Podcast appearances and mentions of scott detrow

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Best podcasts about scott detrow

Latest podcast episodes about scott detrow

The NPR Politics Podcast
Hear What A Facebook Insider Told Congress About How Its Apps Hurt Kids

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 14:19


Former Facebook product manager Frances Haugen told senators that the company knows its products harm children and stoke division, but that executives have continued to prioritize growth over safety.This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, congressional reporter Claudia Grisales, and tech correspondent Shannon Bond.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

The NPR Politics Podcast
Why Does Biden's China Policy Look So Much Like Trump's?

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 14:49


Biden's top trade official, Katherine Tai, indicated in a Monday speech that tariffs levied against China initiated during the Trump administration would remain in place. The countries have been unable to work out key economic and political disagreements.This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, White House correspondent Asma Khalid, and international correspondent John Ruwitch.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

The NPR Politics Podcast
With Biden's Legacy Teetering, Democrats Struggle To Overcome Divisions

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 13:48


Democratic Party discord threatens what amounts to nearly all of President Biden's domestic agenda, from childcare to climate. Compounding the challenge: looming government funding and debt deadlines.This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, acting congressional correspondent Deirdre Walsh, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

The NPR Politics Podcast
Weekly Roundup: September 17th

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 26:53


Saturday's "Justice For J6" rally is being held to protest government treatment of people who participated in the riot. It could serve as a test of how the Capitol Police force has evolved since January's attack.And congressional testimony by prominent U.S. gymnasts about the Federal Bureau of Investigation's handling of their sexual abuse allegations raises major questions about the organization's culture and accountability apparatus.This episode: White House reporter Scott Detrow, congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, congressional reporter Claudia Grisales, and national justice correspondent Carrie Johnson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

The NPR Politics Podcast
With Big Plans And Small Margins, Can Democrats Pull Off Their Agenda?

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 14:32


Progressives feel as though their job compromising on the $3.5 trillion dollar budget bill is done, while Sens. Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema say the package is still too big. Looming over it all, a chance the federal government defaults on its debt as Republicans signal they won't cooperate on raising or suspending the debt ceiling. This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, and acting congressional correspondent Deirdre Walsh. Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

The NPR Politics Podcast
Here Are The Tough Questions Congress Asked About Biden's Afghanistan Withdrawal

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 14:21


Secretary of State Antony Blinken appeared before both the House and the Senate this week, where he met with bipartisan frustration over the hasty withdrawal from Afghanistan after the country's government fell to the Taliban.This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, national political correspondent Mara Liasson, and diplomatic correspondent Michele Keleman.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

The NPR Politics Podcast
Listen: How The Country Remembered 9/11, Two Decades Later

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 15:46


There were remembrance ceremonies in New York City, Pennsylvania, and at the Pentagon. The reading of the victim's names — there were nearly 3,000 — took hours. Former President George W. Bush and Vice President Harris spoke. And, our reporters discuss the political legacy of the attacks after two decades.This episode: White House correspondent Asma Khalid, White House correspondent Scott Detrow, and senior editor and correspondent Ron Elving.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

The Pulse
The Lessons of 9/11

The Pulse

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 60:48


The passing of 20 years since the 9/11 terror attacks has meant that some of the wounds cut by that day have closed — others have not. Thousands of families lost loved ones in the attacks, and their grief became part of a national tragedy. Many more have since gotten sick or even died from illnesses related to exposure to dust and debris. The attacks changed how we think about the long-lasting impact of environmental hazards, what we know about grief and trauma, and how we build. On this episode, we explore some of the lasting effects of the 9/11 attacks, and what we've learned from them. Also heard on this week’s episode: When we think of who suffered the greatest health effects of 9/11, most of us think of first responders — the brave police officers, firemen, and volunteers who risked their lives rushing into Ground Zero. In the years since, many of those first responders have become sick and died from illnesses related to the toxic dust and debris. Stories of their heroism and sacrifice helped fuel the creation of a victims' compensation fund to help with medical costs. But as it turns out, first responders weren't the only ones affected — scores of others in Lower Manhattan have also suffered consequences, ranging from cancer to autoimmune diseases. Alan Yu reports on their fight for recognition — and access to government help. Trauma can change our bodies and minds, and those changes can even be passed on to the next generation. Columbia University neuroscientist Bianca Jones Marlin is trying to figure out what is passed on, and how. Journalist Tim Lambert's professional life became intertwined with the story of Flight 93, the hijacked plane that crashed in a Pennsylvania field after passengers and crew attempted to take back control. His family owned part of the land where Flight 93 crashed before it became a national memorial. He joins us to discuss his connection to the land and to the family members of Flight 93, and how they have grieved over the years. Lambert and NPR reporter Scott Detrow have produced an audio documentary for the 20th anniversary called Sacred Ground.

Up First
Sacred Ground: A 9/11 Story

Up First

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2021 55:48


On September 11, 2001, United Flight 93 was hijacked by four Al Qaeda terrorists. The passengers and crew fought back and because of that, the plane crashed outside of Shanksville, Pa., instead of its likely target: the U.S. Capitol.Part of the plane crashed onto land owned by Tim Lambert, a public radio reporter at WITF in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. The crash would end up connecting Tim, in surprising ways, to the first responders who managed the aftermath and to the families of the people who died on board. He gained access and insight into 9/11 that no other reporter had.20 years after Flight 93's crash, Lambert and NPR's Scott Detrow tell the story of Flight 93: what happened that day and what happened over the years to come.Warning: this episode contains explicit language and content some listeners may find disturbing.

The NPR Politics Podcast
Sacred Ground: A 9/11 Story

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 56:09


On September 11, 2001, United Flight 93 was hijacked by four Al Qaeda terrorists. The passengers and crew fought back and because of that, the plane crashed outside of Shanksville, Pa., instead of its likely target: the U.S. Capitol.Part of the plane crashed onto land owned by Tim Lambert, a public radio reporter at WITF in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. The crash would end up connecting Tim, in surprising ways, to the first responders who managed the aftermath and to the families of the people who died on board. He gained access and insight into 9/11 that no other reporter had.20 years after Flight 93's crash, Lambert and NPR's Scott Detrow tell the story of Flight 93: what happened that day and what happened over the years to come.Warning: this episode contains explicit language and content some listeners may find disturbing. Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

The NPR Politics Podcast
For Now, 73 Percent Of Americans Support Allowing Afghan Refugees Resettle in U.S.

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 13:25


President Joe Biden's approval rating has dropped to a new low, 43 percent, according to a new poll from NPR, PBS NewsHour, and Marist College. Americans are split about what should have happened in Afghanistan, but a large majority label the U.S. role in the country a "failure."The poll found that a historically large majority of Americans approve of resettling Afghan refugees in the United States, but that number could decline as the political fight heats up.This episode: White House correspondent Asma Khalid, White House correspondent Scott Detrow, and senior political editor and correspondent Ron Elving.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

The NPR Politics Podcast
After Two Decades And More Than A 150,000 Dead, America Has Left Afghanistan

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 16:00


The withdrawal effort managed to evacuate 124,000 people before the last U.S. service member left Afghanistan on Monday, ending nearly two-decades of American military presence in the country after the September 11th attacks.Tuesday at the White House, President Biden fervently defended his decision not to "extend the forever war," though touted America's remote warfare capabilities and told terror group ISIS-K: "We're not done with you yet."This episode: White House correspondent Asma Khalid, White House correspondent Scott Detrow, Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

The NPR Politics Podcast
Weekly Roundup: August 27th

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 25:54


President Biden has warned there could be more violence coming over the weekend in Afghanistan. Yesterday's attack at Kabul's airport could be a preview of the disarray that could be in store for the country after the U.S. finally exits. And: it is still unclear where tens of thousands of evacuated Afghans will be allowed to resettle.Also, voting rights activists will take to the streets across the country this weekend to pressure President Biden and congressional Democrats to take aggressive action on voting rights. The protests come as Republican-controlled state legislatures continue to pass measures that advocates say make it harder to vote.This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, national security correspondent Greg Myre, and politics and racial justice correspondent Juana Summers.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

The NPR Politics Podcast
Tens of Thousands Evacuated⁠—And Many Thousands More To Go

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 14:01


The U.S. has only a few more days to evacuate as many as 1,500 Americans and many thousands of Afghans before the Tuesday deadline set in negotiations with the Taliban. Staying longer, U.S. officials say, risks violence. Now, attention has begun to turn to what comes next: how and where to resettle the scores who have fled.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Scott Detrow, and national security correspondent Greg Myre.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

The NPR Politics Podcast
Why Didn't Biden Start Evacuating Americans Sooner? We Asked Him.

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 29:25


President Biden spoke about the situation in Afghanistan again Friday, emphasizing his commitment to evacuating all Americans and Afghan allies after the Taliban's swift takeover. NPR's Scott Detrow asked him why these evacuations didn't begin months ago when the U.S. still had more control in the country.And as COVID cases continue to rise, many school administrators are implementing mask mandates for teachers and students despite orders in some states that prohibit the rules. The Biden administration said this week that ensuring a safe learning environment for students is a civil rights issue.This episode: congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, White House correspondent Scott Detrow, White House correspondent Ayesha Rascoe, and education reporter Clare Lombardo.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

The NPR Politics Podcast
Most Kids Still Can't Get The Vaccine. They Represent 18% Of New Cases.

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 14:24


Hospitals across the country are nearing capacity as they struggle to treat unvaccinated Americans. Children represent eighteen percent of all new cases, as parents and pediatricians push to get those under twelve access to the vaccine as schools begin to reopen.This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, and health correspondent Allison Aubrey.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

The NPR Politics Podcast
Weekly Roundup: August 8th

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 25:53


The unemployment rate dropped to 5.4% in July — a low for the pandemic. Nearly a million new jobs were added to the economy — although restaurants and factories are still hurting for workers. Covid cases continued to rise, too. We take a look at the two ends of the response spectrum: New York City's vaccine mandate and Florida's free-for-all.This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, White House correspondent Asma Khalid, chief economics correspondent Scott Horsley, national correspondent Greg Allen, and national correspondent Jasmine Garsd.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

The NPR Politics Podcast
Prices Are Rising. Who's To Blame?

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 14:31


People agree: prices are up on everything from gasoline to used cars. But both experts and voters disagree on the cause and whether inflation is here to stay. That uncertainty makes the economy a potent messaging tool ahead of the 2022 race for control of Congress. This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow and White House correspondent Asma Khalid.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

The NPR Politics Podcast
Biden Said He Couldn't Stop Evictions. Then He Did.

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 13:58


Gene Sperling oversees the White House's rollout of COVID relief. On Monday, he told reporters that President Biden had "quadruple-checked" whether he had the legal grounds to extend the eviction moratorium unilaterally but said ultimately the president's hands were tied by a Supreme Court ruling that blocked the administration from extending its past moratorium beyond the end of July. Yesterday, the administration extended the renter protections anyway. And, the U.S. continues the hard task of global vaccine distribution.This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

The NPR Politics Podcast
Light Summer Reading? The 2,702-Page Infrastructure Deal Just Dropped.

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 13:11


A vote on the trillion-dollar proposal is expected as soon as Thursday. Also, President Biden has been denying tens of thousands of migrants asylum proceedings, citing public health fears. After months of stagnant negotiations, immigration and civil rights groups are taking the White House to court.This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, congressional reporter Claudia Grisales, national political correspondent Mara Liasson, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

The NPR Politics Podcast
Sixty-Six Percent Of Alabamians Still Need The Shot. Can Tommy Tuberville Help?

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 14:05


The White House says it is "following the science" on masks after the CDC issued new guidance, but some experts say they're falling short on the social science: how to convince the remaining 40 percent of American adults to get vaccinated.Alabama has the lowest vaccination rate in the nation and residents there aren't likely to listen to President Biden. Can football coach-turned-Senator Tommy Tuberville convince the rest of the state to get inoculated?This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, national correspondent Debbie Elliott, and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

The NPR Politics Podcast
Some 6300 New Migrants Arrived At The Southern Border Every Day Of June

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 12:07


Customs and Border Protection reported encounters with 188,829 migrants and asylum-seekers at the U.S. southern border last month, the highest level in a generation. The Biden administration has struggled with how to respond.This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

The NPR Politics Podcast
Weekly Roundup: July 23rd

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 26:40


A hearing next week featuring testimony by Capitol Police officers will be held without any members nominated by Republicans. Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy is boycotting the process after the House's top Democrat Nancy Pelosi vetoed some of the members he selected to serve.And the rate of violent crime is sharply up in some cities across the United States. There are no simple answers about what's driving the increase, but it it is certain to be a central issue in the Republican effort to retake majorities in Congress next year.This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, congressional reporter Claudia Grisales, and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

The NPR Politics Podcast
The First $1.2 Trillion Infrastructure Deal Vote Failed. It Doesn't Really Matter.

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 13:53


A group of 21 senators from both parties but out a statement that they're close to a deal and another vote is expected as soon as Monday.And an Ohio Democratic primary race to replace Biden official Marica Fudge in the House of Representatives is getting a lot of national attention, including from this podcast.This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, congressional correspondent Susan Davis, and demographics and culture correspondent Danielle Kurtzleben.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

The NPR Politics Podcast
What Does Federal Court Ruling Mean For DACA Program?

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 14:49


President Joe Biden's primary policy initiatives, his trillion-dollar infrastructure and economic plans, face their first test in the Senate this week. And does a federal court ruling limiting the Deferred Action For Childhood Arrivals program, known as DACA, increase the urgency around immigration in Congress?This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, congressional reporter Susan Davis, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

The NPR Politics Podcast
Weekly Roundup: July 16th

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2021 27:01


Voting rights activists feel that they have done the work of energizing and organizing voters to care about the issue. Now, they want President Biden to step up the pressure on Congress from the bully pulpit. And Hunter Biden's art sales will be anonymous, which the White House is calling an ethics win. Good governance experts aren't buying it. This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, political correspondent Juana Summers, and senior political editor and correspondent Ron Elving.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

The NPR Politics Podcast
We Asked Vice President Kamala Harris If She's Pushing Senate To Change Filibuster

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2021 16:31


Take our survey: npr.org/podcastsurveyVice President Harris talked to NPR's Asma Khalid about the administration's path forward on their voting rights agenda given the major roadblock in the Senate: some Democrats in the chamber are unwilling to change the filibuster, a rules quirk that forces a sixty-to-forty majority to pass most legislation.And many Democrats from the Texas statehouse have come to Washington D.C. to meet with federal lawmakers, fleeing their own state in a procedural stunt to stall a suite of voting restrictions proposed by Republicans there.This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, White House correspondent Asma Khalid, and KUT reporter Ashley Lopez.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

The NPR Politics Podcast
Weekly Roundup: July 9th

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2021 26:08


President Biden gave a defensive speech Thursday updating the American public on his plan for withdrawal from Afghanistan. He said that the United States accomplished its mission in Afghanistan, though his administration acknowledged earlier in the day that the two-decade war "has not been won militarily" and that there are ongoing risks to the safety and prosperity of Afghans.Domestically, the White House is stalled on voting rights reforms: Democrats in Congress can't find a route around the filibuster and conservative courts have throttled historic enforcement options made possible by the Voting Rights Act. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, White House correspondent Scott Detrow, Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman, White House correspondent Ayesha Rascoe, and national justice correspondent Carrie Johnson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

The NPR Politics Podcast
The Supreme Court Avoids Ruling On Trans Rights, At Least For Now

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2021 14:14


The U.S. Supreme Court declined Monday to wade into a major controversy over the use of bathrooms by transgender students, delivering at least a temporary victory to the trans community. But legislation across the country point to a mounting court battle in the future. Plus, the Biden administration faces criticism from climate activists.This episode: Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg, and White House correspondent Scott Detrow.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

Consider This from NPR
Not Just Wildfire: The Growing Ripple Effects Of More Extreme Heat And Drought

Consider This from NPR

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2021 12:42


For the second weekend in a row, parts of the American West will be gripped by historic heat, coming in the second decade of megadrought that has gripped the region for 22 years.Wildfire is an obvious threat — but there are other consequences of extreme heat and drought, as smaller snowmelts and lower reservoirs lead to water cutbacks and more expensive electricity. And climate change is making it all worse. Colorado Public Radio's Michael Elizabeth Sakas reports on another consequence: what happens when there isn't enough water to build new homes. Kristina Dahl, senior climate scientist with the Union of Concerned Scientists, explains how extreme heat can affect the human body, Additional reporting in this episode: • Jordan Kern spoke to NPR's Scott Detrow about hydropower in the West. • Michael Elizabeth Sakas reported on western snowmelt. • NPR's Kirk Siegler reported on record high temperatures. • NPR's Lauren Sommer reported on dwindling water supplies. • NPR's Nathan Rott, Luke Runyon of KUNC in Colorado and Annie Ropeik of New Hampshire Public Radio discussed the growing consequences of heat and drought.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

The NPR Politics Podcast
"I Did What I Came To Do": President Biden Meets With Russia's Vladimir Putin

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2021 19:21


In Geneva, President Biden and Russia President Vladimir Putin met for hours. At separate news conferences Putin described the talks as "constructive" and Biden said he did what he came to do. Both leaders agreed to keep talking. This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, White House correspondent Ayesha Rascoe, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, and NPR's Moscow correspondent Lucian Kim.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

The NPR Politics Podcast
Vice President Harris, Texas Lawmakers Meet To Push Forward Voting Reform

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2021 14:51


Democrats on the Hill are meeting with Democratic state lawmakers from Texas to discuss federal legislation on voting rights, an issue that was recently added to the Vice President's list of priorities. But a couple of key moderate Democrats still stand in the way of nationwide reform. This episode: White House correspondents Scott Detrow and Ayesha Rascoe, and congressional correspondent Susan Davis.

The NPR Politics Podcast
In First Trip Abroad, Biden Tells Allies "America Is Back"

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2021 15:08


In the first overseas trip of his presidency, Biden is in Europe delivering a central message to allies: America is back. But while G-7 leaders agree on confronting the COVID-19 pandemic and climate change, they diverge on how hard to push China. Plus, will Biden's meeting with Vladimir Putin pave the way for a more predictable relationship with Russia?This episode: White House correspondents Scott Detrow, Tamara Keith and Franco Ordoñez.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

The NPR Politics Podcast
50 Years Of NPR's Political Coverage

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2021 28:12


This month NPR is celebrating its 50th anniversary, and to commemorate the moment we're looking back on the women who shaped how NPR has covered the biggest political stories. Linda Wertheimer, Nina Totenberg, and Mara Liasson built NPR's political coverage from the ground up and take us into the rooms where history was made.This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow and White House correspondent Ayesha Rascoe.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

The NPR Politics Podcast
Weekly Roundup: May 21st

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2021 29:43


The left flank of the Democratic party has exerted a lot of influence over the Biden administration on issues like climate change and economic strain. Will progressive sway Biden on Israel, too? And concerns over mental health could present a foothold for bipartisan regulation of big tech.This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, White House correspondent Asma Khalid, senior political editor and correspondent Ron Elving, and political reporter Miles Parks.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

The NPR Politics Podcast
Are Expanded Unemployment Benefits Keeping People From Returning To Work?

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2021 14:58


Twenty-two Republican led states are planning to roll back expanded unemployment benefits, because they say the benefits are keeping people from returning to work. Progressives argue employers need to do a better job of incentivizing workers to return. We look at what's really going on.This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, White House correspondent Ayesha Rascoe, and chief economic correspondent Scott Horsley.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

Consider This from NPR
The Latest On Biden's Infrastructure Plan, With A Vision For A New 'Climate Corps'

Consider This from NPR

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2021 14:39


The White House is courting influential Democratic senators and making a public relations push for President Biden's infrastructure proposal, while Republicans draw a red line around corporate tax increases. Biden also spent part of this week test-driving Ford's new electric F-150 Lightning. But for all the talk of energy innovation and electric cars, one part of Biden's infrastructure plan is based on a pretty old idea — one from another era when millions of Americans were out of work. NPR's Scott Detrow and Nathan Rott report on Biden's proposal to revamp the nearly 100-year-old Civilian Conservation Corps — with a new focus on climate change. Read more from their reporting here. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

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Supreme Court Will Consider Guns And Abortion Before 2022 Election

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2021 15:10


The court, a 6-to-3 conservative majority, has increasingly filled the legislative role abdicated by a dysfunctional Congress. And as Republican leadership balks at a commission to investigate the January 6th insurrection, it is worth considering what role an official record of the event would play in civic life. This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, congressional correspondent Susan Davis, legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

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Biden Won Georgia And Arizona. Why Are Their Democratic Senators So Different?

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2021 14:39


The states both have long histories of Republican control, but the two pairs of senators have taken remarkably different tactics in Congress. Arizona's Mark Kelly and Kyrsten Sinema came to Washington by persuading the state's split-ticket voters and soft partisans, while Georgia's Jon Ossoff and Raphael Warnock won by exciting Democratic base voters.READ THE STORYThis episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, WABE reporter Emma Hurt, KJZZ reporter Ben Giles, and congressional editor Deirdre Walsh.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

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Biden Wants $10 Billion To Put Young People To Work On Environmental Projects

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2021 13:58


The president's Civilian Climate Corps proposal is a reboot of a New Deal era program that employed young men to build trails, parks, and other nature projects. While it is hard to say what will get through Congress, the initiative appears popular with a diverse set of voters.SEE PHOTOS OF NATE'S TRIPThis episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, White House correspondent Scott Detrow, and national correspondent Nate Rott.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

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World Leaders Convene (Virtually) For White House Climate Summit

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2021 14:23


Ahead of the meeting, the US announced its goal to halve emissions from 2005 levels by the end of this decade. It was one of a number of pledges announced by world leaders at Thursday's Earth Day summit.This episode: White House correspondent Ayesha Rascoe, White House correspondent Scott Detrow, and science correspondentConnect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station. Lauren Sommer.

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White House Climate Adviser Gina McCarthy On Summit

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2021 17:20


How will the US slash emissions by 2030? White House climate adviser Gina McCarthy talks to NPR's Scott Detrow ahead of this week's climate summit with world leaders.This episode: White House correspondents Ayesha Rascoe and Scott Detrow.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

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Americans Support An Expanded View Of "Infrastructure" But Not How To Pay For It

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2021 14:35


A new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll found that Americans generally support making things like broadband part of infrastructure, but they don't agree on how to pay for it. Plus, Republicans shift away from corporations to shore up their support from the white working class.This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, congressional correspondent Susan Davis, and senior editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

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White House Says It Will Meet Vaccine Goals Despite Pause In Johnson & Johnson Use

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2021 14:20


The Center for Disease Control and Prevention and the Food and Drug Administration recommended pausing the use of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine after six rare cases of blood clotting. The White House is emphasizing the condition is extremely uncommon, and it still plans to meet its goal of 200 million doses in President Biden's first 100 days in office. This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and health reporter Selena Simmons-Duffin.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

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John Boehner Thinks The Republican Party Has Changed. Has It?

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2021 14:47


In a new memoir, the former Republican House Speaker says that even Ronald Reagan couldn't get elected in today's GOP. He decries obstructionist tactics used by Republicans, while acknowledging his role in pioneering them.This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, congressional correspondent Susan Davis, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

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Activists Stoke Corporate Backlash To Voting Restrictions

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2021 14:23


States are facing pressure from corporations to dial back legislation that makes it harder to vote. Major League Baseball announced on Friday that it is relocating the All-Star Game from Atlanta in response to a new state law.This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro, KUT reporter Ashley Lopez, and WABE reporter Emil Moffatt.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

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Hunter Biden's Memoir Goes Long On Addiction, Short On Corporate Work

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2021 14:52


A new memoir details a harrowing struggle with addiction but mostly elides the past corporate and lobbying work that has raised political propriety questions. A federal investigation into Hunter Biden's taxes could still prove a headache for the president, though the younger Biden has denied wrongdoing and says he is cooperating fully with investigators. LISTEN: Hunter Biden's interview with Morning EditionThis episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Scott Detrow, and senior political editor and correspondent Ron Elving.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

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Weekly Roundup: April 2nd

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 2, 2021 29:06


President Biden announced his first judicial nominees this week, including one judge seen as a possible candidate for the Supreme Court. Biden's staff says the president sees filling judicial seats as a top priority, but will his picks make it through Congress?Plus, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez tells NPR that the size of Biden's $2 trillion infrastructure plan is "disappointing," but she and other progressive leaders see the proposal as evidence of the Green New Deal's influence on climate policy. This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, national justice correspondent Carrie Johnson, legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg, political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben and White House correspondent Scott Detrow. Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

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"It's Big" And "It's Bold": Biden Unveils Massive Infrastructure Plan

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2021 17:05


Both parties agree that the country's infrastructure needs a face lift, and today President Biden revealed a $2 trillion plan to address the problem. The package will address roads, bridges, high speed internet, climate change, and racial inequity, but to pay for it all Congress would need to rollback former President Trump's corporate tax cuts. This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, and White House correspondent Scott Detrow. Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.

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Migrant Children Advocates Say Biden Should Have Been Prepared For Arrivals

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2021 14:29


The reasons the Biden administration is housing some migrant children in adult detention facilities are complicated. The number of migrants arriving at the border is rising and includes many children traveling without their parents. Trump reduced the capacity of the shelter system and Biden, unlike the former president, is not immediately deporting unaccompanied minors. Still, advocates on both sides of the aisle are calling for improved conditions.And DC statehood is having its day in the sun, but the Senate filibuster stands between the city and its dreams of congressional representation.This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, national political correspondent Mara Liasson, and WAMU reporter Mikaela Lefrak.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.