Podcasts about Axios

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Best podcasts about Axios

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Latest podcast episodes about Axios

Axios Today
Crimes against houses of worship are on the rise

Axios Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 11:31


From Jewish synagogues and Buddhist temples to Catholic churches and Muslim mosques, houses of worship are this year experiencing high levels of vandalism, arson and other property damage. According to early numbers, 2021 is on track to be a record year for hate crimes in the U.S., and many of those are linked to religious bigotry. Plus, global leaders prepare for the climate summit in Glasgow. And, your future home could be 3D-printed. Guests: Professor Brian Levin, director of the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at Cal State University; Axios' Andrew Freedman and Joann Muller. Credits: Axios Today is produced in partnership with Pushkin Industries. The team includes Niala Boodhoo, Sara Kehaulani Goo, Dan Bobkoff, Alexandra Botti, Nuria Marquez Martinez, Alex Sugiura, Sabeena Singhani, Lydia McMullen-Laird, Michael Hanf, and David Toledo. Music is composed by Evan Viola. You can reach us at podcasts@axios.com. You can text questions, comments and story ideas to Niala as a text or voice memo to 202-918-4893. Go deeper: Attacks against houses of worship are on the rise What we're watching during the final countdown to COP26 3D-printed houses poised to go mainstream Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Bike Shed
314: Communication, Testing, and Accountability

The Bike Shed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 40:55


Chris regains several of his developer merit badges and embarks on a perilous CSRF (Cross-Site Request Forgery) adventure. Steph shares highlights from Plucky, a management training course, including ways we can "click" and "break apart" from our current role, and how to have hard conversations. They also discuss how software development processes change at different team sizes, processes that break down as teams grow, and processes that are resilient at any team size. This episode is brought to you by ScoutAPM (https://scoutapm.com/bikeshed). Give Scout a try for free today and Scout will donate $5 to the open source project of your choice when you deploy The Nightmare Before Christmas - What's This (https://youtu.be/QLvvkTbHjHI) Giant Robots Smashing into other Giant Robots - Plucky with Jen Dary (https://www.giantrobots.fm/search?utf8=%E2%9C%93&term=plucky) Plucky (https://www.beplucky.com/) Services are Not a Silver Bullet (https://thoughtbot.com/blog/services-are-not-a-silver-bullet) Become a Sponsor (https://thoughtbot.com/sponsorship) of The Bike Shed! Transcript: STEPH: Boom. I'm recording. Magic is happening. [singing] What's this? What's this? It's a Bike Shed episode. What's this? What's this? CHRIS: You did that on the mic. [laughter] So you just started recording too, so it's not like you're like, "Oh, I forgot I was recording." STEPH: Oh, I didn't have a finishing line that rhymes with shed. CHRIS: Head, dead, bread, spread. STEPH: [singing] Is TDD dead? I don't know. [laughs] CHRIS: Cool. I liked it. STEPH: Hello and welcome to another episode of The Bike Shed, a weekly podcast from your friends at thoughtbot about developing great software. I'm Steph Viccari. CHRIS: And I'm Chris Toomey. STEPH: And together, we're here to share a bit of what we've learned along the way. Hey, Chris, what's new in your world? CHRIS: What's new? I had a fun experience over the past week or two of regaining some of my developer merit badges, which is always enjoyable. So one was I had to configure AWS, specifically S3 and IAM such that I could upload files to an S3 bucket, which seems like one of those things that a developer should be able to do, and it's just not that hard. And, man, I failed so many times, and I stared at the screen. And the ARNs I think that's another acronym that I had to try and figure out what it means and fight against. Anyway, I got there. So that's one merit badge earned. I really hope [laughs] I correctly and securely configured access to an S3 bucket such that we could upload files in our Rails app. Cool, neat. Moving on, the next merit badge that I went for was restoring the sea of green dots. Our RSpec output had gathered some noise. There was a whole bunch of noise across a variety of things. There were some dev tools that were dumping some stuff in there. And there was something related to apparition, which is the...I want to say it's the Capybara feature spec driver that we're using now, which sits on top of ChromeDriver or something like that. I don't really understand the details, but it was complaining about something. And I found a fix, and then I fixed it and whatnot. But it was one of those. I did this on a Saturday because I was just like, you know what? This will be cathartic and healing. And then I got to the sea of green dots, and I was so happy to get to it. STEPH: This is me...I'm giving you a round of applause. CHRIS: Well, thank you. Arguable whether it delivered any real value to users, but again, this was Saturday effort, so I was allowed to indulge my fastidious caretaker of the code role. STEPH: Sorry, before we move on to more serious, can we pause to talk about developer merit badges? I really, really want cute felt badges that we can...I mean, I can't design them. I don't have the talent. But I think between us and other folks, we could design amazing merit badges, and then people could collect those. I'm very much in love with that idea. CHRIS: I love the idea. I am now certain that if we were to really pursue this, that we would fall into the deepest of bike sheds as we try and define well; what are all the merit badges? And what are the different levels? STEPH: [laughs] CHRIS: And how many do you need to collect before you can get to what are the different...There are just so many different taxonomies that we could introduce, and, oh man, I could spend a couple of weeks on that. STEPH: [laughs] It has a very strong Pokémon vibe too of you got to catch them all. CHRIS: Absolutely. STEPH: Okay. All right. We won't digress into bikeshedding merit badges, but I'm still very, very interested in that idea. CHRIS: Indeed. If anyone out there in the listener space wants to just make these, that would be great. This is the way that I avoid bikeshedding now is I just say I'm not allowed to make these decisions or even think about it. But if these happened into the world, I would be happy about that. STEPH: Oh, I just remembered we do have something similar at thoughtbot. They're not physical where you can hold them, but I think we've talked about turning them into physical badges. But we have our internal tool hub that we used to track our schedules. And one of the fun Ralphapalooza events that we had, a team came up with the idea of introducing badges in the tool hub, so then you could award people badges. You could give people badges. And it's very cute. So they could probably help us with the taxonomy. They've probably already figured out a number of badges we could get started with. CHRIS: And of course, this is where my brain went initially to like, oh, what would the taxonomy be? But I think that's how this goes bad. And if we just keep it in the this is cute and fun, and what are all the possible merit badges, but they're all equal, and the points are made up anyway, and then it's just a fun thing, then I'm like, I'm super into this. Let's do that. Have you used a regular expression to parse HTML? Congratulations, you get a merit badge. Have you not used regular expressions to parse HTML? You get a different merit badge. [chuckles] STEPH: [laughs] I feel very positive that I could be chief of cute and fun. I could manage that department. CHRIS: Yes, that feels like definitely a role that you could really excel at. But shifting around ever so slightly, I did run into a fun bug this week. And it was a mystery tour of, I'm going to say, sadness and then eventual learning and understanding, and I think we've come to a better place. But I want to tell a story, take us on a quick tour of the adventure that I went through. So we recently saw a handful of exceptions come through in our exception monitoring service and then piped into Slack, where we see those around CSRF token expiry. So this occasionally happens in a Rails app. The CSRF token that was on the page gets rotated. And therefore, when someone...if they have an older version of the page open and they try and submit a form or something like that, then CSRF protection is going to kick in. And you do get some false negatives there or some cases where like, nope, this is actually a fine user, this is not hacking, this is nothing bad. It's just that that user had a tab open or something like that. I'll be honest; I want to understand better the timeline of expiry and how Rails expires those and whatnot. But it's one of those things; it's deep enough in Rails that I trust that they are doing a very reasonable thing. And I think the failures that we're seeing that's part of the game. And so, mostly, we wanted to add a nicer handling around that. So thankfully, Inertia actually has a really wonderful page in their docs about handling Cross-Site Request Forgery expiration token, this whole thing. This is a particular failure mode that your app might have. And so it's nice to be able to provide a nicer user experience. And so what we ended up doing is if we catch that exception, we have a rescue_from in our application controller that will instead of having this be a 500 and just a full, like, something went wrong error page, we instead respond in an Inertia-like way to basically show a flash message that says, "This page has expired. Please refresh the page to continue." And if the user just refreshes the page, then they will get a new CSRF token. And from there, everything is going to be fine. So it's not ideal. But it is, I think, both secure and now a nicer user experience. STEPH: Yeah, that sounds really nice. When they refresh the page, do they lose all that form data? I'm curious how painful of a flow that is for the user. CHRIS: Currently, yes. Inertia actually has a really nice feature for remembering form data. If you've ever been on GitHub and you're filling in a box, and then you go away to a different tab, and you come back, and it's still there, and you're happy about that, it's that sort of thing. So we could configure that. At this point, we don't have...most of our forms are pretty small. So this is not something that we opted to do proactive management around. But that is definitely something that we could add but not something that's default or anything like that. STEPH: Cool. Yeah, that makes sense. I was just curious because yeah, either small form doesn't really matter, or also, this may be just a small enough error that only a handful of people are experiencing it that it's also just not that big of a deal. CHRIS: Yes, this definitely should be an edge case. And we've also recently been working on functionality to log folks out after a period of inactivity, which would also, I think, obviate this in a different way. So all total, this shouldn't be a big deal. And this was basically a quick, little snippet of code that we thought we could just drop in, and everything would be great because it shouldn't happen much. But then I was testing out a different feature on staging, and everything I tried to do was popping up this little alert flash message that was like, "Hey, your page is expired." And I was like, that seems bad. And then I realized literally every action, any non-GET request, was getting this response that the CSRF token didn't match. And I was like, well, this seems bad. Luckily, it was only on staging and hadn't made it to production. But it had made it to staging, which meant it had gotten through CI, which was very concerning because we have a pretty robust set of feature specs at this point. We built up a bunch of fakes for all of the external data systems that we're interacting with. And we're really putting the app through its paces and trying to do so in a very production-like way. And so I was like, this is such a deep fundamental breakage. I don't know what's going on here. And so I started to investigate. And it turns out that in a recent commit, I had started using Axios, which is a little wrapper around the Fetch API. They may not actually use the Fetch API under the hood, but it allows you to have a nicer interface to make XHRs. And we implicitly had that in our package already by virtue of Inertia. Inertia uses it under the hood, but I wanted to make it explicit because now I was using it directly. So I figured that's cool. I will yarn add Axios, and then I will continue on with my day. And I worked on my feature and everything was great. And then I pushed it up into a pull request, and everything was great, and CI passed. And I got it onto staging, and everything was very sad. So then I started on the adventure of like, what is going on here? It turns out that somewhere between version 0.21.1 of Axios and 0.23.0, which there's a bunch of things about those version numbers that make me uncomfortable but here we are, somehow the behavior where you can configure the XSRF header name, which is what they're calling it on their side, the configuration stopped working. And so our override that says this is what our CSRF or XSRF token should be called when it's sent back up to the server in a header that was getting lost. And so they were falling back to their default name, Axios was. And, therefore, Rails was like, "There's no CSRF token here. So this is going to be a no for me. I'm going to reject all of the requests." So the fix was relatively easy to roll back and to pin the version of Axios to the previous version that we had been using. I didn't actually intend to upgrade it. I just intended to make it an explicit dependency. But by doing that, I accidentally upgraded it. I don't love that there was this pretty deep breakage in that. I haven't done the good work of trying to open an issue. I still want to scan through and see if there is an open issue or a conversation around this before I start making any noise. But I think if I don't find anything, this is the sort of thing that should be reported because I can't imagine I'm the only one running into this. Likewise, I was very sad that my test suite did not find this. Turns out in Rails, CSRF protection is just turned off in test mode, which may be overall makes sense. But for feature specs, in particular, I definitely want to have it. And so, it was nice that I was able to find the relevant configuration. And we introduced an RSpec configuration that says, "If it's a feature spec, save off the existing configuration and enable CSRF. And then after the spec, go back to whatever the previous was." So now all feature specs run with CSRF. And I did make sure to push up that as a singular change to CI, and CI was very unhappy with me. Many, many features-specs failed, which was good. That was what we were going for. They failed for the right reason because things were fundamentally broken. And then, I was able to update the package-lock or the package.json on the yarn lock, pin the version, fix everything. But man, there was this period of like, oh man, the app is broken in such a fundamental way. Users just can't do stuff anymore. They can view anything, but they couldn't change any data. And it just snuck through CI. And that feeling is the worst feeling. We had, at this point, built up a lot of trust in our test suite. It was really telling us when stuff was wrong, and if it was green, I felt very good merging. And suddenly, this just really shook me to my core on that front. STEPH: I love these journeys that you take us on. I mean, they're painful for you, and I am sorry to hear that. But I love these journeys that you take us on. [chuckles] CHRIS: I usually only take us on them when I've figured out the answer. And I'm like, all right, here's where we're at. It was rough for a little while, but now we are happy. And thankfully, the one configuration of saying, hey, Rails, also, please include this as part of our production like, configuration for test mode. So I feel better that moving forward, this breakage won't happen again. STEPH: We should add that as another merit badge for telling a bug story. All right, I'm taking off my hat of chief of fun and cuteness. So this may not be terribly relevant to all the things that you just shared. But I am curious where you mentioned that with Axios because you'd specified the name of the token, and then that overriding behavior is what then broke. And so then that's what led to this whole adventure that you went on. I'm curious, why did y'all customize the name of that token? CHRIS: A, this is a great question. B, I'm not super sure. C, I think the reason is because we were trying to align to Rails. So we have a little middleware on the Rails side that will serialize the CSRF token into a cookie. And then that cookie value gets read by Axios and sent back up as a header on the request. So this is the way that with Inertia CSRF just kind of works and is good. And it's different than Rails' normal. We put a hidden input into any form. And so Rails holistically knows about both sides of that, and everything works fine. But now I have to manually round trip the CSRF token. And Axio's default configuration is a header name X-XSRF-TOKEN, and we needed X-CSRF-TOKEN because that's what Rails is looking for. I probably could have configured it the other way on the Rails side. But one way or another, I had to get Rails and Axios to come to an agreement, to meet at a table, and to agree to collectively protect the app. And so I had to mediate that discussion, and that's what ended us here. STEPH: A meeting of the minds. [chuckles] Cool, cool, cool. Yeah, that makes sense. I was just curious because then that would have changed the whole journey. But yeah, that is super interesting. And I definitely resonate with the idea of when you've really invested in your test suite, and you trust it that then when it doesn't catch something that obviously breaks the application, then that feels like something worth prioritizing and digging into and then figuring out how to bring back that parity. I don't know that I've turned on enable CSRF for feature spec. So I'm also very interested in looking at that configuration and considering if I need that for any of my future client projects if that's something that I need to remember for the future because that's very niche but good to know about. CHRIS: I feel like this only really comes up if you're working in the...it's called the odd middle ground that Inertia ends up occupying. If you're in a traditional Rails app that is generating HTML server-side, forms are generated. They got the CSRF token inlined there in a hidden input. And then when you post that form, it's coming back up. The names automatically are going to match. You don't need to worry about it. And it's probably fine to not have it included in test mode. And if you're at the other end of the spectrum and you've got API interaction, and that's the way you're doing everything, then you have a different auth mechanism and cookies, and whatnot just don't apply in the same way. And so it won't really matter on that side but for a different reason. And it's only because we're in this interesting middle ground, which, again, I really love. And it's the thing that I love about Inertia. But this is a rare case where it's like, oh, we do have to bring the two sides to meet in the middle. And this is a case where, unfortunately, due to a very subtle breakage on a minor release of...a package that we're using silently broke so, yeah. But yeah, thankfully, everything is back to working. And again, we've been able to enhance the test suite in that little way that I feel confident again because this won't sneak in another time. We have coverage around this. We're good to go. So while I was very scared when this initially happened, I feel better now. I'm happy to go into the weekend feeling better about this. But that's my story. What's new in your world? STEPH: So I feel like I've been having one of those weeks where I have less code adventures. In fact, it's one of those days where I went to thoughtbot's daily sync...because we often have our client daily syncs, but then we still have a thoughtbot sync as well. And I went to the group, and I was like, I get to write code today. It's going to be a great day. All the other things I'm doing are also interesting, but I get particularly excited when I get some maker's time and get to write some code. So I feel like I've had less coding adventures recently and more hiring and process-related adventures. And specifically, I just completed the Plucky Manager Training, which is a program that's founded and led by Jen Dary, who was recently on thoughbot's podcast, The Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots. I'll be sure to include a link in the show notes for anyone that's interested. CHRIS: I believe this was the third time she was on. It's at least the second, possibly the third. And all of them are great listens, just as an aside, so we should include links to all of them. STEPH: Yes, I think she's one of the rare guests that has been on the show three times. And I think I've only listened to the first couple minutes of that episode. But I think they talk about the fact that this is her third episode, which is really, really cool. And I'm still frankly synthesizing all the information and the ideas that I've collected from the course. But I do have a few quick takes that I'm interested in sharing with you. So the first one is my cohort...we were the Panda Cohort, so go, Pandas. And some of the things that we talked about were…, and I think that this may have been the first day. So it was three days, and it was three hours for those three days. And they're spread out over a couple of weeks, which is really nice because then you show up for those three hours of the class, but then you leave with some ideas and some things to experiment with. You get a week to then try out an experiment and then come back to class next time and talk about this is how it went; it went to wonderful, or it went terrible. And you get to share that with others and work through it. And in the first class, we talked about coaching versus managing, which I found just a helpful definition to review. So managing is more direct, and telling someone what to do while coaching is encouraging someone to determine their own path and find their own solution. And I find that as a team lead at thoughtbot, I'm very often more in that coaching space than I am in that managing space. I think it's frankly pretty rare that I actually need to put on a manager's hat. And I often feel like I'm wearing my coaching hat instead. And some of the other things we talked about one of them is what is work? Which is a fun question to ask. And Jen had an analogy for this speaking about imagine that you have a plastic Easter egg. So it's got two sides, and side one is all the skills and desires and things that you're fulfilled by. And side two is a company that needs those skills. And it's great when those line up and click together, like when you take a job or get a promotion. Have you ever played...do you know what I'm talking about? Those little plastic Easter eggs. Have you ever played with those as a kid? CHRIS: Yes, certainly. STEPH: [laughs] I realize I just launched into that analogy. [chuckles] And then Jen goes on to say that's totally normal for then those sides to unclick. And Jen continues to say that it's totally normal for them to unclick. So maybe the company changes direction, the company is acquired. You've fallen out of love with something that you do about your job, or you have kids, and that has changed the things that you are fulfilled by and what you're looking for. And that's not necessarily bad. So it can be like, hey, you are working on x now, and you're not fulfilled by that anymore. But then another company comes along and says, "Hey, we're working on this, and you are fulfilled by that." So then another click happens. And essentially, it's a nice analogy to represent someone's career path and the ways that we are going to shift and re-prioritize what we're interested in. But it's also a really nice way to help it feel less personal because both sides are allowed to change. The company can change. You, as an employee, can change. And then you can look for that next click that is going to match up with a company that meets your skills and things that help you feel fulfilled. One of the other topics that we talked about are hard conversations, which I love that we dug into this one because that's certainly one that I struggle with or...I mean, we all get that feeling if you have to confront someone if you have to have that uncomfortable discussion with someone. It is a very hard thing to do. And so we had some very honest conversations around what is a hard conversation? What does that represent? And essentially, they represent that there is stalled progress and something can be improved. So Jen likens a hard conversation to a tool. It's something that you can use to then help something move forward again if something feels stalled or if there's something that needs to change. And during those hard conversations, you may not get to the resolution that you're looking for. So you may be looking for a specific outcome. But you also have another person that needs time to respond and to take in everything that you have said and process that information. So when you have a hard conversation, you may actually only move forward an inch. So if you had a lofty goal of we're going to talk and then we're going to have this hard conversation, and we're going to get to this space...But instead, you actually just make incremental progress. Like, okay, at least this person is now aware of this concern. That might be your win for the hard conversation versus actually tackling; how are we going to address it? I just want them to be aware of this concern. And it's a very vulnerable conversation, and they often take time before you can get to that ideal resolution. But essentially, the idea is get in the game, start the conversation, and then have follow-up conversations for that hard conversation. And I really appreciated that framing because I often will think of hard conversations of oh, we have to have this hard conversation and get to this specific outcome. But if you shift the goal line to be like, no, I really just need to at least make this person aware of a concern, that makes it a lot more approachable. And then also probably yields more fruitful outcomes because that gives the other person time to think about what you've shared to also come to the table with their own ideas and then work together to then get to that ideal resolution. CHRIS: I like that framing a lot. I can definitely see the case where you, as someone who has recognized something that needs to change (perhaps you're a manager),lineup you've now thought about that a good bit; you've observed it, but the individual that you're bringing that to this may be novel. This may be a surprise for them. And so if you come into that interaction both about to share this information but then also trying to resolve it and trying to get to I need you to internalize it, and I need you to fundamentally change your behavior as a result of this conversation we're going to have, that's quite possibly not a realistic outcome. And if you're trying for that, it might inherently lead to just a bad outcome because that individual is not in a position to do that. But they are potentially ready to hear it. And so you can just achieve step one and then later have step two. So I like that a lot. STEPH: Yeah, in general, I found the course incredibly helpful, very insightful. It was also really nice to hear from other managers that are facing similar problems or perhaps novel problems and then getting to weigh in and help each other. So it's a wonderful course. I'll be sure to include a link in the show notes for anyone that is interested. And I'll probably come back with some more insights from the class because it's really...we just wrapped up. So I'm sure I still have some ideas that will percolate over time, and I want to come back and share those with the group. Mid-roll Ad And now a quick break to hear from today's sponsor, Scout APM. 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And as an added-on bonus for Bike Shed listeners, Scout will donate $5 to the open-source project of your choice when you deploy. Learn more at scoutapm.com/bikeshed. That's scoutapm.com/bikeshed. STEPH: Pivoting just a bit, we have a listener question that I'm excited to dive into. This question comes from the one and only, the Edward Loveall, fellow thoughtboter. And Edward wrote in, "How does the process of software development change at different team sizes? What's a process that breaks down soon after the team starts growing? What's a process that is resilient at all sizes? And by process, I mean anything that involves other people including organizing tasks, code review, deployment, or anything else that isn't you alone writing code in a vacuum." I'm really excited about this question because I think there's a lot here. And there's actually one part that I'm struggling with a bit, so I'm curious to see what you think, Chris, about it. But I'm going to start off with saying that I think there are a number of management processes that definitely break down as a team grows. But in the spirit of Edward's question, I'm going to focus more on the software development process and how those might need to change and what starts to break as your team grows. So starting off with processes that break after the team starts growing, this one, frankly, what really starts to break is not a process specifically, but it's the lack of process that really starts to become visible and painful. So, how do we track work? Before, maybe the product manager or someone would just send you a message and say, "Hey, can you work on this?" or "Hey, can you fix this thing?" And how does code need to be reviewed before being merged? Does it need to be reviewed? Are people just merging as they get stuff done? How are deploys performed? Oh, we have a super urgent production fix that needs to go out, and the only person that knows how to deploy is out sick today? Cool. That's the type of process that I think that really breaks down, or at least you start to notice when the team starts to grow. What are your thoughts? CHRIS: I definitely feel that first one very strongly. We're feeling it right now on the team, which is still very small. There are only three developers working on the project, and then we have a product manager. And each week, we're slowly iterating, and tweaking, and honing, and trying to introduce just enough process in terms of how we define the work to be done, communicate the status of it, all of that fun stuff. We started with Trello. And we just had a board with some columns, and then we had more columns, and then we got rid of a few of them. And then we recently added a Power-Up to the Trello board, which allows for epics. So there are cards which are epics which tie to sub cards. And I'm staring at it, and I'm like, how long until we're Jira? How long can I hold out here and not be Jira? But it does feel like we're slowly iterating towards a more useful process for this team rather than process for process' sake, which I feel like is a really useful distinction. There's also a question of like, what can be known or what can be adequately measured and whatnot versus what can't be? So we've talked many a time on the show about estimation and velocity and trying to track that and the pitfalls inherent with that. And so there's, in my mind, two different camps. There's the process we want to avoid. And again, to reference German Velasco's wonderful blog post, Say No To More Process. And I really feel like there is a tendency often when things go wrong to then try and paper over that with process. Oh, this team didn't use the design system. So we need to write ESLint rules to make sure you can't import from the directories that aren't the thing. And it's like, we can do that, and I've definitely done that. And I will do that again in the future. But I always have the lens of do we need this? Is it worth the trade-off, the cost, the overhead, the complexity that it's bringing in? But definitely, organizing and communicating tasks is one of the ones that becomes really difficult. The more people that are working on something, the more you need probably more than one person staying out in front of them and trying to define the next bit of work that needs to be done after that. Code review feels like it probably should stay similar, with the exception that I lose the ability to review all code at some point. Right now, I'm trying to review every single PR that goes through or close to it. At some point, I'm just going to have to give up on that. But for now, that's my goal. But fundamentally, code review, I think, will hopefully take the same shape. Deployment, similarly, like, I've talked about the merge queue thing. I want to get a little bit of process in there but not too much. There is definitely some necessity for change. But I definitely want to resist the urge to change everything and to just say, like, slowly over time; we're going to have to be a big Byzantine organization with lots of rules and standard operating procedures and all of that. I've heard anecdotally, and I don't know if this is true, so maybe someone out there on the internet can correct me if I'm wrong, but my understanding is that at Google, they're pretty tight in terms of what languages and frameworks can be used and what processes, and workflows, and build tools and all of that whereas Facebook, as a counterpoint, is relatively lax. Obviously, React is used very heavily on the core web application. But there's some flexibility in terms of different languages and frameworks and things for sub-projects or small individual teams having a little bit more autonomy. And I think that's a really interesting thing of are you one large, cohesive, organized company or do you try to act like a bunch of small disparate but roughly connected teams that share good ideas but can work independently? And that changes how I would think about this question. STEPH: I really like how you're describing the addition of process. It sounds like a just-in-time process. So as you're learning that something needs to be added, then that's when you look for answers. And then you sprinkle on a bit of process that everyone agrees that feels very helpful within also the right to review and see if that still makes sense for the team. There's one additional area where I think the lack of process really shines through in addition to the number of ways that you've mentioned is also onboarding. So if you have a very small team and you are onboarding, it's likely that...Chris, you can let me know if I'm wrong, but when someone's joining the team, there's probably a good chance that they get to pair with you at some point, or they even get welcomed by you to the team. And then, they get an overview of the product and the codebase. And there's probably this really nice session where they get to ask you questions, and then they have that onboarding session. Does that sound about right? CHRIS: Yes. But I would go so far as to say it's not just a day or a session, but it's probably a couple of days. So yes, and. STEPH: That's even better. And with some of the smaller teams that I've seen, that onboarding process is where they are pairing with that lead person on the team. And that's going well until suddenly that lead person can't pair with everybody. And nobody has really thought about how to streamline that onboarding or how to coach or teach someone else to be a really good onboarding pair. And I have strong feelings about this area because we often focus so much on hiring, but then we drop the ball when it comes to onboarding that new, wonderful colleague that we've worked so hard to recruit. And at the end of that day, someone's going to reach out to them and say, "Hey, how was your first day?" And it makes a big difference for that person's retention as to how those first couple of days ago. So I think onboarding is another really important part that when you're a smaller team, you probably don't need much process because you have more of that personable onboarding experience. But as the team grows, there needs to be more of a process to help other teammates join the team. CHRIS: It's interesting. I think I totally agree with you that over time, there is a necessity to be more intentional and to have a little bit more structure in the process. And I don't think you're saying this, but I just want to make sure we are saying the thing that I think we believe, which is that shouldn't replace the human that helps you onboard. Like, I still like the idea that everybody gets a pair for some amount of time when they start at a new company. And you're working together on a feature, or you're working together on bug fixes. You're shipping to production as soon as possible. But you're not doing that based on some guides in a wiki. You're doing that with another human that's helping you. There should also be guides, and a wiki, and documentation, and formalization as the organization grows but not in place of having another person that you get to talk to. STEPH: We're just going to send you a little yellow rubber duck and then with a little Post-It note that says, "Good luck [laughs] with your onboarding process." Definitely. I agree with everything you said. It does not replace that human element where there's someone that's helping you onboard. I just see that onboarding is one of those things that gets forgotten, or we often point someone to a README which I do think is great because then it is battle-testing our README. But then there still needs to be someone that is readily there to say, "Hey, how's it going? What are you struggling with? Can I pair with you?" There still has to be that human element that is helping guide you through the process. And I think smaller teams may forget that they actually need to assign somebody to you to make sure that you have someone that you know. Like, hey, this is who I can reach out to with all my questions. Because they're probably not going to be comfortable posting in the company channel at that point or a larger communication to say, "Hey, I'm stuck on something." CHRIS: There's one other area that comes to mind, or I guess it's more of an anecdote that I have heard, but it speaks back to GitHub's early, early days. And they were somewhat famous for being very flat in terms of the organization and very self-organized, and everybody's figuring it out, and you're working on the thing that's most important in your mind. And for a long time, this was a celebrated facet of the company and a thing that they talked about rather publicly. And then I think there was this collective recognition, and maybe they reached a tipping point where that just didn't work anymore. Or maybe it actually hadn't been working for a bit, and there was just the collective realization of that. But it was interesting to watch from the outside as GitHub added more formalization, more structure, more managers, and hierarchy, and career ladders, and things of that nature. And I think there's a way to do all of those things in a complicated, overloaded, heavy way. But I think a different version of it is...like, you were using the word coaching earlier. Having formal structures within your organization to encourage people on their career path, to help them grow, to have structure around that, I think is a really difficult thing to get right. But I think it is critical, and I think just not having it can't be the answer past a certain probably pretty small size. So that is an interesting one where I think you do need to introduce some process and formalization around how you think about the group of people and how they work together within your organization. STEPH: I agree. I think where some folks may see a lack of hierarchy; others feel a lack of support. And adding levels of management should really be focused on the outcome is that we're helping people feel supported. So even getting feedback as you're adding those different levels of management, like, hey, did we make your life better? Did we make your life worse? I think that's a great question for management to ask as they're exploring a less flat structure. CHRIS: So, Steph, I have a question for you now on a variant of this topic. In general, we seem to be fans of having a codebase. Probably a Rails app that's got a database behind it, and that's where you put the data. Everybody commits to that same repository. It's all kind of one collected thing. And often, organizations grow to a certain size, and they're like, this is untenable. We cannot have this many people working on this same codebase. So we shall do the logical thing, which is we will break it up into small pieces. And those pieces will communicate over HTTP, and it will be great because then our teams can be separate from each other and can manage their little piece of the world. What do you think about that? Is there truth there? Is it not true at all? What do you think? STEPH: All right, so your team is getting too big, and to the point that you feel like you need to split it out so then you can have small teams, and they can all work independently on different parts and services of the codebase. I don't love the idea. I'm trying to think through because I feel like there's a lot of nuance here. But I don't love the idea that that's the driving force as to why are we making the change? And that is often a question that comes to mind whenever we are making a big change, either architecture or process-related is like, what's driving this? And then how are we going to measure it? And if we are driving it just because we have a large team, let's talk more. Why are people blocked? Why can't people work together? What's preventing people from being able to contribute to the same codebase? Are people blocked for a long time because they're having to wait on someone else to complete that work? I have a lot of questions that I don't know if I can fully answer your question. But my instinct is to say let's not break up the architecture just because our team grew in size. CHRIS: Yeah, I think I definitely agree with that. There's probably a breaking point where it's just too many individuals, and there'll be too much contention. But I think resisting that or at least naming that as like, okay, that's what we're saying but is that really what's true? Or are we actually feeling that this system is so deeply coupled that there's no way to change some small piece of the code without impacting other parts of it? Like, is the CSS completely untenable because we're just using global class names, and it's leaking everywhere? Okay, do we need a different solution there? And then it's actually fine. We don't need to have different services that have their own different style sheets. We just need a different approach to CSS. That's a particularly easy one to go for because there's inherently a global namespace there. But the same thing is true in a lot of different contexts. So services are a way to break things apart and enforce those boundaries. But if inherently coupling is your problem, then you're just going to be coupled over HTTP, and I think it's going to be difficult. There's a wonderful blog post by Josh Clayton, which I think does a better job than I'm doing in this moment of highlighting some of the questions I would want to ask. The blog post is titled Services are Not a Silver Bullet. And so Josh goes through and enumerates a bunch of the different versions of the story that he's heard throughout the years of well, we need to go to services because x, because our test suite is slow because pull requests are constantly having merge conflicts and whatnot, because the code is very deeply coupled and any change here affects everything else. And a fix over here broke something over there. This is no good. And so he does a really good job of presenting alternatives or at least questions that you can ask to say, like, is this the problem, or is this a symptom? And we need to address the more underlying cause. And so I think there is a point where you just can't have 1,000 people trying to commit to the same Rails codebase. That feels like it's maybe too big. But it takes a while to get to 1,000 people. And there will be times where extracting a service makes sense or integrating with an external service that exists. Like, I've talked about Stripe before as my canonical like, yeah, it's actually deeply intertwined with the data model, but they're just dealing with such a distinct complexity set over there. And they have such expertise on that that I'm happy to accept the overhead of the fact that that service lives outside of my core application, and I need to deal with synchronizing state and all of that. I will take on that complexity, but it's not worth it for everything, and it's not a silver bullet. Again, to reference the name of Josh's blog post there, Services are Not a Silver Bullet. And so, coming back to Edward's original question, I would say that having a monolithic codebase works for a really long time, but there is probably a breaking point somewhere well along, but fight it for as long as you can. I think. STEPH: I really like how you touched on coupling because it really helps ask those questions to get to the heart of what are the pain points that you are feeling? And it is less of a decision that is based on people and process but more if you're going to split out a portion of your architecture. It is in response to an actual business need and a business value versus some other pain points that you're trying to fix. A particular example might be like maybe you have a portion of your application that really just needs to spend a lot of time crunching data. And it's really not as specific to your application; it's something that can happen on its own. And then it's beneficial to move that outside so it can scale and relate it to the work that it needs to perform versus keeping it in-house with the application. I do want to circle back to another question that Edward included which is what's a process that is resilient at all sizes? And the ones that really come to mind for me...and these are a bit amorphous intentionally because it will look different for each company. But three areas that are very resilient at all sizes, whether you are 1 to 2 employees versus you've got hundreds or thousands it's communication, testing, and accountability. So communication, where are we headed, and how do we know what we're working on? For testing, it's how do we test our changes? Do we write tests? Do we use QA? Do we have a staging environment? What does that look like? What's our parity between staging and production? And then how do we know what's in progress, and how do we know when it's done? Those are three core areas that, regardless of your team size,,I think are very crucial to the team success. What do you think? What are some of the processes that are resilient at all sizes? CHRIS: I actually really like the list that you just provided. That is a wonderful trifecta, and I think it will take you very far, so probably not much to add from me. But I guess on that note, should we wrap up? STEPH: Let's wrap up. CHRIS: The show notes for this episode can be found at bikeshed.fm. STEPH: This show is produced and edited by Mandy Moore. CHRIS: If you enjoyed listening, one really easy way to support the show is to leave us a quick rating or even a review in iTunes, as it really helps other folks find the show. STEPH: If you have any feedback for this or any of our other episodes, you can reach us at @_bikeshed or reach me on Twitter @SViccari. CHRIS: And I'm @christoomey STEPH: Or you can reach us at hosts@bikeshed.fm via email. CHRIS: Thanks so much for listening to The Bike Shed, and we'll see you next week. All: Byeeeeeeeeeee! Announcer: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success.

Here & Now
How China spreads misinformation around the world; A look at 'The Facebook Papers'

Here & Now

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 40:06


Bret Schafer, a senior fellow at the Alliance for Securing Democracy, explains how China is able to spread misinformation around the world by taking advantage of the way search engines find and list content. And, there are more damaging revelations swirling about Facebook as new reporting has come to light based on information from whistleblower Frances Haugen. Sara Fischer, a media reporter at Axios, has the latest.

The Daily Dive
Teen Girls Are Developing Tourette Syndrome-Like Tics and TikTok Could Be a Part of It

The Daily Dive

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 28:19


A recent phenomena has been turning up in doctors' offices where teen girls are exhibiting sudden and severe physical tics. After digging into it, many of the girls had one thing in common, they are were watching Tourette syndrome TikTok videos. Most of these teens had also previously been diagnosed with anxiety or depression, but girls with tics are rare and these teens had a high number of them and in some cases the same tic, such as saying the word ‘beans.' Julie Jargon, family and tech columnist at the WSJ, joins us for how these tics were developing because of social media. Next, former President Trump has announced that he will be launching a digital media network complete with a social media platform called “Truth Social.” With this venture he seems to be taking aim at everyone in three distinct divisions: social media, subscription based content and news, and even alternatives to internet services like AWS. Truth Social could be launching in early 2022, but there seems to be a lot of work yet to be done as some reports said the site was already hacked. Kia Kokalitcheva, tech and business reporter at Axios, joins us for more. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly
The climate crisis is the only story because it touches everything

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 19:38


We’re talking about twin reports from the federal government today, focused on the risks climate change poses to the American economy and global security. It’s, uh, not good. We’ll talk about what’s in each, why the White House wants that information out now and the Joe Manchin of it all. Plus, Big Tech earnings, Jerome Powell’s next moves and a little WeWork news on this grab bag of a Hollowed-Out Shell Thursday. Here’s everything we talked about on the show today: “Report: Climate change is an “emerging threat” to U.S. economic stability” from Axios “White House, intelligence agencies, Pentagon issue reports warning that climate change threatens global security” from The Washington Post “Apple’s ad business sees windfall; is accused of breaking its own privacy rules” from 9to5 Mac “Snap plummets 22% after missing on revenue expectations” from CNBC “Facebook stock drops after company warns Apple’s privacy changes to have bigger Q3 impact” from TechCrunch “Facebook plans to change company name to focus on the metaverse” from The Verge “Fed cracks down on trading by top officials in wake of scandal” from Politico “Scoop: “How about zero?” Manchin, Sanders get heated behind closed doors” from Axios “Adam Neumann hosts booze-soaked party as WeWork stock soars in debut” from the New York Post “Djokovic will need to be vaccinated to play Australian Open: minister” from Reuters Join us on YouTube Fridays at 3:30 p.m. Pacific/6:30 p.m. Eastern for our live happy hour episode! Subscribe to our channel and sign up for notifications so you don't miss it.

Marketplace All-in-One
The climate crisis is the only story because it touches everything

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 19:38


We’re talking about twin reports from the federal government today, focused on the risks climate change poses to the American economy and global security. It’s, uh, not good. We’ll talk about what’s in each, why the White House wants that information out now and the Joe Manchin of it all. Plus, Big Tech earnings, Jerome Powell’s next moves and a little WeWork news on this grab bag of a Hollowed-Out Shell Thursday. Here’s everything we talked about on the show today: “Report: Climate change is an “emerging threat” to U.S. economic stability” from Axios “White House, intelligence agencies, Pentagon issue reports warning that climate change threatens global security” from The Washington Post “Apple’s ad business sees windfall; is accused of breaking its own privacy rules” from 9to5 Mac “Snap plummets 22% after missing on revenue expectations” from CNBC “Facebook stock drops after company warns Apple’s privacy changes to have bigger Q3 impact” from TechCrunch “Facebook plans to change company name to focus on the metaverse” from The Verge “Fed cracks down on trading by top officials in wake of scandal” from Politico “Scoop: “How about zero?” Manchin, Sanders get heated behind closed doors” from Axios “Adam Neumann hosts booze-soaked party as WeWork stock soars in debut” from the New York Post “Djokovic will need to be vaccinated to play Australian Open: minister” from Reuters Join us on YouTube Fridays at 3:30 p.m. Pacific/6:30 p.m. Eastern for our live happy hour episode! Subscribe to our channel and sign up for notifications so you don't miss it.

The Howie Carr Radio Network
It's the Angry Customers Not the Government - 10.20.21 - Hour 3

The Howie Carr Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 38:09


Howie talks this hour about an Axios article that blames unruly customers stifling the economy not the Biden administration.

SkyWatchTV Podcast
Five in Ten 10/19/21: Biden Administration Has Lost 45,000 Children

SkyWatchTV Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 21:00


The Biden administration has released about 114,000 unaccompanied minors who entered the country illegally. According to Axios, they've lost contact with 40% of them—after weakening the vetting process for adult sponsors. SkyWatchTV was banned by YouTube! Please follow SkyWatchTV on Rumble: www.rumble.com/skywatchtv 5) 17 Christian missionaries kidnapped by gang in Haiti; 4) 45,000 migrant minors missing; 3) Why does Pete Buttigieg still have a job?; 2) “Gut feeling” leads to approval of Moderna boosters; 1) New Zealand fires its official wizard.

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

Tall, bushy, spiny and fragrant, the pinyon pine is a beloved feature of the Mountain West — and not just for its beauty. The tiny piñon nuts in the tree's cones are so good, people in the region have eaten them every fall for countless generations. But as climate change continues to affect the United States, something terrible is happening. The piñon harvest is getting smaller and smaller.Today we go to New Mexico, where the pinyon is the state's official tree. We talk to Axios race and justice reporter Russell Contreras, who's based out of Albuquerque and has an up-close view of the piñon's slow disappearance. And a native New Mexican — Tey Marianna Nunn, director of the Smithsonian Institution's American Women's History Initiative — tells us about the nut and tree's cultural importance.More reading:Op-Ed: Pinyon and juniper woodlands define the West. Why is the BLM turning them to mulch?Locally foraged piñon nuts are cherished in New Mexico. They're also disappearingPine nut recipes: From small seeds, inspiration

Axios Today
Biden, Manchin, and climate change

Axios Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 11:16


There was lots of news over the weekend about West Virginia Senator Joe Manchin's opposition to a crucial piece of President Biden's proposed climate agenda. That piece would encourage wind, solar, and other zero carbon sources of clean electricity. Axios' Ben Geman has a reality check. Plus, how the U.S. Secretary of Education says he's tackling crises in our public schools. And, the history of American newspapers promoting lynching. Guests: Axios' Ben Geman and Jonathan Swan; DeNeen Brown, associate professor at the University of Maryland and Washington Post reporter. Credits: Axios Today is produced in partnership with Pushkin Industries. The team includes Niala Boodhoo, Sara Kehaulani Goo, Dan Bobkoff, Alexandra Botti, Nuria Marquez Martinez, Sabeena Singhani, Alex Sugiura, Lydia McMullen-Laird, Michael Hanf, and David Toledo. Music is composed by Evan Viola. You can reach us at podcasts@axios.com. You can text questions, comments and story ideas to Niala as a text or voice memo to 202-918-4893. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Axios Today
The Hard Truth of facial recognition technology

Axios Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 14:06


On our latest installment of our Hard Truths series, we look at how faulty technology is making its way into the U.S. immigration system. Guests: Chaz Arnett, law professor at the University of Maryland and Miguel. Credits: "Axios Today" is brought to you by Axios and Pushkin Industries. This episode was produced by Nuria Marquez Martinez and edited by Alexandra Botti. Jeanne Montalvo is our sound engineer. Dan Bobkoff is our executive producer. Special thanks to editor-in-chief Sara Kehaulani Goo, executive editor Aja Whitacker-Moore and managing editor for technology Scott Rosenberg. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

PNR: This Old Marketing | Content Marketing with Joe Pulizzi and Robert Rose

Meredith's sale says big things about the future of media. Joe and Robert break down the what and why. Axios says that the creator economy is failing. Why? Because the platforms aren't giving out enough? Because there are big winners and some losers? The creator economy is a huge success. Change the perspective a bit and see. Justin Blau has developed a new NFT marketplace for musicians. Could this be the future business model for content creators? Rants and raves include a huge rave on the Sugar Factory and a continued rant on the lack of calling the practice content marketing. ------- Catch past episodes show notes at ThisOldMarketing.site. Get your .site domain today.

ABL Live!
ABL Live! (10.13.21) Weird Empathy

ABL Live!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 189:04


In this episode of ABL Live, we covered a variety of topics including the air traffic control protest of Southwest Airlines' vax mandate, the Texas school shooter who was given a "coming home party" when he was released on bond, Raiders head coach Jon Gruden resigning after "offensive" private emails leaked to the media, Ben & Jerry of Ben & Jerry's Ice Cream being destroyed by AXIOS reporter Alexi McCammond over their Israel boycott, NASA releasing a cringe Kamala Harris video with paid child actors, and much more!

Unfilter
371: This has Been Concerning Me

Unfilter

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 42:28


A real witch's brew of disaster is stewing. Why I think the near-term is a genuine make-it-or-break-it moment for America's middle class. Links: WATCH: Biden delivers remarks on global supply chain bottlenecks - YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XBRDTkra_Ug) FACT SHEET: Biden-Harris Administration Announces Supply Chain Disruptions Task Force to Address Short-Term Supply Chain Discontinuities | The White House (https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/statements-releases/2021/06/08/fact-sheet-biden-harris-administration-announces-supply-chain-disruptions-task-force-to-address-short-term-supply-chain-discontinuities/) Joe.I.Am's "The Buck Stops With Me" Ft. Lil' KC REMIX - The Remix Bros - YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-sCpthN9qfY) F Joe Biden Chant Compilation - YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W-Dar70Lz9k) FJB TikTok Chant Compilation - YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9DY0HqkStaE) Biden Reacts To F--- Joe Biden Chants Erupting Around The Country - YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d0jGIRzCEEY) Failure to challenge poor scientific advice during pandemic cost thousands of lives (https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2021/10/12/failure-challenge-poor-scientific-advice-pandemic-cost-thousands/) COVID lesson: trust the public with hard truths (https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-02758-2) Merck seeks FDA approval for antiviral COVID pill - Axios (https://www.axios.com/merck-fda-approval-antiviral-covid-19-pill-26ca000c-2325-4a3c-9cf4-21567a5dfe3f.html) Texas Gov. Greg Abbott bans COVID-19 vaccine mandates by any entity - Axios (https://www.axios.com/texas-bans-vaccine-mandates-82b05806-55b4-4cfa-a9ac-ba1959cd235b.html) Natural Immunity and Covid-19: Thirty Scientific Studies to Share with Employers, Health Officials, and Politicians ⋆ Brownstone Institute (https://brownstone.org/articles/natural-immunity-and-covid-19-twenty-nine-scientific-studies-to-share-with-employers-health-officials-and-politicians/?__cf_chl_jschl_tk__=pmd_YJF3bRWtpk3xtpVK0EXmtU38HTdG9xly8Obv9kGf7ig-1634005665-0-gqNtZGzNAqWjcnBszQi9) Economic Policy Institute Newsletter (https://www.epi.org/news/shrinking-labor-force-explains-drop-unemployment/) Southwest Airlines cancels 1,800 flights, blaming weather and staffing (https://www.cnbc.com/2021/10/10/southwest-airlines-cancels-1000-more-flights-as-disruptions-mount.html) The Priests of the Decline — Andrew Yang (https://www.andrewyang.com/blog/g3snyneafaf817fkkdsvpnf7w611w4) Breaking Up with the Democratic Party — Andrew Yang (https://www.andrewyang.com/blog/breaking-up-with-the-democratic-party) Crew shortages bring unprecedented service cuts to Washington State Ferries | The Seattle Times (https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/transportation/dozens-of-runs-canceled-on-washington-state-ferries-as-crew-shortages-worsen/) Washington State Ferries cancels 157 sailings over crew shortage (https://www.q13fox.com/news/washington-state-ferries-cancels-157-sailings-friday) A global energy crisis is coming. There's no quick fix - CNN (https://www.cnn.com/2021/10/07/business/global-energy-crisis/index.html) China Energy Crisis Hitting Everyone in Global Supply Chain - Bloomberg (https://web.archive.org/web/20211008213523/https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-10-07/china-s-energy-crisis-envelops-an-already-slowing-global-economy) China digs in on coal, oil gains as energy crisis deepens | Reuters (https://www.reuters.com/business/energy/china-digs-coal-oil-gains-energy-crisis-deepens-2021-10-08/) Lebanon's 2 Main State Power Plants Shut Down, Out of Fuel - Bloomberg (https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-10-09/lebanon-s-2-main-state-power-plants-shut-down-out-of-fuel) Elon Musk answers all your questions at Tesla's Shareholder Meeting - YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ErlS9x_EsbQ) New York will ban workers who refuse vaccine from getting unemployment (https://www.lawenforcementtoday.com/report-new-york-will-ban-workers-who-refuse-to-get-vaccine-from-getting-unemployment-insurance/) 'Whoa!' CNBC Hosts Stunned by 'Real Low' Jobs Report (https://www.mediaite.com/news/whoa-cnbc-hosts-offer-stunned-live-reaction-to-real-low-jobs-report/) 136 countries agree to minimum corporate tax rate after Ireland drops its opposition - CNN (https://www.cnn.com/2021/10/08/business/ireland-global-tax-deal-oecd/index.html) Seattle Police Department braces for mass firing of officers as hundreds have yet to show proof of vaccination (https://www.fox5ny.com/news/seattle-police-department-braces-for-mass-firing-of-officers) Kaiser suspends thousands of workers who didn't get vaccine (https://www.sfgate.com/coronavirus/article/Kaiser-Permanente-suspends-unvaccinated-employees-16513715.php) U.S. crude oil price tops $80 a barrel, the highest since 2014 (https://www.cnbc.com/2021/10/08/us-crude-oil-price-tops-80-a-barrel-the-highest-since-2014.html) Pfizer's request to OK shots for kids a relief for parents (https://apnews.com/article/coronavirus-pandemic-science-business-coronavirus-vaccine-health-b9a0e105be709a4d7a1c7d604e8d05f2) nejmoa2114583_disclosures.pdf (https://www.nejm.org/doi/suppl/10.1056/NEJMoa2114583/suppl_file/nejmoa2114583_disclosures.pdf) Waning Immune Humoral Response to BNT162b2 Covid-19 Vaccine over 6 Months | NEJM (https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa2114583?query=featured_home) Effectiveness of mRNA BNT162b2 COVID-19 vaccine up to 6 months in a large integrated health system in the USA: a retrospective cohort study - The Lancet (https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(21)02183-8/fulltext) American, other airlines will require employee vaccinations (https://news.yahoo.com/white-house-presses-airlines-employees-205316223.html) Pfizer Scientists in Undercover Videos Say Natural Immunity Likely Better Than COVID-19 Vaccination (https://www.ntd.com/pfizer-scientists-in-undercover-videos-say-natural-immunity-likely-better-than-covid-19-vaccination_685903.html) 403 Seattle PD employees have not submitted proof of vaccination, including 111 who have requested exemptions (https://www.q13fox.com/news/seattle-police-over-350-sworn-personnel-have-not-submitted-proof-of-vaccination) A pill to treat Covid-19: 'We're talking about a return to, maybe, normal life' - CNN (https://www.cnn.com/2021/09/27/health/covid-treatment-pill-khn-partner/index.html) Molnupiravir - Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Molnupiravir) Exploring the binding efficacy of ivermectin against the key proteins of SARS-CoV-2 pathogenesis: an in silico approach (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7996102/) Pfizer CEO Says “Normal Life” Won't Return Without Regular COVID Vaccinations (https://www.blacklistednews.com/article/80875/pfizer-ceo-says-normal-life-wont-return-without-regular-covid.html) Coronavirus Updates: FDA announces 3 key vaccine dates for October - ABC7 New York (https://abc7ny.com/fda-vaccine-decision-emergency-authorization-mandate-pfizer-children/11071641/)

Revelations Radio Network

Canary Cry News Talk #401 - 10.13.2021  THE GREAT FORK Bio Attack Readiness, Virus Brain Rapture, Grandma Climate - CCNT 401 WEBSITE/SHOW NOTES: CanaryCryNewsTalk.com EVERYTHING ELSE: CanaryCry.Party SUPPORT: CanaryCryRadio.com/Support MEET UPS: CanaryCryMeetUps.com ravel: Ravel Podcast Facelikethesun Resurrection YouTube channel Truther Dating experiment   INTRO Rare 2 headed Turtle found (Boston Globe) Clip: Jen Psaki, President timeline  Custom knife winner at second break?   FLIPPY UPDATE MSU recycling adds robot arm to sort (State News) Clip: Real dog meets its cyborg counterpart   NEW WORLD ORDER/BBB 3000 Amazon drivers could be owed nearly $200 million (Insider) Non-toxic gas to be deployed in NY subways, “bio-attack readiness”  (CNBC, NY)   COVID19/PANDEMIC SPECIAL Clip: Climate Change is way bigger threat than Covid, health official Clips: Southwest CEO denies any protest, admits rough summer (CNBC, Jim Cramer grille) Man who got Covid believes imminent rapture, brain problems (SF Chronicle)   BREAK 1: Executive Producers, Paypal, Patrons   I AM WACCINE Clip: Australia strictest waccine mandate (vs rap lady clip) Archbishop: Catholic troops can reject waccine (Axios) Covaxin for kids 2-18 approved by SEC (Economic Times) Note: Louisiana tosses 224,000 doses after no-shows (Fox Atlanta)   MONEY/POLYTICK Largest Social Security boost in nearly 40 years (AP)   BREAK 2: Art, Reviews, Jingles, Meet Ups  

The NewsWorthy
Global Tax Rate, Mass Flight Cancellations & Bisexual Superman - Tuesday, October 12th, 2021

The NewsWorthy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 13:06


The news to know for Tuesday, October 12th, 2021! What to know about new talks between the U.S. and other nations: from an in-person meeting with Taliban leaders to a possible global deal impacting the tax rate.  Also, remember the college admissions bribery scandal? We'll tell you what the jury decided for the first two people to stand trial. Plus, what happened with Southwest Airlines and the thousands of flights canceled over the weekend, how the next Superman will make history, and which iconic women will be featured on the U.S. quarter. Those stories and more in around 10 minutes! Head to www.theNewsWorthy.com/shownotes for sources and to read more about any of the stories mentioned today. This episode is brought to you by BetterHelp.com/newsworthy and Rothys.com/newsworthy Thanks to The NewsWorthy INSIDERS for your support! Become one here: www.theNewsWorthy.com/insider        Sources: U.S.-Taliban Talks: Reuters, CBS News, BBC, CNN, State Dept. Global Minimum Tax Agreement: WSJ, Fox Business, Al Jazeera, Reuters, White House Pledge to Reduce Methane: Reuters, NY Times, Axios, WaPo, State Dept. Navy Engineer Charged with Espionage: WaPo, NY Times, NPR, ABC News, DOJ Parents Convicted in College Admissions Scandal: WSJ, Reuters, CNN, NY Times More Boosters than Initial Doses: NY Times, NBC News, CNN, Becker's Hospital Review, CDC TX Bans Vaccine Mandates: Texas Tribune, NBC News, WSJ, Axios, Texas Gov. Southwest Cancellations: CNN, Fox Business, NY Times, SWAPA Raiders Coach Resigns Amid Controversy: Las Vegas Sun, ESPN, NY Times, NFL, Raiders New Superman is Bisexual: NBC News, Deadline, Vulture, DC Comics, Tom Taylor Women on U.S. Quarters: The Verge, USA Today, NPR, U.S. Mint       

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly
Women are still losing jobs

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 22:44


If you take away anything from the October jobs report, it should be this: More than a year and a half into the pandemic, women keep losing jobs. And it’s probably because we still haven’t figured out child care. Today, we’ll talk about some of the possible long-term effects of women leaving the workforce. Plus, Google and YouTube take big steps against climate deniers, and the “Bad Art Friend” drama is really all about Facebook. Then, a special guest surprises the hosts on Half Full/Half Empty. Here’s everything we talked about today: “September jobs report shows unemployed are still struggling with child care and reluctant to return to low-paying jobs” from The Washington Post “White House Weighs Wide-Ranging Push for Crypto Oversight” from Bloomberg “Google, YouTube to prohibit ads and monetization on climate denial content” from Axios “Biden Signs Legislation to Compensate Victims of Mysterious “Havana Syndrome” from The New York Times “Who is the Bad Art Friend?” from The New York Times “The WhatsApp outage and its global economic implications” from “Marketplace Tech” “American Women Quarters Program”  “USPS is trying out a new business, which could transform how millions access cash and pay bills” from The Washington Post “Fat Bear Week Crowns Its Winner” from CNN Our show needs your voice! Tell us what you think of the show or ask a question for our hosts to answer! Send a voice memo or give us a call at 508-82-SMART (508-827-6278).

Marketplace All-in-One
Women are still losing jobs

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 22:44


If you take away anything from the October jobs report, it should be this: More than a year and a half into the pandemic, women keep losing jobs. And it’s probably because we still haven’t figured out child care. Today, we’ll talk about some of the possible long-term effects of women leaving the workforce. Plus, Google and YouTube take big steps against climate deniers, and the “Bad Art Friend” drama is really all about Facebook. Then, a special guest surprises the hosts on Half Full/Half Empty. Here’s everything we talked about today: “September jobs report shows unemployed are still struggling with child care and reluctant to return to low-paying jobs” from The Washington Post “White House Weighs Wide-Ranging Push for Crypto Oversight” from Bloomberg “Google, YouTube to prohibit ads and monetization on climate denial content” from Axios “Biden Signs Legislation to Compensate Victims of Mysterious “Havana Syndrome” from The New York Times “Who is the Bad Art Friend?” from The New York Times “The WhatsApp outage and its global economic implications” from “Marketplace Tech” “American Women Quarters Program”  “USPS is trying out a new business, which could transform how millions access cash and pay bills” from The Washington Post “Fat Bear Week Crowns Its Winner” from CNN Our show needs your voice! Tell us what you think of the show or ask a question for our hosts to answer! Send a voice memo or give us a call at 508-82-SMART (508-827-6278).

Australia in the World
Ep. 84: AUKUS revisited; Quad leaders; China & CPTPP; Taiwan

Australia in the World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 47:20


This week Allan and Darren begin by resuming their discussion of AUKUS. With the decision now a few weeks old, have their minds changed? How are they seeing the debate evolving? What have been some of the more interesting contributions? For Darren, interventions by former Prime Ministers Malcolm Turnbull and Paul Keating are particularly notable, and Allan has plenty to say on both. Second, the two turn to the first in-person leaders meeting of the Quad. What is its significance? What should one make of the (over 2000 word) communique? Are things headed in a positive direction? Third, an area where both agree US leadership has been lacking is in trade, which makes China's application to join the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) all the more interesting. Is this a serious application? How should Canberra approach it, given the ongoing campaign of economic coercion? Meanwhile, the United States Trade Representative (USTR) Katherine Tai gave a speech on US-China relations this week—does that offer clues as to the Biden administration's plans for China, or economic leadership generally in the region? Finally, with Beijing upping its aerial incursions into Taiwan's air defense identification zone (ADIZ), both Allan and Darren offer some preliminary comments on what will certainly remain an issue in the months and years ahead. We thank Mitchell McIntosh for audio editing and Rory Stenning for composing our theme music.      Relevant links Stephen Dziedzic (@stephendziedzic ; Twitter) on FM Payne's response to criticism on AUKUS, 1 October 2021: https://twitter.com/stephendziedzic/status/1443864244152274948 Deep State Radio (Podcast), “Biden's multi-tiered China policy is a far cry from Trump's”, 4 October 2021: https://thedsrnetwork.com/bidens-multi-tiered-china-policy-is-a-far-cry-from-trumps/ Zachary Basu and Jonathan Swan, “Inside Biden's full-court press with France”, Axios, 6 October 2021: https://www.axios.com/biden-make-amends-france-macron-8db93b4c-39a3-458b-8216-02dfd0a8f03f.html Malcolm Turnbull, Address to the National Press Club, 29 September 2021: https://www.malcolmturnbull.com.au/media/address-to-the-national-press-club-september-2021 Paul Keating, “A relic of a bygone age? I might be, but I'm not a defeatist”, Sydney Morning Herald, 29 September 2021: https://www.smh.com.au/world/asia/a-relic-of-a-bygone-age-i-might-be-but-i-m-not-a-defeatist-20210928-p58vdu.html Peter Khalil, “Why my hero Keating is wrong on China and our national security”, Sydney Morning Herald, 23 September 2021: https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/why-my-hero-keating-is-wrong-on-china-and-our-national-security-20210922-p58twd.html Paul Keating, “China's responsibilities”, Speech to the 21st Century Council, Beijing, 3 November 2013: https://www.lowyinstitute.org/the-interpreter/paul-keating-chinas-responsibilities Quad Leaders' Summit Communique, 24 September 2021: https://www.pm.gov.au/media/quad-leaders-summit-communique Fact Sheet: Quad Leaders' Summit, The White House, 24 September 2021: https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/statements-releases/2021/09/24/fact-sheet-quad-leaders-summit/ “Australia to oppose China's bid to join trade pact until it halts strikes against exports”, The Guardian, 18 September 2021: https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2021/sep/18/australia-to-oppose-chinas-bid-to-join-trade-pact-until-it-halts-strikes-against-exports “A Conversation with Ambassador Katherine Tai, U.S. Trade Representative”, Center for Strategic and International Studies, 4 October 2021: https://www.csis.org/analysis/conversation-ambassador-katherine-tai-us-trade-representative “9/11 Inside the President's War Room” (TV Show): https://www.apple.com/au/tv-pr/originals/911-inside-the-presidents-war-room/ Amia Srinivasan, “Does anyone have the right to sex?”, London Review of Books, 22 March 2018: https://www.lrb.co.uk/the-paper/v40/n06/amia-srinivasan/does-anyone-have-the-right-to-sex Lidija Haas, “A Woman and a Philosopher: An Interview with Amia Srinivasan”, The Paris Review, 22 September 2021: https://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2021/09/22/a-woman-and-a-philosopher-an-interview-with-amia-srinivasan/ Conversations with Tyler (podcast), “Amia Srinivasan on utopian feminism”, 22 September 2021: https://conversationswithtyler.com/episodes/amia-srinivasan/  

Revelations Radio Network
TALE OF TWO FRANCIS'

Revelations Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021


Canary Cry News Talk ep. 398 - 10.06.2021 - TALE OF TWO FRANCIS': Collins Steps Down, RCC Corruption, Reset This! - CCNT 398 HOME: CanaryCryNewsTalk.com LINK TREE: CanaryCry.Party SUPPORT: CanaryCryRadio.com/Support MEET UPS: CanaryCryMeetUps.com ravel: Ravel Podcast Facelikethesun Resurrection YouTube channel Truther Dating experiment   INTRO Clip: Biden on how we always pay off debt (Real Time US Debt Clock) Trillion dollar platinum coin to raise debt ceiling (Axios) CRISPR: Japan rolls out first commercialized CRISPR tomatoes (Genetic Literacy Project) Clip: Truth Bomb on Sky News Australia    FLIPPY Flippy gets Fired   COVID 19/I AM WACCINE Three Amigos, down to two! Francis Collins steps down (NIH) Side Note: NIH New Innovator award for AI-powered Brain Machine Interface Clip: Ted Nugent on Off the Record PBS

Axios Today
Why energy is more expensive

Axios Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 10:46


The price of gasoline at U.S. pumps is up by about 50% in the last year, as energy prices climb around the world. Axios' Kate Marino says it could affect our post-pandemic economic recovery. Plus, Latina entrepreneurs show resilience despite the pandemic. And, manatees are dying in droves off the Florida coast. Guests: Axios' Kate Marino and Ben Montgomery and Telemundo's Marina Franco. Credits: Axios Today is produced in partnership with Pushkin Industries. The team includes Niala Boodhoo, Sara Kehaulani Goo, Dan Bobkoff, Alexandra Botti, Nuria Marquez Martinez, Sabeena Singhani, Lydia McMullen-Laird, David Toledo, Michael Hanf, and Alex Sugiura. Music is composed by Evan Viola. You can reach us at podcasts@axios.com. You can text questions, comments and story ideas to Niala as a text or voice memo to 202-918-4893. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Talking Space
Episode 1305: Space is Open for Business

Talking Space

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 81:08


If it seemed like average people flying into space was something from the future, this episode is proof that the future is now...or is it? In this episode of Talking Space, we start with the launch of the first all-civilian orbital mission, Inspiration 4. We report what it was like from the grounds of the press site (including some fantastic Falcon 9 launch audio) and the reception it received from the public. However it's not all cheers to a new era of spaceflight as some of our team members and the public say space isn't for everyone just yet.  We also discuss the upcoming private Axios mission to the International Space Station getting a launch date, and how the launch of a Russian actress is delaying important work to the newly-installed Nauka modules, which has had some issues from the moment it arrived at the station. We then dive into the delays for the Human Landing System because of a lawsuit. The question remains, even without the lawsuit, is 2024 still viable to land on the moon? We then also discuss the reorganization of NASA's Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate. It left a lot of questions about what that means for the agency, especially this far along with Artemis, which we hope to answer. Finally, we've heard about unruly passengers on commercial flights, but our FAA expert Mark Ratterman looks into what might happen if you get an unruly passenger on a spaceflight. Host: Sawyer Rosenstein Panelists: Gene Mikulka, Mark Ratterman, Dr. Kat Robison

How It Happened
The Next Astronauts Part V: The Launch

How It Happened

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 31:31


Axios space reporter Miriam Kramer follows the Inspiration4 crew to the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla. to cover their launch and catches up with each of them after their return. Kramer takes listeners to the press center at the Kennedy Space Center and inside of a pre-launch press conference with the four civilian astronauts the day before launch. Kramer reports on the launch from on the ground and analyzes the livestream hosted by SpaceX, including the abrupt termination of real-time access to the crew once they reached orbit. She tracks the crew during their three days in orbit, their high-risk descent back through the Earth's atmosphere, and what the safety and success of the mission means for the entire industry going forward. Credits: The Next Astronauts is reported and produced by Miriam Kramer, Amy Pedulla, Naomi Shavin, and Alice Wilder. Dan Bobkoff is Executive Producer. Mixing, sound design, and music supervision by Alex Sugiura. Theme music and original score by Michael Hanf. Fact-checking and research by Jacob Knutson. Alison Snyder is a managing editor at Axios and Sara Kehaulani Goo is executive editor. Special thanks to Axios co-founders Mike Allen, Jim VandeHei and Roy Schwartz.

The Rollo and Slappy Show
Episode 272 - The Best and the Brightest

The Rollo and Slappy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 77:42


Subscribe to the podcast We do it live.  We talk about our technical difficulties, Jamie Dimon, and how Bitcoin frees us. Items mentioned Jamie Dimon on Axios Learn about Bitcoin at a trickle BitcoinTrickle.com Sponsor Liberty Mugs Keep in touch with us everywhere you are Join our Telegram group Join our Sphinx Tribe Like us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter: @RolloMcFloogle @Slappy_Jones_2 Check us out on Patreon Learn everything you need to know about Bitcoin in just 10 hours 10HoursofBitcoin.com Podcast version

Axios Today
Afghanistan's ambassador to the US speaks out

Axios Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 11:14


Axios' Jonathan Swan spoke with Afghanistan's ambassador to the United States, Adela Raz, for the latest episode of “Axios on HBO.” It was her first TV interview since the fall of Kabul. Plus, the Supreme Court takes up some of our nation's biggest issues. And, Mike Allen on the Pandora Papers. Guests: Jeffery Rosen, President and CEO of the National Constitution Center; Axios' Jonathan Swan and Mike Allen. Credits: Axios Today is produced in partnership with Pushkin Industries. The team includes Niala Boodhoo, Sara Kehaulani Goo, Dan Bobkoff, Alexandra Botti, Nuria Marquez Martinez, Sabeena Singhani, Michael Hanf, and Alex Sugiura. Music is composed by Evan Viola. You can reach us at podcasts@axios.com. You can text questions, comments and story ideas to Niala as a text or voice memo to 202-918-4893. Go deeper: Exclusive: Afghan ambassador decries country's "betrayal" Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Rush Limbaugh Show
Clay Travis and Buck Sexton Show H2 – Oct 2 2021

The Rush Limbaugh Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 45:04


Creepy new New York governor says God sent the vaccine to smart people, prepares to fire health care workers who won't get the shot. Axios poll: Majority doesn't trust Biden. Clay and Buck in Tuscaloosa this weekend. NBA players Jonathan Issac, Bradley Beal stand up for freedom from vaccine mandates. Places with high vaccination rates are seeing record covid hospitalizations. Nurse will walk away from 30-year career rather than get vaccine. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast
Calling All Landlords! Rentals Needed in Tampa

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 4:06


Demand is going through the roof for rentals in the Tampa Bay region, and so are the rents. According to one data firm, the hot housing market and a steady stream of new residents have pushed apartment rents up 22% since the beginning of this year.Hi, I'm Kathy Fettke and this is Real Estate News for Investors. If you like our podcast, please subscribe and leave us a review.Real estate data firm CoStar says that rents are moving higher because of an influx of new residents, and without enough rentals to meet that demand, there are no signs of a rent-growth slowdown. USF Financial Professor Lei Wedge explained the situation to local News Channel 8. (1) He listed four basic reasons that rents are moving higher so quickly. He says:1 - There are lots of people moving to Tampa every day, and when people can't afford to buy, they are “rushing into the rental market.”2 - There are more renters in the market than the supply of rentals.3 - Because “home values are going up like crazy,” investors are buying more expensive properties and charging higher rents for a certain rate of return.4 - Long-time landlords are following suit, and raising their rents to match the higher rents offered by investors.Tampa Bay Home PricesAbout a month ago, Axios wrote about Tampa Bay's hot real estate market. It says home values in this area are “rising faster than any other metro in the country” because inventory is too low to meet demand. Tampa real estate agent, Justin Ricke, told Axios that some homes are getting as many as 30 offers, and that homes are selling almost as quickly as they are listed. He says: “You can put a house on the market Thursday, and if you market it correctly, get multiple offers by Sunday, have a decision by Monday.”Axios says that closed and pending sales were down in July across a five-county Tampa Bay area, including Hillsborough, Manatee, Pinellas, Pasco, and Sarasota Counties. That's according to MLS data. It says if the trend were to continue it could be a sign that the market is cooling off, but the article also points out that “slowdowns are typical for this time of year.”Inventory is also a major factor. Because it is too low to meet demand, there would only be “so much cooling off of the market” as too many people go after too few homes.Tampa Bay's Median Home PriceSo what's the median price for the area? Data from Florida Realtors show the median for that five-county area is $373,000. That's up from around $308,000 in July of last year. The months supply of homes in July was only about “one month” for each of those five counties. That represents a 65% drop in inventory for Manatee and Sarasota Counties, and a 30 to 40% drop for the others.Stats show that homes went under contract in six days or less, on average, and that most single-family homes get the asking price or higher.This climb in home prices and rents is also making it difficult for many people to afford a home or a rental. Ricke says he's getting calls constantly from people looking for an affordable place to live.If you are an investor, wondering how this could play out for you, RealWealth has its own data on the market. Recent posts on the Southwest Florida market include a podcast called: “Demographics & Hot Markets with Our Florida Expert.” That's available under the Learn Tab at newsforinvestors.com.You'll also find a webinar replay on the Tampa area that you can access here as a RealWealth member through the Investor Portal. It's free to join and will also give you access to experienced investment counselors, property teams, lenders, 1031 exchange facilitators, attorneys, CPAs and sample pro-formas for rental properties in markets across the U.S. That's it for this episode. Please remember to hit the subscribe button, and leave a review! Thanks for listening. I'm Kathy Fettke.Links:1 -https://www.wfla.com/news/hillsborough-county/tampa-rent-prices-up-22-percent-in-2021-data-shows/2 -https://www.axios.com/tampa-bay-real-estate-market-outlook-home-sales-93f33ec1-30a9-4115-a502-f1728302ecc3.html

The Rush Limbaugh Show
Clay Travis and Buck Sexton Show H1 – Sep 28 2021

The Rush Limbaugh Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 45:04


Creepy new New York governor says God sent the vaccine to smart people, prepares to fire health care workers who won't get the shot. Axios poll: Majority doesn't trust Biden. Clay and Buck in Tuscaloosa this weekend. NBA players Jonathan Issac, Bradley Beal stand up for freedom from vaccine mandates. Places with high vaccination rates are seeing record covid hospitalizations. Nurse will walk away from 30-year career rather than get vaccine. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Killing IT Podcast
Episode: 131 - AI Breaking Bad, CISA Revisited, and More

The Killing IT Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 29:43


Question of the Day: What is a photo? Topic 1: When AI Breaks Bad Once again we address the question of ethics and AI. From Axios: "A new report about artificial intelligence and its effects warns AI has reached a turning point and its negative effects can no longer be ignored." Have we reached the point where we should automatically look for the negative effects first? Link: https://www.axios.com/newsletters/axios-future-0a5d2e2c-acd8-422b-a37c-1fc93f78a76f.html  Topic 2: Let's look at CISA . . . again. Last week we talked about the CISA advice for your customers. Here we revisit, and look at the “Low fruit” considerations that you might actually decide to adopt today. These include Backup documentation, Client data segregation, and Financial health of IT service providers. Link: https://www.cisa.gov/publication/risk-considerations-msp-customers  See also Karl's blog posts on this: - https://blog.smallbizthoughts.com/2021/09/the-government-is-telling-your-clients.html  - https://blog.smallbizthoughts.com/2021/09/three-things-you-should-do-in-response.html  Topic 3: Next Gen Crowd Sourcing? Pondering . . . is there a new name for the group behavior that's emerging on the Internet in the 2020's? For example: - TikTok investors follow members of Congress - Reddit investors manipulate the stock market - Amateur sleuths help in the search for missing persons Question: Is there a name for this kind of activity? It seems like there's something other than "crowd sourcing" here. Link: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/09/20/style/gabby-petito-case-tiktok-social-media.html  Sponsor Memo: Did you know that the average MSP spends 10 hours manually inputting accounting data each week? That time is 120 prospect calls, a month's worth of the Business of Tech, or building an entire Lego death star. Gozynta Mobius can make your life easier through accounting automation. Automatic sync of invoices, expenses and inventory from ConnectWise Manage into QuickBooks Online in just a single click of a button. With onboarding, direct support, and regular feature releases, Gozynta is a family owned company dedicated to making software suck a little less each day. Visit us at www.Gozynta.com :-)  

The Nomad Capitalist Audio Experience
More Families are Homeschooling

The Nomad Capitalist Audio Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 9:44


More people than ever are homeschooling because of chaos 2020. Some parents have lost faith in traditional schools, and others want to protect their children. In this Video Andrew shares, an article from Axios.com and discusses why it brings you opportunities, especially if you decide to start a Nomad Capitalist lifestyle. https://nomadcapitalist.com/ Andrew Henderson and the Nomad Capitalist team are the world's most sought-after experts on legal offshore tax strategies, investment immigration, and global citizenship. We work exclusively with seven- and eight-figure entrepreneurs and investors who want to "go where they're treated best". Work with Andrew: https://nomadcapitalist.com/apply/ Andrew has started offshore companies, opened dozens of offshore bank accounts, obtained multiple second passports, and purchased real estate on four continents. He has spent the last 12 years studying and personally implementing the Nomad Capitalist lifestyle. Our growing team of researchers, strategies, and implementers add to our ever-growing knowledge base of the best options available. In addition, we've spent years studying the behavior of hundreds of clients in order to help people get the results they want faster and with less effort. About Andrew: https://nomadcapitalist.com/about/ Our Website: http://www.nomadcapitalist.com Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=nomadcapitalist Buy Andrew's Book: https://amzn.to/2QKQqR0 DISCLAIMER: The information in this video should not be considered tax, financial, investment, or any kind of professional advice. Only a professional diagnosis of your specific situation can determine which strategies are appropriate for your needs. Nomad Capitalist can and does not provide advice unless/until engaged by you.  

The Four Top
Ep. 92: Money, Money, Money

The Four Top

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 57:43


What do toilet paper and Bordeaux have in common? Who's making money in wine these days and how are they doing it? In Ep. 92, we dive into the economics of the wine world. We discuss the various ways the pandemic has upended the industry, and debate what changes might be here to stay.Our team of financial advisors includes Felix Salmon, Chief Financial Correspondent at Axios and host of The Slate Wine Club podcast; and Rob McMillan, Executive Vice President of the Wine Division at Silicon Valley Bank, and author of the annual State of the Wine Industry Report.

Axios Today
Biden's diplomacy on the world stage

Axios Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 11:16


President Biden struck an optimistic note when addressing the UN this week, emphasizing that the America First doctrines of the Trump administration are in the past. But whether it's the Afghanistan withdrawal or a new nuclear deal with Australia and the UK, many Western allies are unhappy with the U.S. Plus, what's behind Puerto Rico's high vaccination rate. And, the crisis in daycares across the country. Guests: Governor of Puerto Rico Pedro Pierluisi, Axios' Margaret Talev and Katie Peralta Soloff. Credits: Axios Today is produced in partnership with Pushkin Industries. The team includes Niala Boodhoo, Sara Kehaulani Goo, Dan Bobkoff, Alexandra Botti, Nuria Marquez Martinez, Sabeena Singhani, Alex Sugiura, and Michael Hanf. Music is composed by Evan Viola. You can reach us at podcasts@axios.com. You can text questions, comments and story ideas to Niala as a text or voice memo to 202-918-4893. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Axios Today
Haitian migrants at the southern border

Axios Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 11:11


Thousands of Haitian migrants are living in a temporary encampment at the Southern border in Del Rio, Texas. A lot has happened this week since the Biden administration announced they were going to start deporting many of these people back to Haiti. Plus, AirBnB's hopes of housing Afghan refugees. And, Democrats plan to tax the rich. Guests: U.S. Senator Ron Wyden, Axios' Stef Kight and Mike Allen. Credits: Axios Today is produced in partnership with Pushkin Industries. The team includes Niala Boodhoo, Sara Kehaulani Goo, Dan Bobkoff, Alexandra Botti, Nuria Marquez Martinez, Sabeena Singhani, and Alex Sugiura. Music is composed by Evan Viola. You can reach us at podcasts@axios.com. You can text questions, comments and story ideas to Niala as a text or voice memo to 202-918-4893. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Axios Today
Universities force choices on COVID vaccine mixing

Axios Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 11:12


On Monday, the Biden administration said it would lift travel restrictions starting in November, for travelers from 33 countries who are fully vaccinated. That means that the U.S. will let in people who have received vaccines that aren't yet authorized here in the U.S. by the FDA, like the AstraZeneca vaccine. But for international students who are coming here to study, that may not be the case. Plus, a test of the global financial system from China. And, why vinyl record sales keep exploding. Guests: Reuters' Ahmed Aboulenein, The Johns Hopkins News-Letter's Michelle Limpe, Axios' Felix Salmon and Erica Pandey. Credits: Axios Today is produced in partnership with Pushkin Industries. The team includes Niala Boodhoo, Sara Kehaulani Goo, Dan Bobkoff, Alexandra Botti, Nuria Marquez Martinez, Sabeena Singhani, and Alex Sugiura. Music is composed by Evan Viola. You can reach us at podcasts@axios.com. You can text questions, comments and story ideas to Niala as a text or voice memo to 202-918-4893. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Beyond the Kill
EP 304: Consistent Elk Hunting Success with Dylan Eyers

Beyond the Kill

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 89:49


On this episode, Adam's back in the interviewer's seat to host Dylan Eyers from EatWild to discuss what it takes to consistently have success hunting elk in BC. Dylan has decades of experience chasing elk and shares his insights and hard lessons learned from hunting these wily creatures. --------------------------- If you are not a member of WSF, it's time to join the best managed conservation organization on the planet. Go to Wild Sheep Foundation to find a membership option that suits your budget and commitment to wild sheep. --------------------------- Head to Black Rifle Coffee Company or Black Rifle Coffee Company Canada for 15% with the code “JOURNAL” --------------------------- Go to BEYOND site and use code JOMH to get 20% off the Axios and Kyros systems. -------------------------- Use code "QuickandDirty" to get 25% off at www.wildernessathlete.com  

Using the Whole Whale Podcast
256: (news) Haiti Supply Chain Issues & Omaze lands $85M Funding

Using the Whole Whale Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 19:12


nonprofitnewsfeed.com   Global Supply Chain Shortages Disrupt NGO Operations In Haiti & Elsewhere The New York Times reports that many nonprofit organizations and international NGOs are facing severe shortages of goods, disrupting their charitable operations. The global supply chain issues, largely attributed to the pandemic, have caused headaches for groups like the Haitian American Caucus, which provides the shoes at low cost to sellers in Haiti. “That pair of shoes represents so much more,” says executive director Samuel Darguin. “It represents a mother being able to send a kid to school, being able to afford health care and feed her family maybe two meals a day instead of one.” In the United States, nonprofit Soles4Souls, which also supplies the Haitian American Caucus with shoes, was forced to cut back its program to distribute shoes to homeless children in America. Read more ➝ Sweepstakes Fundraising Platform Omaze Raises $85 Million in VC Funding The lottery and sweepstakes fundraising platform Omaze has announced that it has raised over $85 million in Series C venture capital funding, according to this report from Axios. In addition to funding from traditional investors, celebrities Bono, Kerry Washington, and Tom Brady are also named as investors. According to Omzae CEO Matt Pohlson, “90% of a participating charity's donors via Omaze haven't donated to that organization before.” Read more ➝   Summary The Activist: reality TV show to be ‘reimagined' as documentary after backlash 2021 Nonprofit Organizations Salary and Benefits Report – The Non-Profit Times International Day of Peace | United Nations Record $1.7 Billion From Vanguard's DAF Donors

Axios Today
Why France is so angry with the U.S.

Axios Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 11:12


From French diplomacy to Haitian deportations at the Southern border, international headlines dominated the weekend. Axios' Dave Lawler catches us up. Plus, a looming battle with Chicago city workers over vaccine mandates. And, why companies want cool stock symbols. Guests: Axios' Dave Lawler, Monica Eng, and Courtenay Brown. Credits: Axios Today is produced in partnership with Pushkin Industries. The team includes Niala Boodhoo, Sara Kehaulani Goo, Dan Bobkoff, Alexandra Botti, Nuria Marquez Martinez, Sabeena Singhani, Michael Hanf, and Alex Sugiura. Music is composed by Evan Viola. You can reach us at podcasts@axios.com. You can text questions, comments and story ideas to Niala as a text or voice memo to 202-918-4893. Go deeper: Australian prime minister says France knew of "grave" concerns over submarine fleet U.S. begins deportation flights to Haiti from Del Rio Axios Chicago Game of tickers: The heated race to reserve unique stock symbols Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Axios Today
Hard Truths: Environmental Justice and the U.S. Government

Axios Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 15:12


On our latest installment of our Hard Truths series, how the federal government is tackling environmental justice, and what it will take to make real change in vulnerable communities. Guests: Henry Herrera, EPA administrator Michael Regan, and Dr. Robert Bullard, distinguished professor of urban planning and environmental policy at Texas Southern University. Credits: “Axios Today” is brought to you by Axios and Pushkin Industries. This episode was produced by Nuria Marquez Martinez and edited by Alexandra Botti. Jeanne Montalvo is our sound engineer. Dan Bobkoff is our executive producer. Special thanks to executive editor Sara Kehaulani Goo, Hard Truths editor Michele Salcedo, managing editor for business Aja Whitacker-Moore, climate and energy reporters Ben Geman and Andrew Freedman and race and justice reporter Russell Contreras. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Axios Today
What California's recall election and the Texas abortion law have in common

Axios Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 11:02


California's Democratic Governor Gavin Newsom survived a Republican-led effort to recall him from office, this week. Axios' Margaret Talev says new polling points to some GOP voters pushing back on the party in a few places. Plus, research into kids and long COVID. And, crab cakes are the latest supply chain headache. Guests: Axios' Margaret Talev, Tina Reed, and Michael Graff. Credits: Axios Today is produced in partnership with Pushkin Industries. The team includes Niala Boodhoo, Sara Kehaulani Goo, Dan Bobkoff, Alexandra Botti, Nuria Marquez Martinez, Sabeena Singhani, Alex Sugiura, and Michael Hanf. Music is composed by Evan Viola. You can reach us at podcasts@axios.com. You can text questions, comments and story ideas to Niala as a text or voice memo to 202-918-4893. Go deeper: Judge agrees to consider temporarily blocking Texas abortion ban NIH launches massive project to study long COVID Crab cake sticker shock: A crabmeat shortage hits Charlotte restaurants Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast
The Garage Takes on a New Role Among Electric Vehicle Owners

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 5:26


It wasn't too long ago that housing experts were predicting the demise of the garage, because of ride-sharing services like Uber and Lyft, and a desire to live “car free.” Many people have also turned their garages into additional living space. But now, with electric vehicles becoming more popular, EV owners want a place to safely charge their cars overnight and that's making the garage, once again, a more indispensable part of our homes.Hi I'm Kathy Fettke and this is Real Estate News for Investors.Having an electric car is still an expensive purchase for many people, but for those who can afford one right now, it's important to have a convenient and secure way to charge it up. That's not going to be a charging station blocks or miles away. Most people will want a charging station at home, so the car can power-up while they are sleeping. The Wall Street Journal acknowledged this new trend in an article called “Electric-Car Charging Stations Give the Home Garage a Powerful Upgrade.” (1)Powerful At-Home Charging StationsBut it isn't just the importance of “having” a garage. Charging an electric vehicle quickly also requires high-powered outlets and outlets that can charge different kinds of electric vehicles. The Journal reports that EV-owners are installing charging stations that range from “simple, 200- or 240-volt outlets to... elaborate systems that incorporate solar panels and battery walls.”In one example, the Journal cited a bi-coastal family with a 220-volt outlet and charger in Massachusetts, and a Tesla roof tile solar system in California with a Tesla powerwall and 2-foot by 4-foot batteries in California. That's not typical, of course. People who own an all-electric vehicle are also in the minority. Pew Research shows that only about 3% of vehicles in the U.S. are EVs, but we could see a big increase in green-energy vehicles in just the next eight years. An executive order signed by President Biden would increase the use of electric, hydrogen, and plug-in hybrids to 50% by 2030.Nation Need Charging Station NetworkThe biggest obstacles to hitting that goal include the cost of e-vehicles and the lack of charging stations. Having a charging station in the garage is great for local trips, but the nation needs a more robust network of charging stations along public roads and highways.As reported by Axios, the U.S. currently has 104,000 public charging “plugs” for electric vehicles. (2) But only 18% of those plugs will charge your vehicle in an hour or less. Those fast charging plugs are called “Level 3” or “DC Fast Chargers.” Axios cited an analysis by Mobilyze.ai which found that only about 10% of U.S. households have easy access to the plugs that are currently available. An easy access plug would be within a quarter mile from your home. The study counted 18.5 electric vehicles for every available plug. It suggests that one charger is needed for every 10 to 15 vehicles. The distribution of plugs is also uneven, with more plugs in wealthier areas.As more people buy electric vehicles, more plugs will be needed across all communities. Biden's call for the use of electric vehicles also comes with a call for at least a half a million more plugs.Minimum At-Home Charging RequirementMyEV.com says that a garage isn't necessary for at-home charging, so long as you have a dedicated area to park, and an external electric outlet. (3) The outlet might be mounted to an outside wall of the building, or a pole. According to MyEv.com, installation could cost between 500 and $1,200. If it's a 240-volt plug, you'll get a Level 2 charge. Depending on the battery, that could give you a full charge in 8 to 24 hours. Some batteries might only take 4 hours, according to this source. A Level 1 charge would use your typical 100-volt house current, and of course, take much longer to charge.The optimal system would be a Level 3 charge. MyEV.com says a Level 3 charger can bring an EV battery up to 80% of its capacity in just 30 minutes. While a Level 2 charge is still free in many places, a fast charge might cost you about 30-cents a minute. Joining a network could get you a discount. EVgo offers a 10% discount for members with a rate of 31-cents a minute. If you don't want to join a network, check out PlugShare.com for a map of charging stations.Tesla also provides a global network of fast charging stations. (4) With more than 25,000 Superchargers, it claims to operate the largest global, fast charging network in the world.You'll find links to more information in the show notes at newsforinvestors.com. And please remember to hit the subscribe button, and leave a review!You can also join RealWealth for free at newsforinvestors.com. As a member, you have access to the Investor Portal where you can view sample property pro-formas and connect with our network of resources, including experienced investment counselors, property teams, lenders, 1031 exchange facilitators, attorneys, CPAs and more. Thanks for listening. I'm Kathy Fettke.Links:1 -https://www.wsj.com/articles/electric-car-charging-stations-give-the-home-garage-a-powerful-upgrade-116299163132 -https://www.axios.com/electric-vehicle-charging-stations-equity-1b00f7a6-f87a-4125-9bc0-82399663b345.html3 -https://www.myev.com/research/buyers-sellers-advice/what-if-you-want-to-drive-an-electric-vehicle-but-dont-have-a-garage4 -https://www.tesla.com/supercharger

Canary Cry News Talk
CLOWNIFORNIA

Canary Cry News Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 189:37


Canary Cry News Talk ep. 389 - 09.15.2021 - CLOWNIFORNIA: Corona Climate Chaos, Missing Norm, Newsom Science, Alien Penguins - CCNT 389 Our LINK TREE: CanaryCry.Party SUBSCRIBE TO US ON: NewPodcastApps.com SUPPORT: CanaryCryRadio.com/Support MEET UPS: CanaryCryMeetUps.com Basil's other project: Ravel Podcast   INTRO Newsom Wins, the numbers Norm Passes (A couple Norm jokes NK set up/moments, Clip) Lawyer strolls beach as Michael Myer with bloody knife (My San Antonio)   FLIPPY Meet Gary, Israeli robot assistant (Jerusalem Post)   CBDC (Headlines) Central Banker says, Nigeria CBDC safer than other crypto's (Bitcoin News) Australia, Malaysia, Singapore, South Africa to test CBDC (Bitcoinist) China CBDC e-CNY developing (AMB Crypto) India to start testing CBDC, central banker says (NBC)   I AM WACCINE/PANDEMIC SPECIAL NY Judge blocks medical workers jab mandate (CNY Central) GOP Senator tweeted syringe swastika, compares jabs to holocaust (AZMirror) Two officials leaving FDA publish paper in the Lancet (STAT News) Support for Religious Exemption falling in US (Relevant Mag)   Australia:  Far Right: Australia has real life people zoo (Gateway Pundit) Mainstream: “Tyrannical”: Americans slam Australian (News AU)   BREAK (producer party)   POLYTICKS Milley doesn't deny comm with China in opposition to Trump (CBS) China blasts US for forming “Clique” with Japan, India: Biden drops them (Newsweek) Update: Biden forms alliance with Australia and UK against China (Orlando Sentinel)   SPACE POPE REPTILIAN Pope Francis criticizes use of cross as political symbol (AXIOS)   CLIMATE CHANGE/GEOENGINEERING Polar Bears “forced” to inbreeding, cannibalism to fight climate change (Inside Edition) Headline: Climate Change could displace 200 million people by 2050, says World Bank (QZ)   ALIENS Scientists, Penguins Might Be Aliens from Venus (Times Now News)   ADDITIONAL STORIES Undeniable Ivermectin Miracle in India (News Rescue) Opinion: The FDA is broken (Business Insider) Gas pumping robot arm (EU News) Wyoming, Gordon ready to challenge Biden on mandates (Powell Tribune) Convicted felon says he was shooting aliens during arrest (13 ABC) Salary Transparency laws to take effect (Business Insider) CLEAR propaganda for airport surveillance dream (NBC) Globalists get desperate as American's buck Biden (Wa. Times) GOP pushes unfounded election fraud claims (AP) Uchuu, galaxy cluster simulation is a time machine cube (Live Science) Elizabeth Warren wants Amazon to crack down on C19 misinfo (Reason) Does Alexa and Siri make kids bossier? (Sify)   PRODUCERS ep. 389: Brad and Trista**, Sarah P*, Jack V, Gail M, Sir Sammons Knight of the Fishes, Big Tank, Scott K, Sir Casey the Shield Knight, JC, Aaron J, Juan A, Platypuslady44, HeatheRuss, Adam42, Brandt W, Veronica D, Marci T, Runksmash, Ciara, David E   TIMESTAMPS: Jade Bouncerson   JINGLES: LeirBag3000   ART: Dame Allie of the Skillet Nation Sir Dove, Knight of Rustbeltia Ryan N

Axios Today
Pediatricians face a new COVID reality

Axios Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 10:54


With COVID-19 cases in children surging across the country, doctors are seeing more kids in their offices and in hospitals. Two pediatricians share what they're seeing and what they want parents to know. Plus, California's recall election and lies about voter fraud. And, what do you want to know about teenage mental health during the pandemic? Guests: Pediatrician Bryan Kornreich, Michigan Medicine's Marisa Louie and Axios' Sara Fischer. Credits: Axios Today is produced in partnership with Pushkin Industries. The team includes Niala Boodhoo, Sara Kehaulani Goo, Dan Bobkoff, Alexandra Botti, Nuria Marquez Martinez, Sabeena Singhani, and Alex Sugiura. Music is composed by Evan Viola. You can reach us at podcasts@axios.com. You can text questions, comments and story ideas to Niala as a text or voice memo to 202-918-4893. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Beyond the Kill
EP 302: Higher Than Average Number of Rams Confiscated in BC

Beyond the Kill

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 74:27


This episode is a swapcast with Dylan Eyers from EatWild who took the helm as interviewer for his show, the EatWild Podcast. Dylan asked Kyle Stelter of the Wild Sheep Society of BC and Adam to join him in a discussion on the concerningly high number of illegal rams that have been confiscated in BC so far this season. This is a major issue in the wild sheep community that deserves our full attention. --------------------------- If you are not a member of WSF, it's time to join the best managed conservation organization on the planet. Go to Wild Sheep Foundation to find a membership option that suits your budget and commitment to wild sheep. --------------------------- Head to Black Rifle Coffee Company or Black Rifle Coffee Company Canada for 15% with the code “JOURNAL” --------------------------- Go to BEYOND site and use code JOMH to get 20% off the Axios and Kyros systems. -------------------------- Use code "QuickandDirty" to get 25% off at www.wildernessathlete.com  

How It Happened
The Next Astronauts Part IV: Risk

How It Happened

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 25:48


Axios space reporter Miriam Kramer learns how the Inspiration4 crew is grappling with risk, something every company in the space industry and all astronauts must confront. Kramer speaks with the crew, the parent of a crew member, and a former NASA safety expert about how memories of the Challenger explosion have shaped the way the space industry prepares astronauts for risk. In conversations with crew members Jared Isaacman and Chris Sembroski and with their spouses, Kramer explores how uniquely challenging it is for the parents of young children to prepare their families for a mission to space. Kramer travels to Bozeman, Montana to watch the Inspiration4 crew fly in fighter jets over the course of a festive weekend, intended to bring the crew's families together, where they all celebrated the upcoming launch and confronted the reality of its approach. Credits: The Next Astronauts is reported and produced by Miriam Kramer, Amy Pedulla, Naomi Shavin, and Alice Wilder. Dan Bobkoff is Executive Producer. Mixing, sound design, and music supervision by Alex Sugiura. Theme music and original score by Michael Hanf. Fact-checking and research by Jacob Knutson. Alison Snyder is a managing editor at Axios and Sara Kehaulani Goo is executive editor. Special thanks to Axios co-founders Mike Allen, Jim VandeHei and Roy Schwartz.

Axios Today
How the pandemic changed kids' learning

Axios Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 11:11


The number of COVID cases in kids has skyrocketed with the Delta variant. For the week ending September 9th, children made up 28.9% of reported weekly cases, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. But contracting Covid is far from the only risk for young people during this pandemic. With the new school year upon us, and more data coming out all the time, we're looking over the next few days at some of the ways covid has affected kids: from language development to mental health from toddlers to teens. Plus, the group trying to get more Black Democrats elected to Washington. And, getting to the bottom of hate crimes data. Guests: Elizabeth Spencer Norton, assistant professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Northwestern University and Axios' Alexi McCammond and Worth Sparkman. Credits: Axios Today is produced in partnership with Pushkin Industries. The team includes Niala Boodhoo, Sara Kehaulani Goo, Dan Bobkoff, Alexandra Botti, Nuria Marquez Martinez, Sabeena Singhani, Lydia McMullen-Laird, Michael Hanf and Alex Sugiura. Music is composed by Evan Viola. You can reach us at podcasts@axios.com. You can text questions, comments and story ideas to Niala as a text or voice memo to 202-918-4893. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Axios Today
Interfaith efforts to fight hate

Axios Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 12:00


Before the 9/11 memorial in New York City was even built, there were plans to build an Islamic community center and mosque a few blocks away. Eleven years ago, the Anti-Defamation League opposed the building of the center in that place. But this week, the ADL's National Director apologized for that stance. He talks to Axios Today about coming together to combat hate and terror. Plus, how threats to the U.S. have changed over two decades. And, COVID today, by the numbers. Guests: The Anti-Defamation League's Jonathan Greenblatt, Axios' Bryan Walsh and Mike Allen. Credits: Axios Today is produced in partnership with Pushkin Industries. The team includes Niala Boodhoo, Sara Kehaulani Goo, Dan Bobkoff, Alexandra Botti, Nuria Marquez Martinez, Sabeena Singhani, and Michael Hanf, Alex Sugiura. Music is composed by Evan Viola. You can reach us at podcasts@axios.com. You can text questions, comments and story ideas to Niala as a text or voice memo to 202-918-4893. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Axios Today
Brutal crackdowns as Afghanistan gets a new government

Axios Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 11:07


The Taliban yesterday announced the first members of a new temporary Afghan government. And as Axios' national security reporter Zach Basu writes, the interim cabinet is made up of mostly “old-guard Taliban officials.” Plus, disappointing jobs numbers with some glimmers of hope. And, actor Simu Liu on turning a movie into a movement. Guests: Axios' Zachary Basu, Kate Marino, and Hope King. Credits: Axios Today is produced in partnership with Pushkin Industries. The team includes Niala Boodhoo, Sara Kehaulani Goo, Dan Bobkoff, Alexandra Botti, Nuria Marquez Martinez, Sabeena Singhani, and Michael Hanf. Music is composed by Evan Viola. You can reach us at podcasts@axios.com. You can text questions, comments and story ideas to Niala as a text or voice memo to 202-918-4893. Go deeper: BONUS AUDIO: Simu Liu talks to Hope King about 'Shang-Chi's' success and what's next Taliban announce formation of caretaker Afghan government Deconstructing August's disappointing jobs report Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

How It Happened
The Next Astronauts Part III: What It Takes

How It Happened

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 24:38


Axios space reporter Miriam Kramer goes inside SpaceX's headquarters in Hawthorne, California, to see the factory floor, the Inspiration4 crew's training regimen and how this mission fits into SpaceX's broader goals. Kramer speaks with SpaceX senior leadership and tours the facility, culminating in a chance to see a brand new bubble window built specifically for the Inspiration4 crew. She gets to sit in on the crew training in a cockpit simulator and learn about the various scenarios they are learning to anticipate. She also peers inside the Dragon capsule simulator — a mock-up of the capsule they'll fly in — and hears the crew's testimony of a harrowing 30-hour simulation of their mission as the capstone of their training. Credits: The Next Astronauts is reported and produced by Miriam Kramer, Amy Pedulla, Naomi Shavin, and Alice Wilder. Dan Bobkoff is Executive Producer. Mixing, sound design, and music supervision by Alex Sugiura. Theme music and original score by Michael Hanf. Fact-checking and research by Jacob Knutson. Alison Snyder is a managing editor at Axios and Sara Kehaulani Goo is executive editor. Special thanks to Axios co-founders Mike Allen, Jim VandeHei and Roy Schwartz.

How It Happened
The Next Astronauts Part II: The New Right Stuff

How It Happened

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 24:46


Axios space reporter Miriam Kramer unpacks who historically has been able to go to space and why the selection of Inspiration4 crew members Sian Proctor and Hayley Arceneaux is a break from the status quo. Kramer shares what she asked Elon Musk in 2020 as the Dragon capsule flew humans for the first time on the same day of nationwide Black Lives Matter protests — and how he answered. She learns Proctor's story, from her birth in Guam where her father was a contractor for the Apollo 11 mission to becoming a NASA astronaut finalist and to her chance to make history as the first Black female pilot of a spacecraft. Kramer also explores Arceneaux's story, told by Hayley and her mother, of Hayley overcoming childhood cancer, becoming a physician assistant for the hospital that treated her and getting the opportunity to be the first person in space with a prosthesis. Credits: The Next Astronauts is reported and produced by Miriam Kramer, Amy Pedulla, Naomi Shavin, and Alice Wilder. Dan Bobkoff is Executive Producer. Mixing, sound design, and music supervision by Alex Sugiura. Theme music and original score by Michael Hanf. Fact-checking and research by Jacob Knutson. Alison Snyder is a managing editor at Axios and Sara Kehaulani Goo is Executive Editor. Special thanks to Axios co-founders Mike Allen, Jim VandeHei and Roy Schwartz.

How It Happened
The Next Astronauts Part I: A Few Ordinary People

How It Happened

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 24:46


Axios space reporter Miriam Kramer traces how a multi-day orbital mission to space without professional astronauts came together in just a matter of weeks. Kramer takes listeners back to February of 2021, to a press call where SpaceX CEO Elon Musk made a stunning announcement. She brings listeners into her conversations with billionaire benefactor and mission commander Jared Isaacman to learn how he commissioned and designed the mission. She chronicles how the other three crew members were selected — one by raffle, one by contest, and one as an ambassador for her employer — and how they felt watching the last crewed launch before their own. Credits: The Next Astronauts is reported and produced by Miriam Kramer, Amy Pedulla, Naomi Shavin, and Alice Wilder. Dan Bobkoff is Executive Producer. Mixing, sound design, and music supervision by Alex Sugiura. Theme music and original score by Michael Hanf. Fact-checking and research by Jacob Knutson. Alison Snyder is a managing editor at Axios and Sara Kehaulani Goo is Executive Editor. Special thanks to Axios co-founders Mike Allen, Jim VandeHei and Roy Schwartz.