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United States federal agency

  • 764PODCASTS
  • 1,411EPISODES
  • 38mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • May 16, 2022LATEST
National Park Service

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Best podcasts about National Park Service

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Latest podcast episodes about National Park Service

Mind Over Murder
NEW: Shenandoah Murders with "Trailed" Author Kathryn Miles

Mind Over Murder

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 44:47


Kathryn Miles, author of "Trailed: One Woman's Quest to Solve the Shenandoah Murders" joins co-hosts Bill Thomas and Kristin Dilley to discuss her new book. Who killed Julie Williams and Lollie Winans in 1996? Why have the FBI and the National Park Service moved so slowly in this investigation? Is this a hate crime? Is there still untested evidence? Ate the Shenandoah Murders related to the Colonial Parkway Murders? Goodreads Kathryn Miles "Trailed" Book:https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/58328366-trailedOrion: Who's Safe in the Woods? An Interview with Kathryn Miles, author of Trailed:https://orionmagazine.org/article/julie-williams-lollie-winans-murder-appalachian-trail-book/Boston Globe: Tracking a killer and a cold case in Kathryn Miles's ‘Trailed'https://www.bostonglobe.com/2022/04/28/arts/tracking-killer-cold-case/?event=event12Othram DNA Solves: You can help solve a case. Help fund a case or contribute your DNA. Your support helps solve crimes, enable the identification of John & Jane Does, and bring closure to families. Joining is fast, secure, and easy.https://dnasolves.com/Join the discussion on our Mind Over Murder and Colonial Parkway Murders pages on Facebook.Mind Over Murder on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mindoverpodcastColonial Parkway Murders Facebook page with more than 14,000 followers: https://www.facebook.com/ColonialParkwayCaseYou can also participate in an in-depth discussion of the Colonial Parkway Murders here:https://earonsgsk.proboards.com/board/50/colonial-parkway-murdersMind Over Murder is proud to be a Spreaker Prime Podcaster:https://www.spreaker.comNew Article in Virginia Gazette: 35 Years Later, Victims' Families in Colonial Parkway Murders Still Searching for Answers, Hope DNA Advances will Solve Case By Em Holter and Abigail Adcoxhttps://www.dailypress.com/virginiagazette/va-vg-colonial-parkway-murders-anniversary-1024-20211022-76jkpte6qvez7onybmhbhp7nfi-story.htmlNew Article in Medium: The Colonial Parkway Murders — A Tale of Two Killers? By Quinn Zanehttps://medium.com/unburied/the-colonial-parkway-murders-a-tale-of-two-killers-1e8fda367a48Washington Post: "Crimes of Passion"https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/opinions/1997/08/15/crimes-of-passion/0a38e8f9-6d04-48e4-a847-7d3cba53c363/New feature article in the Daily Beast: "Inside the Maddening Search for Virginia's Colonial Parkway Serial Killer" By Justin Rohrlichhttps://www.thedailybeast.com/what-happened-to-cathleen-thomas-and-rebecca-dowski-inside-the-hunt-for-the-colonial-parkway-killerCitizens! Check out our new line of "Mind Over Murder" t-shirts and other good stuff !https://www.teepublic.com/stores/mind-over-murder-podcast?ref_id=23885Washington Post Op-Ed Piece by Deidre Enright of the Innocence Project:"The FBI should use DNA, not posters, to solve a cold-case murder" https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2021/06/25/julie-williams-laura-winans-unsolved-murder-test-dna/Oxygen: "Loni Coombs Feels A Kinship To 'Lovers' Lane' Victim Cathy Thomas"Loni Coombs felt an immediate connection to Cathy Thomas, a groundbreaking gay woman who broke through barriers at the U.S. Naval Academy before she was brutally murdered along the Colonial Parkway in Virginia.https://www.oxygen.com/crime-news/loni-coombs-feels-a-kinship-to-colonial-parkway-victim-cathy-thomasYou can contribute to help "Mind Over Murder" do our important work:https://mindovermurderpodcast.com/supportFour one-hour episodes on the Colonial Parkway Murders are available on Oxygen as "The Lover's Lane Murders." The series is available on the free Oxygen app, Hulu, YouTube, Amazon, and many other platforms. https://www.oxygen.com/lovers-lane-murders Oxygen" "Who Were The Colonial Parkway Murder Victims? 8 Young People All Killed In Virginia Within 4 Years" https://www.oxygen.com/lovers-lane-murders/crime-news/who-were-the-colonial-parkway-murder-victims Washington Post Magazine: "Victims, Families and America's Thirst for True-Crime Stories." "For Bill Thomas, his sister Cathy's murder is a deeply personal tragedy. For millions of true-crime fans, it's entertainment." https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/magazine/wp/2019/07/30/feature/victims-families-and-americas-thirst-for-true-crime-stories/Daily Press excellent series of articles on the Colonial Parkway Murders: "The Parkway" http://digital.dailypress.com/static/parkway_cottage/main/index.htmlColonial Parkway Murders website: https://colonialparkwaymurders.com Mind Over Murder Podcast website: https://mindovermurderpodcast.comPlease subscribe and rate us at your favorite podcast sites. Ratings and reviews are very important. Please share and tell your friends!We launch a new episode of "Mind Over Murder" every Monday morning, and a bonus episode every Thursday morning.Sponsors: Othram and DNAsolves.comContribute Your DNA to help solve cases: https://dnasolves.com/user/registerFollow "Mind Over Murder" on Twitter: https://twitter.com/MurderOverFollow Bill Thomas on Twitter: https://twitter.com/BillThomas56Follow "Colonial Parkway Murders" on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ColonialParkwayCase/Follow us on InstaGram:: https://www.instagram.com/colonialparkwaymurders/Check out the entire Crawlspace Media network at http://crawlspace-media.com/New Article in Virginia Gazette: 35 Years Later, Victims' Families in Colonial Parkway Murders Still Searching for Answers, Hope DNA Advances will Solve Case By Em Holter and Abigail Adcoxhttps://www.dailypress.com/virginiagazette/va-vg-colonial-parkway-murders-anniversary-1024-20211022-76jkpte6qvez7onybmhbhp7nfi-story.htmlNew Article in Medium: The Colonial Parkway Murders — A Tale of Two Killers? By Quinn Zanehttps://medium.com/unburied/the-colonial-parkway-murders-a-tale-of-two-killers-1e8fda367a48Washington Post: "Crimes of Passion"https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/opinions/1997/08/15/crimes-of-passion/0a38e8f9-6d04-48e4-a847-7d3cba53c363/New feature article in the Daily Beast: "Inside the Maddening Search for Virginia's Colonial Parkway Serial Killer" By Justin Rohrlichhttps://www.thedailybeast.com/what-happened-to-cathleen-thomas-and-rebecca-dowski-inside-the-hunt-for-the-colonial-parkway-killerCitizens! Check out our new line of "Mind Over Murder" t-shirts and other good stuff !https://www.teepublic.com/stores/mind-over-murder-podcast?ref_id=23885Washington Post Op-Ed Piece by Deidre Enright of the Innocence Project:"The FBI should use DNA, not posters, to solve a cold-case murder" https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2021/06/25/julie-williams-laura-winans-unsolved-murder-test-dna/Oxygen: "Loni Coombs Feels A Kinship To 'Lovers' Lane' Victim Cathy Thomas"Loni Coombs felt an immediate connection to Cathy Thomas, a groundbreaking gay woman who broke through barriers at the U.S. Naval Academy before she was brutally murdered along the Colonial Parkway in Virginia.https://www.oxygen.com/crime-news/loni-coombs-feels-a-kinship-to-colonial-parkway-victim-cathy-thomasYou can contribute to help "Mind Over Murder" do our important work:https://mindovermurderpodcast.com/supportFour one-hour episodes on the Colonial Parkway Murders are available on Oxygen as "The Lover's Lane Murders." The series is available on the free Oxygen app, Hulu, YouTube, Amazon, and many other platforms. https://www.oxygen.com/lovers-lane-murders Oxygen" "Who Were The Colonial Parkway Murder Victims? 8 Young People All Killed In Virginia Within 4 Years" https://www.oxygen.com/lovers-lane-murders/crime-news/who-were-the-colonial-parkway-murder-victims Washington Post Magazine: "Victims, Families and America's Thirst for True-Crime Stories." "For Bill Thomas, his sister Cathy's murder is a deeply personal tragedy. For millions of true-crime fans, it's entertainment." https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/magazine/wp/2019/07/30/feature/victims-families-and-americas-thirst-for-true-crime-stories/Daily Press excellent series of articles on the Colonial Parkway Murders: "The Parkway" http://digital.dailypress.com/static/parkway_cottage/main/index.htmlColonial Parkway Murders website: https://colonialparkwaymurders.com Mind Over Murder Podcast website: https://mindovermurderpodcast.comPlease subscribe and rate us at your favorite podcast sites. Ratings and reviews are very important. Please share and tell your friends!https://lovethepodcast.com/jpHq3qWe launch a new episode of "Mind Over Murder" every Monday morning, and a bonus episode every Thursday morning.Sponsors: Othram and DNAsolves.comContribute Your DNA to help solve cases: https://dnasolves.com/user/registerFollow "Mind Over Murder" on Twitter: https://twitter.com/MurderOverFollow Bill Thomas on Twitter: https://twitter.com/BillThomas56Follow "Colonial Parkway Murders" on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ColonialParkwayCase/Follow us on InstaGram:: https://www.instagram.com/colonialparkwaymurders/Check out the entire Crawlspace Media network at http://crawlspace-media.com/All rights reserved. Mind Over Murder, Copyright Bill Thomas and Kristin Dilley, Another Dog Productions/Absolute Zero Productions

The Dark Swamp: Horror Stories | Swamp Dweller Podcast
591: The Dark Swamp: Horror Stories (Episode 591) The National Park Service Is Hiding A DISTURBING Secret

The Dark Swamp: Horror Stories | Swamp Dweller Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 23:49


Months ago I took a job guarding a local national park on the night shift. I quickly discovered something disturbing was going on. I am back to share more disturbing details that The National Park Service Is Hiding! Submit your story to swampdweller.net! Follow me on twitch! Twitch.tv/swampdwelleryt Download Swamp Dweller Scary Stories: Apple: https://apple.co/2L7znZp Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2WUFDG8 Check out the Swamp Dweller Merch store! http://bit.ly/32u2eh5

Conduit Street Podcast
Talking History and Policy with Preservation Maryland

Conduit Street Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 51:02


On the latest episode of the Conduit Street Podcast, Preservation Maryland President and CEO, Nicholas Redding, joins Kevin Kinnally and Michael Sanderson to discuss preservation, smart growth, Program Open Space, Maryland's rich heritage, and more!Preservation Maryland is the state's oldest, largest, and most effective preservation organization. Nicholas Redding has led the organization since 2014 and oversees the operations, programs, and growing professional staff.Since his arrival, he has overseen a complex merger and the subsequent creation of Smart Growth Maryland, a dynamic new program. Additionally, he has partnered with the National Park Service's Historic Preservation Training Center to establish the Campaign for Historic Trades, a new program dedicated to developing the next generation of traditional tradespeople.The Conduit Street Podcast is available on major platforms like Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, and anywhere else you get your podcasts. Episodes are also available on MACo's Conduit Street blog.Listen to previous episodes of the Conduit Street Podcast on our website.Useful LinksPreservation MarylandPreserveCast PodcastFollow Preservation Maryland on TwitterFollow Nicholas Redding on Twitter

Secure Freedom Radio Podcast
With Chuck Devore, Elaine Donnelly and George Rasley

Secure Freedom Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 53:00


CHUCK DEVORE, Vice President of Public Policy, Texas Public Policy Foundation, Senior Contributor, The Federalist, Intelligence Officer, U.S. Army (Ret.), @ChuckDeVore An update on the Russia-Ukraine war What is the United States' strategic interest in this conflict? ELAINE DONNELLY, Founder and President, Center for Military Readiness Assessing the readiness of the U.S. military Tom Cotton's recent questioning of Christine Wormuth Declining combat standards for the U.S. military GEORGE RASLEY, Editor, Conservative HQ, former White House Staff Member, Vice President Dan Quayle, former Assistant Director, National Park Service, former Director of Policy and Communication, Congressman Adam Putnam (FL-12) Chinese companies in the Thrift Savings Plan Various aspects of American life the WHO has control over

KUOW Newsroom
National Park grants honor sites significant to Chinese Americans and Black communities in Washington

KUOW Newsroom

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 0:46


The National Park Service has awarded two grants totaling $100,000 to identify and preserve locations of historic significance for the Chinese American and Black communities in Washington state.

RAW Medicine
Episode 15: US Forest Service EMS

RAW Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 51:14


We're joined by Dr. Michelle Curry, the new EMS medical director of the U.S. Forest Service (USFS). As of this episode, the USFS EMS program is just now coming into its own, with a uniform set of policies, Local Emergency Medical Advisor (LEMA) physicians appointed for each USDA Region, patient care protocols, and a national credentialing system. However, there are some big differences between the USFS EMS program and that of the National Park Service, to which it is often compared.

Labor History Today
The Haymarket Martyrs Monument: Past, Present, Future

Labor History Today

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 26:04


Someone threw a bomb into the police ranks, who then opened fire on the unarmed crowd, creating a melee of blood and bullets. Within five minutes, the calamitous event was over. “The calamitous event” was the 1886 Haymarket Square Massacre – or the Haymarket Riot, depending on who you're talking to. As part of the virtual public event "Monumental Labor: Justice Denied, Injustice Remembered," Dr. Melissa Dabakis examines the history of the Haymarket Square bombing. The series was organized by NPS Mellon Humanities Fellows Dr. Eleanor Mahoney and Dr. Emma Silverman, and was made possible by the National Park Service in part by a grant from the National Park Foundation and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. On Labor History in 2:00: The year was 1937. That was the day animators struck Fleischer Studio in New York City. It was the industry's first strike.   Music by Jay Kulstad: Haymarket Massacre.   Questions, comments or suggestions welcome, and to find out how you can be a part of Labor History Today, email us at LaborHistoryToday@gmail.com Labor History Today is produced by Union City Radio and the Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and the Working Poor. Hosted and produced by Chris Garlock.  #LaborRadioPod #History #WorkingClass #ClassStruggle @GeorgetownKILWP #LaborHistory @UMDMLA @ILLaborHistory @AFLCIO @StrikeHistory #LaborHistory @NatlParkService @elbertscube

Outdoors with Hiking Bob – Studio 809 Radio
301 Are Low Income Groups Being Forced Out of National Parks?

Outdoors with Hiking Bob – Studio 809 Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 41:29


On this week's podcast, Bob and co-host Kevin discuss an upcoming entry fee increase at Rocky Mountain National Park and also discuss the "Timed Reservation System" in use there and at other National Parks during certain times of the year. Does the high cost of entry to some National Parks and the need to reserve a time and date to visit, sometimes far in advance, prevent low income groups from visiting? Why isn't the National Park Service doing something to make visiting parks less expensive, instead of making them into playgrounds only for the well off? Also, we talk about how Colorado is lowering the cost for annual state park passes, and that city and county parks don't charge entry fees. This podcast sponsored by the realtors at Springs Homes. (www.Springshomes.com) Please consider becoming a patron of this podcast! Visit: https://www.patreon.com/hikingbob for more information Hiking Bob website: HikingBob.com Wildwestendorf website: Wildwestendorf.com

Big Deep - An Ocean Podcast
Where The Story Ends - Maritime archaeologist Jim Delgado on the magic of stories revealed, what shipwrecks can tell us, and his time exploring Titanic

Big Deep - An Ocean Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 18:05


In today's episode, I speak with maritime archeologist, historian, author, television host, and explorer Jim Delgado. Jim's work has taken him around the globe, and he has known is one of the world's foremost experts in underwater archeology. And his CV reads almost like the greatest history of that field.He started with the National Park Service in San Francisco, then went on to work for NOAA as the Director of Maritime Heritage, was Executive Director of the Canadian Maritime Museum, and headed the Institute of Nautical Archeology. At the same time, he was a TV host for Discovery, History Channel, A&E, and National Geographic.Most recently in 2017, he left to become a senior vice president at Search Incorporated, a maritime archeology company. That was one of the leads on the recent discovery of Ernest Shackleton's Endurance. But beyond all the titles. When I spoke with Jim, I found him to be super fun to talk to, as he was an excellent storyteller. And he spoke about his beginnings as a teenage amateur archeologist, the reason why maritime archeology initially caught his attention, and what it was like to be the lead science officer on the most well-known shipwreck exploration of all time.Scuba Diving, Free Diving, Ocean Environmentalism, Surfing, and Marine Science.Please give us ★★★★★, leave a review, and tell your friends about us as each share and like makes a difference.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/BigDeep)

The Jackson Hole Connection
Episode 187 – Enhancing The Grand Teton National Park with Leslie Mattson

The Jackson Hole Connection

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 40:42


Leslie Mattson is the President of The Grand Teton National Park Foundation. She has over 35 years of experience in nonprofit administration and fundraising. Since 2004, Leslie has helped raise over $80 million from private sector donors for park projects, including the renewal of the trails and educational elements at Jenny Lake, partnering with the National Park Service on the construction of the Craig Thomas Discovery and Visitor Center, and supporting wildlife conservation, youth engagement, and cultural resource improvement projects in Grand Teton National Park.  In this episode, Leslie shares why she left the northeast and made her way out to Jackson over 32 years ago. She talks about how the Jackson Hole non-profit community has changed and developed over the decades. Stephan and Leslie then discuss the impact that The Grand Teton National Park Foundation has had in shaping the inspiring park we love today.  Find out more about The Grand Teton National Park Foundation at http://GTNPF.org (GTNPF.org) Follow the GTNPF on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/grandtetonfoundation/ (@grandtetonfoundation) This week's episode is sponsored in part by Teton County Solid Waste and Recycling, announcing the new commercial Curb to Compost Program for restaurants and other commercial food waste generators. More athttps://tetoncountywy.gov/1459/Compost ( TetonCountyWY.gov) or athttps://www.instagram.com/roadtozerowaste.jh ( @RoadToZeroWaste.JH on Instagram) Support also comes from The Jackson Hole Marketplace. The Deli at Jackson Hole Marketplace offers ready-made soups, sandwiches, breakfast burritos, and hot lunch specials. More athttp://jhmarketplace.com/ ( )http://JHMarketplace.com (JHMarketplace.com) Want to be a guest on The Jackson Hole Connection? Email us at connect@thejacksonholeconnection.com. Marketing and editing support byhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelmoeri ( Michael Moeri) (http://michaelmoeri.com/ (michaelmoeri.com),https://www.instagram.com/thatsamoeri/ (@thatsamoeri)).

The Reese Waters Show
Flowers Due: The Commanders & the Deer Population

The Reese Waters Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 12:21


Every Tuesday Reese Waters takes a moment to hand out flowers to someone, something or some entity that deserves them. Some weeks it is more serious than others. This week? The Commanders have really done a commendable job in how they have honored Dwayne Haskins. And there may be bears in your backyard soon. 

Alaska News Nightly
Alaska News Nightly: Thursday, April 21, 2022

Alaska News Nightly

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022


Republicans look ahead to ranked-choice voting at a convention in Fairbanks. Also, a bill changing marijuana possession charges passes the state House. And the National Park Service gears up for Denali climbing season.

The Tech Humanist Show
How Tech Harms – and Can Help Heal – the Climate

The Tech Humanist Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 45:09


On this week's episode, we're talking about one of the most urgent issues facing humanity today, and how we can reframe our mindset around it to better encourage and allow ourselves to take action. That issue, of course, is climate change. Technology has created a lot of the problems we face, but is also coming up with some of the most innovative and inventive solutions. Solving this is going to take creativity, collaboration, and a willingness to change, but that's what we're all about here at the Tech Humanist Show! What is our individual responsibility to tackling these problems? What are the most exciting solutions on the horizon? Who should we be holding to account, and how? Those answers and more on this week's episode. Guests this week include Sarah T. Roberts, AR Siders, Tan Copsey, Anne Therese Gennari, Christopher Mims, Art Chang, Dorothea Baur, Abhishek Gupta, and Caleb Gardner. The Tech Humanist Show is a multi-media-format program exploring how data and technology shape the human experience. Hosted by Kate O'Neill. To watch full interviews with past and future guests, or for updates on what Kate O'Neill is doing next, subscribe to The Tech Humanist Show hosted by Kate O'Neill channel on YouTube. Full Transcript: Hello, humans! Today we're talking about a problem that technology is both a major cause of and perhaps one of our best potential solutions for: climate change. By almost any reckoning, the climate emergency is the most urgent and existential challenge facing humanity for the foreseeable future. All of the other issues we face pale in comparison to the need to arrest and reverse carbon emissions, reduce global average temperatures, and begin the work of rebuilding sustainable models for all of us to be able to live and work on this planet. By late 2020, melting ice in the Arctic began to release previously-trapped methane gas deposits. The warming effects of methane are 80 times stronger than carbon over 20 years, which has climate scientists deeply worried. Meanwhile, the Amazon rainforest has been devastated by burning. The plastic-filled oceans are warming. Coral reefs are dying. Experts are constantly adjusting their predictions on warming trends. And climate issues contribute to other socio-political issues as well, usually causing a big loop: Climate disasters create uninhabitable environments, leading to increased migration and refugee populations, which can overwhelm nearby areas and stoke the conditions for nationalistic and jingoistic political power grabs. This puts authoritarians and fascists into power—who usually aren't too keen on spending money to fix problems like climate change that don't affect them personally—exacerbating all of the previous problems. UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson showcased exactly this type of position before a recent UN climate conference, claiming the fall of the Roman empire was due to uncontrolled immigration as a way of refocusing people's fear and attention away from climate change. Marine Le Pen of France went so far as to say that those without a homeland don't care about the environment. Similarly out-of-touch and out-of-context things have been said recently by right-wing leaders in Spain, Germany, Switzerland… the list goes on and on. Perhaps the most psychologically challenging aspect of all this is that even as we begin to tackle these issues one by one, we will continue to see worsening environmental effects for the next few decades. As David Wallace-Wells writes in The Uninhabitable Earth: “Some amount of further warming is already baked in, thanks to the protracted processes by which the planet adapts to greenhouse gas…But all of those paths projected from the present…to two degrees, to three, to four or even five—will be carved overwhelmingly by what we choose to do now.” The message is: It's up to us. We know what's coming, and are thus empowered to chart the course for the future. What we need are bold visions and determined action, and we need it now. At this point you may be thinking, “I could really use some of that Kate O'Neill optimism right about now…” Not only do I have hope, but many of the climate experts I have read and spoken with are hopeful as well. But the first step in Strategic Optimism is acknowledging the full and unvarnished reality, and the hard truth about the climate crisis is that things do look bleak right now. Which just means our optimistic strategy in response has to be that much more ambitious, collaborative, and comprehensive. As Christiana Figuere and Tom Rivett-Carnac wrote in The Future We Choose: Surviving the Climate Crisis, “[To feel] a lack of agency can easily transform into anger. Anger that sinks into despair is powerless to make change. Anger that evolves into conviction is unstoppable.” One of the things slowing progress on the climate front is the people on the extreme ends of the belief spectrum—especially those in positions of power—who believe it's either too late to do anything, or that climate change isn't happening at all. Technology exacerbates this problem through the spread of false information. Thankfully by this point most people—around 90% of Americans and a higher percentage of scientists—are in agreement that it's happening, although we're still divided on the cause. The same poll conducted in October 2021 by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research and the Energy Policy Institute at the University of Chicago, found that only 54% of Americans believe humans contribute to climate change. A separate study conducted that same month looked at 88,125 peer-reviewed climate studies published between 2012 and 2020, and determined that 99.9% of those studies found human activity to be directly responsible for our warming planet. It's important, however, not to write off the people who aren't yet fully convinced. Technology, as much as it has given us near-infinite access to information, is also a tremendous propagator of mis- and disinformation, which is fed to people by algorithms as immutable fact, and is often indistinguishable from the truth. Sarah T Roberts, who is Associate Professor at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) where she also serves as the co-founder of the UCLA Center for Critical Internet Inquiry, explains further. Sarah T Roberts: “When I think about people who fall victim to conspiracy theories, what I see is a human impulse to make sense of a world that increasingly doesn't. And they're doing it in the absence of information that is way more complex and hard to parse out and might actually point criticism at places that are very uncomfortable. They sense a wrongness about the world but they don't have the right information, or access to it, or even the ability to parse it, because we've destroyed public schools. And then the auxiliary institutions that help people, such as libraries, and that leaves them chasing their own tail through conspiracy theories instead of unpacking things like the consequences of western imperialism, or understanding human migration as economic and environmental injustice issues. Y'know, you combine all that, and people, what do they do? They reach for the pablum of Social Media, which is instantaneous, always on, easy to digest, and worth about as much as, y'know, those things might be worth. I guess what I'm trying to do is draw some connections around phenomena that seem like they have come from nowhere. It would behoove us to connect those dots both in this moment, but also draw back on history, at least the last 40 years of sort of like neoliberal policies that have eroded the public sphere in favor of private industry. What it didn't do was erode the public's desire to know, but what has popped up in that vacuum are these really questionable information sources that really don't respond to any greater norms, other than partisanship, advertising dollars, etc. And that's on a good day!” The fact is, there are a number of industries and people who have a vested interest in maintaining the status quo. Not all of them engage in disinformation schemes, but some corporations—and people—who are interested in fighting climate change aren't willing to look at solutions that might change their business or way of life. Too much change is scary, so they look for solutions that keep things as they are. AR Siders: “Too much of our climate change adaptation is focused on trying to maintain the status quo. We're trying to say, ‘hey, the climate is changing, what can we do to make sure that everything stays the same in the face of climate change?' And I think that's the wrong way to think about this.” That's AR Siders, assistant professor in the Biden School of Public Policy and Administration and the Department of Geography and a Core Faculty Member of the Disaster Research Center. Siders' research focuses on climate change adaptation governance, decision-making, and evaluation. ARSiders: “I think we need to think about the idea that we're not trying to maintain the status quo, we're trying to choose how we want our societies to change. I often start talks by showing historic photos, and trying to point out, in 1900, those photos don't look like they do today. So, 100 years in the future, things are going to look different. And that's true even if you don't accept climate change. Even if we stop climate change tomorrow, we might have another pandemic. We'll have new technology. And so our goal shouldn't be to try to lock society into the way it works today, it should be to think about, what are the things we really care about preserving, and then what things do we actively want to choose to change? Climate adaptation can be a really exciting field if we think about it that way.” And it is! But as more people have opened their eyes to the real threat looming in the near-horizon, disinformation entities and bad actors have changed their tactics, shifting responsibility to individuals, and away from the corporations causing the majority of the harm. So let's talk about our personal responsibility to healing the climate. Tan Copsey: “We always should be careful of this trap of individual action, because in the past the fossil fuel industry has emphasized individual action.” That's Tan Copsey, who is Senior Director, Projects and Partnerships at Climate Nexus, a strategic communications organization. His work focuses on communicating the impacts of climate change and the benefits of acting to reduce climate risks. You'll be hearing from him a lot this episode. We spoke recently about climate change solutions and responsibilities across countries and industries. He continued: Tan Copsey: “I don't know if it's true but apparently BP invented the carbon footprint as a way of kind of getting people to focus on themselves and feel a sense of guilt, and project out a sense of blame, but that's not really what it's about. Dealing with climate change should ultimately be a story about hope, and that's what I kind of try and tell myself and other people.” Speaking of, Shell had a minor PR awakening in November 2020 when they tweeted a poll asking: “What are you willing to change to help reduce carbon emissions?” The tweet prompted many high-profile figures like climate activist Greta Thunberg and US congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez to call out the hypocrisy of a fossil fuel company asking the public for personal change. In truth, research has found that the richest 1% of the world's population were responsible for the emission of more than twice as much carbon dioxide as the poorer half of the world from 1990 to 2015, with people in the US causing the most emissions per capita in the world. Now, this doesn't mean to abandon personal responsibility. We should all make what efforts we can to lower our carbon footprint where feasible—whether by reviewing consumption habits, eating less meat, driving less, or anything from a wide variety of options. There's interesting psychological research around how making sustainable choices keeps us grounded in the mindset of what needs to change. I spoke with Anne Therese Gennari, a speaker, educator, and environmental activist known as The Climate Optimist, about the psychology behind individual action, and how the simple act of being more climate conscious in our daily lives can make the world a better place in ways beyond reducing our carbon footprints. Anne Therese Gennari: “Do our individual actions matter… and I think it matters so much, for 4 reasons. The first one is that it mends anxiety. A lot of people are starting to experience climate anxiety, and the first step out of that is actually to put yourself back in power. Choosing optimism is not enough. Telling ourselves, ‘I want to be optimistic,' is gonna fall short very quickly, but if we keep showing up for that work and that change, we're actually fueling the optimism from within. And that's how we keep going. The second one is that it builds character. So, the things that you do every day start to build up your habits, and that builds your character. Recognizing that the things we do becomes the identity that we hold onto, and that actually plays a huge part on what I'll say next, which is, start shifting the culture. We are social creatures, and we always look to our surroundings to see what's acceptable and okay and not cool and all these things, so the more of us that do something, it starts to shift norms and create a new culture, and we have a lot of power when we start to shift the culture. And then lastly, I'll just say, we always plant seeds. So whatever you do, someone else might see and pick up on, you never know what's gonna ripple effect from your actions.” No one person can make every change needed, but we can all do something. Every small action has the potential to create positive effects you'll never know. One surprising piece of information is that some of the things we're doing that we know are bad for the environment—like online delivery—may have more of a positive environmental impact than we thought. While the sheer amount of product that we order—especially non-essential items—is definitely exacerbating climate change, there are some positive takeaways. Christopher Mims, tech columnist at the Wall Street Journal and author of Arriving Today, on how everything gets from the factory to our front door, explains how, especially once our transportation and delivery vehicles have been electrified, ordering online may be a significantly greener alternative to shopping in stores. Christopher Mims: “The good news—you would think all of this ordering stuff online is terrible for the environment—look, it's bad for the environment in as much as it makes us consume more. We're all over-consuming, on average. But it's good for the environment in that, people forget, hopping into a 2 or 3 thousand pound car and driving to the grocery store—or a store—to get 5 to 15 pounds of goods and driving it home is horribly inefficient compared to putting the same amount of goods onto a giant box truck that can make 150 stops (if you're talking about a UPS or an Amazon delivery van), or a few dozen if you're talking about groceries. The funny thing is that delivery has the potential to be way more sustainable, and involve way less waste than our current system of going to stores. Frankly, physical retail is kind of a nightmare environmentally.” That's only a small piece of the puzzle, and there are still social and economic issues involved in the direct-to-home delivery industry. More important in regards to our personal responsibility is to stay engaged in the conversation. A both/and mindset is best: embrace our own individual responsibilities, one of which is holding companies and entities with more direct impact on the climate accountable for making infrastructural and operational change that can give individuals more freedom to make responsible choices. Tan Copsey again. Tan Copsey: “It is about political action and engagement for me. Not just voting, but it's about everything that happens in between. It's about community engagement, and the tangible things you feel when there are solar panels on a rooftop, or New York begins to move away from gas. I mean, that's a huge thing! In a more existential sense, the news has been bad. The world is warming, and our approach to dealing with it distributes the benefits to too few people. There are definitely things you can do, and so when I talk about political pressure, I'm not just talking about political pressure for ‘climate action,' I'm talking about political pressure for climate action that benefits as many people as possible.” So, if part of our responsibility is to hold our leaders to account… what changes do we need? What should we be encouraging our leaders to do? Since we're talking about political engagement, let's start with government. Tan spoke to me about government response to another global disaster—the COVID-19 Pandemic—and some of the takeaways that might be applied to battling climate change as well. Tan Copsey: “What's really interesting to me about the pandemic is how much money governments made available, particularly the Fed in the US, and how they just pumped that money into the economy as it exists. Now, you can pump that money into the economy and change it, too, and you can change it quite dramatically. And that's what we're beginning to see in Europe as they attempt to get off Russian gas. You're seeing not just the installation of heat pumps at astonishing scale, but you're also seeing real acceleration of a push toward green energy, particularly in Germany. You're also seeing some ideas being revisited. In Germany it's changing people's minds about nuclear power, and they're keeping nukes back on.” Revisiting debates we previously felt decided on is unsettling. Making the future a better place is going to require a great deal of examination and change, which can be scary. It's also something federal governments are designed not to be able to do too quickly. But that change doesn't have to work against the existing economy; it can build with it. It might be notable to people looking at this from a monetary perspective—the world's seven most industrialized countries will lose a combined nearly $5 trillion in GDP over the next several decades if global temperatures rise by 2.6 degrees Celsius. So it behooves everyone to work on these solutions. And what are those solutions? AR Siders spoke to me about the four types of solutions to climate issues. A lot of her work involves coastal cities, so her answer uses “flooding” as an example, but the strategies apply to other problems as well. AR Siders: “So the main categories are, Resistance, so this is things like building a flood wall, putting in dunes, anything that tries to stop the water from reaching your home. Then there's Accommodation, the classic example here is elevating homes, so the water comes, and the water goes, but it does less damage because you're sort of out of the way. Then there's Avoidance, which is ‘don't build there in the first place,' (America, we're not very good at that one). And then Retreat is, once you've built there, if you can't resist or accommodate, or if those have too many costs, financial or otherwise, then maybe it's time to relocate.” We'll need to apply all four strategies to different problems as they crop up, but it's important that we're proactive and remain open to which solution works best for a given issue. City governments have tremendous opportunities to emerge as leaders in this space. Studies project that by the end of the century, US cities could be up to 10 degrees Fahrenheit warmer in the afternoon and 14 degrees warmer at night, meaning cities need to start taking action now. Phoenix, Arizona—a city that experiences the “heat island effect” year round—is actively making efforts to minimize these effects. In 2020, they began testing “cool pavement,” a chemical coating that reflects sunlight and minimizes the absorption of heat to curb the heat island effect. Additionally, measures to offer better transit options are on the table, with cities like Austin and New York emerging as leaders in the space. The Citi Bike app in New York City now shows transit information alongside rental and docking updates as acknowledgement that for many trips biking isn't enough, but in combination with buses or trains, biking can simplify and speed a commute as part of a greener lifestyle. Austin's recognition of the synergies between bikeshare and public transit has been praised as a model for other cities, as city transit agencies move away from seeing themselves as managers of assets (like busses), and towards being managers of mobility. I spoke with Art Chang, who has been a longtime entrepreneur and innovator in New York City—and who was, at the time of our discussion, running for mayor—about the need for resilience in preparing cities for the future. Art Chang: “There was a future—a digital future—for New York, but also being open to this idea that seas were rising, that global temperatures were going up, that we're going to have more violent storms, that things like the 100-year flood line may not be drawn to incorporate the future of these rising seas and storms. So we planned, deliberately and consciously, for a hundred-fifty year storm. We softened the edge of the water, because it creates such an exorbitant buffer for the rising seas and storms. We created trenches that are mostly hidden so that overflow water had a place to go. We surrounded the foundations of the building with what we call ‘bathtubs,' which are concrete enclosures that would prevent water from going into these places where so much of the infrastructure of these buildings were, and then we located as much of the mechanicals on top of the building, so they would be protected from any water. Those are some of the most major things. All technologies, they're all interconnected, they're all systems.” Making any of the changes suggested thus far requires collective action. And one of the ways in which we need to begin to collaborate better is simply to agree on the terms we're using and how we're measuring our progress. Some countries, like the United States, have an advantage when it comes to reporting on climate progress due to the amount of forests that naturally occur within their borders. That means the US can underreport emissions by factoring in the forests as “carbon sinks,” while other countries that may have lower emissions, but also fewer naturally-occurring forests, look worse on paper. This isn't factually wrong, but it obscures the work that's needed to be done in order to curb the damage. I asked Tan about these issues, and he elaborated on what he believes needs to be done. Tan Copsey: “Again, I'd say we resolve the ambiguity through government regulation. For example, the Securities and Exchange Commission is looking at ESG. So this big trend among investors and companies, the idea that you take account of environmental, social, and governance factors in your investments, in what your company does. Realistically, there hasn't been consistent measure of this. I could buy an exchange-traded fund, and it could be ‘ESG,' and I wouldn't really know what's in it. And it could be that what's in it isn't particularly good. And so regulators are really trying to look at that now and to try and standardize it, because that matters. Likewise, you have carbon markets which are sort of within European Union, and then you have voluntary carbon markets, which are often very reliant on forest credits sourced from somewhere else, where you're not quite sure if the carbon reduction is permanent or not. And yeah, there is a need for better standards there.” To do this holistically we will need to get creative with economic incentives, whether that involves offsets, green energy credits, or new programs at local, state, or national levels. One of the more aggressive and comprehensive plans for rethinking energy policy came from the EU in summer 2021, just as Germany and Belgium reeled from killer floods that were likely exacerbated by the climate crisis. The EU announced its ”Fit for 55” plans, ”a set of inter-connected proposals, which all drive toward the same goal of ensuring a fair, competitive and green transition by 2030 and beyond.” It's an approach that is systemic, recognizing the interconnectedness of a wide variety of policy areas and economic sectors: energy, transportation, buildings, land use, and forestry. And we need more programs and regulations like this. But until we have those better regulations we need, there are still things business leaders can do to make their businesses better for the environment today, so let's move away from government and talk about businesses. A lot of businesses these days pay an enormous amount of lip service (and money) to showing that they care about the environment, but the actual work being done to lower their carbon footprint or invest in cleaner business practices is a lot less significant. Tan spoke to me about this as well. Tan Copsey: “They need to move from a model which was a little bit more about PR to something that's real. In the past when a business issued a sustainability report, it was beautiful! It was glossily designed… And then when it came to like, filings with the SEC, they said ‘climate change is a serious issue and we are taking it seriously,' because their lawyers read it very, very closely. And so, if dealing with climate risk is embedded in everything you do as a business (as it probably should be), because almost every business, well, every business probably, interacts with the energy system—every business is a climate change business. They should be thinking about it, they should be reporting on it, y'know, when it comes to CEOs, it should be part of the way we assess their performance.” Nowadays, lots of companies are talking about “offsetting” their carbon emissions, or attempting to counter-act their emissions by planting trees or recapturing some of the carbon. But is this the right way to think about things? Dorothea Baur: “Offsetting is a really good thing, but the first question to ask should not be, ‘can I offset it?' or ‘how can I offset it?', but, ‘is what I'm doing, is it even necessary?'” That's Dorothea Baur, a leading expert & advisor in Europe on ethics, responsibility, and sustainability across industries such as finance, technology, and beyond. Her PhD is in NGO-business partnerships, and she's been active in research and projects around sustainable investment, corporate social responsibility, and increasingly, emerging technology such as AI. Dorothea Baur: “So, I mean, let's say my favorite passion is to fly to Barcelona every other weekend just for fun, for partying. So, instead of offsetting it, maybe I should stop doing it. And the same for tech companies saying, you know, ‘we're going to be carbon negative!' but then make the most money from totally unsustainable industries. That's kind of a double-edged sword.” It is notable that one of the key ways businesses and governments attempt to offset their emissions is “planting trees,” which has more problems than you may think. Yes, trees are an incredibly important part of a carbon sink approach, and we definitely need to plant more of them—but there's a catch to how we say we're going to do it. The promise of tree-planting has been such an easy add-on for companies' marketing campaigns to make over the years that there's a backlog of trees to be planted and not enough tree seedlings to keep up with the promises. It's not uncommon for companies to make the commitment to their customers to plant trees first, only for them to struggle to find partners to plant the promised trees. Dorothea Baur lamented this fact in her interview. Dorothea Baur: “It's also controversial, what I always joke about—the amount of trees that have been promised to be planted? I'm waiting for the day when I look out of my window in the middle of the city and they start planting trees! Because so much—I mean, the whole planet must be covered with trees! The thing is, it takes decades until the tree you plant really turns into a carbon sink. So, all that planting trees—it sounds nice, but also I think there's some double-counting going on. It's easy to get the credit for planting a tree, but it's hard to verify the reduction you achieve because it takes such a long time.” It's going to take more than lip service about tree-planting; we have to actually expand our infrastructural capability to grow and plant them, commit land to that use, and compensate for trees lost in wildfires and other natural disasters. Beyond that, we have to make sure the trees we're planting will actually have the effect we want. The New York Times published an article in March, arguing that “Reforestation can fight climate change, uplift communities and restore biodiversity. When done badly, though, it can speed extinctions and make nature less resilient…companies and countries are increasingly investing in tree planting that carpets large areas with commercial, nonnative species in the name of fighting climate change. These trees sock away carbon but provide little support to the webs of life that once thrived in those areas.” And that can mean the trees take resources away from existing plant life, killing it and eliminating the native carbon-sink—leading to a situation where net carbon emissions were reduced by nearly zero. These are problems that require collaboration and communication between industries, governments, activists, and individuals. Beyond those initiatives, companies can also improve their climate impact by investing in improvements to transportation for employees and customers, perhaps offering public transit or electric vehicle incentives to employees, or investing in a partnership with their municipality to provide electric vehicle charging stations at offices and storefronts. Additionally, business responsibility may include strategic adjustments to the supply chain or to materials used in products, packaging, or delivery. Another issue when it comes to offsetting emissions is the leeway the tech industry gives itself when it comes to measuring their own global climate impact, when the materials they need to build technology is one of the chief contributors to carbon emissions. Dorothea Baur again. Dorothea Baur: “The whole supply chain of the IT industry is also heavily based on minerals. There are actually, there are really interesting initiatives also by tech companies, or like commodity companies that specifically focus on the minerals or the metals that are in our computers. Like cobalt, there's a new transparency initiative, a fair cobalt initiative. So they are aware of this, but if you look at where is the main focus, it's more on the output than on the input. And even though the tech companies say, ‘oh, we're going to be carbon neutral or carbon negative,' as long as they sell their cloud services to the fossil industry, that's basically irrelevant.” Currently, AI tech is an “energy glutton”—training just one machine learning algorithm can produce CO2 emissions that are 5 times more than the lifetime emissions of a car. But there is still hope for AI as a tool to help with climate change, namely using it to learn how to more efficiently run energy grids and predict energy usage, especially as energy grids become more complicated with combined use of solar, wind, and water power in addition to traditional fossil fuels. AI can also make the global supply chain more efficient, reducing emissions and speeding up the process of developing new, cleaner materials. One small-scale use-case is “Trashbot,” which sorts waste materials into categories using sensors and cameras, eliminating the need for people to try to sort out their own recyclables. What's clear from every emerging report is that net zero emissions are no longer enough. We need governments and companies and every entity possible to commit to net negative emissions. Cities need ambitious plans for incentivizing buildings that sequester carbon. Companies need logistics overhauls to ensure their supply chains are as compliant as possible, and then some. Tan Copsey: ““What's interesting is when they talk about Net Zero—particularly companies, but also a lot of governments—they talk about Net Zero by 2050. What is that, 28 years. 28 years is still a long time away, and if you're a government, the current president certainly won't be president in 2050. If you're a company CEO, you may not be CEO next quarter, let alone in 28 years, and so we have to have nearer-term targets. You want to be Net Zero by 2050? Tell me how you're gonna get there. Tell me what you're gonna do by 2030, tell me what you're gonna do by next quarter. One of the things that encourages me is things like change in financial regulation, which sounds arcane and slightly off-topic, but it's not. It's about what companies report when, and how investors hold those companies to account to nearer-term action, because that's how we get there.” One of the reasons that corporations do so little to minimize their carbon footprint is that they don't accurately measure their own carbon emissions. Using AI to track emissions can show problem areas, and what can be done to address those issues. Abhishek Gupta, machine learning engineer, founder of the Montreal AI Ethics Institute, and board member of Microsoft's CSE Responsible AI board, spoke to me about an initiative he's working on to help ease this burden by making it easier for developers to track the effect they're having on the environment by incorporating data collection into their existing workflow. Abhishek Gupta: “One of the projects that we're working on is to help developers assess the environmental impacts of the work that they do. Not to say that there aren't initiative already, there are—the problem with a lot of these are, they ignore the developer's workflow. So the problem then is, if you're asking me to go to an external website and put in all of this information, chances are I might do it the first couple of times, but I start to drop the ball later on. But if you were to integrate this in a manner that is similar to ML Flow, now that's something that's a little more natural to the developer workflow; data science workflow. If you were to integrate the environmental impacts in a way that follows this precedent that's set by something like ML Flow, there is a lot higher of a possibility for people taking you up on that, and subsequently reporting those outcomes back to you, rather than me having to go to an external website, fill out a form, take that PDF report of whatever… that's just too much effort. So that's really what we're trying to do, is to make it easy for you to do the right thing.” And Abhishek isn't the only one who sees potential in AI. Dorothea Baur also spoke to me about her belief in AI, although she sees us using it for a different purpose. Dorothea Baur: “AI has huge potential to cause good, especially when it comes to environmental sustainability. For example, the whole problem of pattern recognition in machine learning, where if it's applied to humans, it is full of biases, and it kind of confuses correlation and causation, and it's violating privacy, etc. There are a lot of issues that you don't have when you use the same kind of technology in a natural science context, you know? Where you just observe patterns of oceans and clouds and whatever, or when you try to control the extinction of species. I mean, animals don't have a need for or a right to privacy, so why not use AI in contexts where it doesn't violate anyone's moral rights? And where you, at the same time, resolve a real problem.” Turning AI and algorithms away from people and towards nature is a wise decision in many respects. A lot of our efforts to curb the effects of climate change thus far have overlooked the same people that are overlooked in our data, and in almost every measurable respect, negative impacts of the climate crisis are felt most by marginalized populations and poorer communities. Tan Copsey: “I think that when it comes to climate tech, you need to think about who it's supposed to benefit. There's more than 7B people on earth, it can't just be for the US market, it has to be for everyone.” “The best futures for the most people” really comes into play here—communities of color are often more at risk from air pollution, due to decades of redlining forcing them into more dangerous areas. Seniors, people with disabilities, and people with chronic illnesses may have a harder time surviving extreme heat or quickly evacuating from natural disasters. Subsidized housing is often located in a flood plain, causing mold, and frequently lacks adequate insulation or air conditioning. People with a low-income may also be hard-pressed to afford insurance or be able to come back from an extreme loss after catastrophe strikes. Some indigenous communities have already lost their homelands to rising sea levels and drought. Indigenous communities, speaking of, often have traditional approaches—empowered by millennia of historical experience—to living gently on the planet and a mindset for cooperating with nature that are well worth learning. Seeking leadership on climate issues from Indigenous people should be a priority. An article published by Mongabay on December 21, 2021 gives an example of an initiative in Mexico that is using the knowledge of indigenous communities, and is working. Essentially, the Ejido Verde company grants interest-free loans to local communities to plant and tend pine trees for the tapping of resin, a multibillion-dollar global industry. Younger generations are eager to participate, and fewer people feel the need to migrate away from their homes. According to a paper by the Royal Botanic Gardens of Kew, the only way that recovery can work is if it is based on sound science, supported by fair governance, incentivized by long-term funding mechanisms, and guided by indigenous knowledge and local communities. Speaking of long-term funding mechanisms, let's talk about another group of leaders who have the potential to make a drastic positive impact today: private investors. Activist investors may seem unwelcome, but when they're making priorities known on behalf of humanity, they're ultimately doing us all a service. These people have the ability to help shape company and government policy by letting their dollars speak for us, by investing in solutions and burgeoning industries that we drastically need. That's been happening, such as when the shareholders of both ExxonMobil and Chevron sent strong messages about getting serious with respect to climate responsibility. In Europe, shareholder votes and a Dutch court ordered Royal Dutch Shell to cut its emissions faster than they'd already been planning. And social and financial pressure is a good way to nudge executives in the right direction, especially leaders who don't make climate-friendly decisions out of fear of pushback from their boards and investors. Tan Copsey: “Investors increasingly should be thinking about the companies they invest in on the basis of their climate performance. And that isn't just, ‘oh, they reduced some greenhouse gas emissions,' because, y'know, you look at a lot of tech companies and they have reduced greenhouse gas emissions, but really they have to do more than that. For businesses in other sectors, it may not be that simple. Certainly there are harder to abate sectors, and so it could be that you are the CEO of a steel company, and your emissions are still gigantic, but the change you can make by introducing, say, hydrogen, and getting rid of coal, or introducing renewable energy plus hydrogen to your—the way in which you do steel, is transformative for the global economy and transformative for the climate system, and in a way investing in that company is more climate-friendly than investing in a tech company; but chances are you have an ETF and you're doing both.” Despite everything I've talked about today, it's important for all of us to remain optimistic. I asked Anne Therese Gennari why optimism is important, and her answer didn't disappoint. Anne Therese Gennari: “Optimism, for scientific reasons, is actually very important. If you look to neuroscience, we need optimism to believe something better is possible, and then find the motivation and the courage to take action right now to get us closer to that goal. And I think there is a huge difference between optimism and toxic positivity, and I think a lot of people who don't agree with optimism associate it with always trying to be happy, thinking good thoughts and hoping things will turn out to the better. And that's why I love to come back to this understanding that ‘awareness hurts, and that's okay.' Because when we tell ourselves that not everything is beautiful, and sometimes things will be painful, we can actually handle that, and we can take that. But from that place of awareness, we can start to grow a seed of hope and tell ourselves, ‘well, what if? What if we did take action, and this happened? What if we can create a more beautiful world in the future? And so, we can paint a picture that's all doomsday, or we can paint one that's beautiful. So which one do we want to start working towards?” And if you find yourself saying, “I really want to be optimistic, but it's too hard! There's just so much bad news out there…” don't fret! You aren't alone. You might even say that's a quite human response. Anne Therese Gennari: “We're human beings, and as a species, we respond to certain kinds of information in different ways. Information that's negative or fear based has a very limiting response in our brains. When we hear something that's overwhelming, like climate change, and we know it's urgent, we might understand that it's urgent, but the action isn't there. Because how our brains respond to something that we don't want to happen is actually to not take action. And it goes back to way back in time, where like, you're facing this dangerous animal, and you're like ‘there's no way I can fight this animal, I can't outrun it, so what am I gonna do? I'm gonna stand here super still and hope that it doesn't see me.' That's literally what our brains think about when something's that overwhelming. And so I think the more urgent the matter is, the more important it is that we actually fuel ourselves with an optimistic future or goal to work towards, because that is the only way that we can actually trigger action.” So let's fuel our minds with an optimistic future to work towards. Despite all the bad news you've heard—even on this episode—there are a lot of hopeful developments happening! The most recent U.N. Climate Conference, COP26, established the Glasgow Climate Pact, which recognizes that the situation is at an emergency level, asking countries to accelerate their plans by calling for provable action by next year. Policy changes, government regulations, and people becoming motivated are all on the rise. Caleb Gardner, who was lead digital strategist for President Obama's political advocacy group, OFA and is now founding partner of 18 Coffees, a strategy firm working at the intersection of digital innovation, social change, and the future of work, spoke to me about what he's most optimistic about, which is right in line with this show's values. Caleb Gardner: “I'm probably most optimistic about technology's ability to tackle global problems like climate change. I'm actually pretty bullish on technology's ability to solve and actually innovate around the reduction of carbon in our atmosphere, electric vehicles, electric grid… and what's great is a lot of that's already being driven by the private sector around the world, so it's not as dependent on government as we think that it is.” So let's talk about some of the emerging technologies that show a lot of promise in mitigating the effects of climate change—and that might make sense to invest in, if you have the means to do so. A team of UCLA scientists led by Aaswath Raman has developed a thin, mirror-like film that reflects heat to outer space through radiative cooling, and can lower the temperatures of objects it's applied to by more than 10 degrees. The idea comes from generations of knowledge from people living in desert climates who learned to cool water by letting the heat radiate out of it overnight. If this film were added to paint and/or applied to pipes and refrigeration units, it could help cool buildings and make refrigeration systems more efficient, reducing the need for air conditioning, which accounts for as much as 70% of residential energy demand in the United States and Middle East. One of the strongest selling points of innovations like this film is that it doesn't need electricity; it only needs a clear day to do its job. Another innovation in reflecting energy back into space comes in the form of ‘cloud brightening,' a technique where salt drops are sprayed into the sky so that clouds reflect more radiation, allowing us to refreeze the polar ice caps. Then there's the new trend of green roofs, in particular the California Academy of Sciences' Living Roof, which spans 2.5 acres and runs six inches deep, with an estimated 1.7 million plants, collecting 100 percent of storm water runoff and offering insulation to the building below. The whole endeavor is brilliantly hopeful and strategic. A massive green roof is completely on brand for a science museum, but that doesn't mean other buildings and businesses wouldn't benefit from them as well. The National Park Service even estimates that over a forty year building lifespan, a green roof could save a typical structure about $200,000, nearly two-thirds of which would come from reduced energy costs. Other building technologies move beyond solar panels and green roofs, with automated building management systems detecting usage patterns of lighting, heating, and air conditioning. There have also been innovations in window insulation, trapping heat during the winter and blocking it out in the summer. ‘Green cement' can be heated to lower temperatures and cuts emissions by a third compared to regular cement. There are new Hydrogen-powered ships whose emissions are water. Electric planes have been developed for short-distance flights. Large floating solar power installations have the potential to generate terawatts of energy on a global scale, and when built near hydropower, can generate electricity even in the dark. Lithium batteries continue to get smaller and more efficient, and can be charged faster and more often than other batteries, making electric vehicles cheaper. And speaking of electric vehicles, they can help with our energy storage problems, with owners buying electricity at night to charge their cars and selling it to the grid when demand is high and cars are unused during the day. Feeding cows seaweed and replacing beef with insects such as mealworms can drastically reduce methane emissions. Scientists in Argentina are working on backpacks for cows that collect their methane, which have shown to collect enough methane from a single cow every day to fuel a refrigerator for 24 hours. To help curb other types of emissions, carbon capture and storage technologies like NZT allow us to capture CO2 in offshore storage sites several kilometres beneath the North Sea. But it's not just about new technologies, or technologies that only work for the richest people. Here's Tan again to elaborate on this idea. Tan Copsey: “This is a really tricky moment, y'know, this is a really bad time to be inefficiently using the resources we have. As we think about climate tech, think about optimizing mobility, as well as copying the existing model. There's a lot of existing tech out there that would make people's lives better—very simple irrigation systems—and so, we shouldn't just think of this in terms of big new exciting things, we should think about it in terms of deploying existing things.” All of this is part of embracing the mindset that says things can change. We need a can-do mindset, but we also need clarity and collaboration. Basically all options need to be implemented if we want to curb the damage that has already been done. Our solutions need to work in conjunction with one another, and support the greatest number of people. To close out, here's Christopher Mims with the last word on putting away the doom and gloom, and remaining optimistic in the face of overwhelming adversity. Christopher Mims: “If you really think about the whole sweep of human history, we live in a time where the pace of especially technological, and therefore in some ways cultural change, is so much faster than ever. We keep inventing new ways to kind of trip ourselves up, and then we have to just adapt so quickly to them. We're constantly playing catch-up with our own technological and social developments. So there's a lot of beating ourselves up over like, ‘woah, how come we didn't do it this way, or we didn't do this right?' or whatever. Sometimes I'm just like, ahh, just chill! We're going as fast as we can. It's very easy to get caught up in the moment to moment, but I think there is this kind of overall arc where, if we don't cook ourselves to death, or blow ourselves up, or distract ourselves to death, we're moving in directions that, once we have fully understood how to live in harmony with the technology that we've created, we'll probably be okay.” Thanks for joining me on The Tech Humanist Show today. I hope you've learned something, and at the very least, that you're going into the future with more hope than you had before.

Alaska News Nightly
Alaska News Nightly: Wednesday, April 20, 2022

Alaska News Nightly

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022


Republicans look ahead to ranked-choice voting at a convention in Fairbanks. Also, a bill changing marijuana possession charges passes the state House. And the National Park Service gears up for Denali climbing season.

Creative + Cultural
Leah Thomas

Creative + Cultural

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 28:51


Leah Thomas is an eco-communicator, aka an environmentalist with a love for writing + creativity, based in Ventura, CA. She's passionate about advocating for and exploring the relationship between social justice and environmentalism. You could say she's tryna make the world a little more equal for everyone and a little nicer to our home planet.She is the founder of eco-lifestyle blog @greengirlleah and The Intersectional Environmentalist Platform, which is a resource + media hub that aims to advocate for environmental justice + inclusivity within environmental education + movements.Her articles on this topic have appeared in Vogue, Elle, The Good Trade, and Youth to the People and she has been featured in Harper's Bazaar, W Magazine, Domino, GOOP and numerous podcasts. She has a B.S. in Environmental Science and Policy from Chapman University and worked for the National Park Service and Patagonia headquarters before pursuing environmentalism full time. Learn more about Leah and her mission in this BuzzFeed video.Engaging the World: Leading the Conversation on Environmental Justice is a series of informed, sustained, and enriching dialogues looking at how environmental toxicity and risk disproportionately impact populations based on race, ethnicity, nationality, and social standing. Environmental Justice brings awareness to these disparities, fighting to ensure that every voice is heard, every challenge is addressed, and every community has a seat at the table for a greener future.Guest: Leah ThomasHost: Jon-Barrett IngelsProduced by Public Podcasting in partnership with Wilkinson College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences at Chapman University.

Dreamvisions 7 Radio Network
Radical Transformational Leadership with Dr Monica Sharma

Dreamvisions 7 Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 58:00


Guest Hosts Kirsten Gallo and Sudarshan Rodriguez with Guest Joshy Jose In this episode, we explore the use of Radical Transformational Leadership tools in assisting some of our most marginalized people—commercial sex workers and their children. We discuss the importance of shifting from a focus on our rights to focusing on embodying values and how that shift can be the difference between a life filled with violence and a life of care and nurturing. We also describe the importance of community for all of us and steps for building resilient humans and communities. KIRSTEN GALLO Kirsten Gallo served as the head of the National Park Service Inventory and Monitoring Division. She held a variety of positions in the U.S. Forest Service and the National Park Service conducting natural resource monitoring and stewardship of public lands. She holds a doctorate degree in Ecology and has dedicated her career to conserving natural resources and demonstrating interdependence between humans and our environment. She began applying RTL tools and techniques in 2009 and created platforms for leadership in five federal government agencies and NGOs. Kirsten is now working to make RTL a global movement as she works in the fields of the environment, leadership, and finance. Specifically, she's working to remove chemicals from our food systems and return to regenerative agricultural techniques to support the wellbeing of people and the planet. SUDARSHAN RODRIGUEZ Sudarshan Rodriguez is a development professional with experience in disaster management, environmental sciences, environmental economics, policy, and environmental law. He has worked with Dr. Monica Sharma as an RTL practitioner coach since 2010. After 22 years in the development sector with a variety of organizations, including the United Nations, grassroots organizations, policy think tanks, civil society and academia, he dove into the adventure of setting up the next generation development consultancy and social purpose enterprise called “RTLWorks”. Before founding RTLWorks, he was the Programme Director at Mahatma Gandhi Academy of Human Development, heading a center of the Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai located in Nagaland, India focusing on Livelihoods and Social Entrepreneurship. He also delivers and implements Radical Transformational Leaderships ‘learning-in-action programs' for business and non-profit organizations on different aspects of leadership development for sustainable change. JOSHY JOSE Joshy Jose plays the role of an integrator and is responsible for establishing strong accountability and program structures. He contributes to the conceptualization, construction, and strategic planning of programs that provide life-course solutions for children from vulnerable backgrounds, especially “Red light districts.” Joshy brings over 27 years of work experience in program design, innovation, and management. His expertise ranges from leading youth-targeted programmes to building learning systems and designing human-centred initiatives. In the past, Joshy held positions of Senior Director, Programs, Knowledge strategies, and planning. He also worked as a technical advisor for the youth and adolescent vertical of ChildFund International and was a part of the country management teams of The Leprosy Mission and Hope Worldwide. Joshy is a facilitator of the theory (and practice) of change and has been a consultant and Master Trainer for the “Developing Life-Skills” program in organizations across four countries. He is also trained in nonviolent communication and Radical Transformational Leadership. He firmly believes in in fostering children from vulnerable backgrounds “as our own,” and considers any kind of violence, especially violence against children, unacceptable. Learn more about Dr. Monica here: www.radicallytransform.org

The Outdoor Life Podcast
Can Hunting Survive in California?

The Outdoor Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 31:15


And if it can't, who's going to pay to conserve the state's wildlife and habitat? The list of obstacles looming before Golden State hunters reads like a doomsday letter: Megafires close millions of acres of forest during deer season and consume precious quail habitat; urban sprawl eats up increasingly large sections of wild land; drought turns reservoirs to puddles and puddles to cracked earth; duck populations struggle and deer numbers plummet; predator populations expand; ammunition becomes harder to find and much more complicated to purchase; and the possibility of a ballot initiative banning hunting lingers in a state with 63 percent fewer hunters than it had 50 years ago. But don't worry—there's good news in this episode, too. This episode is based on the story Can Hunting Survive in California? by Christine Peterson, which appeared in the No. 1, 2022 Issue of Outdoor Life. You can read more stories from this issue on Apple News, and subscribers can access them our iOS, Android, and Outdoor Life apps. Hosted by Editor-in-Chief Alex Robinson. Edited and produced by Senior Deputy Editor Natalie Krebs. Theme song by Harrison Black, Zep Jameson, and Emerson Lee. News clips in this episode include excerpts from The Sacramento Bee, ABC 7 News, ABC10, 23ABC News, with sound effects from the National Park Service and FreeSound.org.

KGNU Morning Magazine Podcast
Morning Magazine Podcast — Wednesday April 13, 2022

KGNU Morning Magazine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 27:54


On today’s Morning Magazine, refugees are front and center during observations of the Muslim religious month of Ramadan this year in Colorado. We'll hear from the head of Muslim Family Services. Then we'll look at how the National Park Service […]

The Dark Swamp: Horror Stories | Swamp Dweller Podcast
575: I Work For The National Park Service, Something Disturbing Is Going On

The Dark Swamp: Horror Stories | Swamp Dweller Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 28:12


I decided to take a job guarding the local national park on the night shift. I needed extra money and working with nature and others who love nature seemed like a dream. I Work For The National Park Service, Something Disturbing Is Going On. submit your story to swampdweller.net! Follow me on twitch! Twitch.tv/swampdwelleryt Download Swamp Dweller Scary Stories: Itunes: https://apple.co/2L7znZp Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2WUFDG8 Check out the Swamp Dweller Merch store! http://bit.ly/32u2eh5

KZMU News
Wednesday April 6, 2022

KZMU News

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 9:11


Every year, Utah Division of Wildlife officials collect fish for a breeding program. Their goal is the Tiger muskie – the division's secret weapon in managing fish populations throughout the state. Today on the news, we spend time fishing. Plus, a National Park Service program aims to recruit interns from diverse backgrounds historically underrepresented at the federal agency. // Show Notes // Photo: Calvin Black, Utah Division of Wildlife's assistant aquatics manager, catches Northern Pike in Recapture Reservoir on April 4th. Pike are bred with muskie to create the sterile Tiger muskie predator. KHOL: Effort to Diversify National Park Service Hosts Orientation at Grand Teton https://891khol.org/effort-to-diversify-national-park-service-hosts-orientation-at-grand-teton/

Outdoors with Hiking Bob – Studio 809 Radio
297 More on North Cheyenne Bridge Project; NPS Week; more land restrictions

Outdoors with Hiking Bob – Studio 809 Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 43:17


On this week's show, Bob interviews Aaron Egbert from the City of Colorado Springs about the North Cheyenne Canon Bridge Replacement Project. Also discussed: National Park Service week; more lands facing usage restrictions; cabins opening at Cheyenne Mountain State Park. This podcast sponsored by SpringsHomes.com Please consider becoming a patron of this podcast! Visit: https://www.patreon.com/hikingbob for more information Hiking Bob on ,   and  (HikingBob.com) Wild Westendorf on ,   and  (Wildwestendorf.com) Listen on ,   and 

Secure Freedom Radio Podcast
With Capt. James Fanell, Rebecca Weber and George Rasley

Secure Freedom Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 53:00


CAPT. JAMES FANELL, Retired Intelligence Officer for the Indo-Pacific, US Navy, former National Security Affairs Fellow, Hoover Institute Capt. James Fanell talks about a recent bilateral security agreement between the Solomon Islands and the People's Republic of China: “Which will include the Solomons requesting and allowing the People's Liberation Army Navy and other forces…to be able to stop over and make use of facilities in the Solomons” Capt. Fanell talks about the controversy surrounding Hunter Biden's laptop and the likelihood that the president of the United States, Joe Biden, is “deeply compromised” by the Chinese Communist Party: “Now it seems to be accepted that this laptop is a legitimate piece of evidence…Hunter Biden, you know, essentially being an employee of a Chinese state-owned enterprise…and having communications with the chief of their intelligence” REBECCA WEBER, President and CEO, Association for Mature American Citizens (AMAC), @MatureAmericans Rebecca Weber, President of Association for Mature American Citizens (AMAC), talks about one of the greatest threats facing our nation, Critical Race Theory GEORGE RASLEY, Editor, Conservative HQ, former White House Staff Member, Vice President Dan Quayle, former Assistant Director, National Park Service, former Director of Policy and Communication, Congressman Adam Putnam (FL-12) George Rasley talks about the Progressive Left's vision of the Supreme Court of the United States Is the Biden administration failing on purpose: “If you have to create the ‘new man' or the ‘new civilization,' you have to tear down the old one”

Inspirational Journeys
The Third Mrs. Galway with Deirdre Sinnott

Inspirational Journeys

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 34:33


This week, I have a special treat for you. Stick around to the end of the episode to hear an excerpt from my special guest's debut novel, read by the author herself. Deirdre Sinnott is an author, researcher, and activist for social change. She grew up in Utica, New York, and graduated from Syracuse University. Sinnott speaks nationally about the role of Central New York's residents in the abolition of slavery. She is a historical consultant for the Fort Stanwix Underground Railroad History Project, funded by the National Park Service. The Third Mrs. Galway is her first novel. The Third Mrs. Galway is a historical novel sent in Utica in 1835. The action begins when a young bride discovers an enslaved family hiding in her shed, setting in motion the exhumation of long-buried family secrets. Suddenly, she is at the center of not only the era's greatest moral dilemma, but her own as well. Should she be a “good wife” and report the fugitives to her husband? Or will she defy convention and come to their aid. The novel won The Writers Lounge 2021 Bookshelf Award and was chosen by the Women's National Book Association as one of their 2021 Great Group Reads. Purchase link: https://www.amazon.com/Third-Mrs-Galway-Deirdre-Sinnott/dp/1617758426/ Connect with Deirdre at the following links: www.ThirdMrsGalway.com https://www.facebook.com/deirdresinnott/ https://twitter.com/DeirdreNYC If you're looking for high quality editing services at reasonable prices, send queries to theplotstitch@gmail.com Visit www.everyday-excellence.com and use promo code Inspirational Journeys to get 10% off any product on the site. Support this podcast with a monthly donation: https://anchor.fm/inspirational-journeys/support or you can give a one-time donation via PayPal at: https://paypal.me/annHarrisonBarnes?country.x=US&locale.x=en_US --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/inspirational-journeys/message

Living My FEST Life
76. Grand Canyon Road Trip

Living My FEST Life

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 22:23


This week, Joe and John sit down to take in the beauty of one of Nature's Wonders, The Grand Canyon in Arizona. Once the sun goes down you can join the Star Party - so bring your red-shifted glow sticks! Plan your adventure, get more information at the National Park Service's website: https://www.nps.gov/grca/index.htm - Check out the show's Instagram feed: https://www.instagram.com/livingmyfestlifepodcast/ - Follow Kelly Collette online! https://www.kellycollettecomedy.com/ - Original Theme music performed and written by Honey Combs and Combo Slice. Stream their album today: https://open.spotify.com/album/4VZ775lbPom1lv3Vmi4KIM?si=YKFkPNWFQDC5zJ3AP4r_zQ&nd=1 - Editing provided by Phil at https://www.instagram.com/micompodre/

Sustainable World Radio- Ecology and Permaculture Podcast
Raptors and Rodenticides- the Unintended Consequences of Rat Poison

Sustainable World Radio- Ecology and Permaculture Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 68:05


Episode 164: Are you a fan of Raptors or birds of prey? Members of this large group of magnificent birds include hawks, eagles, falcons, and owls. For many of us, seeing raptors in cities and in the wilderness is awe-inspiring.  To learn more about these amazing birds, I am joined by Lisa Owens Viani and Allen Fish, co-founders of the nonprofit Raptors Are the Solution (RATS).  We begin by chatting about the wonders of raptors and why Lisa and Allen have devoted so much of their lives to helping these birds. We then discuss the impact that anticoagulant rodenticides is having on raptors and wildlife. Used worldwide, rodenticides (or rat poisons) affect not only rats, but also large numbers of non-target animals including raptors, bobcats, mountain lions, coyotes, bears, and fish. Rodenticides enter the food chain when animals eat poisoned rodents and receive secondary exposure. Anticoagulant rodenticide ingestion can lead to immune suppression, rodenticide-induced mange, internal hemorrhaging, and death. The overgrowth of rats is caused partly by a lack of predators. We talk about how the poisons we use to control rats end up harming or killing the very predators that are efficient at keeping rodent populations in check.  This interview contains vital information about how we can be better caretakers of our shared environment. All of us can take action to protect raptors and wildlife from anticoagulant rodenticides. What can we do? Start with avoiding the use of toxic rat poisons. Don't make your yard a rat haven. Exclusion, sanitation, and trapping are effective nontoxic methods of rodent control. Visit the Raptors are the Solution website for tips on how to make your yard less attractive to rats, educational resources, an activist toolkit, and more at raptorsarethesolution.org  Guests: Lisa Owens Viani is a long time environmental writer and wildlife advocate. Lisa co-founded and directs Raptors Are The Solution- or RATS, a project of Earth Island Institute.  RATS educates about the ecological role of raptors and the enormous danger that they and all wildlife, as well as pets and children, face from the wide use and availability of anticoagulant rat poisons. RATS partners with other agencies, scientists, municipalities, and NGO's to work toward eliminating toxic rodenticides from the food web. RATS' multi-pronged approach includes public education as well as legislative and legal work to achieve better regulation of these products.  Lisa was honored as the Fund for Wild Nature's Grassroots Activist of 2021 and received a Special Achievement Award on behalf of raptors from the International Owl Center in 2018. Allen Fish is the Associate Director for Conservation and Community Science at the Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy.  Allen is also the director of the Golden Gate Raptor Observatory since its founding in the mid 1980s. The Golden Gate Raptor Observatory is a four-decades-old community-science program of the Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy in cooperation with the National Park Service. It's set up to monitor the largest migration site for birds of prey in the Pacific Flyway.   Allen was a Lecturer at UC Davis from 2003 to 2011 where he taught Raptor Biology. Allen has a long history of writing and public speaking on raptor biology and conservation, urban wildlife ecology, climate change impacts, and the power of community science. Allen was awarded Bay Nature's Environmental Educator of the Year Award in 2016 and Golden Gate Audubon honored Allen with the Elsie Roemer Award for Conservation in 2020.   In 2011, Allen assisted Lisa in founding Raptors are the Solution. Allen lives with his family in Berkeley, and has recently become obsessed by the lives and ecology of dragonflies. Note: I was inspired to pursue this topic when I noticed that I wasn't hearing as many owls at night in my neighborhood. When disoriented rats began stumbling around our yard during the day and several were found dead in our yard, I did some research and discovered that rat poisons or anticoagulant rodenticides were the likely culprit-not only responsible for the dying and dead rats, but also for the decreased owl numbers. I decided to write an article Silent Night- The Unintended  Consequences of Rodenticides and in doing my research, I discovered Raptors Are the Solution (RATS). Links: Raptors Are the Solution or RATS Link to RATS Pilot Project in Seattle Article: Silent Night- The Unintended Consequences of Rodenticides

KHOL Jackson Hole Community Radio 89.1 FM
Effort to Diversify National Park Service Hosts Orientation at Grand Teton

KHOL Jackson Hole Community Radio 89.1 FM

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 5:15


Spring break drew a diverse group of young people to Grand Teton National Park for the annual NPS Academy orientation.

Good Morning, HR
Preserving Company Culture in a Remote Environment

Good Morning, HR

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 47:25


In episode 39, Coffey talks with Andrew Pryor, CHRO at ECI Software Solutions, about building and maintaining a great company culture in a remote work environment. They talk about Andrew's initial pandemic experience; his company's continued growth throughout the pandemic; how ECI has thrived in a remote and hybrid environment over the past two years; how employee engagement actually increased during the pandemic; how they maintained their “culture of recognition” throughout the pandemic; the importance of consistent communication with employees; the value of employee engagement surveys; how ECI took their learning and development program to a remote environment; how ECI emphasized mental health in the second year of the pandemic; Andrew's appreciation of frontline workers throughout the pandemic; changing working spaces to accommodate hybrid workers; the importance of hybrid workplaces and flexibility in recruiting great employees; the changing role of talent acquisition teams; and how employee expectations differ across ECI's global footprint.Good Morning, HR is brought to you by Imperative—premium background checks with fast and friendly service. For more information about our commitment to quality and excellent customer service, visit us at https://imperativeinfo.com. If you are an HRCI or SHRM-certified professional, this episode of Good Morning, HR has been pre-approved for half a recertification credit. To obtain the recertification information for this episode, visit https://goodmorninghr.com. About our Guest:As CHRO at ECI Software Solutions, Andrew Pryor dedicates his time to making ECI the best it can be in every aspect and works tirelessly to ensure employees are engaged and working in an optimal, enjoyable environment. His passion is  utilizing the platform of HR to help employees build strong careers for themselves and, in return, better lives for their families. Under Andrew's guidance, ECI's culture has been recognized as one of the 50 Most Engaged Companies to work for in 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, and 2021. ECI has been Certified as a Great Place to Work in 2017, 2019, and 2020. In 2018, the International Business Awards recognized Andrew as HR Executive of the Year. That same year, his peers in the Dallas HR Association recognized him as Dallas HR Executive of the Year.Andrew joined ECI in 2015 and has more than 35 years of experience in human resources. Before ECI, he served as Chief Human Resources Officer for Anthelio Healthcare in Dallas, Vice President of Human Resources for BerylHealth, and Senior Human Resources Business Partner to Bell Helicopters Engineering Division. In addition, while serving as the Senior Human Resource Manager, Andrew was part of the original launch team that brought Nokia Mobile Phones to the United States in 2005. In 2012, he co-authored the book SMILE GUIDE Employee Perspectives on Culture, Loyalty and Profit.Upon graduating from The University of Texas at Arlington, Andrew was named a White House Intern by President George H. W. Bush. During his time at The White House, he worked on the president's Thousand Points of Light project. He is a past president of the Society for Human Resources Management's Fort Worth Chapter. Andrew married his college sweetheart, Amy. They have two children, Chloe and Elijah, and one very spoiled rescue dog, Thomas. The family loves mountain hiking and exploring Americas national parks. His long-term goal is to retire from ECI (many years from now) and become a volunteer park ranger for the National Park Service.Andrew Pryor can be reached at https://www.linkedin.com/in/andrewlpryor. About Mike Coffey:Mike Coffey is an entrepreneur, human resources professional, licensed private investigator, and HR consultant.In 1999, he founded Imperative, a background investigations firm helping risk-averse companies make well-informed decisions about the people they involve in their business.Today, Imperative serves hundreds of businesses across the US and, through its PFC Caregiver & Household Screening brand, many more private estates, family offices, and personal service agencies.Mike has been recognized as an Entrepreneur of Excellence and has twice been named HR Professional of the Year. Additionally, Imperative is included in the prestigious Best Places to Work in Texas list and has been named the Texas Association of Business' small business of the year.Mike is a member of the Fort Worth chapter of the Entrepreneurs' Organization and volunteers with the SHRM Texas State Council.Mike maintains his certification as a Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR) through the HR Certification Institute. He is also a SHRM Senior Certified Professional (SHRM-SCP).Mike lives in Fort Worth with his very patient wife. He practices yoga and maintains a keto diet, about both of which he will gladly tell you way more than you want to know.Learning Objectives: Understand the benefits of a culture of recognition. Modify learning and development programs for success in a remote or hybrid environment. Redesign work spaces to better accommodate a hybrid work model.

Big Blend Radio
Author Megan Kate Nelson - Saving Yellowstone

Big Blend Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2022 37:00


This episode of Big Blend Radio features acclaimed author and historian Dr. Megan Kate Nelson, who discusses her latest book, "SAVING YELLOWSTONE: Exploration and Preservation in Reconstruction America." Each year, nearly four million people visit Yellowstone National Park—one of the most popular of all national parks—but few know the fascinating and complex historical context in which it was established. SAVING YELLOWSTONE shines a light on the creation of our first national park and the tensions of the era that lead to a weaken of the Native population. More: http://www.megankatenelson.com/ Special thanks to the National Parks Arts Foundation - https://www.nationalparksartsfoundation.org/ 

Here & Now
Reginald Dwayne Betts on the Freedom Library; B-29 bomber at the bottom of Lake Mead

Here & Now

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 41:44


Reginald Dwayne Betts says he survived his prison sentence by reading. He talks about the Freedom Library, which is now on display at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C. And, a World War II-era plane was on a scientific mission when it crashed into Lake Mead. The National Park Service is taking steps to protect it. Frani Halperin of H2O Radio reports.

Imagine This Podcast
Milwaukee Preservation Alliance w/ Jeremy Ebersole

Imagine This Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2022 74:45


This week on the pod, we welcome Jeremy Ebersole. Jeremy is the is the Executive Director of the Milwaukee Preservation Alliance (oh, and the spouse of Imagine MKE's Operations Coordinator Rachel Shields Ebersole.)  First, in the intro, the team chats about “swords and sandals,” Game of Thrones style alliances, and historic preservation projects of note. Jeremy joins around 15:00, and speaks about the history of the built environment, and how curiosity and a reverence for place led him to pursue a career in historic preservation.   Jeremy studied communications and peace studies, and worked in college admissions before pivoting into commercial archeology and eventually working for the National Park Service. He got his Masters in Historic Preservation from the University of Oregon, before taking his current role and moving to Milwaukee. In the conversation, Jeremy discusses Milwaukee's rust belt past, the diversity and friendliness of the city, and how the continued revitalization of spaces tells of the vibrancy of this community. He reflects on how preservation projects have the ability to cross boundaries, create social and environmental solutions and push culture forward. In his work, Jeremy advocates for the future of historic spaces in Milwaukee including the Mitchell Park Domes.   Follow the http://milwaukeepreservationalliance.org/ (Milwaukee Preservation Alliance) and on Facebook, Insta, and Twitter, and get in touch at mpa@milwaukeepreservationalliance.org; Get updates on https://www.facebook.com/SaveOurDomes (Save our Domes on Facebook); http://savethesoldiershome.com/ (Save the Soldiers Home)  Follow Jeremy on Insta: @jeremytheebersole   406 Ephemera  https://franklloydwrightsites.com/wisconsin/index.html (Frank Lloyd Wright)  https://gandhiashramsabarmati.org/en/ (Gandhi's Ashram)   https://www.lrsd.org/Page/2916 (Little Rock Central High)  https://mkefilm.org/oriental-theatre/about (The Oriental Theater)  https://thebasilica.org/ (The Basilica of St. Josaphat)  https://cathedral.org/ (National Cathedral)  “https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0pdqf4P9MB8 (La La Land”) (Trailer, YouTube)  https://www.avclub.com/daft-punk-in-coney-island-1798212025 (Daft Punk in Coney Island) (AV Club)  “https://screenrant.com/weird-al-yankovic-movie-daniel-radcliffe-insane-response/ (Weird Al Yankovic Movie Will Be Insane, Teases Daniel Radcliffe)” (Screenrant)  https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/1357329347 (Urban Spelunking) 

The Trail Dames Podcast
Episode #148 - Natalie Bonthius

The Trail Dames Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2022 49:48


Natalie Bonthius is the founder of Survival Med. She earned her Doctorate of Medicine from the University of Central Florida, and is combining a career in austere medicine with her background in neuroscience. Dr. Bonthius is a Fellow in the Academy of Wilderness Medicine, Advanced Wilderness and Expedition Provider, Advanced Wilderness Life Support instructor, and board member of the International Association of Near-Death Studies. She researches and teaches about what happens to the mind and human behavior in extreme environments and survival conditions. Dr. Bonthius has worked with the University of Utah, National Park Service, UVA Division of Perceptual Studies, National Association for Search and Rescue, independent expedition organizations, and more. Guest Links- Natalie on Instagram- https://www.instagram.com/survivalmeduniversity/ Survival med- www.survivalmedonline.org Connect with Anna, aka Mud Butt, at info@traildames.com You can find the Trail Dames at: Our website: https://www.traildames.com The Summit: https://www.traildamessummit.com The Trail Dames Foundation: https://www.tdcharitablefoundation.org Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/traildames/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/traildames/ Hiking Radio Network: https://hikingradionetwork.com/ Hiking Radio Network on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/hikingradionetwork/ Music provided for this Podcast by The Burns Sisters "Dance Upon This Earth" https://www.theburnssisters.com

America's National Parks Podcast
National Park News | New Mask Rules, Fewer Humpbacks, Missions Damaged, & a New Nat'l Historic Site

America's National Parks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2022 10:05


In this month's national park news roundup, we share info about the newest unit in the National Park Service system, the Amache National Historic Site. Plus, we cover things you might want to know about visiting a park this year — from new mask rules, to cashless payments, to prescribed fires, and we share some striking news about humpback whales in Glacier Bay National Park.

O'Connor & Company
03.21.22: [Hour 4 / 8 AM]: MD Gas Tax Holiday, Cherry Blossoms Blooming, Alexandria Assault, MoCo's Anti-Police Crusade

O'Connor & Company

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2022 30:03


In the fourth hour of the morning show, Larry O'Connor and Julie Gunlock talked to Mike Litterst of the National Park Service about the cherry blossoms blooming and IWF's Inez Stepman on her exclusive report on Alexandria assaults in schools.  They also discussed Maryland signing into law the gas tax suspension. For more coverage on the issues that matter to you, visit www.WMAL.com, download the WMAL app or tune in live on WMAL-FM 105.9 FM from 5-9 AM ET. To join the conversation, check us out on Twitter: @WMALDC, @LarryOConnor, @Jgunlock, @amber_athey and @patrickpinkfile. Show website: https://www.wmal.com/oconnor-company/ WMAL's "O'Connor and Company" podcast is sponsored by Cornerstone First Financial: https://www.cornerstonefirst.com/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Quick Hits : JFK Assassination News & Analysis
QH EP. 31 ~ Provocateurs, Croissants, & Milieus

Quick Hits : JFK Assassination News & Analysis

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 20, 2022 169:36


IN THIS EPISODE~ Rob & Doug are joined by Intrepid JFK Assassination Student/Researcher, Academic, Award-Winning Archeologist (currently serving with our National Park Service), Media-Content Creator, Published Author and Budding Film Critic Jeffrey Shanks! GET READY, because he knows his stuff and brings much to our discussion. Among the topics covered in this information-packed episode:The tenacious & legendary Warren Report critic William Turner; The mysterious disappearance of adventurer/anti-Castro pilot Alexander Rorke, concurrent with the "Oswald-In-Mexico Cty"-Episode; Mr. Shanks presents further research re: a document shared by Rob on a previous podcast; a deep-dive into the infamous John Martino, and a cryptic memo from the Garrison Investigation regarding Extreme Rightists plotting assassinations in Dallas, Texas, a few years after Dealey PlazaPLUS~ 'The Torbitt Document", Oswald & the Carcano rifle, determining exactly when Ruby got the order to hit Oswald, and why the Non-French should never pronounce French words in a French-like manner.JOIN US!Written & Hosted by Rob Clark & Doug CampbellProduced by Drop-D Podcast Productions

TUNDRA TALK PODCAST
Episode 132: John Sturgeon

TUNDRA TALK PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022 53:02


In this episode, I get to sit down with the man who took the NPS to the Supreme Court and won. Twice. John is a passionate hunter and now advocate for Alaskans, our lifestyle, and use of our lands. He talks about his now famous lawsuit against the National Park Service that has greatly impacted access to many of our lands. John also currently sits as president of the Alaska chapter of SCI, and is raising awareness around the upcoming meetings to decide the fate of millions of acres of federal public lands in northwest Alaska. Meeting link and info: Public hearing announced for deferred Temporary Wildlife Special Action Request WSA21-01 regarding caribou and moose in Units 23 and 26A | U.S. Department of the Interior (doi.gov)https://doi.gov/subsistence/news/general/public-hearing-announced-deferred-temporary-wildlife-special-action-0

Spartanburg City News Podcast
Community planning process to create vision for Duncan Park improvements

Spartanburg City News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022 23:09


Last month, Spartanburg City Council approved a resolution authorizing the City to pursue $300,000 in federal Land and Water Conservation Fund matching grant for improvements to trails and clearing of invasive species in wooded areas of Duncan Park, an opportunity identified as an early opportunity by a new community steering committee working with the National Park Service, the City, and to create a plan for improvements to the park that will increase its use and provide new recreation opportunities. The City's largest recreational asset at over 100 acres, Duncan Park is home to tennis courts, a playground, two recreational ball fields, historic Duncan Park stadium, a 14-acre lake, large wooded areas, four miles of natural surface trails, and one mile of paved trail. Last year, the City and PAL were selected by the National Park Service to receive expert consultation for a broad reimagining of Duncan Park. Through the process, the City and PAL will engage with stakeholders, surrounding neighborhood residents, and the broader Spartanburg community in creating a vision for the park that include multi-use trails, open spaces, and possible water recreation opportunities, with community gathering spaces linking recreational amenities to Historic Duncan Park Stadium. Today on the podcast, we're talking with PAL Executive Director Laura Ringo about the Duncan Park planning process, and we get an update on the group's latest trails work in Spartanburg.

The Tommy Show
March Madness, Doolittle returns to DC, Jon Stewart and His Friends Are Coming To The Kennedy Center

The Tommy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022 30:39


The Washington Nationals agreed to terms on a one-year contract with left-handed pitcher Sean Doolittle and announced their promotion calendar for the season. Women's March Madness has a few local teams Howard, U of MD, and American University. On Sunday, April 24, 2022, the Kennedy Center will present the 23rd annual Mark Twain Prize for American Humor to Jon Stewart. Widely considered to be the nation's highest recognition for humorists, the Prize honors an artist each year who has unquestionably shaped the world of comedy. For the full schedule of National Park Service cherry blossom events, including the Anacostia River Festival to be held in Anacostia Park, as well as a history of the cherry blossoms, and the bloom watch countdown, go to www.nps.gov/cherry. The Friends Experience opens up in downtown DC and runs through June. Join us at Freedom Plaza on March 27, 2022 to run or walk the DC ScopeItOut 5K. Register today, fundraise and build your team, and get ready to run during colorectal cancer awareness month. Tix On Sale for DC Central Kitchen #CapFoodFight Tom Colicchio, Andrew Zimmern, Spike Mendelsohn will be at The Anthem on April 7 for the annual fundraiser for DC Central Kitchen. Four of DC's best chefs battle head-to-head on stage while you enjoy food and drinks from dozens of your favorite restaurants! Tickets are now on sale. New Walk A Mile podcast alert - Tommy interviews Alysha Clark the upbeat, positive, dog-loving, coffee enthusiast, foodie who's ready to light it up for the Washington Mystics. The WNBA star is exploring DC after an injury, pandemic, and interrupted a few years. We stepped out to Walk A Mile in Northeast at Union Market. SPOILER: You're about to hear them become best friends. Scope It Out Race: https://impact.ccalliance.org/event/2022-dc-scopeitout-5k/e364416 Food Fight tickets and info: www.capitalfoodfight.org Mark Twain at Kennedy Center: https://www.kennedy-center.org/whats-on/explore-by-genre/comedy/2021-2022/marktwain-stewart/ Walk A Mile Podcast: https://open.spotify.com/episode/2kAJ372eN3RTR7Lk4d3TX6?si=fWe9r44cSKSObfbhT5v0WA Tickets for Friends Experience https://www.friendstheexperience.com

Left of Skeptic
Episode 60" "How she pulled that all together in one night, I do not know. But she did."

Left of Skeptic

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2022 65:22


This week marks the 60th Spooky Wednesday at Left of Skeptic, and we're visiting two new states to celebrate! First Kala takes us all the way up through Canada into Alaska to discuss the Alaskan Hotel in Juneau. This tiny, slightly dated hotel has a history of shy ghosts who don't seem to like it when people pay too much attention to them. If you're there on a daily basis for work or visiting, you're probably fine, but ghost hunters should beware. You might just end up hitting a few buildings on your way out... and no. We're not going to explain that any further, much to Brittany's frustration. After that, Brittany takes us to Hampton House in Towson, Maryland. This haunted location is technically a National Park and is haunted by a butler named Tom. Not Thomas. Tom. As well as a few others. Despite these documented hauntings, the National Park Service does not want to believe that these ghosts are real. But we know. YOU HEAR THAT, PARKS & REC? We know!

Secure Freedom Radio Podcast
With Rep. Scott Perry, George Rasley, and Pete Hoekstra

Secure Freedom Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022 53:00


REP. SCOTT PERRY, Pennsylvania's 4th Congressional District, U.S. House of Representatives, Member, House Transportation & Infrastructure, and Foreign Affairs Committees, Former State Representative, Pennsylvania General Assembly, @RepScottPerry Rep. Scott Perry's take on the Russia-Ukraine war An update on the Iran Nuclear Deal Perry's thoughts on the Iranian attack on Iraq GEORGE RASLEY, Editor, Conservative HQ, former White House Staff Member, Vice President Dan Quayle, former Assistant Director, National Park Service, former Director of Policy and Communication, Congressman Adam Putnam (FL-12), @Geerayz George Soros' funding for district attorneys across the country Soros' impact on campaigns in the United States Joe Biden blaming Putin for inflation AMB. PETE HOEKSTRA, former Congressman (1993-2011), Michigan's 2nd Congressional District, former US Ambassador to the Netherlands (2017-2021), Fellow, Center for Security Policy, @Petehoekstra The Trump administration's warnings against Russia The sending out of unsolicited absentee ballots in the 2020 election

The Mentor Project
Director of National Park Service, Jonathan Jarvis with Dr. Ruth Gotian

The Mentor Project

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 13, 2022 49:32


Jonathan (Jon) B. Jarvis went from seasonal employee to Director of the National Park Service (NPS). He was nominated by President Barack Obama and confirmed by the Senate as the 18thDirector of the National Park Service (NPS), serving for the entire Obama administration. During his tenure, he led the agency through its Centennial, adding 22 new parks including those that recognize the contributions of women and people of color, achieved its largest budget in history, addressed climate change and raised over $400 million in philanthropic support. He served for 40 years with the National Park Service as ranger, biologist and superintendent in national parks across the country. Retiring from the NPS in 2017, he became the Inaugural Executive Director of the Institute for Parks, People and Biodiversity at the University of California, Berkeley and now serves as Chairman of the Board. He serves as the Chairman of the Editorial Board for the Parks Stewardship Forum, an online publication for conservation practitioners and as a steering committee member of the California Biodiversity Network. His most recent book, co-authored with Clemson Professor Dr. Gary Machlis, is “The Future of Conservation in America: A Chart for Rough Water”, from the University of Chicago Press. Jarvis is the recipient of numerous awards and recognitions including the National Recreation and Park Association's Legend Award, Sierra Club's Edgar Wayburn Award and Trailblazer Award, International Union for the Conservation of Nature's Fred Packard Award and the American Alpine Club's David R. Brower Conservation Award.

The Secret Lives of Parks
An American Hero Turns 200

The Secret Lives of Parks

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2022 32:20


One of the most remarkable figures in American history was born into slavery on Maryland's Eastern Shore in March 1822. No one could have predicted the incredible life that this girl, Harriet Tubman, would go on to lead. On the eve of Tubman's 200th birthday, host Jennifer Errick explores what this American legend was really like and what we can learn at some of the park sites that interpret her history. Guests include Alan Spears, senior director for cultural resources at the National Parks Conservation Association; Dana Paterra, park manager at the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad State Park and Visitor Center; Kate Clifford Larson, American historian and Tubman biographer; and Diane Miller, program manager for the Underground Railroad Network to Freedom with the National Park Service.Learn more about Harriet Tubman's early history and download audio tour information on the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway website at https://harriettubmanbyway.org/; learn about Tubman's namesake park on Maryland's Eastern Shore at https://www.nps.gov/hatu/index.htm; and learn about the Underground Railroad Network to Freedom Program at https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1205/index.htm. Original theme music by [Chad Fischer](https://www.chadfischermusic.com/).Sound effects by Ismael Gama Jr.This episode was produced by Jennifer Errick with moral and technical support from Todd Christopher, Bev Stanton and Vanessa Pius.The Secret Lives of Parks is a production of the National Parks Conservation Association. With more than 1.6 million members and supporters, NPCA is the nation's only independent, nonpartisan advocacy organization dedicated to protecting national parks. Learn more at npca.org.

MTR Podcasts
Molly Ricks

MTR Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2022 30:05


About the guestMolly Ricks joined the Baltimore Heritage team in September 2019. In the past she has interned with the National Park Service and worked as a research historian with the federal government. Molly received her undergraduate and graduate degrees in history from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Her thesis (a comparison of the commemoration of the Black and white burial grounds at prominent Virginia plantations) and subsequent work have focused on public history, preservation, and uncovering untold stories.Molly coordinates Baltimore Heritage's walking tours, speakers, our annual Bmore Historic unconference, and the organization's volunteers that help with these events. She also maintains connections with other community partners, like the Bruce Street Arabber Stable and the Laurel Cemetery Memorial Taskforce. She is in charge of Baltimore Heritage's social media and outreach efforts. She also edits, researches, and produces the videos for Baltimore Heritage's Five Minute Histories series (over 150 videos have been published).The Truth In This ArtThe Truth In This Art is a podcast interview series supporting vibrancy and development of Baltimore & beyond's arts and culture.Mentioned in this episode:Baltimore Heritage Inc.To find more amazing stories from the artist and entrepreneurial scenes in & around Baltimore, check out my episode directory.Stay in TouchNewsletter sign-upSupport my podcastShareable link to episode★ Support this podcast ★

The Joy Trip Project
In The Words of Robert Stanton

The Joy Trip Project

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2022 31:10


A few weeks before his 80th birthday, I had the rare pleasure to speak by phone to the 15th director of the National Park Service Robert Stanton. From his home in Maryland, Mr. Stanton shared with me a personal history of his career as a leading figure in the preservation of public land as well as the enduring legacy of our heritage as a nation. Born in 1940, as Black American Stanton was subjected to the racially focused prohibitions of the Jim Crow era that denied him access to many of the national parks and monuments that he would grow up to manage. And though he and his family were restricted from the recreational spaces where white Americans were free to travel, Stanton was able from an early age to experience the wonders of nature.Stanton: I grew up in rural segregated Texas, and we came from very meager means, so we did not vacation. I was in the cotton fields or the hay fields during my young adulthood. But I was not a stranger, if you will, to the out of doors, you know, with bare feet running through the woods, fishing in the lakes, gravel pits, taking a little dip in our birthday suits and what have you and watching out for the copperheads and water moccasins. But so, no the out of doors were not a stranger to me.JTP: It was during his childhood that policies that had restricted Black Americans from visiting national parks were slowly beginning to lift. Under the administration of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt around the end of the Second World War progressive shifts in the nation's attitude toward Black Americans became a bit more favorable, despite the objections of many state legislators and private citizens. Stanton: In terms of my exposure to the National Park Service and other land management agencies and putting it in sort of historical context, you recognize the courage on the part of Harold Ickes, Secretary of the Interior, and Roosevelt, when he issued his secretarial order in 1945, saying that there will not be any discrimination in the national parks. My understanding is that when he made the decision that the proprietors of restaurants and overnight accommodations surrounding the gateways to the parks, they raised holy hell. “You mean you're going to allow them colored folks to come in and eat and sleep where they want to in the park?”JTP: It could be said that first battle lines of modern Civil Rights Movement were drawn in our national parks. By order of Secretary of the Interior Harold Ickes in 1945, these public recreation areas were among the first sites to be desegregated nation-wide. It was through the leadership and encouragement of social activists within the Roosevelt Administration and then under President Harry S. Truman that Ickes ordered that the National Parks be made open to everyone regardless of race or ethnicity.Stanton: But the thing I would bring to your attention, which was not widely advertised, is that he had the counsel of two prominent, forceful, unrelenting Black executives who were promoting the integration in full accessibility of not only to Park Service citizen programs, but throughout the breadth of the programs at Interior. The first one was Robert Weaver, who became the first African-American to serve as a Cabinet Secretary at HUD appointed by President Johnson. He was followed by William Trent Jr.. And it is William Trent Jr. who was really a strong advocate that here you have young men returning from World War II and they need to have some way in which they could just sort of relax themselves. Coming from the war, even though we were coming back to places they were not permitted to enter, such as cafes and restaurant, but still they should have an opportunity to enjoy some of the benefits of being an American citizen. JTP: Civil Rights leaders during the presidency of Franklin Roosevelt through the 1940s became known as the Black Cabinet or the Federal Council of Negro Affairs. The phrase was coined by Dr. Mary McLeod Bethune in 1936 and as group that incl...