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Profession

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Latest podcast episodes about advocates

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology
Counsel of Jerusalem: Scott Hahn Reflects on the Sixth Sunday of Easter

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 3:00


Readings: Acts 15:1–2, 22–29 Psalm 67:2–3, 5–6, 8 Revelation 21:10–14, 22–23 John 14:23–29 The first Church council, the Council of Jerusalem we hear about in today's First Reading, decided the shape of the Church as we know it. Some Jewish Christians had wanted Gentile converts to be circumcised and obey all the complex ritual and purity laws of the Jews. The council called this a heresy, again showing us that the Church in the divine plan is meant to be a worldwide family of God, no longer a covenant with just one nation. Today's Liturgy gives us a profound meditation on the nature and meaning of the Church. The Church is One, as we see in the First Reading: “the Apostles [bishops] and presbyters [priests], in agreement with the whole Church [laity].” The Church is Holy, taught and guided by the Spirit that Jesus promises the Apostles in the Gospel. The Church is Catholic, or universal, making known God's ways of salvation to all peoples, ruling all in equity, as we sing in today's Psalm. And the Church, as John sees in the Second Reading, is Apostolic—founded on the twelve Apostles of the Lamb. All these marks of the Church are underscored in the story of the council. Notice that everybody, including Paul, looks to “Jerusalem [and] . . . the Apostles” to decide the Church's true teaching. The Apostles, too, presume that Christian teachers need a “mandate from us.” And we see the Spirit guiding the Apostles in all truth. Notice how they describe their ruling: “It is the decision of the Holy Spirit and of us.” Knowing these truths about the Church, our hearts should never be troubled. The Liturgy's message today is that the Church is the Lord's, watched over and guarded by the Advocate, the Holy Spirit sent by the Father in the name of the Son.

Business Pants
FRIDAY SHOW: Mark Zuckerberg is the ultimate free speech advocate... unless his employees want to talk about abortions at the office, of course.

Business Pants

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 42:07


Louisiana Considered Podcast
Finding hope in a storm-battered city: one reporter reflects on his year in Lake Charles

Louisiana Considered Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 24:30


The Advocate's Mike Smith spent the last year living and reporting on Lake Charles, Louisiana. Today he joins Patrick Madden and the Advocate's Editorial Director and columnist, Stephanie Grace, to reflect on his time in the southwestern city. He shares how he managed to find lasting hope among residents, despite their struggles with storm damage. WBHM's Mary Scott Hodgin's new podcast dives deep into the failures of the Alabama prison system. The Gulf State's Newsroom's Brittany Brown spoke with her to learn how these prisons are violating civil rights.  Nearly eight months after Hurricane Ida, nearly 1,000 residents of bayou parishes are still waiting on FEMA trailers. WWNO's Coastal Reporter Kezia Setyawan tells us why FEMA has struggled to provide enough move-in ready trailers and how residents are responding.  Today's episode of Louisiana Considered was hosted by Patrick Madden. Our managing producer is Alana Schreiber and our digital editor is Katelyn Umholtz. Our engineers are Garrett Pittman, Aubry Procell, and Thomas Walsh.  You can listen to Louisiana Considered Monday through Friday at 12:00 and 7:30 pm. It's available on Spotify, Google Play, and wherever you get your podcasts.  Louisiana Considered wants to hear from you! Please fill out our pitch line to let us know what kinds of story ideas you have for our show. And while you're at it, fill out our listener survey! We want to keep bringing you the kinds of conversations you'd like to listen to. Louisiana Considered is made possible with support from our listeners. Thank you! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Frankie Boyer Show
Cannabis A to Z - Dr. Hyla Cass and Mickey Nulf Cannabis Patient Advocate

The Frankie Boyer Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 40:13


Cannabis A to Z - Dr. Hyla Cass and Mickey Nulf Cannabis Patient AdvocateDr. Hyla Casshttps://cassmd.com/magicofcbdDr. Hyla Cass is a nationally acclaimed innovator and expert in the fields of integrative medicine and psychiatry. She's known as the drug-free psychiatrist for helping individuals overcome anxiety, depression and more, using specific natural supplements, including Hemp Oil Extracts/CBD. She is also the author of several popular books including Supplement Your Prescription, Natural Highs, 8 Weeks to Vibrant Health, The Addicted Brain and How to Break Free, and Your Amazing Itty Bitty Guide to Cannabis. https://cassmd.com/Mickey Nulf is a Cannabis Patient Advocate, Natural Healer, and Mental Health Warrior! A voice and face fighting against the stigma of using Mother Nature and energy work to help in the darkest of times to find the light. https://talkingcannabis.wordpress.com/@artwith_dart******Frankie Boyer is an award winning talk show host that empowers listeners to live healthy vibrant lives http://www.frankieboyer.com

Active Towns
Engaging with Data feat. David Wasserman & Samuel Zneimer (video available)

Active Towns

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 55:26


Video version of this episodeHelpful Links (note that some may include affiliate links to help me support the channel):- Alta Planning + Design website- Digital Twins for Sustainable Transportation - Trimet Improving Access to TransitHow You Can Make A Difference:- If you enjoyed this video please give it a "thumbs up", leave a comment, and share it with a friend.- And if you haven't yet done so, please subscribe to the Channel and don't forget to "Ring" that notifications bell; this lets you know when I post a new video or schedule a premiere.- Pick up some Active Towns #StreetsAreForPeople Merch at my store- Pls. consider becoming a Patron, by pledging as little as $1 per month on PatreonAll video and audio production by me.Music:- Intro and outro mixed by meResources used during the production of this episode:- My awesome recording platform is Ecamm- Adobe Creative Cloud SuiteStudio Equipment:- Main MIcrophone Sennheiser Pro Audio MKH416-P48U3- Rode RODECaster Pro Podcast Production Studio- Additional Microphone - Shure MV7- Camera - Sony ZV-E10 (currently sold out)- Lens - Sigma 16mm f/1.4 DC DN Contemporary Lens- Elgato Cam Link 4k- Elgato Streamdeck XL*- Elgato Streamdeck (*you may not need the XL)Editing Computer System:- Apple MacBook Pro 16" 2021 M1 Pro- LG 34WP88C-B 34-inch Curved 21:9 UltraWide QHD (3440x1440) IPS Display with Ergo StandAll video, audio, and music production by me, John SimmermanFor more information about my Active Towns effort or to follow along please visit my links below:- Website- Twitter- Newsletter- Podcast landing pages- Facebook- InstagramBackground:Hi Everyone, my name is John Simmerman.I'm a health promotion professional with over 30 years of experience and my area of concentration has evolved into a specialization of how the built environment influences human behavior related to active living and especially active mobility.In 2012 I launched the non-profit Advocates for Healthy Communities as an effort to help promote and create healthy, active places.Since that time I've been exploring, documenting, and profiling established, emerging, and aspiring Active Towns wherever they might be, in order to produce high-quality multimedia content to help inspire the creation of more safe and inviting, environments that promote a "Culture of Activity" for "All Ages & Abilities".My Active Towns suite of channels feature my original video and audio content and reflections, including a selection of podcast episodes and short films profiling the positive and inspiring efforts happening around the world as I am able to experience and document them.Thanks for tuning in, I hope you find this content helpful.Creative Commons License: Attributions, Non-Commercial, No Derivatives, 2022Advocates for Healthy Communities, Inc. is a nonprofit 501c3 organization (EIN 45-3802508) dedicated to helping communities create a Culture of Activity. Any donations collected are used specifically to support the organization's mission.To make a donation to Advocates for Healthy Communities go here★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

First Right Podcast
Episode 68: Kurt Kondrich, pro-life and Down Syndrome advocate

First Right Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 27:37


Jerry Ewalt, talks to Kurt Kondrich, pro-life and Down Syndrome advocate. Restoration PAC is a non-partisan political action committee that sponsors political activities advocating for policy changes and/or the election or defeat of candidates on the basis of time-tested conservative principles. Visit our website: https://restorationofamerica.com/ Facebook: https://facebook.com/restorationpac Twitter: https://twitter.com/restorationpac Instagram: https://instagram.com/restoration_pac/ GETTR: https://gettr.com/user/restorationpac

Flourish-Meant: You Were Meant to Live Abundantly
Voices Against Trafficking with Andi Buerger

Flourish-Meant: You Were Meant to Live Abundantly

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 30:35


How could you speak up to help those who have no voice because they suffer from human trafficking? Today's guest, Andi Buerger, shares her personal story and mission which culminates in the ministry she provides to advocate for victims. Andi is the founder of Voices Against Trafficking and is an active warrior against 21st-century slavery - human trafficking. Her journey began when she survived 17 years of child sex trafficking from the age of 6 mos to 17 years. After her escape, Andi had a choice - to live for herself or to fight for others trapped by predators. She chose to fight. Andi has become a tough fighter for human rights. Buerger states that she recalls serving in a soup kitchen after suffering her fourth brain injury. Despite challenges to her memory during that time, homeless teens made an unforgettable impression on her heart. Andi and her husband established Beulah's Place in Redmond, Oregon, a ministry to rescue homeless, abused, and at-risk teenagers. Andi and I discuss the need to create safe places for kids, where they can speak up if someone mistreats them. Buerger also details ways to educate the community and better protect our children. Connect with Andi Buerger's ministry and check out her book at voicesagainsttrafficking.com. Join the True Crime Missions Program at https://www.theunlovelytruthtribe.com/uttylk22r3e?affiliate_id=3727901

Live Like the World is Dying
S1E41 - Casandra on Mediation

Live Like the World is Dying

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 64:20


Episode Notes Episode summary Margaret and Casandra talk about the importance of learning mediation skills, what mediation is and what different processes look like. Guest Info The host Margaret Killjoy can be found on twitter @magpiekilljoy or instagram at @margaretkilljoy. This show is published by Strangers in A Tangled Wilderness. We can be found at www.tangledwilderness.org. You can support the show on Patreon at www.patreon.com/strangersinatangledwilderness. Links Mediate.com The Little Book of Conflict Transformation (little books series also has books on different types of mediation and restorative Justice) Getting to Yes The Promise of Mediation Transcript Margaret 00:14 Hello, and welcome to Live Like The World is Dying, your podcast for what feels like the end times. I'm your host, Margaret, Kiljoy, and I use 'she' or 'they' pronouns. And today we're going to talk about something that everyone has requested. Just kidding, no one actually bothers request this because they don't know they need it. That's actually not true. People actually haverequested this. We're gonna be talking about conflict mediation, and we're going to be talking about when conflict mediation isn and isn't the way to handle different types of situations. And when we'll be talking to Cassandra about that. And I'm very excited to hear what they have to say. This podcast is a proud member of the Channel Zero network of anarchists podcasts. And here's a jingle from another show in the network. Margaret 01:40 Okay, if you could introduce yourself with your name, your pronouns, and then I guess kind of your background, both professionally and non professionally with what we're gonna be talking about today with conflict mediation. Casandra 01:52 Yeah, my name is Cassandra, I use 'they' or 'she' pronouns. I'm a volunteer mediator at a community mediation center. I trained in mediation...What year is it right now? I don't know, eight years ago? Margaret 02:08 It's 2022, right now, Casandra Johns 02:09 Nine years ago, something like that. And I also worked at my local mediation center, at the beginning of the pandemic, as program coordinator for one of the counties. Margaret 02:25 So what is conflict mediation? This is when when you don't like someone, you just respond passive aggressively to them and or cancel them, right? Casandra 02:36 Yep, and block them on Twitter. Margaret 02:39 That's important. Casandra 02:42 Conflict mediation is where a third party is called in to be present during discussion about a conflict. So, in its most basic form, that could mean asking a friend who isn't like a stakeholder in a conflict to come sit in while you talk with someone who you have issues with. Through the mediation center, like on a, on an organizational level, we deal with all different sorts of conflicts. So community conflicts, like neighbors disputing property lines. We also do family mediation, parent/teen, stuff, things like that, we do a certain amount of mediation through the court system. So people in my area can opt to do mediation instead of going to like small claims court, which is pretty cool. Margaret 03:32 So like if you're mad at your neighbor for hitting your car with their bicycle. I don't know that's not a good example. Instead of suing them, you can, like go hash it out with someone. Casandra 03:49 Yep. Yeah. Margaret 03:50 How do you then maximize your personal profit? Casandra 03:54 Well, that's a good question. I mean, the chance if you go before a judge, there's a chance that they'll say, Nope, you don't get this money. Whereas in mediation, you get to talk to the person and explain to them why you need the money, and they explain to you why they can't pay the money, and then you work out a plan, which usually benefits both people. Margaret 04:14 Well it just doesn't lead very easily to feeling righteous and better than everyone, though. So it seems like a disadvantage. Casandra 04:21 Yeah, I mean, I think if you want to feel righteous, you should probably just sue someone and okay, and not worry about mediation. Yeah. Margaret 04:29 So what were you gonna say before, i said weird sarcastic things? Casandra 04:32 The center where I work, also has this really cool program, where we do restorative justice processes for youth offenders. So, rather than going through the usual punitive process, some juvenile offenders have the option to do restorative justice instead. Margaret 04:52 Give me an example of like, not a "John did this," but I like what that might look like? Casandra 04:59 Yeah, Let me think. I have to be vague. So I'm remembering a case where one teenager punched another teenager, like the, I think they were at the movies or something, this was pre-pandemic, and was charged with assault. And so rather than having to go through a punitive process and have that assault charge on their record, they have the option to do this restorative process instead. So that would look like sitting down with the person who was harmed or with a proxy, we use proxies as well, if the victim doesn't want to be present, and talking about the impact of their actions and then coming up with a plan for making amends, which can be really varied. Like it can be, It can be as simple as like, "I will go to therapy." Or it can be direct remediation, like "I will pay you money or do yard work for you," you know, it, people get really creative. But it's a cool option. Margaret 06:04 Okay. What is the difference between, outside of a legal or court system, what is the difference between conflict mediation and restorative justice? Like, when is one thing appropriate? And when is the other thing appropriate? Casandra 06:20 Yeah, I think of mediation as a part, like an aspect of larger alternative justice processes. So it's like a tool you can use in alternative justice processes. But alternative justice processes are intended for instances where harm has been caused. So it's not just a you and me on equal footing having a conflict or disagreement, actual harm has been done. Does that make sense? Margaret 06:46 Yeah, so like, basically, if I'm trying to...if someone within my same social circle sexually assaulted me, and then I don't want to go and sit down have a like samey samey conversation with them about like, how we all have feelings. Instead, I can....instead restorative justice as the more appropriate thing, then specifically, mediation in that circumstance. Is that what you're saying? Casandra 07:11 Yeah, or probably transformative justice. But yeah. Margaret 07:15 What's the difference? Casandra 07:17 Sure. So. Margaret 07:19 Sorry. Casandra 07:20 No, that's fine. Restorative justice was developed, I think in the 70s, I want to say, and that's what the mediation center where I work...that's what we use in conjunction with the court system. And it's dealing more with individuals. So, this individual has harmed that individual, and we're going to figure out how to make amends as best as possible between the two of them. Transformative justice, I think, was developed in the 90s. And it's a more systemic approach. So it's acknowledging that people often cause harm. Because of trauma, because of a lack of resources, you know, it acknowledges that we're all a part of these larger systems of oppression. And so through this transformative process, it seeks to heal both people. Often communities are brought in as part of that as well. Margaret 08:22 Okay. So like, everyone who's involved with the thing shows up, and has a say in it. Casandra 08:31 Maybe not for all parts. But, you know, the hope is to bring in as many people as possible, because the idea is that, that creates more sustainable change. Margaret 08:42 So how does one...How does one go about doing this, right? Like to focus maybe more on mediation than restorative and transformative justice? We obviously within our communities come up with like ad hoc means quite often, and we just sort of try weird things all the time. And sometimes those things don't work very well, like passive aggressive notes. Or, you know, Casandra 09:11 Wash your dishes! Margaret 09:13 Yeah, totally. Yeah. You know, like, how does one do this? Like, if I'm starting to feel like I'm either having conflict with someone that I'm in community with, or I'm watching a conflict develop within the community that I'm part of? What are some steps to notice that that's happening and work to resolve it? Casandra 09:35 I feel like that shouldn't be a big question, but because we're so conditioned to be conflict avoidant, not just on an interpersonal level, but like, society, you know, we live in a....part of liberal democracy, part of representative democracy is like creating these abstractions when it comes to conflict and creating institutions to deal with it, instead of even acknowledging that the conflict exists. Now I have to remember what your question was. Margaret 10:09 So what the fuck do you do when you're like, really pissed off that your roommate won't do the dishes, and is like, snubbing you at parties and this pretending like you don't exist. But they think that it's happening because you borrowed their guitar without asking. Casandra 10:31 I mean, mediation doesn't have to be a big formal thing, right? Like, you can just ask a mutually trusted friend to be...Well, first of all, you can just talk to them. So, so mediation is just a tool in our toolkit. But there's something about having a third person present, who isn't like a stakeholder in a conflict. And even if they don't say anything, just having a third person present and witnessing is sometimes really helpful. One of my favorite mediators at the center rarely says anything. He just has this presence, he'll sit there with his hands in bold and just like exists, and somehow people are like, Oh, well, shit. Now I have to... Margaret 11:13 Just like quietly judging you? Casandra 11:16 No, just like, holding this like, calm space. He's, yeah. Margaret 11:23 Quietly judging you! Because like, well not in a bad way, right? Because like, yeah, if I'm like, if I feel really, like, justified and you know, like, bah, blah, blah. But then as soon as I realized I'm saying it to a third party, I'm like, "Oh, this might not make sense." Like when I say to a third party? Yeah, yeah, no, okay. Okay. Casandra 11:41 Yeah. And anyone can do that. Right? Anyone who isn't a stakeholder and who's comfortable being around, conflict can be in that role. Obviously, there's more that you can do to like develop those skills. That's why trainings and mediation centers exist. Margaret 12:00 Most of the time, I've tried to do this. It's gone very badly when I've been asked to mediate things, but I think that's usually because the people...because I did everything, right, and the people involved id everything wrong. But, it seems like people got really defensive and kind of entrenched in their positions. And it stayed a really like, "No, I'm right. Fuck, you," "No, I'm right. Fuck you," kind of thing? How do you break that up? Casandra 12:31 Yeah. Have you heard the analogy of like, if you draw a heart on a piece of paper, and place it between two people, and they're like standing on opposite sides of it, and ask them to describe what they see, they're going to describe totally different things, but they're looking at the same image, you know? Margaret 12:50 Oh, because it's like, not symmetrically positioned between them. Casandra 12:53 Yes. Margaret 12:54 Okay. Casandra 12:55 I think that...Well, first of all, I think it's okay for people to just not agree, tight? Part of getting over our conflict avoidance, as a society, I think is acknowledging that, like, we're not going to agree and that's not only okay, but positive. Like we need to have people around us who we disagree with, in order to like, examine our own opinions and things like that. But, the second thing is that conflict isn't bad or scary. Like, I feel like part of people's fear around not agreeing with someone is that the assumption is that if you and I don't agree, then we can't have any sort of relationship or function. Like we're so conflict avoidant, that if we don't agree, we just simply can't function. Margaret 13:46 Oh, yeah, totally. And then we just like ice each other out completely. Casandra 13:49 Yeah, which is really common and unfortunate. And obviously, like, there, I'm gonna disagree with a Nazi, right? Margaret 13:58 Right. Casandra 13:59 We're not just going to agree to disagree, but I'm gonna ice them out. But, that doesn't have to be the case for everything. Margaret 14:06 No, that makes sense. I kind of...I kind of do this thing where I have, like, one set of values that I hold myself to, and one set of values that I hold other people to, you know, so like, I'm trying to come up with a good value to to use this for. I don't want to get...Okay, so like, but if there's if there's something that I believe I shouldn't do, it doesn't necessarily mean...even though kind of in the abstract, I wish no one would do it. Like okay, like lying, right? Like I have a very, very strong sense of never lying to anyone that you're not trying to control or hurt, right? And I, I will, like live or die by this as a person, but I recognize that not everyone I surround myself with holds the same value, and it like rubs me the wrong way. But, I can agree to disagree about it because I recognize that this is a value that is not shared by everyone. Um, and I'm on my own, like, wing nut paladin and kick or whatever. Andk but then yeah, like, there's other values like, you know, "don't be like", I don't know, "don't be fucking, like racist or whatever, like, don't be a fucking Nazi," that or...is that kind of what you're kind of what you're saying, like learning to have different standards for yourself versus other people or I guess that's not just the only way to...how do you how do you personally decide which things you are allowed to disagree about and which things you're not allowed to disagree about? Casandra 15:39 Oh, I don't feel like I'm in total agreement with anyone, like literally anyone. And that's great. Yes. The world would be really fucking boring. If I was. There's this, there's this essay called "In Defense of...." shoot, am I going to forget it while we're recording? No. In Defense of Arguing. Margaret 16:05 Okay. Casandra 16:05 Like an anarchist theory of arguing or something like that. And the author talks about these like larger things, like how social democracy...how the how liberal democracy as a larger structure encourages us to to not be in direct communication, and to avoid conflict. Margaret 16:24 Well, okay, so, how does this I guess my question is like, okay, we know that Nazis are on the far end of one...you know, like, God gave us Nazis, so that we have enemies. You know, there's this, like pure representation of bad right, that most of society used to agree on and it's no longer the case, but like, we have this pure representation of bad over on one end, and then you have like, you know, "John Barrows, my guitar without asking sometimes, and thinks it's okay, that he does." Or someone is has a different interpretation of some political analysis or, you know, like, like, shit that I might feel really directly personally strongly about, but is at the end of the day, not a big deal. You know, so that...Is the answer, "Everyone's just gonna draw those lines in different places?" That's my instinct is that everyone's going to draw the lines of like, well, I can be in community with someone who I don't know, like, sometimes as a like grouchy libertarian on some issues. Or some other people will be like, "Oh, I can be in community with Marxists," or something, right? And then other people will be like, "No, we've seen where Marxism leads to. So fuck them." So people are going to draw these lines in different places. Is it just, is it just alright, that people are going to draw those lines in different places. Casandra 17:53 Yes. And that, thank you. Yeah. So it's alright, that people are going to draw this lines in different places. And that reminds me why I brought up that article, which is what...not only is it okay to draw those lines, but having actual dialogue about where we draw those lines and why, and how they might be different from where other people draw those lines is ultimately productive. Margaret 18:15 That makes sense. Casandra 18:18 Because that's how we, you know, interrogate our own boundaries, right? And our own ideology. Margaret 18:26 It was interesting. I was like, this thing is gonna be very, like nuts and bolts episode Are we like talk about like, really specific practices, but... Casandra 18:32 I mean, we can but... Margaret 18:33 No, we should do it too, but I, what I really like thinking about this stuff around...Yeah, the how we build diverse communities and how we avoid, you know, I would argue that echo chambers are one of the things that destroys communities of resistance more effectively than even sometimes outside pressure. You know, as soon as everyone starts...go ahead. Casandra 18:55 Oh, I was just gonna say that like moral homogeneity is also what leads to these like, fundamentalist movements that were opposing, right. . Margaret 19:04 Yeah. And then yet, like, people were like, well, you know, you can't let 'something something' in because it's a slippery slope. And I'm, I'm on this like, crusade against slippery slope as a useful phrase, because, well, it's a useful phrase, be like, "Hey, that's a slippery slope," should mean like, so be careful when you walk it not like boarded up, none shall enter like, you know, maybe like put handholds along the way to like, help people like navigate complicated ethical terrain. Casandra 19:31 Cautionary signage. Margaret 19:32 Yeah, exactly. Like instead of being like, well, everyone who likes the following philosopher who died 100 years before Nazis came about is a Nazi, even though like, you know, both Nazis like this guy and some Nazis hated this guy and some non Nazis hated this guy. I'm actually not trying to defend Evola right now at this time. That's not the path I'm trying to go down right now. Maybe Nietzsche is how I'm trying to...But I don't even want to defend Nietzsche... anyway. Casandra 20:04 They can both go to the sun as far as I'm concerned. Margaret 20:08 But like, but you know, where we draw these lines might be different about like, okay, so like, fuck this guy, but is it fuck everyone who is inspired by this guy? And is it fuck everyone who's inspired by people who were inspired by this guy, you know? Because, like how many how many layers removed from something do we still hate it? You know? Casandra 20:33 Yeah. Yeah, totally. Margaret 20:37 So nuts and bolts of conflict resolution? Casandra Johns 20:42 Can I first... Margaret 20:43 Yeah, please do. Casandra 20:44 Before we move into specifics. I think the like overarching stuff is really important because every so often I see these pushes in radical spaces to develop more skills around things like transformative justice, but no one talks about conflict resolution, no one talks about mediation, which is wild to me. Like, the reason I trained as a mediator is because I saw it is like one of the building blocks of these larger structures. But it's just not something that seems to be valued or discussed on the left for the most part. And that's baffling to me, considering how much divisiveness we face and how we all seem to agree it's a huge issue. But haven't put in the work to develop the skills to like, deal with it. Margaret 21:35 So what we're doing is we're jumping straight to the like justice framework, which is, you know, far more, it's not inherently punitive, but like, it's more antagonistic and implies far more heavily that there's like harm that's been done. And it's one directional, right like, which is often the case, I'm not trying to claim that this is not the case quite often, but but we're jumping to that rather than a lot of things that could be headed off way before they get really intense through mediation, or even things that are really intense are still a mediation type thing rather than a transformative justice type thing is that right? Casandra 22:12 So yeah, even just as abolitionists, if we're talking about divesting from the current system as a whole, people don't just go to court because they've been abused, you know, they go because they're in conflict with someone and want an authority figure to decide who's right and who's wrong. And so that's something we have to replace as well. Margaret 22:36 Yeah, I know that makes sense. Casandra 22:36 And ideally without the authority figure. But even like, it doesn't have to be some intense formal, heavy thing. You know, like I've mediated for friends, and it's just been like a very casual conversation. I think that normalizing it, talking about it at all would be great as the left, but then normalizing these practices, Margaret 23:02 Just normalizing going to your roommate, your housemate, the third person and being like, "Hey, like, we keep arguing about the fact that I want to leave my socks in the living room." Casandra 23:16 Will you just be present while we chat through this? Margaret 23:18 Yeah, Casandra 23:19 Like yeah why not? You know. Margaret 23:22 Okay. I'm coming up with silly examples, but I'm like, mostly because I'm just not feeling very imaginative off the top my head, but Casandra 23:28 I've had housemates, I know how it goes. Margaret 23:31 It starts feeling really personal at a certain point. Casandra 23:33 It does! Margaret 23:35 Yeah, and sometimes it's really easy to be really, really angry at this, like, heavier stuff than the larger framework of what's happening. Casandra 23:46 Yeah, totally. I have a child, I understand that. I'm taking your lack of folding your laundry personally at a certain point. Margaret 24:01 That's because you're the authority. No, I don't want to get into that that's a different conversation. Casandra 24:07 Abolish bedtimes? Margaret 24:12 Yeah, okay. So like, well, actually, I mean, I mean, this would be an appropriate, like mediation would be an appropriate thing to do with, like, between you and between a parent and a child at various points also, or is that? Casandra 24:26 Yeah, yeah, one of my favorite types of mediation that I do through the center's parent/teen. There are different types of mediation. And the type I was trained in was..is somewhere between what's called facilitative and transformative mediation. So, in some scenarios, we're just hashing through a specific problem. And the people aren't going to have a relationship after that. And then in other scenarios, we're actually trying to shift the relationship to make it healthier, which I prefer. And Margaret 24:58 Yeah. Casandra 24:59 The Family mediations tend to go in that direction. But there's a power dynamic, right. And so part of the mediators job is to level out power imbalances, which can be really tricky. But also really cool to watch. Margaret 25:17 Well that's cool, because I think that critiques of power are necessary, but there's always going to be different types of relationships between people with power imbalances, right? Even when, like two adults are dating, you know, there's going to be power imbalances based on like, different levels of societal privilege, or, you know, heterosexual relationships have a massive power imbalance to start with that they have to deal with...either overcome or like learn to address. So it makes sense to, like... Casandra 25:46 I think personal history and like communication style cnn create that Margaret 25:52 In terms of like, if someone has a more aggressive communication style, and another person has like a style that is triggered badly by that style of communication, is that kind of what you're getting at? Casandra 26:03 Yeah, things like that. Margaret 26:05 Okay. I remember thinking about how this has to, like, sort of be taught and developed, I remember being at a workshop once at a conference about this issue....Pardon me, as I pull a tick off of my head and cut it with a knife Margaret 26:23 But ticks aside, you know, the way the way that this needs to be taught was really laid clear to me, I was at this, this workshop, and we're going through and, you know, the person teaching the workshop was teaching about conflict resolution and things and, and a friend of mine, who was a, I believe, a kindergarten teacher, I'm not entirely certain worked with very young kids. And my friend was explaining it was like, "oh, when two kids get in a conflict, like they both want a toy, you know, it's recess, and only one of them gets the toy. And they, they both want it, they get really excited, and they run up and they're like, "Teacher, Teacher, we have a conflict, we have to resolve it."" You know, and it was this really amazing heartwarming story. And, unfortunately, most of the people at the workshop, because they didn't have enough context for what was being told in the story were like, Ah, yes, this is the wisdom of children. You know, we should all just learn from children. And then my friend came up to me later, and was like, that was really frustrating. The kids do that, because we taught them how to, Margaret 26:23 Oh God! Casandra 26:29 Yeah, yeah. Margaret 26:33 And it... And there was a certain amount of like wisdom of children, and that they hadn't specifically developed other bad habits, like, you know, I have a lot of bad conflict habits that I don't love about myself that are ingrained to me for various purposes. But, it seems like we still have to, like...go ahead. Casandra 27:47 Even that approach, that they were excited to talk about it...like they knew where to turn. They knew where their resources were, and they were excited to resolve it. Like imagine feeling that way about disagreeing with someone. One of my teachers says that every mediation is a success, meaning that regardless of whether or not people come to an agreement, the fact that they've shown up to talk about it shifts something in their relationship. And that is in and of itself a success. Margaret 28:16 That makes a lot of sense. And then also might lead to kind of my next question, which is like, when? Well, as I had a phrased was like "when conflict resolution fails," you know, but it seems like sometimes you would go and be like,"Oh, we've heard each other out. And we fucking hate each other. or we're fucking mad about this thing." Casandra 28:39 We've heard...like feeling hurt, being able to say your piece to someone, and knowing that you're in this contained space where they have heard you. And then still not agreeing with them is still a form of resolution, you know, like, we're not going to agree on this. But, I've had the opportunity to, like, say my part. And that's something. Margaret 29:03 Yeah. No, that makes sense. It's like, asking nicely before you ask meanly, in terms of like, on like, a social change level, right? You know, we're like, "Hey, give us our rights." And they're like, "No, we don't give you your rights." and we're like, "Well, we asked, now, we're not asking anymore." And that. And that's sort of assuming one person is like, right in this mediation whereas theoretically, probably both parties think they're right, but I don't know. Yeah, I feel like sometimes I've been asked to kind of mediate informally, which i don't have nearly the background you do, but I like rambling. And I've kind of ended up leaving with this result with like the, you know, no one's really asking my opinion, necessarily, but I'm like, oh, probably the answer is that they hate each other. That the answer is that like both people feel totally justified and from their own perspective, they are totally justified. And probably this won't be settled and they should stay away from each other.I don't know. Casandra 29:59 Which like, at least they knew that afterward, you know? Margaret 30:02 Yeah. Casandra 30:03 Yeah. I mean, I've had many...or I've been present for.... I've been present for many more mediations than I've actually actively mediated just because of the job I had. Which is awesome, because I get to see the way other people mediate and learn from that. But I've witnessed really shocking mediations where it seems like the people walk in hating each other, and they don't come to an agreement. They're not going to agree. But they... the sense in the room at the end is peace. You know, they're like, "Ah, well, we both know, we're not going to agree and why. And at least we know that." Margaret 30:43 Yeah. Yeah. Casandra 30:45 Which is real. Right. Yeah. Margaret 30:49 No, I like that. Because it's like, it's not trying to... Casandra 30:53 Kumbaya? Casandra 30:53 I've already said this but, yeah, they're not trying to solve everything, you know, like some things just don't get solved. But, but at least everyone knows what's happening. Casandra 31:04 And there's that detachment to, you know, the idea that one person's right and the other is wrong is something that if you're mediating, you can't, that can't be in your brain. It's not your job to decide who's right and who's wrong or to even have an opinion about it. And there's something freeing there, because suddenly, you can see why both people feel they're right, like where the rightness is in, in both stories, which is pretty interesting. Margaret 31:30 Well does that end up leaving the mediator like, hated by both sides often? Because like, this person, this staying neutral when clearly I'm right? Casandra 31:31 No, and maybe this is important to talk about, but like part of, especially in a formal setting, when I open to mediation, some of the things I explain include, like confidentiality and mandatory reporting stuff, but I also explain that my role is to be neutral. I'm not going to take aside, I'm not going to make decisions or offer opinions or advice, like, all I'm there to do is to help them communicate productively. Yeah. Margaret 32:07 And I actually, I would guess, that the average, not...no training mediator of the things that you just said that they might fail at, would be the not offering advice part, right? So it's not like showing up to the council of elders or whatever the people who are going to, like, offer their wisdom down onto you. Instead, it's really just about helping the people involved, develop their own communication as relates to it. So it's not a...you're a no way like a judge or an arbiter. Is that kind of what you're saying? Casandra 32:39 No, there are. So there are different types of mediation. Arbitration is involved in certain types, but not the type I do and not the type that I think is useful in like, community and interpersonal settings. Yeah, and it is hard sometimes to not give advice. Margaret 32:59 Yeah, I know when I'm like, I think people might have failed that. I'm like, No, that's probably what I failed at.When I have attempted to mediate things, because I'm like, " Ah! I now, see, because I have all of the information. Now I will clearly explain because I'm so wise." And then I'm like, "Why isn't this working?" Casandra 33:13 Okay, no, it's it's really hard. And it takes a lot of practice. Honestly, the...when in mediations where I take a more active role, because in some mediations, I don't have to people are...people don't really need much guidance sometimes. But, when they do, I find myself almost like teaching healthy communication skills through example. And there's really not any time for me to think about offering my opinion or something like that. I'm like, so busy trying to help them untangle the communication. Margaret 33:50 Okay. Which seems like, in a similar way that like facilitating consensus in a large group is absolutely not about your own opinions about what should happen. And basically by being a facilitator in a large group you like, kind of like, get your own voice removed from that particular decision. Casandra 34:12 Yeah, I see it as a spectrum of skill sets, the like facilitator, the mediator and then whatever we want to call these transformative or alternative justice. Margaret 34:21 Judge Dredd? No, we have no movie about that. Okay. Okay, so which brings me to this idea like, right, you're like, oh, you know, you're gonna come in assuming neutrality as mediator, not that both sides are equal, but assuming your own neutrality to help foster communication. What about when it is...like, this sounds like it would be really unhealthy if I was forced to do it with an abuser, right? And so I'm under the impression that you would not use this in situations of abuse is that? Casandra 34:59 Mediation? Margaret 35:00 Yeah. Casandra 35:01 Yeah, yeah. And, and maybe before that, it's expected that if a mediator doesn't feel that they can maintain appropriate neutrality, they just don't mediate the case, they pass it to someone else. So that's, you know, people are gonna have strong opinions, and feel triggered by different scenarios. And that's real and fine. Margaret 35:27 Oh, I meant I meant as a participant, I wouldn't, you know, I wouldn't want to be called...am I wrong in thinking that it would, that I wouldn't want to be called into mediation with my abuser, you know? Casandra 35:42 Well, I mean, the easy answer is no. But both restorative and transformative justice, have mediation type processes, that can be a part of these larger processes. Margaret 35:59 Okay. Casandra 36:00 So, and maybe we don't call it mediation, maybe we call it like, a facilitated dialogue or something? Margaret 36:06 I don't know. Casandra 36:09 I think it's, it's a tool, right? Like mediation is a tool. And you have to do it differently when there's a vast power imbalance like that, or when harm has been caused. But.. Margaret 36:25 So I guess...how do you judge...How do you judge when to use mediation versus transformative justice? Like, how do you decide when a given thing is the right means? Casandra 36:42 That's a really big question. Because ideally I don't, right? So I can tell you at the Center, how it works, which is that if the courts contact us and are like, "We have decided that someone harmed another person, therefore this is going to be restorative process." Like that's how we know. Margaret 37:00 Right. Casandra 37:01 But in this larger project on the Left of developing these these alternative systems, that's something we have to figure out. And I don't think it can happen without intact communities. Because, I don't think it would be an individual process. Margaret 37:21 Yeah, okay. Casandra 37:23 But as a mediator, if I'm in a session...maybe this is a much simpler way to answer it, If I'm in a session, and someone says something about, like, causing physical harm to the other person. That's a like, "Oh, we got to stop this and shift" moment. Margaret 37:39 Okay. That makes sense. That is kind of one of my questions is like, do you ever like, yeah, escalate up the like, response ladder? It's a terrible way of phrasing it. But yeah, Casandra 37:53 There are plenty of cases that get called...so that so the Community Mediation Center, it's all free, right? Like anyone can call in with anything and be like, can you help me with this, which means there are plenty of cases that we can't mediate, that we say, "Oh, that's, that's not an appropriate topic for us. But here's some other resources." Margaret 38:11 And that would be usually cases of like, clear harm having been caused? Casandra 38:15 Yep. Or like certain types of conflicts, just because of the way the legal system is set up. Like, custody disagreements, we don't do it our center, it's just bureaucratic bullshit. But I think it would be similar in a community setting where different mediators are comfortable mediating different types of cases. And if something comes up within a mediation that either signals that harm has happened or that isn't suitable for that particular mediator, you just stop and find someone else to help. Margaret 38:49 Okay. Casandra 38:50 Like, we all have different skill sets, you know, Margaret 38:52 And what you said about it requires an intact communities to be able to, to effectively do this kind of thing, as a, you know, the more transformative justice element of it. It's kind of interesting to me, right? Because then that's something that... it seems to me that intact communities relies on conflict, resolution, and conflict resolution, and mediation and all of the things we've been talking about. So it's sort of a... Casandra 39:19 Chicken, egg? Margaret 39:20 Oh, I was thinking almost of a like, like, building a building, you know, like, a pyramid, a traditional representation of hierarchy. But, in this case, representing bottom up, you know, where like, the strong base of a community is not it's like justice system, but instead it's like, conflict resolution and the ability for diverse opinions to coexist. And there's the general ability for people to coexist, because people implies diverse opinions unless you live in some hellscape. Ideological bubble. Casandra 39:54 Yeah, yeah, that makes sense. Margaret 39:57 Now, it's interesting because then this answers the question of how do you supplant the justice system? which is an important question. Casandra 40:05 You support people in developing skill sets like this, which I was thinking about it before this interview and remembering when I was...so I don't get paid to mediate as part of the neutrality, nut the initial 40 hour training, I took cost money, because it's a non profit, very poor mediation center. And you're one of the people who who you gave me like 50 bucks or something. Margaret 40:32 No. Casandra 40:32 And you said, you messaged me, you said something to the effect of like, "Oh, I'm giving you money. This is like a skill that I think we need in more radical spaces." And I was like, "Fuck, yeah, this Margaret person seems really cool." Margaret 40:44 Cool. Yeah, I don't remember that. But, I believe you. I don't remember a lot of things, dear, listener. That's one of my skill sets is that I don't remember things. Casandra 40:59 That can be a blessing, I suppose. Margaret 41:02 Sometimes, it's like I, you know, it helps me really live in the present, you know, because it's all just fog in front of me and behind me. I have impressions, impressions of what's ahead and impressions of what came before. No, that's great. I mean, how common are these types of organizations? Like, you have one in your town? Is it? Do I have one in my...well, I don't have one in my town. There's 500 people who live in my town. Casandra 41:28 I'm only really familiar with my state. So, I'm in Oregon. And we have a network of Community Dialogue Resource Centers [CDRC]. I'm so bad at acronyms. There's a whole network all over Oregon. And each center works, to some extent with the current justice system, depending on where they are in the resources, but they also offer free community mediation, and it's really easy in my state to get training. Like at my center, you can, if you speak Spanish, and are willing to volunteer, as a bilingual mediator, you can get training for free, like it's a pretty accessible thing, but I'm not sure about other states, like the agreement we have with the Justice System to do these restorative processes for youth offenders is pretty unique, apparently, like it's a it's a test...test run, that's been going on for years. But I don't think that's necessarily common. Margaret 42:31 I mean, it's so basically, a way that some elements of the Justice System are trying to move towards an actual reasonable model away from the incarceration and punitive model is that right? Casandra 42:43 Yep. Yeah. And it's been because people at these Community Dialogue and Resource Centers have pushed really hard for the state to implement these programs here. But it's also...I mean, mediate.com has really good classes, you can just take on mediation. You can get, I have a whole...I'm looking at it, I realized this is not a video recording, but I have a whole bookshelf full of books on mediation, AK has presses put out...you know, there, there are lots of resources on mediation that are accessible. If people want to explore the skill set. Margaret 43:22 Would you be able to provide a few of those links for our show notes? Casandra 43:27 Yeah, yeah, absolutely. Margaret 43:29 Thanks. So okay, my last question, I want to I want to take with take you on this journey, where we imagine you know, a society without the state, whether because we win or because we lose, depending on how you know, like, like, Casandra 43:47 How you want to look at it? Margaret 43:48 Yeah, I mean, you know, obviously, like, this is a, it's not gonna be like some wingnut thing for people, for me to suddenly be like, "What if there was an apocalypse?!" right? Y'all are listening to Live Like The World Is Dying. I kind of want to ask you about the role of, and I know a lot of it's implied, but we talked about, but like, the role of conflict resolution in terms of community preparedness, if you have like thoughts around that? [That] didn't really end with a question mark. Casandra 44:18 That's fine. That's hard for me to answer because it feels like a given. Like, community preparedness means that we need functional, intact communities, which means we have to have systems that could look all sorts of different ways, right? But we have... Margaret 44:34 Like passive aggressive notes? Casandra 44:36 That's one way. But we have to have systems for working through conflict or else we do not have functional communities. And maybe different communities choose to do that in different ways. This is just like one particular tool or skill set that's very adaptable. Margaret 44:54 So if the state is abstraction of power, right, away from ourselves, basically the existence of the state, the long standing existence, the state is probably a huge part of what leads us to this conflict avoidance that you talk about, like causes these problems, we're so used to relying on the state to handle our conflicts for us by calling armed people who like putting people in cages. And so basically...do you ever have those moments where like, you've been an anarchist for a long time, and then you still end up with these, like, obvious epiphanies that like, seem really obvious when you say them out loud, but still feel like epiphanies? That's what I'm having right now about this, because I'm like, "Oh, this is everything. This is the foundation," which is also what you just said, I'm saying this back to you. Casandra 45:39 That's why it's so baffling to me that I've searched for years for collectives, groups, any, any individuals, anyone offering these skills in radical spaces, and it's so hard to find. And that's wild to me. It's so wild. And that doesn't, people aren't doing it. Margaret 46:00 Right. Casandra 46:01 But it just doesn't seem to be of high value. Margaret 46:04 I wonder if it's like, because people...because I have seen a lot of groups, and I'm glad there are groups that focus on transformative justice, right, but that's the top of this pyramid of needs...my hierarchy of needs that I've created because I love hierarchy. Casandra 46:19 Such a good anarchist. Margaret 46:21 I know. I wonder if it's kind of similar to how like, it's a lot easier to find like armed anarchist organizations that will teach you how to shoot guns and like harder to find ones that'll teach you how to like immediate conflict resolve, like someone angrily comes into your...you know, I and often I'm...the individuals do this, right? Like, there was a time. I don't know if this person listens to this podcast, but a friend of mine was at some anarchist screening at some info shop and some angry guy comes in and starts yelling this and that about I think trans people. And my friend who's trans was just like, "Hey, man, you want to go outside and have a cigarette with me?" And just like, went outside and talked to the guy. And he calmed down and left, and like, and my friend carries, right. But like, it's so much easier to find information about the nuclear option the the, you know, the escalated version than it is to find resources about the "Hey, man wanna step outside with me and have a conversation." Casandra 47:26 Yeah, those soft skills are really devalued because of the way our society... Margaret 47:32 What?! What if there was like a word to describe type of...We should call it patriarchy? Casandra 47:38 I mean, who did people used to go to? Right? Was it like, grandma? Or like, gr... you know, the people, we devalue? e? Margaret 47:53 Yeah. Margaret 47:55 Well, I, you know, it's hard. I don't know where to go from, okay like, now we understand the entire basis of an anarchist society, without the state, basically means that we have to learn how to stop putting this not on other people, because obviously, we need other people, we need society to help us do this, but stop putting it on this, like, legalized abstraction that's off in the distance. Casandra 47:55 Yeah. Casandra 48:23 So there, I mean, there are interpersonal skills, we all need to develop right around communication? But if we're talking about people actually filling these roles that we need, we have to actually figure out how to support people in developing those skills and like value their skill set. Margaret 48:40 Yeah. So how do we how do we do that? Casandra 48:44 Well, you did it for me, I was like, Hey, Internet, I need money for this training. And you were like, "Here's 50 bucks. This is important." I was like, "Thanks!" Margaret 48:58 Best part is that was probably a couple of years ago when I had substantially less ...and like I've, since I think people who listen to this know that I've since like, started a nonprofit job and like, have more money than I used to. Casandra 49:09 Oh, this was like 2016. Margaret 49:11 Yeah, okay. Yeah. Okay. But okay, so like, so people can go and get trainings and people can bring this kind of information to their communities, both by doing it, but also by maybe like spreading the skills that people could be setting up like informal collectives or formal collectives are something to kind of like, work on fostering these types of skills like what else can we do? Casandra 49:38 Just talking about it more. I mean, I remember who was I...Oh, I guess I can't talk about this on the internet. I was doing seasonal labor that grants one a lot of spare time to talk and the people I was doing this.... Margaret 49:53 Blueberry harvest. Casandra 49:55 Yes, blueberry harvest. The people that I was doing the seasonal labor with were like, "Hey, what if we listen to Rosenberg's lectures on non violent communication and practice, because we got time to kill." And we were like, "Alright," so we all... I mean, and there's a lot to say about NVC and its flaws, but we agreed to do this as a group and she sat around and practiced arguing using NVC until we got comfortable like, I, it's hard to, it's hard to, like, write us a prescription for people to normalize something like this, right? But the, the solution is that we have to normalize it somehow.. Margaret 50:35 No, that makes sense. Do you have any any final thoughts on conflict resolution or things that we didn't talk about that we should have talked about? Casandra 50:46 Um, it's really important, we won't function as a society without it whether it's mediation or some some similar skill. I don't know, Google "mediation centers" where you are. Chances are there there's one somewhere in your state, or wherever you're listening from. Margaret 51:08 Yeah, I think we sometimes try to reinvent the wheel all the time, within radical subcultures. I can't speak to other ones besides the anarchists ones, because it's the one I participate in the most. But, we I think sometimes we like only look to existing anarchists projects as like, the realm of what's possible. And that seems nonsensical. Casandra 51:29 Yeah, actually, that reminds me...so that the center where I work is not politically affiliated, right. I'm like the youngest person there. It's mostly a bunch of retired folks of various political leanings, which we don't talk about. And there's something to be said, for working in spaces like that, and learning these skills in spaces like that, because we don't live in an anarchist society right now. Which means that we need to be able to navigate conflict with people who aren't anarchists. And so if two people are in conflict, and they aren't anarchists, and I approach them and say, "Hey, I'm an anarchist mediator," then suddenly I'm not neutral or like a useful resource, right? Margaret 52:16 Right. Casandra 52:17 So it's not that I think we shouldn't have anarchists mediation collectives. I'm just saying that. I don't think people should shy away from these a-political resources, because they really valuable still. Margaret 52:31 There's this thing I learned yesterday while doing research for my other podcast that you can check out, it's called Cool People Who Did Cool Stuff that comes out every Monday and Wednesday. Okay, and um... 52:41 I know what you're going to say, and yes. Margaret 52:43 Yeah, well, okay. So like, I learned about this thing where, you know, I have infinite respect for the Jane Collective, right, the people who in the late 60s, early 70s, in Chicago were in this collective that ended up including more than 100 different people; women working as Abortionists illegally before Roe v. Wade. And for some reason that's on a lot of people's minds right now. But then I discovered looking back that in the 1920s and early 30s in Germany...Cassandra's already heard this...there was all of these non politically affiliated organizations of illegal birth control advocates and Abortionists all over Germany. There's more than 200 of these groups, and they were non politically aligned. But it was almost all syndicalists, anarchist syndicalists coming from a specific union, the acronym of which I forget off the top of my head. FAUD actually, I now remember it. And it's like the Free Workers Union of Germany or something. And even though they did a lot of organizing and propaganda as anarchists in the rest of their lives, the abortion clinics, were not an anarchist project, because that wasn't the point of it. And they weren't there to recruit. And they weren't...they were just there because people needed to have access to birth control and abortions. And I could imagine mediation....you know, if I was forming an anarchist mediation collective, if it was like, "We are the anarchists mediation collective," it would maybe be for the anarchists, but if it was like, "We are anarchists doing this mediation collective and we're willing to tell you, we're anarchists, but it is not about anarchism." I don't know is that? Casandra 54:23 Yeah, totally. I mean, I remember during my first training, going up to one of the directors and asking, I don't remember what question I asked, but it was something about like, "What we're talking about sounds like prison abolition," you know, and like, there's a particular mediation center in my area that is politically affiliated, and I was asking him if I should try volunteering with that center or with one of the non affiliated centers, and he said, "Definitely one of the non affiliated centers because the whole point of this if we're actually abolishing the prison industrial complex is to get everyone to divest from it, which means everyone needs access, which means we don't want to turn them off because we say we're liberals or anarchists or whatever." Margaret 55:17 Yeah. Casandra 55:18 I say liberal because he was probably a liberal, but surely, yeah. Margaret 55:23 Yeah. No, that that makes a lot of sense to me. It's interesting challenges a lot of like, the presuppositions I have about like when it isn't, isn't useful to identify projects politically. But, I think that makes a really strong case. Because, the point has never been, from my point of view to create little weird pure bubbles, cause, as we talked about creating weird pure bubbles is just....they're just going to destroy themselves, much like bubbles, when you blow bubbles, they don't last. Casandra 55:54 Well and even like if you create this weird pure bubble, what if someone..what if you're in conflict with someone outside that bubble? Is that person going to trust a mediator who is strictly inside that bubble? Margaret 56:08 No, then we'll just go break their windows, no matter what happened. Even if our friends are the one at fault. Casandra 56:15 You know, if I get in an argument with my Catholic, Republican, anti-semitic neighbor across the street, even if I might prefer an anarchist mediator, that's not something he's going to agree to, therefore, the mediation won't happen, and therefore it's not productive. Margaret 56:33 Right. Yeah. And, and even then, like, if you have a mediator who specifically there to be on your side, you don't have a mediator, you have an advocate, I guess. Casandra 56:42 Which is important. Advocates are really important. But that's different. Different skill set. Margaret 56:50 Yeah. No, totally. I mean, and then you get into the like, since you can't enter someone into transformative justice, if they don't want to, and if they're not part of a community, you know, sometimes like, I remember there was an instance where to abstract this as far as I possibly can with the story is still making sense, where an anarchist went on a really bad date with a guy who wasn't an anarchist, and then, like 30, people in black bloc, showed up outside his house with megaphones, and scared the everLiving shit out of him. And I think he was a little bit more careful from then on. But... Casandra 57:28 Different techniques for different scenarios, right? Margaret 57:31 Exactly. Exactly. Like, not everything should resort to violence or the threat of violence, but also, not everything...I think that is...I think that's one of the things that turns people off from a lot of mediation is that I think that people see it applied at times when sometimes like,"No, maybe just like direct conflict is the actual answer to certain types of problems," you know, but not that not that many of them. Casandra 57:56 Well in mediation when it's done well, I see the same argument around nonviolent communication, which I think Rosenberg was brilliant, I think that...or is? he like... Margaret 58:07 I don't know. Casandra 58:08 Anyway, I don't know, I think the way it's applied often is horrible. But, I see this a similar argument around mediation and NVC and where those tools can be utilized to like tone police or silence people, etc. But mediation, one of the foundations of mediation is that it's a consensual process. Which means that if someone's in a mediation, and is like, "Oh, this doesn't feel good to me anymore. This is like some boundaries been crossed, or I'm not comfortable with the way I'm being asked to communicate," or whatever. They just stop the process. That's it. Margaret 58:50 Yeah, no, that makes sense. Yeah, I wish I could have done that with like...I have such negative connotations for NVC, because I feel like the times it just gets use...it's, it's just been like weaponized against me by people who are like, making me cry and then asking why I'm communicating so meanly while I'm crying because of the things that they're saying to me or whatever, you know? Casandra 59:10 Same, same. When I when I actually read Rosenberg, I'm like, oh, yeah, that's not what he was describing. Margaret 59:20 Yeah. Casandra 59:23 Yes, yeah. Margaret 59:24 And the spirit of the law, the spirit of the idea often gets stripped away and left with the letter of it. Casandra 59:31 I've also had so many jobs where I've had so many bosses who were like, hippies using NVC to just like gaslight the shit out of you, you know? Like, "Yeah, I hear you feel this way. But I'm still your boss and will fire you." You know? Margaret 59:52 Yeah. All right. Well, I think we've covered every single thing about mediation and... Casandra 1:00:01 Ever. Yep. And even can go and mediate now I'm sure. Margaret 1:00:04 Yeah, totally. Just make sure to stick your own opinions in. Anyone is free to leave at any point all they...they will just be excised from the community. And, passive aggression is the logical response to everything. What else, did we cover everything? Casandra 1:00:20 Gossip with your friends about everything you hear in a mediation so they can cancel each other. Margaret 1:00:24 Oh, yep, definitely. And it's really good to not only block people on social media, but then yell at everyone else to block the person on social media. Getting anything? I sarcastically make fun of things that people do in order to defend themselves from really bad things that happen. I understand why people do these things sometimes. It just gets out of hand. Casandra 1:00:49 Different different tools for different scenarios. Margaret 1:00:51 Yeah, totally. All right. Well, thank you so much for coming on. Is there anything you want to shout out or plug or draw people's attention towards here at the end of the episode? Casandra 1:01:05 Um, maybe this...I don't know publishing project called Strangers In A Tangled Wilderness. Margaret 1:01:12 Oh, are you part of a publishing project? Casandra 1:01:13 Have you heard of that? Margaret 1:01:15 Is it Strangers In A Tangled Wilderness at Tangledwilderness.org? The publishing collective that you and I are both part of? Casandra 1:01:24 Yeah, yeah, we could call that out. Margaret 1:01:27 Yeah, if...this podcast is published by Strangers In A Tangled Wilderness, and we also publish a monthly zine. We're publishing a bunch of books this year. And we're really just...it's a project that's been around in one incarnation or another for about 20 years. But we're like really, kind of kick starting it. No pun intended with the company this year and trying to give it a good push and we have a bunch of stuff coming out. Casandra 1:01:54 If you like podcasts, now, there's an audio version of each zine each month. Margaret 1:01:58 Oh, yeah. What's it called? Casandra 1:02:01 Oh, shit, isn't it's just called Strangers [In a Tangled Wilderness]? This is our job. Margaret 1:02:10 We're very professional. All right. Well, thank you so much for coming on. Casandra 1:02:18 Thank you. Margaret 1:02:19 Thank you so much for listening. If you enjoyed this podcast, you should learn how to mediate or don't learn how to mediate and just walk like a wrecking ball through communities and tell everyone what you think. I guess I've already made enough sarcastic jokes this episode. Mediation is really cool. And you should look into it. You can also support this podcast. The main way you can do that is by telling people about it. You can tell people about it on the internet, or in person. Those are the only two spaces that exist I think. But either way you'd be helping us out. You can also support us directly by supporting us on Patreon. Our Patreon is patreon.com/strangersInatangledwilderness, and depending we put up content every month, we have now two podcasts, this one and the podcast Strangers In A Tangled Wilderness. We publish a lot of fiction, we will be publishing some poetry's, and role playing game content, also some essays, memoir, history, you name it. And in particular, I'd like to thank Mikki, Nicole, David, Dana, Chelsey, Staro, Jennifer, Elena, Natalie, Kirk, Micaiah, Nora, Sam, Chris, and Hoss the dog. You all are amazing and make all this possible. Strangers...well, this podcast used to be just me. But now it's going to be coming out more regularly, thanks to all the hard work of all the people who work behind the scenes. So thank you for supporting them and thank you people who are behind the scenes for doing that also Anyway, I hope you're doing as well as you can with everything that's happening and I will be back soo Find out more at https://live-like-the-world-is-dying.pinecast.co

RNZ: Checkpoint
Big Budget boost for Pharmac, but advocates call for more

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 3:54


Pharmac's been given its biggest ever Budget allowance - $191 million - but it falls well short of what patient advocates wanted. The drug buying agency would've needed around $400 million to clear its waitlist, which has about 130 applications. And as Louise Ternouth reports those with rare diseases are still fighting to even get a spot on the list.

Online Success Journey
#346: Betsy Cerulo

Online Success Journey

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 31:09


In 1990, Betsy Cerulo founded AdNet/AccountNet, Inc., a Baltimore based company with a powerful mission of being “Advocates for Workplace Excellence & Equality”' placing subject matter experts with Accounting/Finance, Human Resources and Legal expertise. Betsy is the Co-Founder and Past President of the Maryland LGBT Chamber of Commerce, which was awarded Rising Star Chamber in 2018 by the National LGBT Chamber of Commerce. She helped found the Maryland LGBT Foundation, which generates resources and works to activate, educate and mobilize the LGBTQ+ community to access opportunity and wealth generation. Betsy is a passionate activist pushing for equity and equal rights for women and all diverse groups. She has authored books including Shake It Off Leadership - Achieving Success Through the Eyes of our Labels and is also a contributing author to various publications.

The Annie Frey Show Podcast
SCOTUS ruling could be a huge win for 2A advocates.

The Annie Frey Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 13:39


Ryan Wiggins discusses a case currently before the SCOTUS that could strike down some of the most restrictive firearm permit standards in the country. Of course, it doesn't hurt to have Brad Young's legal expertise on the topic. 

HealthCare UnTold
Dr. Helen Nunberg, Physician Leader and Advocate for the Reduction of Opioid Deaths

HealthCare UnTold

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 39:16


Helen Nunberg is a physician, researcher, and instructor living in Santa Cruz, California. She studied medicine in NYC, health care policy at Berkeley, and psychiatry in New Hampshire. She practiced medicine in Puerto Rico and California. With a nonjudgmental, open minded, curiosity driven approach to the evaluation of medical marijuana applicants, she paved the way to accepting cannabis as a substitute for riskier prescription medicines. She currently promotes acceptance of the reality of opioid use, buprenorphine as a substitute for riskier opioids, plus overdose prevention centers that give users the dignity they deserve, all of which will lead to a marked reduction in opioid deaths.#overdosereduction#treatmentworks#harmreduction#healthcareuntold#gentecare

Resilient Voices & Beyond
“Be the change

Resilient Voices & Beyond

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 69:40


In this episode, I had a great conversation with Natalie Nicole Clark BSW. She is an Alumni of Care Adult Living Assistant Coordinator at DCFS, FosterClub Allstar, Advocate, mentor, and more. In this episode, she walked us through her lived experience to her expertise tune in for more.

Wild with Sarah Wilson
THIS WILD ELECTION: EP 12, Last thoughts…with Betoota Advocate

Wild with Sarah Wilson

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 53:30


THIS WILD ELECTION: EP 12, Last thoughts…with Betoota AdvocateIt's been a wild ride but here ends our journey together. Wendell Hussey from the awesome satirical news site and I answer last questions about the election, who to vote for if you care about climate, what to do if there are no indies in your electorate, what if one of the parties directs my preferences (hint: they can't) and what do we think will be the ideal outcome for Australia (I don't hold back). We return to the normal format next week with some awesome guests. Meantime, please do rate this pod. To keep things going here, I will need some 5 star love! Love you all! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Nomad Capitalist Audio Experience
Yes, Your Country is Corrupt

The Nomad Capitalist Audio Experience

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 15:04


Join Our Free Newsletter and be the First to Hear about Breaking News and Exciting Offers https://nomadcapitalist.com/email Secure Your Spot at the Best Offshore Conference - Nomad Capitalist Live 2022 - on September 21-24 in the most vibrant city in the world, Mexico City: https://nomadcapitalist.com/live/ Discover the world's best passports for 2022: https://nomadcapitalist.com/nomad-passport-index/ Report: Corruption in U.S. at Worst Levels in Almost a Decade: https://foreignpolicy.com/2021/01/28/report-transparency-international-corruption-worst-decade-united-states/ US President Joe Biden just issued his First Presidential Pardons. This speaks to us there is some Corruption not only in the United States but in the Western World in general. Corruption in the United States is apparently at its worst in almost a decade. Advocates attribute the drop to declining trust in democratic institutions and poor oversight of pandemic-related financial aid. Today Andrew is going to explain why the Corrupt Countries you wouldn't move to, are Not More Corrupt than the country where you're living now. Andrew Henderson and the Nomad Capitalist team are the world's most sought-after experts on legal offshore tax strategies, investment immigration, and global citizenship. We work exclusively with seven- and eight-figure entrepreneurs and investors who want to "go where they're treated best". Work with Andrew: https://nomadcapitalist.com/apply/ Andrew has started offshore companies, opened dozens of offshore bank accounts, obtained multiple second passports, and purchased real estate on four continents. He has spent the last 12 years studying and personally implementing the Nomad Capitalist lifestyle. Our growing team of researchers, strategies, and implementers add to our ever-growing knowledge base of the best options available. In addition, we've spent years studying the behavior of hundreds of clients in order to help people get the results they want faster and with less effort. About Andrew: https://nomadcapitalist.com/about/ Our Website: http://www.nomadcapitalist.com Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=nomadcapitalist Buy Andrew's Book: https://nomadcapitalist.com/book/ DISCLAIMER: The information in this video should not be considered tax, financial, investment, or any kind of professional advice. Only a professional diagnosis of your specific situation can determine which strategies are appropriate for your needs. Nomad Capitalist can and does not provide advice unless/until engaged by you.    

3:59
We Can't Forget the Accessibility Lessons Learned From the Pandemic (The Daily Charge, 5/19/2022)

3:59

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 12:00


The pandemic moved the needle in terms of accessibility advances for the disability community. Advocates want to keep the momentum going. Story: https://cnet.co/3lJ1MGh Text us: https://cnet.co/dailycharge Follow us: twitter.com/rogerwcheng Homepage: cnet.com/daily-charge  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Reefer Reporters
Reefer Reporters - May 19 2022 with Rev Kelly & Al

Reefer Reporters

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 57:53


Reefer Reporters - May 19 2022 with Rev Kelly & AlStories include.....Health Canada still hasn't officially begun Cannabis Act's three year review, ‘We don't understand it': Advocates slam Vancouver police raid of low-barrier cannabis program, 'He was a totally different kid': The impact of cannabis oil on the health of children, Drug raid in Norfolk County nets thousands of ‘destroyed' cannabis plants, ADC partners with Alt Magic to launch the first WebXR Cannabis Store in Metaverse, First-ever export of Israeli medical cannabis seeds heads to US, Uruguay's cannabis regulator visits Quebec, Ontario on fact finding mission, We Put Cannabis Brands Tied to Famous Names to the Test to See if They Live Up to the Hype, Havn Life partners with non-profit TheraPsil to bring safe access to psilocybin

CRUSADE Channel Previews
Si Qua Virtus – Episode 41: Nicole Abisinio and “The Advocate”

CRUSADE Channel Previews

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 1:12


Si Qua Virtus - Episode 41: Nicole Abisinio and "The Advocate" For episode 41 of Si Qua Virtus – Creativity and the New Christendom, host Christopher Laurence is very pleased to welcome actress, director and producer Nicole Abisinio, who tells an incredible and true tale of conversion, childhood trauma, the evils and spiritual perils of Hollywood, to how a reversion and spiritual awakening through the Holy Ghost led to creating film and TV for Christ and the Truth of the Catholic Church. Nicole also discusses her latest Faith-filled project, the TV series "The Advocate", about a Child Protection officer who utilizes the supernatural gifts of the Holy Ghost to rescue children in peril. [Opening and closing music for each episode of Si Qua Virtus provided by Josef Saunders/Mödest. His albums can be heard HERE.] More information about "The Advocate", including trailers and where to sign up for info on the premiere, can be found on TheAdvocateTVSeries.com  More information about Nicole and her work can be found at her production company website, GabrielsMessengerFilms.com Nicole's book, "Pure Power", can be purchased from TAN Books. Our Readers And Listeners Keep Us In Print & On The Air! Click here to subscribe to The CRUSADE Channel's Founders Pass Member Service & Gain 24/7 Access to Our Premium, New Talk Radio Service. www.crusadechannel.com/go What Is The Crusade Channel? The CRUSADE Channel, The Last LIVE! Radio Station Standing begins our LIVE programming day with our all original CRUSADE Channel News hosted by award winning,  25 year news veteran Janet Huxley. Followed by LIVE! From London, “The Early Show with Fiorella Nash & Friends. With the morning drive time beginning we bring out the heavy artillery The Mike Church Show! The longest running, continual, long form radio talk show in the world at the tender age of 30 years young! Our broadcast day progresses into lunch, hang out with The Barrett Brief Show hosted by Rick Barrett “giving you the news of the day and the narrative that will follow”. Then Kennedy Hall and The Kennedy Profession drives your afternoon by “applying Natural Law to an unnatural world”!    The CRUSADE Channel also features Reconquest with Brother André Marie, The Fiorella Files Book Review Show, The Frontlines With Joe & Joe and your favorite radio classics like Suspense! and CBS Radio Mystery Theater. We've interviewed hundreds of guests, seen Brother Andre Marie notch his 200th broadcast of Reconquest; The Mike Church Show over 1500 episodes; launched an original LIVE! News Service; written and produced 4 Feature Length original dramas including The Last Confession of Sherlock Holmes and set sail on the coolest radio product ever, the 5 Minute Mysteries series! Combined with our best in the business LIVE! Coverage of every major political/cultural event of the last 6 years including Brexit, Trump's Election, Administration events, shampeachment, the CoronaDoom™, the 2020 Election and resulting Biden Regime's Coup d;'tat, January 6th Psy-op and now the attempt to make Russia and Vladimir Putin out as the new Hitler and his Germany. "When News Breaks Out, We Break In!" because we truly are:   The Last, Live, Radio Station, Standing.

Home Base Nation
Actor, Author, Advocate & U.S. Army Veteran JR Martinez | #MentalHealthAction Day

Home Base Nation

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 50:56


This is the second of two episodes this week in honor Mental Health Action Day which this year falls on Thursday, May 19th. Dr. Ron Hirschberg talks with U.S. Army Veteran, burn survivor, actor, motivational speaker, The New York Times best-selling author of the book Full of Heart: My Story of Survival, Strength, and Spirit, and Dancing with the Stars Season 13 winner. Ron and JR talk about service, survival - or rebirth as JR describes it - overcoming trauma and resilience, the importance of connecting with the world and with others, and so much more. ---May is mental health awareness month. The second annual Mental Health Action Day is Thursday May 19, 2022. Setting the theme of “connection,” MTV and about 1,700 companies and organizations will drive calls to action to address the surge of loneliness and isolation felt by millions because of the pandemic. Mental Health Action Day is an open-source movement to drive culture from mental health awareness to mental health action. The 1,700 partners will encourage people to take their first steps towards mental health action. Free resources and tools, such as an employer toolkit and platforms for hosting and organizing events, are available for organizations and groups to help support their audiences through a myriad of ways – from starting a meditation practice to learning how to support a friend to advocating for change. For more information on how you can participate, please visit MentalHealthActionDay.org.Today, May 19 at 4:00m ET,  join Home Base, Paramount Veterans Network, Movember, GI GoFund, FourBlock, Veterans In Media & Entertainment, Empire Vets, Student Veterans of America, Operation Homefront, Wounded Warrior Project, and JobPath as they unite to create an amazing panel on “Making Connections for Mental Health & Wellness”. The session will be moderated by CBS New York's very own, John Elliott joined by an esteem panel of mental wellness experts including veterans. Opening remarks will be given by Stephen Hill of CBS' Magnum P.I. And, In addition to the panel discussion there will be a mental wellness activity that we can use to incorporate into our daily routines. Incredible right? RSVP at http://bit.ly/MHAD51922 You don't want to miss it. For more information you can visit Paramount Veterans Network at www.paramountvetnet.com---If you are your loved one is experiencing any emotional, mental health struggles, you are not alone and please contact Home Base at (617) 724-5202, or visit www.homebase.org  **REMEMBER FOLKS THE ANNUAL RUN TO HOME BASE IS 7-30-22 THIS YEAR! ALL FUNDRAISING GOES DIRECTLY TO THE CARE OF OUR VETERANS AND MILITARY FAMILIES, SO SIGN UP HERE: www.runtohomebase.orgTheme music for Home Base Nation: "Rolling the tree" by The Butler FrogsAdditional music credits include "Cadillac" by Ron Hirschberg. Follow Home Base on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, LinkedInThe Home Base Nation Team is Steve Monaco, Maureen Roderick, Laurie Gallagher, Karianne Kraus, Lucy Little, Taylor Orlando, with COO Michael Allard, Brigadier General Jack Hammond, and Peter SmythProducer and Host: Dr. Ron HirschbergProducer, Sound, Editor: Lucy LittleChairman, Home Base Media Lab: Peter SmythHome Base Nation is the official podcast of Home Base Program for Veterans and Military Families, a partnership of the Massachusetts General Hospital and the Red Sox Foundation. To learn more and connect with us at Home Base Nation: www.homebase.org/homebasenation. To Donate to Home Base where every dollar goes to the care of veterans and military families that is cost to them, go to: www.homebase.org/donate.The views expressed by guests to the Home Base Nation podcast are their own and their appearance on the program does not imply an endorsement of them or any entity they represent. Views and opinions expressed by guests are those of the guests and do not necessarily reflect the view of the Massachusetts General Hospital, Home Base, the Red Sox Foundation or any of its officials.

Edge of Philly Sports
PPR #391: Live From the Linc ("Dish It Up" Event)

Edge of Philly Sports

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 86:27


A special show ... live from Lincoln Financial Field! Eagles Insider Dave Spadaro stops by to talk about the Birds' draft picks and other offseason additions, and we may also get a visit also from Eagles great Troy Vincent and his wife Tommi, as they're being honored as Advocates of the Year at the Women Against Abuse "Dish It Up" event happening during the evening. Jim "Chet" Chesko hosts this 90-minute episode right at the Linc, Bill Furman joins the show from Florida, and we get some on-site help from our Edge of Philly Sports pal "Big Al" Zaffiri. Although we're at a football stadium you'll also get Phillies and (ugh!) Sixers talk, too!

Catholic Apostolate Center Podcast

For the Sixth Sunday of Easter, Fr. Frank reflects on the Holy Spirit giving the ability to share the peace of Christ in our world.

Call to Service
Amy Dillon

Call to Service

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 42:02


This week we have Amy Dillon on the show. Amy has worn many hats, notably that of a United States Marine Corps Drill Instructor; Amy is a writer, producer, instructor, advocate, and former Marine. We dive into her call to service, get a perspective on what it takes to produce Marines, and her drive for continuing to service through training and education.Web: guntherapy.orgIG: @adda.may FB: @amydillonofficial To learn more about 5.11, be sure to visit us at www.511tactical.com

RNZ: Checkpoint
Advocates for more Pharmac drugs react to Budget 2022

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 3:55


Health is one of the major budget items, with $11.1 billion over the next four years. It's the biggest government investment in health to date with a huge focus on creating Health NZ and a Māori Health Authority. Health NZ, which will replace the District Health Boards, will get $3.1 billion in funding over the next two years. And Pharmac, the government's drug buying agency will receive an extra $191 million, taking its total funding to $1.2 billion. Outside Parliament on Thursday a group of about 30 people - some of whom have rare diseases - were keenly awaiting news of the Pharmac funding. On a cold and windy day in the capital - the group were wearing beanies reading: "let them live". Malcolm Mulholland's wife Wiki died of breast cancer last year after spending her final months campaigning for better access to medications that Pharmac does not fund but are available in places like Australia.

Thale-Harate Kannada Podcast
ಗುಪ್ತಚರ ಸಂಸ್ಥೆಗಳ ಸಾಂವಿಧಾನಿಕತೆ | Legitimacy of Intelligence Agencies ft. Aditya Sondhi

Thale-Harate Kannada Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 47:25


ಗುಪ್ತಚರ ಸಂಸ್ಥೆಗಳ ಕೆಲಸಗಳ ಕುರಿತು ಮತ್ತು ಅದರ ಕಾನೂನಿನ ಚೌಕಟ್ಟುಗಳ ಕುರಿತು ಹಿರಿಯ ವಕೀಲ ಆದಿತ್ಯ ಸೋಂಧಿ ಅವರು ನಿರೂಪಕರಾದಂತಹ ಸೂರ್ಯಪ್ರಕಾಶ್ ಬಿ.ಎಸ್ ಮತ್ತು ಗಣೇಶ್ ಚಕ್ರವರ್ತಿ ಅವರ ಜೊತೆ ಮಾತನಾಡಿದ್ದಾರೆ.Host Surya Prakash BS and Ganesh Chakravarthi talks to Aditya Sondhi on how intelligence agencies functions and its legal frameworks.ತಲೆ ಹರಟೆ ಕನ್ನಡ ಪಾಡ್ಕ್ಯಾಸ್ಟ್ ನ 138 ನೇ ಸಂಚಿಕೆಯಲ್ಲಿ ಗುಪ್ತಚರ ಸಂಸ್ಥೆಗಳ ಕೆಲಸಗಳ ಕುರಿತು ಮತ್ತು ಅದರ ಕಾನೂನಿನ ಚೌಕಟ್ಟುಗಳ ಕುರಿತು ಹಿರಿಯ ವಕೀಲ ಆದಿತ್ಯ ಸೋಂಧಿ ಅವರು ನಿರೂಪಕರಾದಂತಹ ಸೂರ್ಯಪ್ರಕಾಶ್ ಬಿ.ಎಸ್ ಮತ್ತು ಗಣೇಶ್ ಚಕ್ರವರ್ತಿ ಅವರ ಜೊತೆ ಮಾತನಾಡಿದ್ದಾರೆ. ಪೋಲೀಸರ ಕಾರ್ಯವು ಸಾರ್ವಜನಿಕ ವಲಯದಲ್ಲಿ ಚಿರಪರಿಚಿತವಾಗಿದೆ - ಕಾನೂನು ಮತ್ತು ಸುವ್ಯವಸ್ಥೆಯನ್ನು ಕಾಪಾಡುವಲ್ಲಿ ಅವರ ಪಾತ್ರ, ಅವರ ಅಧಿಕಾರ ಇತ್ಯಾದಿ ಇವುಗಳ ಬಗ್ಗೆ ನಮಗೆಲ್ಲ ತಿಳಿದೇ ಇದೆ. ಅವರ ಚಟುವಟಿಕೆಗಳು ಮತ್ತು ಅದರ ಕಾನೂನು ಆಧಾರಗಳ ಬಗ್ಗೆ ಆರೋಗ್ಯಕರ ಚರ್ಚೆಗಳು ನಡೆಯುತ್ತಾ ಇರುತ್ತವೆ. ಭಾರತದ ಗುಪ್ತಚರ ಏಜೆನ್ಸಿಗಳು ಅಂದ್ರೆ ಉದಾಹರಣೆಗೆ ಇಂಟೆಲಿಜೆನ್ಸ್ ಬ್ಯೂರೋ (IB), ರಿಸರ್ಚ್ ಅಂಡ್ ಅನಾಲಿಸಿಸ್ ವಿಂಗ್ (RAW) ಬಗ್ಗೆ ನಾಗರಿಕರಿಗೆ ಅಷ್ಟು ತಿಳುವಳಿಕೆ ಇಲ್ಲ. ಈ ಸಂಸ್ಥೆಗಳು ಭಯೋತ್ಪಾದನೆ, ಸೈಬರ್ ದಾಳಿ ಮುಂತಾದ ಅಪರಾಧಗಳನ್ನು ತಡೆಗಟ್ಟುವಲ್ಲಿ ಮತ್ತು ವಿಚಾರಣೆಗೆ ಒಳಪಡಿಸುವಲ್ಲಿ ಭಾರಿ ಪಾತ್ರವನ್ನು ವಹಿಸುವ ಮಾಹಿತಿಗಳನ್ನು ಸಂಗ್ರಹಿಸುತ್ತವೆ. ಆದ್ದರಿಂದ ಗುಪ್ತಚರ ಸಂಸ್ಥೆಗಳು ಪರಿಣಾಮಕಾರಿಯಾಗಿ, ಪಾರದರ್ಶಕತೆ ಮತ್ತು ಹೊಣೆಗಾರಿಕೆಯನ್ನು ಕೇಂದ್ರವಾಗಿರಿಸಿಕೊಂಡು ಸಾಂವಿಧಾನಿಕ ಮತ್ತು ಕಾನೂನು ಚೌಕಟ್ಟಿನೊಳಗೆ ಕಾರ್ಯನಿರ್ವಹಿಸುವುದು ಮುಖ್ಯವಾಗಿದೆ. ಈ ಕ್ಷೇತ್ರದಲ್ಲಿ ಅಗಾಧವಾದ ಜ್ಞಾನವನ್ನು ಹೊಂದಿರುವ ಹಿರಿಯ ವಕೀಲ ಆದಿತ್ಯ ಸೋಂಧಿ ಅವರೊಂದಿಗಿನ ಹರಟೆಯನ್ನ ಕೇಳಿ. ಆದಿತ್ಯ ಸೋಂಧಿ ಅವರು ನ್ಯಾಷನಲ್ ಲಾ ಸ್ಕೂಲ್ ಆಫ್ ಇಂಡಿಯಾ ಯೂನಿವರ್ಸಿಟಿ, ಬೆಂಗಳೂರಿನ ವಿದ್ಯಾರ್ಥಿಯಾಗಿದ್ದರು ಮತ್ತು ಮೈಸೂರು ವಿಶ್ವವಿದ್ಯಾನಿಲಯದಿಂದ ಪಿಎಚ್‌ಡಿ ಕೂಡ ಪಡೆದಿದ್ದಾರೆ. ಬನ್ನಿ ಕೇಳಿ!In episode 138 of the Thale-Harate Kannada Podcast, Host Surya Prakash BS and Ganesh Chakravarthi talks to Aditya Sondhi on how intelligence agencies functions and its legal frameworks. The function of police is well known in the public imagination - their role in maintaining law and order, their investigation powers, etc. There is also a healthy discussion on their activities and the legal basis for it. Little is known and understood about India's intelligence agencies - e.g., Intelligence Bureau (IB), Research and Analysis Wing (RAW). Such functions are often conflated with those of the police and especially at the state level. These agencies gather information and intelligence that play a huge role in preventing, and prosecuting crimes such as terrorism, cyber attack, etc. It is therefore important that intelligence agencies operate within a sound constitutional and legal framework that balance effectiveness, transparency, and accountability. Join us in a discussion with Senior Advocate Aditya Sondhi who has a deep knowledge in these areas. Mr. Aditya Sondhi is from the National Law School of India University, Bengaluru and also has a PhD from Mysore University.ಫಾಲೋ ಮಾಡಿ. Follow the Thalé-Haraté Kannada Podcast @haratepod. Facebook: https://facebook.com/HaratePod/, Twitter: https://twitter.com/HaratePod/ and Instagram: https://instagram.com/haratepod/.ಈಮೇಲ್ ಕಳಿಸಿ, send us an email at haratepod@gmail.com or send a tweet and tell us what you think of the show!You can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the new and improved IVM Podcast App on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/ios and check out our website at https://ivmpodcasts.com/ .You can also listen to the podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Gaana, Amazon Music Podcasts, JioSaavn, Castbox, or any other podcast app. We also have some video episodes up on YouTube! ಬನ್ನಿ ಕೇಳಿ!

Hudson Mohawk Magazine
Advocates Call To Expand Bottle Bill On 40th Anniversary

Hudson Mohawk Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 9:37


Advocates gathered at the State Capitol on May 18th to observe the 40th anniversary of the Bottle Bill and to urge lawmakers to increase the deposit to 10 cents and to expand it to include other containers such as wine, liquor, and noncarbonated beverages. We hear from Ryan Carson of NYPIRG; Judith Enck of Beyond Plastics; As. Engelbright and Sen. May; and the Redemption Association. With Mark Dunlea for Hudson Mohawk Magazine.

RNZ: Morning Report
Public transport advocates hope cheap fares will stay

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 3:11


Advocates are holding out hope that half-price public transport will be continued in today's Budget. Climate Minister James Shaw previously signaled that half-price fares could be part of the Emissions Reduction Plan but that didn't happen. Public Transport Users Association's Jon Reeves hopes the government may still continue the popular deal. He spoke to Susie Ferguson.

Flash In The Pan
Flash in the Pan - Episode 79: Playing Pervert's Advocate

Flash In The Pan

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 92:25


Tom and Alex talk about alien juices in AVATAR: HOT NA'VI SEX, bathroom horrors in MEN'S ROOM MONOLOGUE, and finish up by exploring some MICROSOFT OFFICE XP ADs... starring Gilbert Gottfried as Clippy??? Plus, your emails, and a lorra lorra laffs. Video links in the show notes. Support us on Patreon - https://www.patreon.com/flashinthepan

Active Towns
Be Courageous for Quick Results w/ Lior Steinberg (video available)

Active Towns

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 63:42


Video version of this episodeIt seems like every day Lior notices the improvements happening all around him and in the bold work that he and his firm Humankind is helping bring about in cities, he notes that changes can happen quite quickly. In this discussion, we talk about several of his projects, Rotterdam as a wonderful model city for other cities globally to benchmark off of, and his delightful newly released children's book, The Car That Wanted To Be A Bike.Helpful Links (note that some may include affiliate links to help me support the channel):- Humankind Website- Children's book - The Car That Wanted To Be A Bike  - My Amazon affiliate link to buy the book- My study tour video - Not Just Bikes Trash Pick Up videoHow You Can Make A Difference: - If you enjoyed this video please give it a "thumbs up", leave a comment, and share it with a friend.- And if you haven't yet done so, please subscribe to the Channel and don't forget to "Ring" that notifications bell; this lets you know when I post a new video or schedule a premiere.- Pick up some Active Towns #StreetsAreForPeople Merch at my store- Pls. consider becoming a Patron, by pledging as little as $1 per month on PatreonAll video and audio production by me.Music:- Intro and outro mixed by me- Video clip song via Epidemic SoundResources used during the production of this episode:- My awesome recording platform is Ecamm- Adobe Creative Cloud SuiteStudio Equipment:- Main MIcrophone Sennheiser Pro Audio MKH416-P48U3- Rode RODECaster Pro Podcast Production Studio- Additional Microphone - Shure MV7- Camera - Sony ZV-E10 (currently sold out)- Lens - Sigma 16mm f/1.4 DC DN Contemporary Lens- Elgato Cam Link 4k- Elgato Streamdeck XL*- Elgato Streamdeck (*you may not need the XL)Editing Computer System:- Apple MacBook Pro 16" 2021 M1 Pro- LG 34WP88C-B 34-inch Curved 21:9 UltraWide QHD (3440x1440) IPS Display with Ergo StandAll video, audio, and music production by me, John SimmermanFor more information about my Active Towns effort or to follow along please visit my links below:- Website- Twitter- Newsletter- Podcast landing pages- Facebook- InstagramBackground:Hi Everyone, my name is John Simmerman.I'm a health promotion professional with over 30 years of experience and my area of concentration has evolved into a specialization of how the built environment influences human behavior related to active living and especially active mobility.In 2012 I launched the non-profit Advocates for Healthy Communities as an effort to help promote and create healthy, active places.Since that time I've been exploring, documenting, and profiling established, emerging, and aspiring Active Towns wherever they might be, in order to produce high-quality multimedia content to help inspire the creation of more safe and inviting, environments that promote a "Culture of Activity" for "All Ages & Abilities".My Active Towns suite of channels feature my original video and audio content and reflections, including a selection of podcast episodes and short films profiling the positive and inspiring efforts happening around the world as I am able to experience and document them.Thanks for tuning in, I hope you find this content helpful.Creative Commons License: Attributions, Non-Commercial, No Derivatives, 2022Advocates for Healthy Communities, Inc. is a nonprofit 501c3 organization (EIN 45-3802508) dedicated to helping communities create a Culture of Activity. Any donations collected are used specifically to support the organization's mission.To make a donation to Advocates for Healthy Communities go here★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

Troubled
URGENT: Residential School Survivors (& Descendants) Call to Submit Testimony (and Ally Action Items)

Troubled

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 11:24


Last week, the first volume of the report on the Federal Indian Boarding School Initiative Investigation was released. Last year, the first Indigenous Secretary of the Interior, Deb Haaland, created the initiative after the discovery of 215 unmarked graves of Indigenous children by Canada's Tk'emlúps te Secwépemc First Nation at the Kamloops Indian Residential School in May 2021. If YOU are a Survivor of Institutional Child Abuse (w/in the so-called "Troubled Teen Industry": Conversion Therapy, Wilderness Therapy, Bootcamps, Boarding Schools), or one of our allies, it is imperative to support the Indigenous Communities of Turtle Island through this review and reconciliation. Please center, elevate and amplify Indigenous Survivors and Advocates. READ Indian Country Today's coverage for a summary and follow for more information. The National Boarding School Healing Coalition is requesting people who attended a boarding school or are a descendent of a boarding school attendee to submit their written testimonies to the House of Natural Resources Committee by May 26. Email submissions to HNRCDocs@mail.house.gov and CC NABS at info@nabshc.org. The National Boarding School Healing Coalition (NABS) has put together a suggested outline for written testimony for individuals to follow if needed: dentify yourself, your Tribe, and the boarding school you attended a. Boarding School: what school did you or your family member attend, and what year(s) did you/they attend? State your position of support for “H.R. 5444 the Truth and Healing Commission on Indian Boarding School Policies Act” Personal story that you are comfortable sharing. This is often the most powerful part. Conclusion: Restate/review your position at the end of your testimony Thank the committee or task force for the opportunity to speak a. “Thank you to the Natural Resources Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States” There is not a limit to the length of your statements. Your written testimony will be on record in the House of Congress. YOU can support the first targets of the US' Historic prevalence of mass, for-profit, legal, child abduction, detention, trafficking and torture schema by sharing this brief update episode and ALL of the links below to help make sure that ALL Survivors of the Residential Schools for the Indigenous are aware of their opportunity to submit testimony. We are disheartened that after centuries of Survivors speaking up, and a year of investigation, the US Government is allowing mere days for Survivors to step forward and share traumas they may have kept locked away for decades. STILL, raise awareness for this update in #everychildmatters and then do the following: Read the Truth and Healing Commission on Indian Boarding Schools Act HR5444 & SB2907 Support HR5444 & SB2907 (Truth and Healing Commission on Indian Boarding Schools) via ResistBot Text PCGYYN to 50409 SIGN the Change.org Petition to "Demand Thorough Searches of Residential School Lands for Native Children Remains" Podcast on this Friday! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/troubled/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/troubled/support

Rising Tide
The New Linear Career Path

Rising Tide

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 14:41


Growing up we were fed a steady diet of the linear career path. We were taught to get an education, figure out our career before graduating or else you are behind (or worse...a failure), make sure to use your degree and get a good job, and then make sure to climb the management ladder. Sound familiar?Except the concept of a linear career path is an illusion. Or is it?What if instead of real career paths looking more like squiggly messes than lines we simply changed the x and y axis? On this episode I share:What the new linear career path isWhat causes careers to feel like a squiggly lineThe stories we need to stop telling ourselves about our careerThe foundation for your new linear career pathReferences:Jennifer Chapman - Sales Professional to Stroke Warrior & Mindset CoachCarrie Jeffrey - CEO of the House to Tech SalesJenn Goldstone - TV Producer & Investigative Journalist to Non-Profit ExecutiveMelissa Craig - Political Action Services to Tech ExecutiveDr. Liz Riedford - Academic Advisor to Asylum OfficerLisa Bowman - CMO to Best Selling Author, Speaker, and Advocate

Dear Cancer, I'm Beautiful
Breast Cancer, Globe Trotting and a GREAT Love Story with Kim Angell, Breast Cancer Advocate

Dear Cancer, I'm Beautiful

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 29:54


You don't want to miss this one! Everyone needs a Kim Angell in their life. Kim is not only an incredible breast cancer advocate and metastatic breast cancer thriver, but she's also a travel lover and just wait till you hear how she met her hubby, Josh. Thank you Kim for sharing all of you with all of us!

Really Riley
Episode 315 : Advocating For Your Health

Really Riley

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 18:54


What happens when the doctors say "Everything is fine", but you not its NOT fine?

The Horse's Advocate Podcast
Horses And The Web Of Influence- #055 The Horse's Advocate Podcast

The Horse's Advocate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 43:31


I am so grateful when I hear someone listen to these podcasts from all parts of the world. But, more than that, people listen and apply what I say and find excellent results from their changes. I am so humbled. In this episode, I go through an email I received from Africa with a connection in the state of Washington here in America. Their results with laminitis are remarkable. But this is not the only feedback I receive. I get messages from around the world - and almost every one of them is positive beyond words. Unfortunately, a few can't understand what I am saying or are unable to gain improvements from the information I give. Some are downright rude! So what!?! I am not here for everyone and there are doubters everywhere. Luckily they are few and far between so I don't spend my time there. Instead, I focus on the great connections I make throughout the world. The influence made with horses everywhere through the internet is mind-blowing. This invention, made only a short time ago, fills the information gap. Now, this gap is becoming crowded and filled with information and misinformation. It is hard to sift through it all. I am so grateful for all of you who have found my voice in the crowd. This responsibility also humbles me. My mission is to continue to discuss information that will help our horses thrive in a human world. It may be very different from what you have been told. It may cause you to become upset with what is thought to be familiar and acceptable knowledge; however, if you like what you hear, please forward this podcast to others and become part of the "Web Of Influence."

Montana Public Radio News
Wildlife advocates say Kootenai National Forest logging project would endanger grizzly habitat

Montana Public Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 1:11


The nearly 5,000-acre Knotty Pine project would include roughly 3,000 acres of commercial logging as well 40 miles of road maintenance and road building. WildEarth Guardians in a lawsuit filed in federal court in Missoula argue that work will harm the local grizzly bear population.

Face to Face
MMIWG advocate says cost of not implementing calls for justice is a ‘continuance of violence'

Face to Face

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 24:18


On this episode of Face to Face: Hilda Anderson-Pyrz Hilda Anderson-Pyrz has been a tireless advocate for Indigenous women and a leader to end gender-based and race-based violence for more than 20 years. She is currently chair of the National Family and Survivors Circle in Canada.

Arthritis Life
Becoming an Advocate with Lupus and Type 1 Diabetes: Melissa's Story

Arthritis Life

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 54:53


Melissa shares how she learned to be a more effective advocate over time, and provides insights into how she copes with the ups and downs of chronic illness life.Episode at a glance:Melissa's Diagnosis story for Lupus & Type 1 Diabetes as a nine year oldMelissa becomes a mental health occupational therapist while managing her conditionsMelissa shares her treatment ups and downs for lupus, including medications and lifestyle factors such as exercise and stress managementAdvocacy: Melissa shares her journey towards becoming a health advocateWhat to do when your supporters or caregivers don't “get it?”Melissa's Best Advice for people newly diagnosed with Lupus and/or Type 1 DiabetesMelissa's Mental health / coping tips for chronic illness lifeMedical disclaimer:All content found on Arthritis Life public channels was created for generalized informational purposes only. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.Episode SponsorsRheum to THRIVE, a community support & education program Cheryl created to help people with rheumatic disease go from overwhelmed, confused and alone to confident, supported and connected. Join the waitlist for the next group, which starts in September 2022!Rheumatoid Arthritis Roadmap, a self-paced online course Cheryl created that teaches you how to confidently manage your physical, social and emotional life with rheumatoid arthritis.

Untrained Wisdom
54: Panola, Ala. COVID-19 Vaccine Advocate Dorothy Oliver

Untrained Wisdom

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 22:56


Dorothy Oliver, owner and operator of the general store in rural Panola, Ala., joined forces with a local county commissioner in 2021 to get as many people as she could to get vaccinated from COVID-19 in her small black community. Dorothy's efforts included diligently communicating with residents and educating them about the disease, which resulted in a nearly 99 percent vaccination rate among the community's adults in a state with one of the lowest vaccination rates in the U.S.In this interview, Dorothy talks about the work she did before and after the vaccine became available as well as the recognition she's received publicly, which includes a personal address by Dr. Anthony Fauci. Her story was also featured in a 2021 short documentary by The New Yorker magazine called The Panola Project.View PDF TranscriptIf you enjoyed this episode, please leave a review on Apple Podcasts. Check out guest recommendations on Pinterest. Finally, you can support the show through Patreon.Interested in starting your own podcast? Sign up here for your own Buzzsprout account.

Heartland POD
Luke Barber for MO-89 (D)

Heartland POD

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 24:32


Host: Adam SommerGuest: Luke BarberAdam is joined for a chat by Luke Barber, a democrat and disability advocate running for the Missouri House in the 89th district. Luke explains why his diagnosis on the autism spectrum is an asset to his ability to represent the people of the 89th district in Missouri. https://heartlandpod.com/Twitter: @TheHeartlandPODChange The Conversation

All Things Vocal: Podcast for Singers, Speakers, Voice Coaches and Producers
Chat With Lachi - Recording Artist, Disabled Inclusion Advocate

All Things Vocal: Podcast for Singers, Speakers, Voice Coaches and Producers

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 34:19


Have you ever felt like there was something about you that would keep your voice from certain opportunities, careers or stages? Maybe you're the wrong race, wrong gender, wrong size, too old, too young, too dark, too light, too weird, too loud, too shy. How about being... too blind? Today I talk with Lachi - a highly successful force of nature who fully embraces and USES her blindness to make the entertainment industry a place where the disabled are successful and where universal access is the norm. Wait til you hear where HER voice is successfully performing! After listening, don't be surprised if you feel a fire in your own gut to think outside the box of your perceived limitations, and go after some dream you may have tucked away.  If you enjoy this, please support it with your rating or review! Lachi's Links: http://www.lachimusic.com/ http://www.rampd.org/index.html    

LGBTQ&A
Karine Jean-Pierre: The Historic White House Press Secretary

LGBTQ&A

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 27:19


As of today, a Black lesbian is now the voice and face of the United States government. Karine Jean-Pierre, the newest White House press secretary, joins us to talk about why there is a place for all of us in politics, no matter what you might think of as the typical background or narrative for a politician. If a queer woman of color who immigrated to the U.S. as a kid could make it in politics, she says, then so can you. LGBTQ&A is hosted by Jeffrey Masters and produced by The Advocate magazine, in partnership with GLAAD. A condensed transcript of each week's interview is posted on The Advocate's website. Follow us on Twitter: @lgbtqpod [This interview was originally recorded in November 2019.]

How I Lawyer Podcast with Jonah Perlin
#066: Brian Cuban - Attorney, Author, & Addiction Recovery Advocate (Mental Health Month Collaboration with Personal Jurisdiction Podcast)

How I Lawyer Podcast with Jonah Perlin

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 53:17


**This month, May 2022, How I Lawyer is teaming up with the Personal Jurisdiction Podcast (https://www.personaljxpod.com/) to feature five interviews on the important topic of mental health in the legal profession. Learn more here.** In today's episode I speak with Brian Cuban. Brian is a Dallas-based attorney, keynote speaker, writer, and addiction recovery advocate. Brian has been in long-term recovery from alcohol, cocaine and bulimia since April of 2007. Brian is well known and speaks across the country at law schools & law firms both to tell his story and to offer advice on how our profession can better improve mental health awareness, awareness of substance abuse problems, and building more compassionate communities. He is the author of three books: Shattered Image, the Addicted Lawyer, and most recently his debut novel: The Ambulance Chaser. In our conversation, Brian candidly shared his personal story from addiction to recovery; what he recommends to individuals who are struggling & those who want to support them, and suggestions for the legal profession and legal education writ large. **Please note this episode does cover several topics that some might find disturbing including substance abuse, eating disorders, and suicide.** This episode is sponsored, edited, and engineered by LawPods, a professional podcast production company for busy attorneys.

The Bike Shed
338: Meticulously Wrong

The Bike Shed

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 45:52


Chris switched from Trello over to Linear for product management and talks about prioritizing backlogs. Steph shares and discusses a tweet from Curtis Einsmann that super resonated with the work she's doing right now: "In software engineering, rabbit holes are inevitable. You will research libraries and not use them. You'll write code just to delete it. This isn't a waste; sometimes, you need to go down a few wrong paths to get to the right one." This episode is brought to you by BuildPulse (https://buildpulse.io/bikeshed). Start your 14-day free trial of BuildPulse today. Linear (https://linear.app/) Curtis Einsmann Tweet (https://twitter.com/curtiseinsmann/status/1521451508943843329) Louie Bacaj Tweet (https://twitter.com/LBacaj/status/1478241322637033474?s=20) Become a Sponsor (https://thoughtbot.com/sponsorship) of The Bike Shed! Transcript: AD: Flaky tests take the joy out of programming. You push up some code, wait for the tests to run, and the build fails because of a test that has nothing to do with your change. So you click rebuild and you wait. Again. And you hope you're lucky enough to get a passing build this time. Flaky tests slow everyone down, break your flow and make things downright miserable. In a perfect world, tests would only break if there's a legitimate problem that would impact production. They'd fail immediately and consistently, not intermittently. But the world's not perfect, and flaky tests will happen, and you don't have time to fix them all today. So how do you know where to start? BuildPulse automatically detects and tracks your team's flaky tests. Better still, it pinpoints the ones that are disrupting your team the most. With this list of top offenders, you'll know exactly where to focus your effort for maximum impact on making your builds more stable. In fact, the team at Codecademy was able to identify their flakiest tests with BuildPulse in just a few days. By focusing on those tests first, they reduced their flaky builds by more than 68% in less than a month! And you can do the same because BuildPulse integrates with the tools you're already using. It supports all the major CI systems, including CircleCI, GitHub Actions, Jenkins, and others. And it analyzes test results for all popular test frameworks and programming languages, like RSpec, Jest, Go, pytest, PHPUnit, and more. So stop letting flaky tests slow you down. Start your 14-day free trial of BuildPulse today. To learn more, visit buildpulse.io/bikeshed. That's buildpulse.io/bikeshed. CHRIS: Good morning, and welcome to Tech Talk with Steph and Chris. Today at the top of the hour, it's tech traffic hits. STEPH: Ooh, tech traffic. [laughs] I like that statement. CHRIS: Yeah. The Git lanes are clogged up with...I don't know. I got nothing. STEPH: [laughs] Hello and welcome to another episode of The Bike Shed, a weekly podcast from your friends at thoughtbot about developing great software. I'm Steph Viccari. CHRIS: And I'm Chris Toomey. STEPH: And together, we're here to share a bit of what we've learned along the way. So, hey, Chris, what's new in your world? CHRIS: What's new in my world? Actually, I have a specific new thing that I can share, which is, as of the past week, I would say, switched from Trello over to Linear for product management. It's been great. It was a super straightforward transfer. They actually had an importer. We lost some of the comment threads on the Trello cards. But that was easy enough to like each Linear ticket has a link back to Trello. So it's easy enough to keep the continuity. But yeah, we're in a whole new world, a system actually built for maintaining a product backlog, and, man, it shows. Trello was a bunch of lists and cards and stuff that you could link between, which was cool. But Linear is just much more purpose-built and already very, very nice. And we're very happy with the switch. STEPH: I feel like you came in real casual with that news, but that is big news, that you did a switch. [laughter] CHRIS: How are you going to bury the lead like that? You switched project management...[laughter] I actually didn't think it was...I'm excited about it but low-key excited, which is weird because I do like productivity and task management software. So you would think I would be really excited about this. But I've also tried enough of them historically to know that that's never going to be the thing that actually makes or breaks your team's productivity. It can make things worse, but it can't make you great. That's the thing that I believe. And so it's a wonderful piece of software. I'm very excited about it but -- STEPH: Ooh, I like that. It can make you worse, but it doesn't make you great. That's so true, yeah, where it causes pain. Well, and it does make sense. You've been complaining a bit about the whole login with Trello and how that's been frustrating. But I haven't even heard of Linear. That's just...that's, I mean, you're just doing what you do where you bring that new-new. I haven't heard of Linear before. CHRIS: I try to live on the cutting edge. Actually, I deeply try to not live on the cutting edge at this point in my life. That early adopter wave, no, no, no, that's not for me anymore. But I've known a few folks who've moved to Linear. And everyone that I've spoken to who has moved to it has been like, "Yeah, it's been great." I've not heard anything negative. And I've heard or experienced negative things about every other product management tool out there. And so, it seemed like an easy thing. And it was a low-cost enough switch in terms of opportunity costs or the like, it took the effort of someone on our team moving those cards over and setting up the new system and training, but it was relatively straightforward. And yeah, we're super happy with it. And it feels different now. I feel like I can see the work in a different way which is interesting. I think we had brought in a Chrome extension for Trello. I think it's like Hello Epics or something like that that allows...it abuses the card linking functionality in Trello and repurchases that feature as an epic management thing. But it's quarter-baked is how I would describe it, or it's clearly built on top of existing things that were not intended to be used exactly in that way. So it does a great job. Hello Epics does a great job of trying to make something like parent-child list management stuff happen in Trello. But it's always going feel like an afterthought, a secondary feature, something that's bolted on. Whereas in Linear, it's like, no, no, we absolutely have the idea of projects, of course, and you can see burndown charts and things. And the thing that I do want to be careful about is not leaning too much into management. Linear has the idea of cycles or sprints, as many other folks think of them, or iterations or whatever you want to call them. But we've largely not been working in that mode. We've just continued to work through the next up list; that's it. The next up list should be prioritized and well defined at the top and roughly in priority order. So just pick up the next card and work on it. And we just do that every single day. And now we're in a piece of software that has the idea of cycles, and I'm like, oh, this is vaguely interesting. Do we want to do that? Oh, but if you're going to do that, you probably do some estimation, right? And I was like, oh no, now we're into a place that's...okay, I have feelings. I got to decide how to approach that. And so, I am intrigued. And I wonder if we could just say like ten carts that's how many come into a cycle, and that's it. And we use the loosest heuristics possible to define how we structure a cycle so that we don't fall into the trap of, oh, what's our roadmap going to look like six months from now? JK, what's anything going to look like six months from now? That's not a knowable fact. STEPH: I was just thinking where you said that you're moving into sprints or cycles, and then there's that push, well, now you got to estimate. And I just thought, do you? Do you have to estimate? [laughs] CHRIS: We need a burndown chart through 2024, and it must be meticulously accurate down to the hour. STEPH: I think meticulously wrong is how that goes. [laughs] CHRIS: Which is the best kind of wrong. If you're going to be wrong, be meticulous about it. STEPH: Be thorough about it. [laughs] Yeah, the team that I'm on right now, we have our bi-weekly planning, and we go through the board, and we pull stuff in. But there's never a discussion about estimation. And I hadn't really appreciated that until just now. How we don't think about how long is this going to take? We just talked about, well, what's in-flight? And how much work do people still have going on? And then here's the list of things we can pull in. But there's always a list that you can go back to. Like, it's very...we pull in the minimum and knowing that if we run out of work, there's another place to go where there's stuff that's organized. And I just love that cadence, that idea of like, let's not try to make guesses about the future; let's just have it lined up and ready for us to go when we're ready to pull it in. Although I know, that's also coming from a very developer's perspective, and there are product managers who are trying to communicate as to when features are going to get out into the world. So I get that there's a balance, but I still have strong feelings and hesitations around estimating work. CHRIS: Well, I feel like there is a balance there. And so many things in history are like, well, this is an overcorrection against that, and that's an overcorrection against this. And the idea that we can estimate our work that far out into the future that's just obviously false to me based on every project I've ever worked on that has tried to do it. And it has always failed without question. But critically, there is the necessity to sync up work and like, oh, marketing needs to plan the launch of this feature, and it's a critical one. What's it going to look like? When's it going to be ready? You know, we're trying to go for an event, it's not just know...we developers never estimate anything past the immediate moment where like, that's not acceptable. We got to find a middle ground here. But where that middle ground is, is interesting. And so, just operating in the sort of we do work as it comes up is the easiest thing because no one's lying about anything at that point. But sometimes you got to make some guesses and make some estimations. And then it gets into the murky area of I believe with 75% confidence that in three weeks, we will have this feature ready. But to be clear, I said with 75% confidence that means one-quarter of the time; we will not be there at that date. What does that mean? What does that failure mode look like? Let's talk about that. And can you have honest, open, transparent, useful conversations there? That's the space that it becomes more subtle if you need to do that. STEPH: You're reminding me of a conversation that I had with someone where they shared with me some very aggressive team goals. And it was a very friendly conversation. And they're like, "How do you feel about aggressive goals?" And I was like, "Well, it depends. How do you feel about aggressive failure?" Because then once I know where you stand there, then we can talk about aggressive goals. Now, if we're being aggressive, but then we fail to achieve that, and it's one of those, okay, we didn't meet the goal that we'd expected, but everything is fine, and it's not a big deal, then I am okay. Sure, let's shoot for the stars. But if it's one of those, we are communicating these goals to the outside world, and it's going to become incredibly important that we meet these goals, and if we don't, then things are going to go on fire, people are going to be in trouble, and it's just going to be awful, then let's not set aggressive goals. Let's not box ourselves into a space where we are setting ourselves up to fail or feel pain in a meaningful way. I agree that estimations are important, especially in terms of you need to collaborate with other departments, and then also just to provide some sense of where the product is headed and when things may be released. I think estimations then just become problematic when they do become definite, and they're based on so many unknowns, and then when I don't know is not an answer. So if someone asked, "What's your estimate for this?" And the very honest real answer is I don't know, like, we haven't done this type of work before, or these are all the unknowns, and then someone's like, "Well, let's just put an estimation of like two weeks on it," and they just sort of try to force-fit it into being what they want, then that's where it starts to just feel incredibly problematic. CHRIS: Yeah, estimation is a very murky area that we could spend entire episodes talking about, and in fact, I think we have a handful of times. So with that, Linear has been great. We're going to see just how much or how little estimation we actually want to do. But it's been a very nice addition to the toolset. And I'll let you know as we deepen our usage of it what the experience is like, but that's the main thing that's new in my world. What's new in your world? STEPH: Well, before we bounce over to my world, you said something that has intrigued me that has also made me start reflecting on some of the ways that I like to work. And you'd mentioned that you have this prioritized backlog that people are pulling tickets from. And I don't know exactly if there's a planning session or how that looks, but I have recognized that when I am working with a team, and we don't have any planning session, if everybody is just pulling from this backlog, that's being prioritized by someone on the team, that I find that a bit overwhelming. Because the types of work being done can vary so drastically that I find I'm less able to help my colleagues or my teammates because I don't have the context for what they're working on. It surprises me. I'm like, oh, I didn't even know we're working on that feature, or I don't have the context for what's the problem that we're trying to solve here. And it makes it just a lot harder to review and then have conversations with them. And I get overwhelmed in that environment. And I've recognized that about myself based on previous projects that were more similar to that versus if I'm on a project where the team does get together every so often, even if it's high level to be like, hey, here's the theme of the tickets that we're working on, or here's just some of the stuff, then I feel much more prepared for the work that is coming in and to be able to context switch and review. And yeah, so I've kind of learned that about myself. I'm curious, are you similar, or how does that work for you? CHRIS: I'm definitely similar. And I think probably the team is closer to what you're describing. So we do have a planning session every week, just a quick 30-minute scan through the backlog, look at the things that are coming up and also the larger themes. Previously, Epics and Trello now projects and Linear. But talking about what are the bigger pieces of work that we're moving on, and then what are the individual tickets associated with that that we'll be expecting to work on in the next week? And just making sure that everyone has broad clarity around what that feature set is. Also, we're a very small team at this point. Still, we're four people total, but one of the developers is on a break for a couple of weeks this summer. And so there are really only three of us that are driving on the code. And so, with three of us working on the projects, we try very intentionally to have significant overlap between the various...like, we don't want any one person to own any portion of things at this point. And so we're doing a good amount of pairing to cross-pollinate and make sure everyone's...not everyone's aware of everything, but at least one other person is sufficiently aware of everything between the three of us. And I think that's been working well. I don't think we have any major gaps, save for the way that we're doing our mobile architecture that's largely managed by one of the developers on the team and a contractor that we're working with to help do a lot of the implementation. That's a known we chose to silo that thing. We've accepted the cost of that for now. And architecturally, the rest of us are aware of it, but we're not like in the Swift code writing anything because I don't know how to write Swift at this point. I'd love to learn it. I hear good things about the language. [12:26] So yeah, I think conceptually very similar to what you're describing of still want to have people be able to review. Like, I don't want to put up a PR and people be like, I don't know, that looks like code, I guess. I'm not sure what it does. Like, I want it to be very...I want us all to be roughly on the same page, and thus far, we are. As the team grows, that will become trickier to maintain because there are just inherently probably more things that are moving, more different feature areas and surface area that we're tackling in any given week, or there are different ways to approach that. I know you've talked about having a limited number of themes for a given cycle, so that's an idea that can pop up. But that's something that we'll figure out as we get further. I think I'm happy with where we're at right now, so yeah, that's the story there. STEPH: Okay, cool. Yeah, all of that resonates with me, and thinking about it a little more deeply in this moment, I'm realizing I think something you said helped me put this together where when I'm reviewing someone's change, I'm not necessarily just looking to see does your code work? I'm going to trust you that your code works. I may have thoughts about design and other things, but I really want to understand more what's the change to the product that we're making? What's the goal that we're looking to achieve? How are we measuring this? And so if I don't have that context, that's what contributes to that feeling of like, hard context switching of not just context switching, but now I have to level myself up to then understand the problem that's being solved by this. Versus had I known some of the themes going into that particular cycle or sprint, I would have felt far more prepared for that review session versus having to then dig through all the data and/or tickets or talk to someone. Well, switching back to what's going on in my world, I have a particular tweet that I want to share, and it's one that Joël Quenneville brought to my attention. And it just resonates so much with all the type of work that I'm doing right now. So I'm going to read the tweet, and then we'll link to it in the show notes as well. But it's from Curtis Einsmann, and Curtis wrote: "In software engineering, rabbit holes are inevitable. You will research libraries and not use them. You'll write code just to delete it. This isn't a waste; sometimes, you need to go down a few wrong paths to get to the right one." And that describes all the work that I'm doing right now. It's a lot of exploratory, a lot of data-driven work, and finding ways that we can reduce the time that it takes to run RSpec on CI. And it also ties in nicely to one of the things that I think we talked about last week, where we discovered that a number of files have a high runtime variance. And I've really dug into the data there to understand, okay, is it always specific files that have these high runtime variants? Are there any obvious contributions to what's causing this? Are we making real network calls that then could sometimes take a long time to return? And the result is there's nothing obvious. They're giant files. The number of SQL commands that are being run for each file varies drastically. They're all high, but it's still very different. There's no single fact about these files that has really been like, yes, this is what's causing these files to have such a runtime variance. And so while I've been in the data, I'm documenting it, and I'm making a list and putting it all together in a ticket so at least it's there to look at later. But I'm going to move on. It's one of those I would love to know what's causing this. I would love to address it because it would put us in an ideal state for how we're distributing tests, which would have a significant impact on our runtime. But it also feels a little bit like chasing my tail because I'm worried, like with some of the other experiments that we've done in the past where we've addressed tentpoles, that as soon as you address the issue for one or two files, then other files start having the same problem. And you're just going to continue to chase and chase, and I don't want to be in that. So upfront, this was one of those; hey, let's look at the data. If there's something obvious, let's address it; if not, move on. So I'm at that point today where I'm wrapping up all of that data, and then I'm going to move on, move on to the next thing. CHRIS: There's deep truth in that tweet that you shared at the start of this segment. The idea like if we knew the work that we had to do at the front, yeah, we would just do that, but often, we don't. And so, being able to not treat it as a failure when something doesn't work out is, I think, so critical. I think to expand on the idea just a tiny bit, the idea of the scientific method, failure is totally an option and is part of science. I remember watching MythBusters, and Adam Savage is just kind of like, "Failure is always an option," and highlighting that as part of it. Like, it's an outcome. You've learned something. You have a new data point. You can take that and then carry it forward with you. But it's rough in the moment. And so, I do think that this is a worthwhile thing to meditate on. And it's something that I've had to revisit a handful of times in my career of just like, man, I feel like I've just been spinning my tires all week. I'm like, we know what we want to get done, but just each approach I take isn't working for one reason or another. And then, finally, you get to the end. And then you've got this paragraph-long summary of all the things that didn't work in your PR and one-line change sort of thing. And those are painful, but they're part of the game. Like, that is unavoidable. I have not found a way to just know how to do the work upfront always. I would love that. I would sign up for whatever seminar was selling that. I wouldn't. I would know that that seminar is a lie, actually. But broadly, I'm intrigued by the idea if someone were selling that, I'd be like, well, I mean, pitch me on it. Tell me why I should believe you; I don't, just to be clear. But yeah. STEPH: This project has really helped me embrace always setting a goal or a question upfront about what I'm wanting to achieve or what I'm looking to answer because a number of times while Joël and I have been spelunking through data...And then so originally, with the saga, we started out with why doesn't our math match reality? We understand that if these tests are distributed perfectly across the CPUs, then that should cut the runtime in half. But yet, we weren't seeing that even though we had addressed the tentpoles. So we dug into understanding why. And the answer is because they're not perfectly distributed, and it's because of the runtime variance. And that was a critical moment to look back and say, "Did we achieve the goal?" Yes, we identified the problem. But once you see a problem, it's just so easy to dig in and keep going. It's like, well, now I want to know what's causing these files to have a runtime variance. But it's one of those we achieved our goal. We acknowledged upfront that we wanted to at least understand why. Let's make a second decision, do we keep going? And I'm at that point where, frankly, I probably dug in a little more than I should because I'm stubborn. But I'm recognizing that now's the time to back away and then go back and move on to the next high-priority item, which is converting for funsies; I'll share. The next thing is converting Test::Unit test over to RSpec because we have, I think, around 25 tests that are written in Test::Unit. And we want to move them over to RSpec because that particular just step in the build process takes a good three to four minutes. And part of that is just booting up Rails and then running the tests very fast. And we're underutilizing the machine that's running them because it's only 25 tests, but there are 86 CPUs to run it. So we'd really like to combine those 25 tests with the rest of the RSpec suite and drop that step. So then that should add minimal time to the overall build but then should take us down at least a couple of minutes. And then also makes it easier to manage and help folks so that way, there's one consistent testing framework that's in use versus having to manage some of these older tests. CHRIS: It's funny; I think it was just two episodes back where we talked about why RSpec, and I think both of us were just like, well yeah. But I mean, if there are tests and another, like, it's fine, you just leave them with the exception that if there's like 2% of our tests are in Test::Unit, and everything else is in RSpec, yeah, maybe that that conversion efforts seem totally worth it. But again, I think as you're describing that, what I'm hearing is just like the scientific method, just being somewhat structured in the approach to what's the hypothesis? And what's the procedure we're going to use to determine if that hypothesis is true or false? And then what do we do? And then what are the results? And then you just do that on loop. But being not just sort of exploring. Sometimes you have to be on exploratory mode. But I definitely find that that tiny bit of rigor of just like, wait, okay, before I actually do anything, what do I think is going on here? What's my guess? And then, okay, if that guess were true, what would I be able to observe in the world? Okay, here we go. And just that tiny bit of structure is so...it sometimes feels highly formal to go into that mode and be like, no, no, no, let me take a step back. Let me write down my thoughts. I'm going to have a little checklist and do the thing. But I've never regretted doing it. I will say that. I have deeply regretted not doing it. I feel like I should make a list of things that fit that structure. I've never regretted committing in Git ever. That's been great. I've always been able to unwind it, but I've never been able to not unwind it or the opposite. I've regretted not committing. I have not regretted committing. I have regretted not writing out my hypothesis or approach. I have not regretted doing it. And so, yeah, this feels like it falls firmly in that category of like, it's worth just a tiny bit of structure. There's a reason it is the scientific method. STEPH: Yeah, I agree. I've not regretted documenting upfront what it is I look to achieve and how I think I'm going to answer the question. That has been immensely helpful. Because then I also forget, like, two weeks ago, I'll be like, wasn't there a question around why this was happening, and I need to understand? And all of that was so context-heavy that as soon as I'm out of the thick of it, I completely forget it. So if I care about it deeply or if I want to be able to revisit it, then I need to document it for myself. It's given me a lot of empathy for people who do more scientific research around, oh my gosh, like, you have to document everything you do and then still be able to prove it five years from now or however long. I'm just throwing out numbers. And it needs to be organized enough that someone, if they do question your research that, then you have it there. My research documents would not withstand scrutiny at this point because they are still just more personal notes. But yes, it's given me a lot of empathy and respect for people who do run very serious research, experiments, and trials, and then have to be able to prove it to the world. Pivoting just a bit, there's a particular topic that resonated with both you and I; in fact, it's a particular tweet. And, Louie, I do apologize if I mispronounce your last name, but Louie Bacaj. And we'll include a link in the show notes to the tweet, but Louis shared, "I managed multiple engineering teams before quitting tech. Now that I quit, I can speak freely. Here are 12 things your manager may not be telling you, but I know for a fact will help you." So there are a number of interesting discussions and comments that are in this thread. The one thing in particular that really caught my attention is number 10, and it's "Advocate for junior developers." So they said that their friend reminded them that just because you don't have 10-plus years of experience does not mean that they won't be good. Without junior engineers on the team, no one will grow. Help others grow; you'll grow too. And that's the part that I love so much is that without junior engineers on the team, no one will grow because that was very thought-provoking for me. It's something that I find that I agree with deeply, but I hadn't really considered why I agree with that so much. So I'm excited to dive into that topic with you. And then, as a second topic to go along with that is, can juniors start with a remote team? I think that's one of the other questions when you and I were chatting about this. And I'm intrigued to hear your thoughts. CHRIS: A bunch of stuff there. Starting with the tweet, I love elements of this. Some of it feels like it's intentionally somewhat provocative. So like, without junior engineers on the team, no one will grow. That feels maybe a little bit past the bar because I think we can technically grow, and we can build things and whatnot. But I think what feels deeply true to me is truly help others grow; you'll grow too. The act of mentoring, of guiding, of training, of helping someone on their journey will inherently help you grow and, I think, change the way that you think about the work. I think the beginner mind, the earlier in the career folks coming into a codebase, they will see things fundamentally differently in a really useful way. It's possible that along your career, you've just internalized things. You've been like, yeah, no, that was weird. But then I smashed my head against it for a while, and now I understand this thing. And it just makes sense to me. But it's like, that thing actually doesn't make sense. You have warped your mind to match the thing, not, quote, unquote, "come to understand it." This is sounding too judgmental to people who've been in the industry for a while, but I found this of myself. Or I can just take for granted things that took a long time to adapt my head to, and if anything, maybe I should have pushed back a little more. And so, I find that junior engineers can be a really fantastic lens for the complexity of a project. Like, the world is truly a complex place, and that's just true. But our job as software engineers is to tame that complexity and manage it. And so, I love the mindset that can come or the conversations that can come out of that. And it's much like test-driven development is a pressure on the complexity of your code, having junior engineers join the team and needing to explain how all of the different features work, and what the overall architecture is, and the message passing under this and that, it's a really useful conversation to have. And so that "Help others grow; you'll grow too" feels deeply, deeply true to me. STEPH: Yeah, I couldn't agree more in regards to how juniors really help our team and especially, as you mentioned, with complexity and ¬having those conversations. Some of the other things that have come to mind for me as well around the importance of having junior developers on your team...and maybe it's not specifically they're junior developers but that you just have a variety of experience on your team. It's going to help you lean into a culture of learning because you have people that are at different stages of their career. And so you want an environment where people can learn together, that they can fail together, and they can be public about it. And having people that are at different stages of their career will lead, well, at least ideally, it'll lead to more pair programming. It's going to lead to more productive code reviews because then people can ask more questions around why did you choose this, or why are you doing that? Versus if everybody is at the same level, then they may just intuitively have reasons that they think someone did something. But it takes someone that's a bit new to say, "Hey, why did you choose this?" or to bring up some other ideas or ways that they could pursue it. They may bring in new ideas for, like, why has the team always done something this way? Let's think about new ways that we could do this. Or maybe this is really unfriendly, the way that we're doing this, not just for junior people but for people that are new to the team. And then there's typically less knowledge siloing because then you're going to want to pair the newer folks with the more experienced folks. So that way, you don't have this more senior developer who's then off in a corner working by themselves. And it's going to improve your communication skills. There's just...I realized I'm just rambling because I feel like there are so many benefits that go along with having a variety of people on your team, especially in terms of experience. And that just leads to such a better learning environment and, ultimately, better software and better products. And yet, I find that so many companies won't embrace people that are newer to software. They always want the senior developers. They want the 10x-er or whatever those are. They want the people that have many, many years of experience. And there's so much value that comes from mentoring the next group of developers. And it's incredibly frustrating to me that one, companies often aren't open to it. But honestly, more than that, as long as you're upfront and honest about like, hey, this is the team that we need right now to build what we're looking to build, I can get past that; I can understand that. But please don't then mislead people and say that you're a junior-friendly team, and then not be prepared. I feel like some teams will go so far as to say, "Yes, we are junior-friendly," and they may even tweak their interview process to where it is a bit more junior-friendly. But then, by the time that person joins the team, they're really not prepared. They don't have an onboarding plan. They don't have a mentorship plan. And then they fail that person because that person has worked hard to get there. And they've worked hard to bring that person onto the team, but then they don't have a plan from there. And I've seen it too many times. And it just frustrates me so much because it puts that junior person in such a vulnerable state where they really have to be an incredible self-advocate to then overcome those hurdles from a lack of preparation on that company's part. Okay, I think that's my event. I'm sure I could vent about this a lot more, but I will cut it off there. That's the heart of it. CHRIS: I do think, like, with anything else, it's something that we have to be intentional about. And so what you're saying of like, yeah, we're a junior-friendly company, but then you're just hiring folks, trying to find folks that may work at a slightly lower pay grade, and that's what that means to you. So like, no, no, that's not what this is. This needs to be something different. We need to have a structure and an organization that can support folks at different points in their career. But it's interesting to me to think about the sort of why of it. And the earlier part of this conversation, we talked about some of the benefits that can come organizationally from it, and I do sincerely believe in that. But I also believe that it is fundamentally one of the best ways to find really talented people early on in their career and be in a position to hire them where maybe later on in their career, that just wouldn't happen naturally. And I've seen this play out in a number of organizations. I went to Northeastern University for my college, and Northeastern is famous for the co-op program. Northeastern sounds really fancy. Now I learned that they have like a 7% acceptance rate for college applications right now, which is wildly low. When I went to Northeastern, it was not so fancy. So just in case anyone's hearing that and they're like, "Oh, Northeastern, wow." I'm not that fancy. [laughs] But they did have the co-op then, and they still have it now. And the co-op really is a differentiating thing. You do three six-month rotations. And it is this fundamental differentiator in terms of when you're graduating. Particularly, I was in mechanical engineering. I came out, and I actually knew what that meant in the world. And I'd used Outlook, and I knew what a water cooler was and how to talk near one because that's a critical thing to learn in the world. And really transformative experience for me. But also, a thing that I observed was many of my friends ended up working at companies that they had co-opted for. I'm one of those people. I would say more than 50% of my friends ended up with a position at a company that they had done a co-op rotation with. And it really worked out fantastically. That organization and the individual got to try things out, experience. And then, I ended up staying at that company for a number of years, and it was a wonderful experience. But I don't know that I would have ended up there otherwise. That's not necessarily the way that would have played out. And similarly like, thoughtbot has the apprenticeship. And I have seen so many wonderful developers start at that very early point in their career. And there was this wonderful structure around them joining the thoughtbot team, intentional, structured, supported. And then those folks went on to be some of the most talented developers that I've ever worked with at a wonderfully talented organization. And so the story of like, you should do this, organizations. This is a thing that you should invest in for yourself, not just for the individual, like, for both. Everybody wins in this case, in my mind. I will say, though, in terms of transparency, I currently manage a team of three developers. And we hired very intentionally for senior folks this early on in where we're at. And that was an intentional choice because I do believe that if you're going to be hiring more junior developers, that needs to be something that you do very intentionally, that you have a support structure in place, that you're able to invest the time in where they're at and make sure we have sort of... I think a larger team makes more sense to bring juniors into broadly. That's the thing that I'm saying out loud that I'm like, I should push on that a little bit. Is that true? Do I really believe that? But I think so, my actions obviously point to it. But it is an interesting trade-off space of how do you think about that? My hope is that as we grow as an organization, that we would then very intentionally start hiring folks in a more junior, mid-level to junior and be very intentional about how we support them, bring them into the organization, et cetera. I do believe it is a win-win situation for everyone when done with intention and with focus. STEPH: That's such an interesting bit that you just said because I very much appreciate when companies recognize do we have the bandwidth to support someone that's more junior? Because at thoughtbot, we go through periods where we don't have our apprenticeship that's open because we recognize we're not in a place that we can support someone. And we don't want to bring someone in unless we can help them be successful. I very much admire that and appreciate that about companies when they can perform that self-assessment. I am so intrigued. You'd mentioned being a smaller team. So you more intentionally hire senior developers. And I think that also makes sense because then you need to build up who's going to be in that mentorship pool? Because then people could leave, people could take vacations, and so then you need to have that support system in place. But yeah, I don't know what that then perfect balance is. It's like, okay, so then as soon as you have like five people available to mentor or interested in mentorship, it's like, then do you start bringing in the conversation of like, let's bring in someone that we can help build up and help them be successful and join our team? And I don't know what that magical number is. I do think it's important for teams to reflect to say, "Can we take on someone that's junior?" All the benefits of having someone that's junior. And then just being very honest and then having a plan for once that junior person does arrive. What does their career path look like while they've joined that team, and who's going to be that person that's going to help them level up? So not only make that choice upfront of yes, we are bringing someone on but let's also think about like the first six months of their work here at the company and what that's going to look like. It feels like an important step that a lot of companies fail to do. And I think that's why there are so many articles that then are like, hey, if you're a junior dev, here's all the things that you should do to be the best junior dev. That's fabulous. And we're constantly shoring up junior devs to be like, hey, here's all the things that you need to be great at. But we don't have as many conversations around; hey, here's all the things that your manager or the rest of your team should be great at to then support you equally as you are also doing your best to meet them. Like, they need to meet you halfway. And I'm not completely unsympathetic to the plight; I understand. It's often where I've seen with teams the more senior developers that have very strong mentorship communication skills are then also the teammates that get pulled into all the meetings and all the different projects, so then they are less available to be that mentor. And then that's how this often fails. So I don't think anybody is going into this intentionally, but yet, it's what happens for when someone is new and joining a team, and it hasn't been determined the next six months what that person's onboarding and career path looks like. Circling back just a bit, there's the question around, can juniors start with a remote team? I can go first. And I'm going to say unequivocally yes. There's no reason a junior can't start with a remote team. Because all the things that I feel strongly about come down to how is your team going to plan for this person? And how are they going to support this person? And all the benefits that you get from being in an office with a team, I think those do exist. And frankly, for someone like myself, it can be easier to establish a bond with someone that you get to see each day, get to see in person. You can walk up to their desk and can say, "Hey, I've got a question for you." But I think all those benefits just need to be transferred into a remote-friendly way. So I think it does ratchet up how intentional you have to be with your team and then onboarding a junior