Podcasts about professor emeritus

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Honorary title for professors who want to stay active in scholarship following retirement

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Best podcasts about professor emeritus

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Latest podcast episodes about professor emeritus

Millennials Are Killing Capitalism
"The Research Arm of the Movement" - Abdul Alkalimat on The History of Black Studies

Millennials Are Killing Capitalism

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 114:55


Abdul Alkalimat is a founder of the field of Black Studies and Professor Emeritus at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign. A lifelong scholar-activist with a PhD from the University of Chicago, he has lectured, taught and directed academic programs across the US, the Caribbean, Africa, Europe and China. His activism extends from having been chair of the Chicago chapter of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) in the 1960s, to a co-founder of the Black Radical Congress in 1998. This conversation is framed around his recent book The History of Black Studies. Alkalimat shares some of his background, and his experiences with the struggles for Black Studies in the 1960's. We also talk about his role in the founding of the Institute of the Black World. In discussing Black Studies, we ask Dr. Alkalimat about the ideological strains that make it up, the origins of it as an academic discipline, and what Black Studies looked like before it was allowed into the academy and how it continues to look outside of the academy. A focus in this conversation is a discussion about social movements and the type of knowledge that is examined within them and the type of knowledge that is produced by them. Within this, we get into discussion about the role of cadre development and mass political education in social movements, and the role that Alkalimat thinks Black Studies can and should still play for these struggles.  We close with some discussion of the work Dr. Alkalimat is currently doing with the Southern Workers Assembly to organize the South.  In the show notes, we'll include links to several of the resources Abdul Alkalimat talks about in the episode. Thank you again to all of the folks who continue to support us on patreon. If you want to support our work our greatest need right now is for patrons who support on a monthly basis, you can do that for as little as $1 a month. And if you don't want the monthly payment, you can also make a yearly contribution. You can find our patreon at patreon.com/millennialsarekillingcapitalism. Now here is our conversation with Abdul Alkalimat on The History of Black Studies. Links: The History of Black Studies The Future of Black Studies (forthcoming) Abdul Alkalimat's website & weekly listserv Southern Workers Assembly The Wall of Respect New Philadelphia  The cited conversation with Africa World Now Project

Scott Thompson Show
Remembering Donna Summer, pack your patience before you go to the airport, housing unaffordability in Ontario and more

Scott Thompson Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 73:14


The Hamilton Today Podcast with Scott Thompson Donna Summer passed away 10 years ago yesterday and Scott brings in Eric Alper to remember her impact on disco and the greater music scene as well as remembering the disco era and the outsized backlash of the time. A vigil will be held tonight out front of Hamilton City Hall to show support and remembrance for the victims of Russia's war in Ukraine. Scott speaks to Mary Holadyk, VP of Hamilton's Branch of the Ukrainian Canadian Congress. Housing affordability in Ontario is shot. A new report by Generation Squeeze found that with current home prices, a new homebuyer would have to work full-time for nearly 22 years to save up enough money for a 20 per cent down payment on a home — up from 15 years in late 2019. Barry Choi talks to Scott about the extensive wait times at Canadian airports, Elections Ontario gives Scott an update on advance polling for the provincial election, we get more on Finland and Sweden joining NATO and it is all coming up on the Hamilton Today Podcast. Guests: Ian Lee, Associate Professor with the Sprott School of Business at Carleton University. Paul Delaney, Professor Emeritus, Astronomy, York University, Toronto Eric Alper, Publicist and music commentator. Barry Choi, Personal Finance & Travel Expert. Aurel Braun, Professor of International Relations and a Senior Member of the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto. Colin D'Mello, Queen's Park Bureau Chief, Global News. Mary Holadyk is the vice president of the Ukrainian Canadian Congress -- Hamilton Branch Dr. Paul Kershaw, an associate professor at the University of British Columbia and the founder of Generation Squeeze. Jo Langham, Manger of Media & Public Engagement with Elections Ontario. Host - Scott Thompson Content Producer – William Erskine Technical/Podcast Producer - William Webber Podcast Co-Producer - Ben Straughan News Anchors – Diana Weeks, Dave Woodard Want to keep up with what happened in Hamilton Today? Subscribe to the podcast! https://omny.fm/shows/scott-thompson-show See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

CHED Afternoon News
Researchers have found an important discovery to combat Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

CHED Afternoon News

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 9:52


Guest: Dr. Ian Mitchell - Paediatric Respirologist at Alberta Children's Hospital & Clinical Professor, Professor Emeritus of Paediatrics at the University of Calgary.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Point of View Radio Talk Show
Point of View May 16, 2022 : Dr. Mark Bauerlein

Point of View Radio Talk Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022


Monday, May 16, 2022 On Point of View today, Kerby is joined by Dr. Mark Bauerlein, author of the new book, The Dumbest Generation Grows Up. A nationally renowned writer and social critic, Mark Bauerlein is an Editor at First Things and Professor Emeritus of English at Emory University. In the second hour, Kerby brings […]

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
5/13/22 John Quigley on the Russian Enclaves of Eastern Europe

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 30:58


Download Episode. Scott talks with John Quigley about Crimea, the Donbas and other regions in Eastern Europe with heavy ties to Russia. In the mid-90s, Quigley was tasked with leading talks between the new Ukrainian government and the people of Crimea and the Donbas who saw themselves as Russian. Scott and Quigley go through the history of these regions and examine the issues with today's Eastern European borders.   Discussed on the show: “I led talks on Donbas and Crimea in the 90s. Here's how the war should end” (Responsible Statecraft) John Quigley was CSCE expert on Crimea 1994-95. A specialist in international law, he is Professor Emeritus at the Moritz College of Law, The Ohio State University. This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: The War State and Why The Vietnam War?, by Mike Swanson; Tom Woods' Liberty Classroom; ExpandDesigns.com/Scott; EasyShip; Free Range Feeder; Thc Hemp Spot; Green Mill Supercritical; Bug-A-Salt and Listen and Think Audio. Shop Libertarian Institute merch or donate to the show through Patreon, PayPal or Bitcoin: 1DZBZNJrxUhQhEzgDh7k8JXHXRjYu5tZiG.

Scott Horton Show - Just the Interviews
5/13/22 John Quigley on the Russian Enclaves of Eastern Europe

Scott Horton Show - Just the Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 32:27


Scott talks with John Quigley about Crimea, the Donbas and other regions in Eastern Europe with heavy ties to Russia. In the mid-90s, Quigley was tasked with leading talks between the new Ukrainian government and the people of Crimea and the Donbas who saw themselves as Russian. Scott and Quigley go through the history of these regions and examine the issues with today's Eastern Eruopean borders.   Discussed on the show: “I led talks on Donbas and Crimea in the 90s. Here's how the war should end” (Responsible Statecraft) John Quigley was CSCE expert on Crimea 1994-95. A specialist in international law, he is Professor Emeritus at the Moritz College of Law, The Ohio State University. This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: The War State and Why The Vietnam War?, by Mike Swanson; Tom Woods' Liberty Classroom; ExpandDesigns.com/Scott; EasyShip; Free Range Feeder; Thc Hemp Spot; Green Mill Supercritical; Bug-A-Salt and Listen and Think Audio. Shop Libertarian Institute merch or donate to the show through Patreon, PayPal or Bitcoin: 1DZBZNJrxUhQhEzgDh7k8JXHXRjYu5tZiG. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Social Media and Politics
Technology Disruption, Democracy, and Principled Platform Regulation, with Prof. Lance Bennett

Social Media and Politics

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 42:38


Prof. Lance Bennett, Professor Emeritus of Political Science and Communication at the University of Washington, discusses the types of principled values that should guide platform regulation. We reflect on the disruptive ethos of tech companies and what that means for democracy. We also discuss theories of capitalism, recent changes in data privacy and third-party tracking, as well as the connection between digital technologies and protest parties. The article we discuss in the episode is Killing the Golden Goose: A Framework for Regulating Disruptive Technologies. 

What's Next! with Tiffani Bova
Building a Strategic Mindset with Roger Martin

What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 32:28


Welcome to the What's Next! podcast with Tiffani Bova. Friend to the show, Roger L. Martin, made his third appearance on the What's Next! Podcast to discuss the essentials of strategy and management, highlighting the launch of his new book A New Way to Think: Your Guide to Superior Management Effectiveness. Roger is Professor Emeritus at the Rotman School of Management at University of Toronto, where he served as Dean from 1998 to 2013, and as Institute Director of the Martin Prosperity Institute from 2013 to 2019. In 2013, he was named Global Dean of the Year and in 2017, he was named the world's number one management thinker by Thinkers50. He has published 12 previous books including When More Is Not Better and Playing to Win (with A. G. Lafley), which won the award for Best Book of 2012-13 by Thinkers50. Martin is a trusted strategy adviser to the CEOs of many global companies. A Canadian from Wallenstein, Ontario, he holds a BA from Harvard College and an MBA from Harvard Business School.      THIS EPISODE IS PERFECT FOR…  business leaders and managers that are looking to enhance their operating strategy with an alternative model that ultimately increases effectiveness.   TODAY'S MAIN MESSAGE… The best metrics for success are based on past successful experiences, and conventional wisdom would say to imitate the dominant model to create that same success. But you must also view those strategies in context of the challenges and resources of a specific situation, because models cannot be copy pasted for an exact situation.  The execution of an idea is just as important as the idea itself, and in order to achieve true success, the strategy is always evolving to create a better and more innovative strategy for success.   WHAT I LOVE MOST… For Roger, there isn't any singular model of success, but rather success comes from building a strategic mindset to approach and solve problems. The solutions that we often look for may not always be obvious, but by simply being willing to experiment with the past models of success, we can come out on the other end better than before.     Running time: 32:37 Subscribe on iTunes     Find Tiffani on social: Facebook Twitter LinkedIn   Find Roger online: Official Website Twitter LinkedIn   Roger's Book: A New Way to Think: Your Guide to Superior Management Effectiveness

ADHD IS OVER!
Episode 111 - Dr. Stephen W. Porges on ADHD

ADHD IS OVER!

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 63:18


THE CHRONICALLY THREATENED is an eye-opening episode with the creator of the Polyvagal Theory, Dr. Stephen Porges. In this episode, Dr. Porges and I talked about how the Polyvagal Theory relates to ADHD and why there is nothing 'wrong' with children who have been diagnosed with these so-called mental disorders (ADHD, ODD, Anxiety, Depression etc.). What if all these children were simply dealing with a nervous system that's locked in 'threat mode', due to chronically occurring traumatic events occurring in their environments. Now, when parents hear words such as threats or trauma, they typically only think of actual threats such as violence, divorce, abuse etc. But as Dr. Porges explains, for a highly sensitive child not much is needed to lock their nervous system while in threat mode... Listen in and hear for yourself to see if you can relate to what Dr. Porges shares around ADHD and his Polyvagal Theory. Stephen W. Porges, PhD, is Distinguished University Scientist at Indiana University, where he is the founding director of the Traumatic Stress Research Consortium within the Kinsey Institute.  He holds the position of Professor of Psychiatry at the University of North Carolina and Professor Emeritus at the University of Illinois at Chicago and the University of Maryland.  Dr. Porges served as president of both the Society for Psychophysiological Research and the Federation of Associations in Behavioral & Brain Sciences and is a former recipient of a National Institute of Mental Health Research Scientist Development Award.  He has published approximately 300 peer reviewed scientific papers across several disciplines including anesthesiology, biomedical engineering, critical care medicine, ergonomics, exercise physiology, gerontology, neurology, neuroscience, obstetrics, pediatrics, psychiatry, psychology, psychometrics, space medicine, and substance abuse. His research has been cited in approximately 40,000 peer review publications. In 1994 Dr. Porges proposed the Polyvagal Theory, a theory that links the evolution of the mammalian autonomic nervous system to social behavior and emphasizes the importance of physiological state in the expression of behavioral problems and psychiatric disorders. The theory is leading to innovative treatments based on insights into the mechanisms mediating symptoms observed in several behavioral, psychiatric, and physical disorders. He is the author of The Polyvagal Theory: Neurophysiological foundations of Emotions, Attachment, Communication, and Self-regulation (Norton, 2011), The Pocket Guide to the Polyvagal Theory: The Transformative Power of Feeling Safe (Norton, 2017),co-editor of Clinical Applications of the Polyvagal Theory: The Emergence of Polyvagal-Informed Therapies (Norton, 2018), and Polyvagal Safety (Norton, expected 2021). Dr. Porges is also the creator of a music-based intervention, the Safe and Sound Protocol™, which currently is used by more than 2000 therapists to improve spontaneous social engagement, to reduce hearing sensitivities, and to improve language processing, state regulation, and spontaneous social engagement. For more information on Dr. Stephen W. Porges, please visit https://www.stephenporges.com For more information on this podcast, please visit www.adhdisover.com

The Real News Podcast
How 50 years of class war changed the state of Wisconsin

The Real News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 99:02


This is the final podcast installment of our special series of conversations with teachers, organizers, scholars, and activists in Wisconsin that TRNN Editor-in-Chief Maximillian Alvarez, Cameron Granadino (TRNN), and Hannah Faris (In These Times) recorded in the summer of 2021 as part of a special collaboration between The Real News Network and In These Times magazine for “The Wisconsin Idea.” To round out the series, we drive straight into the heart of darkness with an in-depth discussion with veteran educators and organizers Frank Emspak and Adrienne Pagac about the passage of Act 10 in Wisconsin under Republican Governor Scott Walker, the statewide protests against it, and the devastation that it has left in Wisconsin for the past 11 years. Frank Emspak is Professor Emeritus at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School for Workers and a labor activist based in Madison, Wisconsin. He is a regular contributor to WORT Labor Radio, Progressive Magazine, and a range of other media outlets. Adrienne Pagac is a scholar, organizer, and former co-president of the Teaching Assistants Association. The statewide protests against Act 10, known as the Wisconsin Uprising, comprised one of the largest sustained collective actions in the history of the United States, and anyone who was there in 2011 will attest to the collective spirit of resistance and solidarity that the uprising embodied, and the lasting impact it left on all who participated. But the protests were ultimately unsuccessful in beating back Act 10, and the short- and long-term effects of its passage have been a disaster for working people and organized labor. How did this coordinated assault on labor come to pass in Wisconsin? And what lessons can the rest of us around the country learn from the 50-year war on workers that has changed the state of Wisconsin for generations?Pre-Production: Maximillian Alvarez, Hannah Faris, Alice Herman, Cameron Granadino, Eleni Schirmer (research consultant), John Fleissner (research consultant), John Yaggi (research consultant), Harvey J. Kaye (research consultant), Jon Shelton (research consultant), Adam Mertz (research consultant)Studio: Cameron GranadinoPost-Production: Cameron Granadino, Stephen Frank, Kayla Rivara, Jules Taylor, Maximillian AlvarezThe Wisconsin Idea is an independent reporting project of People's Action Institute, Citizen Action of Wisconsin and In These Times.Read the full description (including additional links/info) and the transcript of this podcast: https://therealnews.com/how-50-years-of-class-war-changed-the-state-of-wisconsinFeatured Music (all songs sourced from the Free Music Archive at freemusicarchive.org):Jules Taylor, "Working People Theme Song"Help us continue producing radically independent news and in-depth analysis by following us and becoming a monthly sustainer:Donate: https://therealnews.com/donate-podSign up for our newsletter: https://therealnews.com/newsletter-podLike us on Facebook: https://facebook.com/therealnewsFollow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/therealnews

This Week in America with Ric Bratton
Episode 2427: BEYOND KNOWLEDGE: HOW TECHNOLOGY IS DRIVING AN AGE OF CONSCIOUSNESS by William E. Halal

This Week in America with Ric Bratton

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 25:11


Beyond Knowledge: How Technology Is Driving an Age of Consciousness by William E. HalalBeyond Knowledge Lies the Triumph of Human SpiritThe Knowledge Age of the past two decades is passing today as the digital revolution and artificial intelligence replace knowledge work. Halal's study of social evolution explains how this marks the passage to a new frontier beyond knowledge that is poorly understood – an “Age of Consciousness” is here. But more pandemics, climate change, gross inequality, gridlock and other threats form a “Crisis of Maturity” that is blocking this historic transformation.This book provides a wealth of evidence and leading examples of an emerging “global consciousness” now driving the world to grow up, resolve this global crisis and develop a sustainable world order – or perish. With foresight and hard work, we could see the triumph of human spirit, once again.--- Chapter 1Introduction:The Noosphere is Here Chapter 2 Promises and Perils of the Technology Revolution:Eating Fruit from the Tree of Knowledge Chapter 3 Uniting Science and Spirit:Technologies of Consciousness Chapter 4 Democratic Enterprise:Collaboration Between Business and Society Chapter 5 New Social Contract:Centrist Politics and Government Markets Chapter 6 Virtual Education:The Uneasy Shift from Teaching to Learning Chapter 7 From Religion to Spirit:The Ultimate Technique of Consciousness Chapter 8 Managing Our Minds: Living and Working in Spirit Chapter 9 Toward a Global Consciousness:Start by Being Responsible Chapter 10 Evolution's Climax:The Flowering of Human Spirit Halal is Professor Emeritus at George Washington University, Washington, DC, with degrees from Purdue and UC Berkeley.Prof. Halal has published 7 books and hundreds of articles, consults to corporations and governments, and is a frequent speaker, once substituting for Peter Drucker. Bill also served as a major in the US Air Force, an aerospace engineer on the Apollo Program and a business manager in Silicon Valley.He received the 1977 Mitchell Prize ($10,000) for his article “Beyond the Profit-Motive,” and another article, “Through the MegaCrisis,” was awarded Outstanding Paper of 2013.Halal was cited by the Encyclopedia of the Future as one of the top 100 futurists in the world.Find out more about the book here www.BeyondKnowledge.orghttps://www.amazon.com/dp/B09C2JS8QB?ref_=pe_3052080_276849420https://www.billhalal.com/http://www.bluefunkbroadcasting.com/root/twia/halalpj.mp3   

New Books Network
Isabel Hofmeyr, "Dockside Reading: Hydrocolonialism and the Custom House" (Duke UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 68:11


In Dockside Reading: Hydrocolonialism and the Custom House (Duke University Press, 2022), Isabel Hofmeyr traces the relationships among print culture, colonialism, and the ocean through the institution of the British colonial Custom House. During the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, dockside customs officials would leaf through publications looking for obscenity, politically objectionable materials, or reprints of British copyrighted works, often dumping these condemned goods into the water. These practices, echoing other colonial imaginaries of the ocean as a space for erasing incriminating evidence of the violence of empire, informed later censorship regimes under apartheid in South Africa. By tracking printed matter from ship to shore, Hofmeyr shows how literary institutions like copyright and censorship were shaped by colonial control of coastal waters. Set in the environmental context of the colonial port city, Dockside Reading explores how imperialism colonizes water. Hofmeyr examines this theme through the concept of hydrocolonialism, which puts together land and sea, empire and environment. Isabel Hofmeyr is Professor Emeritus at the University of the Witwatersrand and Global Distinguished Professor at New York University. She received her PhD from the University of the Witwatersrand. She is author of The Portable Bunyan: A Transnational History (2004) and Gandhi's Printing Press: Experiments in Slow Reading (2013). Along with Antoinette Burton, she co-edited Ten Books That Shaped the British Empire: Creating an Imperial Commons. Her articles have been published in the American Historical Review, Social Dynamics, PMLA, Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East, and the Journal of African History, to name a few. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Literary Studies
Isabel Hofmeyr, "Dockside Reading: Hydrocolonialism and the Custom House" (Duke UP, 2022)

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 68:11


In Dockside Reading: Hydrocolonialism and the Custom House (Duke University Press, 2022), Isabel Hofmeyr traces the relationships among print culture, colonialism, and the ocean through the institution of the British colonial Custom House. During the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, dockside customs officials would leaf through publications looking for obscenity, politically objectionable materials, or reprints of British copyrighted works, often dumping these condemned goods into the water. These practices, echoing other colonial imaginaries of the ocean as a space for erasing incriminating evidence of the violence of empire, informed later censorship regimes under apartheid in South Africa. By tracking printed matter from ship to shore, Hofmeyr shows how literary institutions like copyright and censorship were shaped by colonial control of coastal waters. Set in the environmental context of the colonial port city, Dockside Reading explores how imperialism colonizes water. Hofmeyr examines this theme through the concept of hydrocolonialism, which puts together land and sea, empire and environment. Isabel Hofmeyr is Professor Emeritus at the University of the Witwatersrand and Global Distinguished Professor at New York University. She received her PhD from the University of the Witwatersrand. She is author of The Portable Bunyan: A Transnational History (2004) and Gandhi's Printing Press: Experiments in Slow Reading (2013). Along with Antoinette Burton, she co-edited Ten Books That Shaped the British Empire: Creating an Imperial Commons. Her articles have been published in the American Historical Review, Social Dynamics, PMLA, Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East, and the Journal of African History, to name a few. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

New Books in British Studies
Isabel Hofmeyr, "Dockside Reading: Hydrocolonialism and the Custom House" (Duke UP, 2022)

New Books in British Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 68:11


In Dockside Reading: Hydrocolonialism and the Custom House (Duke University Press, 2022), Isabel Hofmeyr traces the relationships among print culture, colonialism, and the ocean through the institution of the British colonial Custom House. During the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, dockside customs officials would leaf through publications looking for obscenity, politically objectionable materials, or reprints of British copyrighted works, often dumping these condemned goods into the water. These practices, echoing other colonial imaginaries of the ocean as a space for erasing incriminating evidence of the violence of empire, informed later censorship regimes under apartheid in South Africa. By tracking printed matter from ship to shore, Hofmeyr shows how literary institutions like copyright and censorship were shaped by colonial control of coastal waters. Set in the environmental context of the colonial port city, Dockside Reading explores how imperialism colonizes water. Hofmeyr examines this theme through the concept of hydrocolonialism, which puts together land and sea, empire and environment. Isabel Hofmeyr is Professor Emeritus at the University of the Witwatersrand and Global Distinguished Professor at New York University. She received her PhD from the University of the Witwatersrand. She is author of The Portable Bunyan: A Transnational History (2004) and Gandhi's Printing Press: Experiments in Slow Reading (2013). Along with Antoinette Burton, she co-edited Ten Books That Shaped the British Empire: Creating an Imperial Commons. Her articles have been published in the American Historical Review, Social Dynamics, PMLA, Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East, and the Journal of African History, to name a few. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/british-studies

New Books in African Studies
Isabel Hofmeyr, "Dockside Reading: Hydrocolonialism and the Custom House" (Duke UP, 2022)

New Books in African Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 68:11


In Dockside Reading: Hydrocolonialism and the Custom House (Duke University Press, 2022), Isabel Hofmeyr traces the relationships among print culture, colonialism, and the ocean through the institution of the British colonial Custom House. During the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, dockside customs officials would leaf through publications looking for obscenity, politically objectionable materials, or reprints of British copyrighted works, often dumping these condemned goods into the water. These practices, echoing other colonial imaginaries of the ocean as a space for erasing incriminating evidence of the violence of empire, informed later censorship regimes under apartheid in South Africa. By tracking printed matter from ship to shore, Hofmeyr shows how literary institutions like copyright and censorship were shaped by colonial control of coastal waters. Set in the environmental context of the colonial port city, Dockside Reading explores how imperialism colonizes water. Hofmeyr examines this theme through the concept of hydrocolonialism, which puts together land and sea, empire and environment. Isabel Hofmeyr is Professor Emeritus at the University of the Witwatersrand and Global Distinguished Professor at New York University. She received her PhD from the University of the Witwatersrand. She is author of The Portable Bunyan: A Transnational History (2004) and Gandhi's Printing Press: Experiments in Slow Reading (2013). Along with Antoinette Burton, she co-edited Ten Books That Shaped the British Empire: Creating an Imperial Commons. Her articles have been published in the American Historical Review, Social Dynamics, PMLA, Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East, and the Journal of African History, to name a few. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-studies

New Books in the Indian Ocean World
Isabel Hofmeyr, "Dockside Reading: Hydrocolonialism and the Custom House" (Duke UP, 2022)

New Books in the Indian Ocean World

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 68:11


In Dockside Reading: Hydrocolonialism and the Custom House (Duke University Press, 2022), Isabel Hofmeyr traces the relationships among print culture, colonialism, and the ocean through the institution of the British colonial Custom House. During the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, dockside customs officials would leaf through publications looking for obscenity, politically objectionable materials, or reprints of British copyrighted works, often dumping these condemned goods into the water. These practices, echoing other colonial imaginaries of the ocean as a space for erasing incriminating evidence of the violence of empire, informed later censorship regimes under apartheid in South Africa. By tracking printed matter from ship to shore, Hofmeyr shows how literary institutions like copyright and censorship were shaped by colonial control of coastal waters. Set in the environmental context of the colonial port city, Dockside Reading explores how imperialism colonizes water. Hofmeyr examines this theme through the concept of hydrocolonialism, which puts together land and sea, empire and environment. Isabel Hofmeyr is Professor Emeritus at the University of the Witwatersrand and Global Distinguished Professor at New York University. She received her PhD from the University of the Witwatersrand. She is author of The Portable Bunyan: A Transnational History (2004) and Gandhi's Printing Press: Experiments in Slow Reading (2013). Along with Antoinette Burton, she co-edited Ten Books That Shaped the British Empire: Creating an Imperial Commons. Her articles have been published in the American Historical Review, Social Dynamics, PMLA, Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East, and the Journal of African History, to name a few. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/indian-ocean-world

New Books in History
Isabel Hofmeyr, "Dockside Reading: Hydrocolonialism and the Custom House" (Duke UP, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 68:11


In Dockside Reading: Hydrocolonialism and the Custom House (Duke University Press, 2022), Isabel Hofmeyr traces the relationships among print culture, colonialism, and the ocean through the institution of the British colonial Custom House. During the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, dockside customs officials would leaf through publications looking for obscenity, politically objectionable materials, or reprints of British copyrighted works, often dumping these condemned goods into the water. These practices, echoing other colonial imaginaries of the ocean as a space for erasing incriminating evidence of the violence of empire, informed later censorship regimes under apartheid in South Africa. By tracking printed matter from ship to shore, Hofmeyr shows how literary institutions like copyright and censorship were shaped by colonial control of coastal waters. Set in the environmental context of the colonial port city, Dockside Reading explores how imperialism colonizes water. Hofmeyr examines this theme through the concept of hydrocolonialism, which puts together land and sea, empire and environment. Isabel Hofmeyr is Professor Emeritus at the University of the Witwatersrand and Global Distinguished Professor at New York University. She received her PhD from the University of the Witwatersrand. She is author of The Portable Bunyan: A Transnational History (2004) and Gandhi's Printing Press: Experiments in Slow Reading (2013). Along with Antoinette Burton, she co-edited Ten Books That Shaped the British Empire: Creating an Imperial Commons. Her articles have been published in the American Historical Review, Social Dynamics, PMLA, Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East, and the Journal of African History, to name a few. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

The Maryland Curiosity Bureau
Could Baltimore City & County Ever Unite?

The Maryland Curiosity Bureau

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 23:32


Listener Kate Jakuta asks, “Why isn't Baltimore City part of Baltimore County? And could the city and the county ever join in the future?” It's a mystery that hopscotches us through time to the founding of Baltimore Town in 1729, the rewriting of the State Constitution in 1851, and a sly ballot referendum in 1948, which adds up to an unfortunate result for the city. While other US cities continue to grow by annexing land from surrounding counties, Baltimore's city/county line has been frozen in place for more than 70 years. Is there a way to unbind the city? And is there a political will to make it happen? This episode we hear from: The Villena family, whose house is bisected by the city/county line Matthew Crensen, Professor Emeritus of Political Science at Johns Hopkins University, and author of Baltimore: A Political History Ron Cassie, Senior Editor and Political Reporter at Baltimore Magazine. Check out Ron's article, How To Fix Baltimore Don Hutchinson, former County Executive of Baltimore County See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Working People
50 Years of Class War in Wisconsin (w/ Frank Emspak & Adrienne Pagac)

Working People

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 99:02


This is the final installment in our special series of conversations with teachers, organizers, scholars, and activists in Wisconsin that Max, Cameron Granadino (TRNN), and Hannah Faris (In These Times) recorded in the summer of 2021 as part of a special collaboration between The Real News Network and In These Times magazine. To round out the series, we drive straight into the heart of darkness with an in-depth discussion with veteran educators and organizers Frank Emspak and Adrienne Pagac about the passage of Act 10 in Wisconsin under Republican Governor Scott Walker, the statewide protests against it, and the devastation that it has left in Wisconsin for the past 11 years. Frank is Professor Emeritus at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School for Workers and a labor activist based in Madison, Wisconsin. He is a regular contributor to WORT Labor Radio, Progressive Magazine, and a range of other media outlets. Adrienne is a scholar, organizer, and former co-president of the Teaching Assistants Association. The statewide protests against Act 10, known as the Wisconsin Uprising, comprised one of the largest sustained collective actions in the history of the United States, and anyone who was there in 2011 will attest to the collective spirit of resistance and solidarity that the uprising embodied, and the lasting impact it left on all who participated. But the protests were ultimately unsuccessful in beating back Act 10, and the short and long term effects of its passage have been a disaster for working people and organized labor. How did this coordinated assault on labor come to pass in Wisconsin? And what lessons can the rest of us around the country learn from the 50-year war on workers that has changed the state of Wisconsin for generations? Additional links/info below... Frank's Twitter page Adrienne's Twitter page Frank Emspak, Red Madison, "Commemorating the Wisconsin Uprising" Maximillian Alvarez, The Real News Network, "'You've got to shut it down': Lessons from Wisconsin's 2011 Worker Uprising" In These Times investigative series: The Wisconsin Idea The Jacobin Show, "The Democratic Coalition after Trump and the Fall of Wisconsin" Dan Kaufman, Norton Books, The Fall of Wisconsin: The Conservative Conquest of a Progressive Bastion and the Future of American Politics Michael D. Yates, Monthly Review Press, Wisconsin Uprising: Labor Fights Back John Nichols, Bold Type Books, Uprising: How Scott Walker Betrayed Wisconsin and Inspired a New Politics of Protest Permanent links below... Working People Patreon page Leave us a voicemail and we might play it on the show! Labor Radio / Podcast Network website, Facebook page, and Twitter page In These Times website, Facebook page, and Twitter page The Real News Network website, YouTube channel, podcast feeds, Facebook page, and Twitter page Featured Music (all songs sourced from the Free Music Archive: freemusicarchive.org) Jules Taylor, "Working People Theme Song"

Six Pixels of Separation Podcast - By Mitch Joel
SPOS #826 - Roger Martin On A New Way To Think

Six Pixels of Separation Podcast - By Mitch Joel

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 57:24


Welcome to episode #826 of Six Pixels of Separation. Here it is: Six Pixels of Separation - Episode #826 - Host: Mitch Joel. Don't take my word for it, but Roger Martin is one of the world's top business thinkers in the world. I do think this is true. In 2017, Roger was named the world's #1 management thinker by Thinkers50, an annual ranking of the most influential global business thinkers. Roger is a trusted strategy advisor to the CEOs of companies worldwide including Procter & Gamble, LEGO and Ford. He is is a Professor Emeritus at the Rotman School of Management at University of Toronto where he served as Dean from 1998-2013. In 2013, he was named global Dean of the Year by the leading business school website, Poets & Quants. His newest book is, A New Way to Think - Your Guide to Superior Managerial Effectiveness. His previous twelve books include, When More is Not Better, Creating Great Choices (with Jennifer Riel), Getting Beyond Better (with Sally Osberg), and Playing To Win (with A.G. Lafley). He has written thirty Harvard Business Review articles and writing every week on Medium as well. If you love big thinking about business, this episode is for. Enjoy the conversation... Running time: 57:24. Hello from beautiful Montreal. Subscribe over at Apple Podcasts. Please visit and leave comments on the blog - Six Pixels of Separation. Feel free to connect to me directly on Facebook here: Mitch Joel on Facebook. or you can connect on LinkedIn. ...or on Twitter. Here is my conversation with Roger Martin. A New Way to Think - Your Guide to Superior Managerial Effectiveness. When More is Not Better. Creating Great Choices. Getting Beyond Better. Playing To Win. Roger on Medium. Follow Roger on LinkedIn. Follow Roger on Twitter. This week's music: David Usher 'St. Lawrence River'.

Architecture Off-Centre
On Auschwitz and The Evidence Room (pt.2) / Anne Bordeleau and Donald McKay

Architecture Off-Centre

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 82:58


Self-explanatory in its nomenclature, The Evidence Room was first presented at the 2016 Venice Biennale as a room with architectural evidence from Auschwitz to assert the existence of the gas chambers used for committing genocide in the Nazi concentration camp. It presents three monuments – a door, a wall hatch and ladder, and a gas column along with a number of plaster casts as proofs of the crimes against humanity and underscores the culpability of architects in creating these instruments of murder. Anne Bordeleau and Donal McKay are two of the four principals who worked on The Evidence Room. Anne is an architect, a historian and professor at Waterloo Architecture. Her research interests include the epistemology of the architectural project, as well as the historiographical and practical bearing of investigating the relations between architecture and time. Donald McKay, Professor Emeritus, served as a full-time faculty at Waterloo Architecture until 2018. Currently living between France and Canada, McKay is developing A Photographic Atlas of Cimetière du Père Lachaise, writing, and serving as managing editor of CHALK BOOKS. Details about The Evidence Room - https://evidenceroomfoundation.com/

Trending In Education
Confessions of a School Reformer with Dr. Larry Cuban

Trending In Education

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 23:04


Larry Cuban is Professor Emeritus in Education at Stanford University. He recently wrote Confessions of a School Reformer, an educational history and personal memoir of his life that begins with his childhood in school in Pittsburgh, then proceeds through his years as a teacher and school administrator, and concludes with his thoughts on the present day. Larry joins host Mike Palmer in a conversation about his 87 years of experience with education beginning in the Progressive Era, proceeding through the Civil Rights Movement, and concluding in the present day where the Standards-Based Reform movement continues to predominate. Larry provides advice to educators, administrators and school reformers, reminding us that change tends to come slowly in schools since generally speaking they are conservative institutions. Larry encourages us to focus on the direct impact of educators on students in the classroom and to understand the history of school reform and educational policy to help navigate the challenges and complexities of the current educational landscape. It's a wise and informed conversation about how change happens in schools in the US that you won't want to miss. Subscribe to Trending in Education wherever you get your podcasts. Visit us at TrendinginEd.com for more deep thinkers' takes on the future of education.

The Royal Irish Academy
ARINS: A Shared Ireland? Identity, Meaning, Representation and Sport

The Royal Irish Academy

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 44:53


In this month's episode, Katie Liston, Joseph Maguire and Bruce Kidd explore the role of sports in crafting identities and shaping politics on the island of Ireland. You can read Katie Liston and Joseph Maguire's paper, as it appears in Irish Studies in International Affairs, at doi.org/10.1353/isia.2022.0005. Bruce Kidd's response is available at doi.org/10.1353/isia.2022.0007. Katie Liston is Senior Lecturer School of Sport, University of Ulster. Joseph Maguire is Professor Emeritus of Sociology of Sport, Loughborough University. Bruce Kidd is Professor Emeritus Sport and Public Policy University of Toronto. This is episode 11 of a podcast series that provides evidence-based research and analysis on the most significant questions of policy and public debate facing the island of Ireland, north and south. Host Rory Montgomery, MRIA, talks to authors of articles on topics such as cross border health co-operation; the need to regulate social media in referendums, education, cultural affairs and constitutional questions and the imperative for good data and the need to carry out impartial research. ARINS: Analysing and Researching Ireland North and South brings together experts to provide evidence-based research and analysis on the most significant questions of policy and public debate facing the island of Ireland, north and south. The project publishes, facilitates and disseminates research on the challenges and opportunities presented to the island in a post-Brexit context, with the intention of contributing to an informed public discourse. More information can be found at www.arinsproject.com. ARINS is a joint project of The Royal Irish Academy, an all-island body, and the Keough-Naughton Institute for Irish Studies at Notre Dame's Keough School of Global Affairs.

ON Point with Alex Pierson
Do We Know How Many Men Are Being Abused By Their Spouses?

ON Point with Alex Pierson

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 9:03


Guest host Angela Kokott speaks with Dr. Don Dutton, Professor Emeritus at the University of British Columbia about men who are abused by their spouses. Dr. Dutton tells Angela about the lack of support available, why this needs to be further researched, and why domestic abuse affects men, women, and children. Let's get talking See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Irish Tech News Podcast
A New Way to Think, Roger L Martin explains more with Minter Dial

The Irish Tech News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 50:08


Minter Dial catches up with Roger L Martin in this episode BIO Roger L Martin is a renowned professor, expert in strategy and author. In 2017, he was named the world's #1 management thinker by Thinkers50, a biannual ranking of the most influential global business thinkers. Roger is a trusted strategy advisor to the CEOs of companies worldwide including Procter & Gamble, Lego and Ford. Roger Martin is a Professor Emeritus at the Rotman School of Management at University of Toronto where he served as Dean from 1998-2013, Academic Director of the Michael Lee-Chin Family Institute for Corporate Citizenship from 2004-2019 and Institute Director of the Martin Prosperity Institute from 2013-2019. In 2013, he was named global Dean of the Year by the leading business school website, Poets & Quants. His new book, from HBR Press, is "A New Way to Think." is the culmination of a lifetime's work in education and advising CEOs. In it, he addresses key issues within leadership and strategy, applying his trademark scepticism for received wisdom. DESCRIPTION OF EPISODE In this conversation with Minter Dial, Roger Martin discusses the premise behind his new book, the retooling of existing business models and frameworks, working with and transforming culture, his work with ex-P&G CEO AG Lafley, and many more elements to help make leadership more effective. MY BIO Minter Dial is an international professional speaker, elevator and a multiple award-winning author. Minter's core career stint of 16 years was spent as a top executive at L'Oréal, where he was a member of the worldwide Executive Committee for the Professional Products Division. Previously, he was MD of L'Oréal PPD Canada and MD Worldwide for Redken. He's the author of one WWII biography and three business books, Futureproof (2017), Heartificial Empathy (2019) and the last one on leadership, You Lead, How Being Yourself Makes You A Better Leader (Kogan Page 2021). He's currently working on a new book that he's publishing in weekly installments: Dialogos, Fostering More Meaningful Conversations which you can find via Substack. https://minter.substack.com.

Arts & Ideas
Kawanabe Kyōsai and Yukio Mishima

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 45:09


Frogs, farting competitions, art connoisseurs, courtesans and crows all feature in the art of Kawanabe Kyōsai,- a key Japanese figure who challenged traditions of Japanese art. Kyōsai blurred the lines between popular and elite forms and we take a look at a new exhibition of his work at the Royal Academy. In today's Free Thinking, Chris Harding looks at both his art and the writing of Yukio Mishima. Mishima was one of Japan's most infamous writers when he died in 1970, writing both for the mass market novels and readers of high literature, fusing traditional Japanese and modern Western styles. In his final years he became increasingly interested in extreme politics, a call for the restoration of the Emperor to his pre-war power and culminated in his death by seppuku, the Samurai's ritual suicide. With a new translation of Beautiful Star, we learn about him and the recent reappraisal of his work. Israel Goldman is a leading collector and dealer in the field of Japanese prints, paintings and illustrated books. The exhibition, Kyōsai: The Israel Goldman Collection, is at the Royal Academy from 19th March to 19th June 2022. Koto Sadamura specialises in Japanese art history of the late nineteenth century, with a particular focus on the painter Kawanabe Kyōsai. Stephen Dodd is Professor Emeritus of Japanese Literature at SOAS, University of London. He has written widely on modern Japanese literature and translated two novels by Yukio Mishima, including a new version of Beautiful Star published in April 2022. Kate Taylor-Jones is Professor of East Asian Cinema at the University of Sheffield. Producer: Ruth Watts

BCG Henderson Institute
A New Way to Think with Roger L. Martin

BCG Henderson Institute

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 33:49


Roger L. Martin is a Professor Emeritus of Strategic Management and former Dean at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management. He is a trusted strategic adviser to the CEOs of many global companies. Roger has consistently been featured in the Thinkers50 list, where he was named the world's number one management thinker in 2017. He has authored 12 books, including When More is Not Better in which he discusses how growing inequality in American society poses a threat to democratic capitalism (listen to our interview about the book with Roger here). In his latest book, A New Way to Think: Your Guide to Superior Management Effectiveness, Roger challenges us to rethink many dominant mental models, revisiting common misconceptions and pitfalls in the application of common frameworks and ideas. He urges leaders to continuously develop their own ideas to lead and reinvent the future and explores fourteen management topics from this perspective. Together with Martin Reeves, Chairman of BCG Henderson Institute, Roger delves into the intricacies of human ingenuity, change, competitive advantage, and the importance of building organizations that recognize the uniqueness of talented individuals. *** About the BCG Henderson Institute The BCG Henderson Institute is the Boston Consulting Group's think tank, dedicated to exploring and developing valuable new insights from business, technology, economics, and science by embracing the powerful technology of ideas. The Institute engages leaders in provocative discussion and experimentation to expand the boundaries of business theory and practice and to translate innovative ideas from within and beyond business. For more ideas and inspiration, sign up to receive BHI INSIGHTS, our monthly newsletter, and follow us on LinkedIn and Twitter.

New Books Network
Moshe Shokeid, "Can Academics Change the World?: An Israeli Anthropologist's Testimony on the Rise and Fall of a Protest Movement on Campus" (Berghahn, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 57:55


AD KAN (NO MORE) was founded in 1988 by a group of academics at Tel Aviv University. The initiative, a public pressure group, was prompted by public indifference (at best) about Israel's 20-year occupation of the Palestinian Territories, and its forceful attempts to suppress the nascent First Intifada popular uprising in the West Bank. Whilst outward facing in their basic ambitions, the founder members of AD KAN also understood that academia's failure to engage with the realities of the moment—through debate, protest, even applied research—could easily be taken too as acceptance of the status quo, embodying as it did the subaltern position of the Palestinian people. Can Academics Change the World? An Israeli Anthropologist's Testimony on the Rise and Fall of a Protest Movement on Campus (Berghahn Books, 2020) by Moshe Shokeid, is a personal account of the author's experiences as co-founder of AD KAN. An account of dissent on campus, the book is at once a memoir, a historical account, and an anthropological consideration of the academic's responsibility as a public intellectual. Can Academics Change the World? remains relevant today, with many of the issues underpinning the formation and activities of AD KAN still live: the occupation of the West Bank; attempts to force Israel into concession and compromise, principally through the Boycott, Diversification, and Sanctions (BDS) campaign; and the continued status of the academic as public intellectual, in Israel and elsewhere—this cast against a university landscape that has reorganized itself around a different set of principles in the three decades since AD KAN ceased its activities. Professor Moshe Shokeid is Professor Emeritus of Anthropology at Tel Aviv University. His other books include Three Jewish Journeys through the Anthropologist's Lens: From Morocco to the Negev, Zion to the Big Apple, the Closet to the Bimah; A Gay Synagogue in New York; Children of Circumstances: Israeli Emigrants in New York; and The Dual Heritage: Immigrants from the Atlas Mountains in an Israeli Village. Akin Ajayi (@AkinAjayi) is a writer and editor, based in Tel Aviv. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Jewish Studies
Moshe Shokeid, "Can Academics Change the World?: An Israeli Anthropologist's Testimony on the Rise and Fall of a Protest Movement on Campus" (Berghahn, 2020)

New Books in Jewish Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 57:55


AD KAN (NO MORE) was founded in 1988 by a group of academics at Tel Aviv University. The initiative, a public pressure group, was prompted by public indifference (at best) about Israel's 20-year occupation of the Palestinian Territories, and its forceful attempts to suppress the nascent First Intifada popular uprising in the West Bank. Whilst outward facing in their basic ambitions, the founder members of AD KAN also understood that academia's failure to engage with the realities of the moment—through debate, protest, even applied research—could easily be taken too as acceptance of the status quo, embodying as it did the subaltern position of the Palestinian people. Can Academics Change the World? An Israeli Anthropologist's Testimony on the Rise and Fall of a Protest Movement on Campus (Berghahn Books, 2020) by Moshe Shokeid, is a personal account of the author's experiences as co-founder of AD KAN. An account of dissent on campus, the book is at once a memoir, a historical account, and an anthropological consideration of the academic's responsibility as a public intellectual. Can Academics Change the World? remains relevant today, with many of the issues underpinning the formation and activities of AD KAN still live: the occupation of the West Bank; attempts to force Israel into concession and compromise, principally through the Boycott, Diversification, and Sanctions (BDS) campaign; and the continued status of the academic as public intellectual, in Israel and elsewhere—this cast against a university landscape that has reorganized itself around a different set of principles in the three decades since AD KAN ceased its activities. Professor Moshe Shokeid is Professor Emeritus of Anthropology at Tel Aviv University. His other books include Three Jewish Journeys through the Anthropologist's Lens: From Morocco to the Negev, Zion to the Big Apple, the Closet to the Bimah; A Gay Synagogue in New York; Children of Circumstances: Israeli Emigrants in New York; and The Dual Heritage: Immigrants from the Atlas Mountains in an Israeli Village. Akin Ajayi (@AkinAjayi) is a writer and editor, based in Tel Aviv. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/jewish-studies

New Books in Politics
Moshe Shokeid, "Can Academics Change the World?: An Israeli Anthropologist's Testimony on the Rise and Fall of a Protest Movement on Campus" (Berghahn, 2020)

New Books in Politics

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 57:55


AD KAN (NO MORE) was founded in 1988 by a group of academics at Tel Aviv University. The initiative, a public pressure group, was prompted by public indifference (at best) about Israel's 20-year occupation of the Palestinian Territories, and its forceful attempts to suppress the nascent First Intifada popular uprising in the West Bank. Whilst outward facing in their basic ambitions, the founder members of AD KAN also understood that academia's failure to engage with the realities of the moment—through debate, protest, even applied research—could easily be taken too as acceptance of the status quo, embodying as it did the subaltern position of the Palestinian people. Can Academics Change the World? An Israeli Anthropologist's Testimony on the Rise and Fall of a Protest Movement on Campus (Berghahn Books, 2020) by Moshe Shokeid, is a personal account of the author's experiences as co-founder of AD KAN. An account of dissent on campus, the book is at once a memoir, a historical account, and an anthropological consideration of the academic's responsibility as a public intellectual. Can Academics Change the World? remains relevant today, with many of the issues underpinning the formation and activities of AD KAN still live: the occupation of the West Bank; attempts to force Israel into concession and compromise, principally through the Boycott, Diversification, and Sanctions (BDS) campaign; and the continued status of the academic as public intellectual, in Israel and elsewhere—this cast against a university landscape that has reorganized itself around a different set of principles in the three decades since AD KAN ceased its activities. Professor Moshe Shokeid is Professor Emeritus of Anthropology at Tel Aviv University. His other books include Three Jewish Journeys through the Anthropologist's Lens: From Morocco to the Negev, Zion to the Big Apple, the Closet to the Bimah; A Gay Synagogue in New York; Children of Circumstances: Israeli Emigrants in New York; and The Dual Heritage: Immigrants from the Atlas Mountains in an Israeli Village. Akin Ajayi (@AkinAjayi) is a writer and editor, based in Tel Aviv. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/politics-and-polemics

New Books in Israel Studies
Moshe Shokeid, "Can Academics Change the World?: An Israeli Anthropologist's Testimony on the Rise and Fall of a Protest Movement on Campus" (Berghahn, 2020)

New Books in Israel Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 57:55


AD KAN (NO MORE) was founded in 1988 by a group of academics at Tel Aviv University. The initiative, a public pressure group, was prompted by public indifference (at best) about Israel's 20-year occupation of the Palestinian Territories, and its forceful attempts to suppress the nascent First Intifada popular uprising in the West Bank. Whilst outward facing in their basic ambitions, the founder members of AD KAN also understood that academia's failure to engage with the realities of the moment—through debate, protest, even applied research—could easily be taken too as acceptance of the status quo, embodying as it did the subaltern position of the Palestinian people. Can Academics Change the World? An Israeli Anthropologist's Testimony on the Rise and Fall of a Protest Movement on Campus (Berghahn Books, 2020) by Moshe Shokeid, is a personal account of the author's experiences as co-founder of AD KAN. An account of dissent on campus, the book is at once a memoir, a historical account, and an anthropological consideration of the academic's responsibility as a public intellectual. Can Academics Change the World? remains relevant today, with many of the issues underpinning the formation and activities of AD KAN still live: the occupation of the West Bank; attempts to force Israel into concession and compromise, principally through the Boycott, Diversification, and Sanctions (BDS) campaign; and the continued status of the academic as public intellectual, in Israel and elsewhere—this cast against a university landscape that has reorganized itself around a different set of principles in the three decades since AD KAN ceased its activities. Professor Moshe Shokeid is Professor Emeritus of Anthropology at Tel Aviv University. His other books include Three Jewish Journeys through the Anthropologist's Lens: From Morocco to the Negev, Zion to the Big Apple, the Closet to the Bimah; A Gay Synagogue in New York; Children of Circumstances: Israeli Emigrants in New York; and The Dual Heritage: Immigrants from the Atlas Mountains in an Israeli Village. Akin Ajayi (@AkinAjayi) is a writer and editor, based in Tel Aviv. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/israel-studies

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies
Moshe Shokeid, "Can Academics Change the World?: An Israeli Anthropologist's Testimony on the Rise and Fall of a Protest Movement on Campus" (Berghahn, 2020)

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 57:55


AD KAN (NO MORE) was founded in 1988 by a group of academics at Tel Aviv University. The initiative, a public pressure group, was prompted by public indifference (at best) about Israel's 20-year occupation of the Palestinian Territories, and its forceful attempts to suppress the nascent First Intifada popular uprising in the West Bank. Whilst outward facing in their basic ambitions, the founder members of AD KAN also understood that academia's failure to engage with the realities of the moment—through debate, protest, even applied research—could easily be taken too as acceptance of the status quo, embodying as it did the subaltern position of the Palestinian people. Can Academics Change the World? An Israeli Anthropologist's Testimony on the Rise and Fall of a Protest Movement on Campus (Berghahn Books, 2020) by Moshe Shokeid, is a personal account of the author's experiences as co-founder of AD KAN. An account of dissent on campus, the book is at once a memoir, a historical account, and an anthropological consideration of the academic's responsibility as a public intellectual. Can Academics Change the World? remains relevant today, with many of the issues underpinning the formation and activities of AD KAN still live: the occupation of the West Bank; attempts to force Israel into concession and compromise, principally through the Boycott, Diversification, and Sanctions (BDS) campaign; and the continued status of the academic as public intellectual, in Israel and elsewhere—this cast against a university landscape that has reorganized itself around a different set of principles in the three decades since AD KAN ceased its activities. Professor Moshe Shokeid is Professor Emeritus of Anthropology at Tel Aviv University. His other books include Three Jewish Journeys through the Anthropologist's Lens: From Morocco to the Negev, Zion to the Big Apple, the Closet to the Bimah; A Gay Synagogue in New York; Children of Circumstances: Israeli Emigrants in New York; and The Dual Heritage: Immigrants from the Atlas Mountains in an Israeli Village. Akin Ajayi (@AkinAjayi) is a writer and editor, based in Tel Aviv. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/middle-eastern-studies

New Books in Anthropology
Moshe Shokeid, "Can Academics Change the World?: An Israeli Anthropologist's Testimony on the Rise and Fall of a Protest Movement on Campus" (Berghahn, 2020)

New Books in Anthropology

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 57:55


AD KAN (NO MORE) was founded in 1988 by a group of academics at Tel Aviv University. The initiative, a public pressure group, was prompted by public indifference (at best) about Israel's 20-year occupation of the Palestinian Territories, and its forceful attempts to suppress the nascent First Intifada popular uprising in the West Bank. Whilst outward facing in their basic ambitions, the founder members of AD KAN also understood that academia's failure to engage with the realities of the moment—through debate, protest, even applied research—could easily be taken too as acceptance of the status quo, embodying as it did the subaltern position of the Palestinian people. Can Academics Change the World? An Israeli Anthropologist's Testimony on the Rise and Fall of a Protest Movement on Campus (Berghahn Books, 2020) by Moshe Shokeid, is a personal account of the author's experiences as co-founder of AD KAN. An account of dissent on campus, the book is at once a memoir, a historical account, and an anthropological consideration of the academic's responsibility as a public intellectual. Can Academics Change the World? remains relevant today, with many of the issues underpinning the formation and activities of AD KAN still live: the occupation of the West Bank; attempts to force Israel into concession and compromise, principally through the Boycott, Diversification, and Sanctions (BDS) campaign; and the continued status of the academic as public intellectual, in Israel and elsewhere—this cast against a university landscape that has reorganized itself around a different set of principles in the three decades since AD KAN ceased its activities. Professor Moshe Shokeid is Professor Emeritus of Anthropology at Tel Aviv University. His other books include Three Jewish Journeys through the Anthropologist's Lens: From Morocco to the Negev, Zion to the Big Apple, the Closet to the Bimah; A Gay Synagogue in New York; Children of Circumstances: Israeli Emigrants in New York; and The Dual Heritage: Immigrants from the Atlas Mountains in an Israeli Village. Akin Ajayi (@AkinAjayi) is a writer and editor, based in Tel Aviv. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/anthropology

Business Matters
EU divided over how to step away from Russian energy

Business Matters

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 56:57


The EU is attempting to agree on a harmonised approach to the continuing issue of oil and gas imports from Russia. Member states' energy ministers have held an emergency meeting. Suzanne Lynch, a reporter for Politico in Brussels, tells us what was on their agenda. The European Commission has accused Apple of abusing it's market position for contactless smartphone payments. Apple denies the charge and has promised to engage with the Commission. We hear more about the the accusations from the BBC's Jonathan Josephs. When a member of staff leaves your workplace team, or gets married, or has a birthday - who is it that organises the whip round, nips out to buy the gift or plans the office party? Is it in most cases a woman? Yes, according to four American academics who've written a book called the 'No Club' in which they identify what they call non promotion task that do nothing for that woman's career. We hear more from one of the book's authors, Lise Vesterlund, an economics professor at thw University of Pittsburg. Ed Butler is joing throughout the programme by Peter Morici, Professor Emeritus of International Business at the R.H. Smith School of Business at the University of Maryland and Sharon Brettkelly from Radio New Zealand in Auckland. (Picture description: Gas pipes at a new gas pipeline compressor station. Picture credit: Getty Images/John Tlumacki)

Trending In Education
Welcome to the Future - May 2022 Edition

Trending In Education

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 26:05


Mike Palmer returns with virtual CoHost Nancy to run through highlights from recent episodes of Trending in Ed before sharing clips from a couple of upcoming episodes to pique your interest. We begin by sharing Mike's conversation with Sunil Gunderia from Age of Learning where Sunil talks about building learner identity and the fact that learning is intrinsically rewarding in its own right. From there, we hear from Abby Falik, the Founder/CEO of Global Citizen Year, as she shares her thoughts on the future of a traditional 4-year or 2-year degree. GSY is a fascinating program that recently made news by receiving funding from the Mackenzie Scott Foundation. Then we share sound from our episode with Dr. David Lenihan from Tiber Health as he imagines how emerging technology will likely impact both medical education and the delivery of medical care. Then we hear some fun facts from Frances Valintine about the Kiwi, the national bird for her native New Zealand. Fun stuff! We conclude with clips from upcoming episodes with Tony Wan from Reach Capital and with Larry Cuban, Professor Emeritus at Stanford University and author of a new book, Confessions of a School Reformer. Mike also shares some news about what else we've got cooking here at Palmer Media. Thanks to everyone for listening. Subscribe wherever you pod. Visit us at TrendinginEd.com for more amazing content!

Double Reed Dish
Episode 131: Christopher Weait

Double Reed Dish

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 59:43


On this episode we discuss recent good news! For our interview we welcome Christopher Weait, Professor Emeritus of bassoon at The Ohio State University. This podcast is brought to you by Chemical City Double Reeds (www.chemicalcityreeds.com), TheJoyousBassoon (www.etsy.com/shop/TheJoyousBassoon), Barton Cane (https://www.bartoncane.com/), and RDG Woodwinds Inc. (rdgwoodwinds.com)! Thank you to our wonderful sponsors!

Digital, New Tech & Brand Strategy - MinterDial.com
A New Way to Think with Author and Professor Emeritus Roger L Martin (MDE470)

Digital, New Tech & Brand Strategy - MinterDial.com

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 57:55


Minter Dialogue with Roger L. Martin Roger L. Martin is a trusted strategy advisor to the CEOs of companies worldwide including Procter & Gamble, Lego and Ford. In 2017, Roger was named the world's #1 management thinker by Thinkers50 . He is a Professor Emeritus at the Rotman School of Management at University of Toronto where he served as Dean from 1998-2013 and was named global Dean of the Year by the leading business school website, Poets & Quants. He's also an author and his latest book, 'A New Way to Think, Your Guide to Superior Management Effectiveness' by HBR Press, is the culmination of a lifetime's work in education and advising CEOs. In this conversation, we discuss the premise behind his new book, working with and transforming culture, dealing with received wisdom and best practices, his work with ex-P&G CEO AG Lafley, the gap-filling machine that is our brain and many more fascinating elements to make leadership more effective. If you've got comments or questions you'd like to see answered, send your email or audio file to nminterdial@gmail.com; or you can find the show notes and comment on minterdial.com. If you liked the podcast, please take a moment to go over to iTunes or your favourite podcast channel, to rate/review the show. Otherwise, you can find me @mdial on Twitter. Show notes; https://minterdial.com/2022/05/roger-martin/

Moody's Talks - Inside Economics
Dr. Doom, a Stiff Drink, and Deflators

Moody's Talks - Inside Economics

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 71:45


Nouriel Roubini, Professor Emeritus of Economics and International Business at New York University Stern School of Business, joins the podcast to discuss the U.S. and Global economic outlook and the threats of stagflation. For more from Nouriel Roubini, follow him on Twitter @Nouriel. Follow Mark Zandi @MarkZandi, Ryan Sweet @RealTime_Econ and Cris deRitis on LinkedIn for additional insight. 

Teleforum
Judicial Ethics in the Modern Era

Teleforum

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 58:33


In the modern era, U.S. Supreme Court justices have been cited for what some critics characterize as “controversial” statements, sometimes relating to actual or potential matters before the Court. In some instances, these critiques have been accompanied by calls for recusal in specific cases. More recently, critics have turned to the statements not only of the justices themselves, but of the spouse of one particular justice. In light of these recent developments, what are the free speech considerations for justices and their family members? Although there is no formal code of judicial conduct applicable to spouses or even the justices of the Supreme Court, what are the ethical considerations of these actions? Does Congress have authority to impose an ethical code on this co-equal branch of government, particularly at the level of the Supreme Court?Featuring:-- Prof. Rebecca Roiphe, Trustee Professor of Law and Co-Dean for Faculty Scholarship, New York Law School-- Prof. Thomas D. Morgan, Oppenheim Professor Emeritus of Antitrust and Trade Regulation Law, George Washington University Law School-- Prof. Michael I. Krauss, Professor Emeritus of Law, Antonin Scalia Law School, George Mason University-- Moderator: Dean Reuter, Senior Vice President and General Counsel, The Federalist Society

FORward Radio program archives
Solutions To Violence | Third Thursday Lunch | Andrew Bacevich | 4-25-22

FORward Radio program archives

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 51:07


Andrew J. Bacevich is Professor Emeritus of International Relations and History at Boston University. A graduate of the U.S. Military Academy, he received his PhD in American Diplomatic History from Princeton University. Before joining the faculty of Boston University, he taught at West Point and Johns Hopkins. He is the author of nine books. Among them are: American Empire: The Realities and Consequences of U. S. Diplomacy (2002); The New American Militarism: How Americans Are Seduced by War (2005); Breach of Trust: How Americans Failed Their Soldiers and Their Country (2013); and After the Apocalypse (2021), His essays and reviews have appeared in a variety of scholarly and general interest publications including The Wilson Quarterly, The The Nation, and The New Republic. His op-eds have appeared in the New York Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, Financial Times, Boston Globe, and Los Angeles Times, among other newspapers. His latest is in the publication: WORLD - October 5, 2021 “A sprawling military network across 4 million square miles and 560 million people in the MIddle East undermines goals of security and stability.”

BroadEye: An Ophthalmology Podcast
Instilling the call for humanitarian service - Dr. Bradley Farris

BroadEye: An Ophthalmology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 30:51


In this episode, we had the chance to talk with Dr. Farris about his charitable work in eye care both in the United States and internationally. For the past 20 years, he has led a team annually from Dean McGee Eye Institute to develop academic exchange and work with the local residency-training programs in China.  He has done the same in Africa for the past 11 years. Dr. Farris is the 2021 recipient of the Outstanding Humanitarian Service Award by the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Professor Emeritus of Ophthalmology at the University of Oklahoma and Dean McGee Eye Institute. 

Collectable Daily with Alan Goldsher
A Trip to Collectors University with Sports Collectors Daily's Rich Mueller - Collectable Daily, April 26, 2022

Collectable Daily with Alan Goldsher

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 30:36


The man we like to refer to as The Hobby's Professor Emeritus discusses the relative complexity of collecting vintage cards versus modern cards, the possibilities of a Junk Wax Era 2.0, and the importance (or non-importance?) of card comp research.

The Other Side of Midnight with Frank Morano
Sweet, Tweet Revenge | 04-26-2022

The Other Side of Midnight with Frank Morano

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 223:21


If Frank comes knocking on your door, you answer-- just don't shoot! On this hump day-eve episode of The Other Side of Midnight, Frank starts the day off with what he calls good news for free speech, as newly announced owner of Twitter, Elon Musk, officially buys the social media mega-site. Why aren't young voters sticking with President Joe Biden... other than him being older than most of their grandparents? Frank searches for the answer. Controversy arises in Long Island where a beloved yet mischievous childhood prank of ringing someone's doorbell and running off before they could answer the door takes a tragic turn. Want a spot in heaven? Donate an organ. Want a free hat? Apparently just call the show complaining you never got one. Alan Tonelson, Founder of RealityChek joins the program to talk about the ever-growing inflation the United States is battling, whether or not former President Donald Trump's health will affect him running for office again, and potential candidates running for presidency in 2024 & Professor Emeritus in the Department of Anthropology and author of “Between Ape and Human” Gregory Forth sits down with Frank to talk about the accounts of ape-men and hobbits being spotted in the open, and his contemporaries disbelief of his findings. It's Tuesday so Frank reads YOUR mail! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Frank Morano
Gregory Forth, anthropologist and author | 04-26-2022

Frank Morano

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 21:04


Professor Emeritus in the Department of Anthropology and author of “Between Ape and Human” Gregory Forth sits down with Frank to talk about the accounts of ape-men and hobbits being spotted in the open, and his contemporaries disbelief of his findings. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices