel like you can, that you you're able to be undeniable and FYI on deniability does not mean everything is great about you.3 (50m 48s):Right? Like it doesn't mean, it just means that you're telling the truth about who you are. Good, bad, ugly, weird.1 (50m 56s):Yeah. You, you could be an undeniable asshole. There's no, it's a, it doesn't have a necessarily positive connotation, but you know, if you are an asshole and you're, well, that's not a good example. If you are, if you hate yourself, let's say that's a good example. If you hate yourself, you know, you're never going to get to a place where you don't hate yourself by pretending that you don't hate yourself. You have to start with the idea that, okay, here's what I'm up against right now. Hearn's out. I really hate myself. And you know, and I'm going to have to get real about that before I can, because how could you begin to interrogate a problem that you haven't named at all? That's like, that's like, you know, getting, I don't know that to the end of a math problem without having like what the3 (51m 43s):She's learning a new language without studying one minute of the language in your life. It doesn't, it's not possible. I mean, you might get one word. Right. But by luck. But1 (51m 55s):Yeah. And my thing, and I think this is your thing too in life is just encouraging people and the reason, and I understand why people want to lie to themselves about it because it's painful or because you don't want to be a person who hates yourself. You don't want to be a person who feels unfulfilled by career traces. I get that. But, but it's like that, that you are unfulfilled or you are that you just haven't done the work of accepting.3 (52m 23s):Right. And I, and I, I definitely feel like for me, the turning point, literally in my life had to, had to do with, when I had a physical problem with my heart, where I was like, oh, this is what is happening. I haven't taken care of my body for whatever reason. Not because I'm a bad person, but because I've always shit going on and all these issues and hereditary, but I haven't done the work to, to look at this. And so now it's coming, it's now it's, it's, it's a problem. And, and, and when you're laying in the hospitals hooked up to machines and you and people are telling you, it's a problem that are trained specifically in this problem.3 (53m 7s):And you finally are faced with, oh, either I'm going to believe this or not, and acknowledge it or not. And I just was like, okay, I acknowledge it. I need to lose weight. I need to move my body and I need to eat less shitty foods and okay. That's it. It's in my face. It's in my face. It's in my face. I'm the1 (53m 25s):Hospital. Yeah. My, my wish for it to be something other than it isn't has, it helped me to have it be something other than it isn't. But my, my courage, if, if you can summon the courage to face it, then it might actually be different. So the other thing that you were talking about before was legacy, and that is, that has been a theme in my life recently too, because, you know, I realized after my sister died, like it's all over for her. I, you know how a lot of times when people die, then people will go on their Facebook account and like, write these messages to them.1 (54m 16s):You know, I miss you, blah, blah, blah. No, nobody did that on my sister's Facebook page. Nobody and no, nobody and her kids, you know, who are too young, really to use Facebook there that's because it's an old person's thing, but they have Facebook accounts and they had each written something about their mom when she died. And periodically, I checked back in to see like, what the comments are at for first of all, I don't know, 95% of the people who were making the comments, cause I haven't been in their lives, but it really ended like a few, you know, a few days after she died, it ended.1 (54m 58s):And I just thought, wow, man, there's just no trace of this first. God, I don't like that. There's yeah. It's it's really unsettling. And so recently we came in to possession of unpublished manuscript that Aaron's grandfather wrote on which sirens grandfather, his dad's dad. Okay. Aaron's grandfather was a, you know, hardcore Chicago in, he was a tool and die maker. He worked in one of these factories where whenever there was factories in Chicago and he retired when he was 70, 70 or 75 and went back and went to college and he was the oldest graduate from Roosevelt university where I teach by the way weird.1 (55m 58s):Yeah. And he was a writer and a poet and he wrote a book. Now, dear listeners, I regret to inform you. It's not a great book. You know, he could have used an editor. I'm sure. And, but it doesn't matter. The point is we receive this cream and a half of paper that's wrapped up in like a grocery bag and bound with string and it hasn't been touched3 (56m 34s):How'd you get it? How'd you get it?1 (56m 37s):His mom had it. And she sent him a bunch of stuff in that, and that was in there. So we opened it up and, and I thought to myself, okay, this is fascinating because one of the things that I think compels people to write is a desire to leave some kind of an imprint. And I'm curious how other people think or don't think or feel, or don't feel about their legacy. I mean, I guess people do it in other ways you get really rich and you name a building after yourself or by the way, they took the Sackler name off the mat. Finally they took the Sackler name off the met. Yes. And oh God.1 (57m 18s):Yes. That's a whole other thing. Watch dope. Sick with John who can aprons really good. Yeah. Anyway, people do use philanthropy. I mean, it kind of seems like, unless you're in the arts or rich, how do you have a legacy? What's your, what is,3 (57m 33s):This is a great freaking question. Like this is the question that I really been thinking about in my brain. And I, I think I have the answer for me, but I'm not exactly sure. So, all right. So I love to teach, but I love to teach a very specific population. It's a population that is underrepresented in colleges. So I I'm trying to narrow down like what I want to do with my life basically. And I think I want, I know I want to be a writer, but I was like, okay. But my realtor says I have to make 80 to a hundred thousand dollars if I want a house in California.3 (58m 17s):Okay. And I'm tired of sitting around, waiting for Hollywood to discover me. Okay. Fine. And us. So what do I do? Okay, fine. So then I've been teaching right at Roosevelt and other places and I love it. I love the 1819 year olds. Okay. Fine. I love teaching acting. I don't know. I feel like I don't really know shit about acting, but I know I do when it's mixed with psychology. Does that make sense? Okay.1 (58m 44s):A hundred percent then the other3 (58m 45s):Day I was like, and then I was like, okay, but I don't want to teach at a fancy conservatory. Like I don't, that's just, I just don't. So I was like, all right. All right. All right. So then someone sent me a listing to teach a community college, making a $90,000 a year. Community colleges paid better than a lot of colleges. And so I'm applying to teach first year actors at a community college in Glendale. And I don't know, and I don't know, and I actually think it's going to make my writing. And I think it's going to make me hustle in a different way. I don't know if I'll get the job, but I gotta say my legacy might be, cause I thought, okay.3 (59m 30s):At first I thought my legacy was going to be, and we could track it with the podcast. Right. Like I thought my legacy was going to be famous actor even though like, I don't know if that's, that is a legacy like Brando and you know, that's a legacy. That's what I thought. I thought, oh, that'll be my legacy. I'll be fancy, famous lady. Okay, fine. That did not happen. Then I thought, okay, my legacy is going to be that I'm a very sort of famous PR prolific addictions counselor, like at a social service agency. Yeah. That's going to be my legacy, but that's what I thought, like, that's my mark. That's where I'm going to leave my mark. That did not happen. Then I thought, okay, I'm going to be again, a famous actor, but maybe a solo artist. Right.3 (1h 0m 10s):And, and then, and then a screenwriter and I'll get really famous as a television writer, which still could happen. But I was like, I'm not sure that is the flavor of legacy that we're talking. I'm talking about here in terms of service, right. Service. What I want is to teach, I could teach 18, 19 year olds tangible skills that they can use then and move on in their lives and then teach their kids. Like, like that seems more in alignment with what I'm talking about in terms of legacy than just fancy screenwriter.3 (1h 0m 50s):That makes a lot of money. So, yeah.1 (1h 0m 53s):Yeah, because actually I was just having this thought yesterday, if I was ever given an award that was related in any way to theater, the first person I would think is my junior high acting teacher and teachers truly do leave some of the biggest, like good and bad. Some of the biggest legacies. I remember every single teacher I've ever had. Yeah. And w I mean, I mostly remember the ones who were really good or really bad, but they, I can think of five people off the top of my head who should be canonized as saints, because really Mrs. McDaniels, you were a prima ballerina who ended up teaching math in junior high.1 (1h 1m 37s):And you know what she did, she knew that I had just a, I was having a really hard time in junior high. And she invited me to eat lunch in her classroom every day, because I think she was at a Mexican, she didn't eat. And so she could go over the math with me cause I was having a hard time getting it. And I was just having a hard time. Sure. In general, this is seventh grade. And she provided all under the guise of teaching me math. Of course she gave me mentorship. She gave me attention. She showed me love.1 (1h 2m 19s):Right. Like what's3 (1h 2m 20s):What more could you ask for legacy I'm looking for? I'm not, I decided like, especially during COVID times, I've really been thinking, I think a lot of us have about like, what is obviously important, but also what is lasting and what is, and I thought, yeah. Okay. So, so I don't have a desire to like go into the classroom and teach, you know, I don't wanna teach psychology. I don't want to teach, but I was like maybe. And the thing that like the community colleges in California in Southern California, like I believe Pasadena city college and Glendale community college are two of the best community colleges in the country. So I'm like, okay.3 (1h 3m 0s):And it's cheap to go there. And it's a bunch of different kinds of learners and it's not just white kids that are like, I'm fucking going to be the next, I don't know whoever it's like kids that actually want to learn. And I, I mean, look, there's going to be some real assholes in there. I know it. But like I thought, oh, okay. Like also I really, really need a house with a yard. And I don't know how, I don't want to do it by, by getting an office job that I'm gonna die at. And I, and I, and then try to write on top of that.3 (1h 3m 45s):So like, I really need more space. And we were looking at houses and this all really was, was sparked by talking to a realtor, a really great realtor who also was like a very therapeutic and his approach. And he was like, listen, do you want a house in California? Yes. Okay. Do you want a two bedroom, two bath? Yes. This is how much money you each need to bring in a year. And this is how much your down payment is going to be act accordingly. He just told me that like, it's not,1 (1h 4m 16s):It's not a mystery. It's not an unknowable path. It's just like, no, no, no.3 (1h 4m 22s):It's very clear. And he was very loving, but he was also like, you, you piecemealing the piecemealing, your salary together is not going to work for this. And I was like, and I, I needed him to say that too, to know that like, it's time for me to bring in a decent amount of money. Now, if it comes, if it, if, if, if somehow it comes from your mind getting a television show or our documentary taking off. Great. But like, in the meantime, I need to feel like I am, I am not just piecemealing my shit together.1 (1h 5m 8s):Right. Because in addition to all the other things we've mentioned, you have a lot other needs that are undeniable and it is much your responsibility to meet those needs your, your need to have, you know, your own space. You need to have address, you know, that's as important to listen to as anything else.3 (1h 5m 27s):I had no idea. Like I just thought it's interesting. I, I thought that I did not have those needs. Like I thought, who cares where you live literally. I mean, I've moved 15 times. So it's like, who cares if you live in a one bedroom with two people and a dog, I care. I care a lot now I really care. And it's really, really important to me to be out. So having an outside space,1 (1h 5m 55s):And what I hear in this for you is a shift from what does it look like to other people to, what does it feel like inside of me? And it was always more important,3 (1h 6m 8s):More important. And it's also super interesting. And I think we run up against this all the time. People think that they're like, oh, you're not going to be an actor anymore. Like you're not going to audition anymore. And I'm like, I don't think so. It's not like it's like I had the other night. I had the experience. So I get off the train right at eight o'clock the day before I got an audition from my agent for self-tape for a show in Chicago, that's a procedural show, you know, and that everyone auditions for in Chicago. And I got a self-tape quick turnaround. I had to get off and I chose to, I got off the train, dropped my stuff, picked up.3 (1h 6m 50s):My friend came to coworking and was up til midnight filming this scene. It's not a good scene. I'm not good. I'm not good in the scene because I don't, I'm, I'm not, I was having trouble memorizing because it's late at night. And then, and then I turned to my friend and I just said, you know, and, and I'm not paid, obviously we're not paid for the audition. If I book it, I have to go to Chicago on my own dime, stay in a hotel on my own, or place my own plane fare. I hate to fly to do this thing. That's going to terrorize me on set for a day to make $900.3 (1h 7m 32s):What the fuck am I doing? So I turned to my friend and I just said, who was nice enough to stay up with me till midnight, taping this in the fucking coworking space. I turned to her and I said, I don't want to do this anymore. And she said, okay. And she said, okay. I mean, she doesn't give a shit. She's a writer. She's not an actor. She doesn't, but she's like, okay. And I was like, yeah, this is no, no, no, it's not. That is not my legacy.1 (1h 8m 0s):Right.3 (1h 8m 1s):So it's very clear. So now I'm going to, I'm just, I'm not, I'm having calling my agents1 (1h 8m 8s):And you can't know until, you know, I mean, like that reality couldn't hit you until it did. I'm like, no, so yeah, yeah, yeah. Well, good for you. I mean, part of life is figuring out what it's not, and as much as it is figuring out what it is. Yeah. So4 (1h 8m 34s):If you liked what you heard today, please give us a positive five star review and subscribe and tell your friends. I survived. Theater school is an undeniable in production. Jen Bosworth, Ramirez and Gina plegia are the co-hosts. This episode was produced, edited, and sound mixed by Gina Culichi for more information about this podcast or other goings on of undeniable, Inc. Please visit our website@undeniablewriters.com. You can also follow us on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. Thank you. 

The Commstock Report Podcast
12/20/21 It Felt Like a "Twilight Zone" Episode

The Commstock Report Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 5:39


The Commstock Report: Monday, December 20th, 2021.  To get the full report, please sign up using the link below:   https://commstock.com/membership-account/membership-levels/

The Harbor
O Holy Night - The Soul Felt Its Worth - Rick Baldwin

The Harbor

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 37:02


How is worth calculated? The worth of anything depends on what someone is willing to pay or do for it. There may be many who value you. Make sure you don't settle for any less than your true worth!Listen to this message "The Soul Felt Its Worth" from the series O Holy Night by Senior Pastor Rick Baldwin to see how valuable you are to Jesus!Rick's notes are here: https://notes.subsplash.com/fill-in/view?page=v0rg27kb-ap____________________________Like & subscribe so you don't miss anything!See what's happening at The Harbor on social media:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/TheHarbor_lifeTwitter: https://twitter.com/TheHarbor_lifeFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheHarbordotlifeWebsite: https://TheHarbor.life

Sunny Side Up Nutrition
Exploring Responsive Feeding with Katja Rowell

Sunny Side Up Nutrition

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 38:45


In this episode, Elizabeth Davenport and Anna Lutz have a conversation with Katja Rowell, M.D., a family doctor, author, and responsive childhood feeding specialist. We highlight Katja's work on extreme picky eating and kids with feeding challenges.  We also discuss:  Responsive feeding and responsive feeding therapy  Differences between responsive feeding and Ellyn Satter's Division of Responsibility Issues with mainstream advice on feeding and what makes these messages confusing What ‘pressure' looks like and how a parent knows if they are creating pressure in the feeding relationship Advice for parents of teenagers who are selective eaters Felt safety and connection amidst traumatic experiences for children  Eating and feeding accommodations for neurodiverse children Katja Rowell M.D. is described as “academic, but warm and down to earth,” she is a popular speaker and blogger and has appeared in numerous publications. Katja has developed an expertise in anxious and avoidant eating (including ARFID), food preoccupation, and supporting foster and adopted children. Katja is on the SPOON medical advisory board and founder of The Feeding Doctor. Her books include: Helping Your Child with Extremely Picky Eating: A Step-by-Step Guide to Overcoming Selective Eating, Food Aversion, and Feeding Disorders, and Love Me, Feed Me.  Learn more about Katja at theFeedingDoctor.com Links:  Katja Rowell: The Feeding Doctor Responsive Feeding Therapy: Values and Practice White Paper Ellyn Satter's Division of Responsibility Sunny Side Up Nutrition Podcast  Lutz, Alexander & Associates Nutrition Therapy Pinney Davenport Nutrition

Lakeside United Methodist Church
A Thrill Of Hope, Week 4: The Soul Felt Its Worth

Lakeside United Methodist Church

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 29:17


Sermon: The Soul Felt Its Worth Scripture: Matthew 6:25-34, John 3:16-17 Speaker: Rev. Dan Wunderlich Description: There are many voices, both in us and around us, competing to build us up and tear us down. But we can only know our true worth and identity in the light of Jesus. And in the birth of Jesus and all he did for us, we see that God's words of love and peace are not simply talk but backed up by action. Sermon Series: A Thrill of Hope Description: This new sermon series explores the traditional themes of Advent with the help of familiar lines from the song “O Holy Night".

Inspire and Tire (the new and Improved Bedtime Stories for Adults)
Have you ever felt all alone even with someone you love

Inspire and Tire (the new and Improved Bedtime Stories for Adults)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 7:30


Let's continue on with Eve's diary. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/inspireandtire/message

Actually, You Are a Real Runner
Ep 370: Marathon Training 16 Weeks Till- 6 miles felt so hard!

Actually, You Are a Real Runner

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 11:58


Join the FB Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/systemsforselfcare Join my email list: https://www.systemsforselfcare.com/moderationmadeeasy Work with me: https://www.systemsforselfcare.com/blog Follow me on FB: https://www.facebook.com/coachjaclynricchio Follow me on IG: https://www.instagram.com/jaclyn.ricchio.stover/  

Free Agent Lifestyle
Ben Affleck Says He "Felt Trapped In His Marriage" To Jennifer Garner, And J. Lo Is Pissed

Free Agent Lifestyle

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 145:10


Ben Affleck Says He "Felt Trapped In His Marriage" To Jennifer Garner, And J. Lo Is Pissed Coach Greg Adams YouTube Channel Free Agent Lifestyle YouTube Channel

The Word's Worth
Of Parasites, Felt Boots, and Garbage Words

The Word's Worth

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 9:38


There is a newish filler word going around that driving the older generation crazy.

The Awakened Man: A Repository For Holistic Health, Red Pill Alpha Masculinity, & Ultimate Freedom
#523:What Ben Affleck’s Revelations That He Felt Trapped & Would Continue Drinking If Married Tells You That Marriage Is…

The Awakened Man: A Repository For Holistic Health, Red Pill Alpha Masculinity, & Ultimate Freedom

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 11:47


If you would like to support Naturopathic Earth (www.naturopathicearth.com), the easiest is via our crowd-funding account via PayPal (www.paypal.me/agregoryluna) The Awakened Man… The post #523:What Ben Affleck's Revelations That He Felt Trapped & Would Continue Drinking If Married Tells You That Marriage Is… appeared first on Naturopathic Earth.

The Bert Show
Bert Opens Up About The Tremendous Joy He Felt At Our Holiday Party

The Bert Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 6:41


Last night Kristin hosted our annual holiday party, and we all had a great time especially, Bert. He was so overwhelmed with joy and gratitude. And today, he's sharing his thoughts on the party.Listen... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/the-bert-show.

Redemption Church
The Soul Felt Its Worth (WEST)

Redemption Church

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 40:30


Redemption Church
The Soul Felt Its Worth (NORTH)

Redemption Church

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 38:41


Apartment Building Investing with Michael Blank Podcast
MB295: Become a Person of Value, Achieve Success – With John Lee Dumas

Apartment Building Investing with Michael Blank Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 40:54


John Lee Dumas spent the first 32 years of his life chasing the almighty dollar—with little success. But when he took Albert Einstein's advice and decided to become a man of value, that's when JLD got a taste of success. JLD is the host of the award-winning podcast Entrepreneurs on Fire, which has racked up over 100M listens and 3K five-star reviews since its launch in 2012. Through EOF, he has interviewed more than 3K of the world's most successful entrepreneurs, delivering the inspiration and strategies listeners need to FIRE UP their own entrepreneurial journey. JLD is also the author of The Common Path to Uncommon Success: A Roadmap to Financial Freedom and Fulfillment. On this episode of Financial Freedom with Real Estate Investing, JLD joins cohost Garrett Lynch and me to discuss his early struggle to succeed and explain how he approaches the podcast as a way to provide value. He reflects on the powerful combination between hard work and passion, sharing the lessons he's learned from elite entrepreneurs around productivity, discipline and focusing on one path to success. Listen in for JLD's method of deciding which opportunities to pursue (investment and otherwise) and find out how achieving financial freedom can help YOU bring big-time value to the world. Key Takeaways  Why JLD struggled to succeed prior to EOF Dealt with PTSD after tour in Iraq Chase success vs. provide value JLD's short career in commercial real estate Commit to one year as junior broker Felt no excitement for closing deals JLD's approach to starting the podcast Think long-term and be patient 18-month window to earn revenue Why hard work isn't enough to succeed Hard work + passion win every time Grow to love things you're good at Why financial freedom is important to JLD Utility of money brings joy Lack causes anxiety and overwhelm The key themes in The Common Path... Steps to make more than you spend Become #1 solution to real problem What JLD is investing in right now Cryptocurrency and NFTs Angel invest in startups JLD's top takeaways from 3K interviews Focus on producing right content Discipline to execute on plan Focus on one course to success How JLD picks what opportunities to pursue If it's not a hell yes, it's a no Miss great opportunities if plate full How JLD decides what to invest in Research and find mentors in space Believe in value company brings Connect with John Lee Dumas  Entrepreneurs on Fire  The Common Path to Uncommon Success: A Roadmap to Financial Freedom and Fulfillment by John Lee Dumas Resources  Get Tickets for Deal Maker Bootcamp  Learn More About Michael's Mentoring Program Join the Nighthawk Equity Investor Club  Financial Freedom with Real Estate Investing by Michael Blank Rich Dad Poor Dad by Robert T. Kiyosaki  Hell Yeah or No: What's Worth Doing by Derek Sivers  CryptoDads  Mutant Punks  Mutant Cats  HEAD DAO NFTs on Fire Podcast  Michael Hyatt's Desire Zone Michael on Facebook  Michael on Instagram  Michael on YouTube  Apartment Investor Network Facebook Group  Podcast Show Notes