Podcasts about Scrutiny

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Best podcasts about Scrutiny

Latest podcast episodes about Scrutiny

Overthinking It Podcast
Episode 689: The Legend of Scrutiny

Overthinking It Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021


On the Overthinking It Podcast, we tackle the newest entry in the MCU, “Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings.” Episode 689: The Legend of Scrutiny originally appeared on Overthinking It, the site subjecting the popular culture to a level of scrutiny it probably doesn't deserve. [Latest Posts | Podcast (iTunes Link)]

The Capitol Pressroom
Massive state health care contract attracts new scrutiny

The Capitol Pressroom

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 12:29


September 9, 2021 - Assembly Health Committee Chair Dick Gottfried, a Manhattan Democrat, wants additional eyes on a lucrative state health care contract that has traditionally avoided scrutiny from the comptroller's office.

Marietta Daily Journal Podcast
Local Lawyer's Barn Destroyed in a Fire; Cobb Government Under Scrutiny for ‘Prison Break' Themed Game; Kennesaw State Takes on Georgia Tech

Marietta Daily Journal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 19:00


A Marietta Attorney Lost Her Barn To A Fire Friday Night; The Cobb Government is Under Fire After Advertising an Escape Room Based Off Prison; And the Kennesaw State Owls Head to Midtown for a Date with the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets. #KennesawState #GeorgiaTech  #CobbCounty #Georgia #LocalNews      -            -            -            -            -            The Marietta Daily Journal Podcast is local news for Marietta, Kennesaw, Smyrna, and all of Cobb County.              Subscribe today, so you don't miss an episode! MDJOnline             Register Here for your essential digital news.             Find additional episodes of the MDJ Podcast here.              This Podcast was produced and published for the Marietta Daily Journal and MDJ Online by BG Ad Group on 9-8-2021.           For advertising inquiries, please email j.southerland@bgadgroup.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Response-ability.Tech
The Ethics of Venture Capital Investors. With Johannes Lenhard

Response-ability.Tech

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 45:38


Our guest today is Dr Johannes Lenhard. Johannes received his PhD in Anthropology at Cambridge University and in 2017 started a post-doctoral research project, at the Max Planck Centre Cambridge for the Study of Ethics, the Economy and Social Change, on the ethics of venture capital investors.Johannes spoke at the 2021 Response-ability Summit. He shares what drew him to studying venture capitalists and how he does ethnography in this very closed, elite world across various field sites including Silicon Valley and London. Johannes explains that "not a single book" has been written about venture capitalists by someone who isn't one. As he says, "only an engaged anthropology" can enable someone to be both insider and outsider in this rarefied world.Johannes explains the impact of the lack of diversity in venture capital since not only are VC's hiring people who look like them (white, male) but they "also reproduce themselves into who runs these tech companies". The issue of venture funding is explored by Johannes and Erika Brodnock in their book, Better Venture, which will be published later in 2021.Johannes also briefly discusses Environmental Social and Corporate Governance (ESG) metrics which are starting to affect VC's and the “aggregate confusion” identified by an MIT paper.Johannes believes more scrutiny into venture capital investors is needed, saying "they are the ones deciding the big tech companies in the next 10-15 years....scrutinizing them now has an impact on everything in the future. They are the kingmakers, and we've been solely focussing on the kings, the Mark Zuckerbergs and the Jeff Bezos of this world".Scrutiny, he explains, will benefit both society and the VC's themselves.Drawing on his Medium post, "The Ultimate Primer on Venture Capital and Silicon Valley", Johannes shares his top reading picks for anyone eager to learn more: Doing Capitalism in the Innovation Economy by William Janeway; The Code by Margaret O'Mara; VC: An American History by Tom Nicholas; and a paper, "How Do Venture Capitalists Make Decisions?". And lastly, Johannes explains why more academics "of any kind" are needed to study the world of venture capital investors.You can follow Johannes on Twitter at @JFLenhard and connect with him on LinkedIn. Academics and articles also mentioned in our conversation:Saskia SassenJames LaidlawJohannes Lenhard, Can Tech Ever Be Good? Public Books, September 2020.

Tech Transfer IP
Innovation Impact Rankings with Cullum Clark and Christian Blackwell

Tech Transfer IP

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 60:03


Today I am joined by two guests; Cullum Clark and Christian Blackwell. Cullum is the Director of the Bush Institute SMU-Economic Growth Initiative and Christian is the Managing Partner at Opus Faveo Innovation Development, and their combination of skills and experience is a force to be reckoned with!  The purpose of today's episode is to unpack the report which was produced by Cullum, Christian, and a number of other colleagues of theirs (who are all acknowledged by name towards the end) titled the Innovation Impact of US Universities: Ranking and Policy Conclusions. The concept of innovation impact centres around the success of higher education institutions in having their research findings be brought to life in the world outside the walls of academia.  After explaining the value of this kind of measure, as well as how the data was collected, Cullum and Christian do a deep dive into the factors which are responsible for determining levels of impact innovation productivity (including one which has never before been cited in a report before), the universities which ranked the highest in their respective categories (categories were based on the size of the institution), and recommendations for leaders in all sectors who are interested in enhancing impact innovation (something that everyone should be interested in!).   In This Episode: [00:50] An introduction to today's two guests, and their educational and professional backgrounds.  [03:22] Cullum and Christian explain the focus of the work being done by the George W. Bush Institute and Opus Faveo.  [05:18] Where the idea of the importance of innovation impact originated. .    [09:16] Aims of the collaboration between Opus Faveo and the Bush Institute (which resulted in The Innovation Impact of US Universities: Rankings and Policy Conclusions paper).  [11:00] What research shows about the nature of spill overs from higher education institutions to the business sector.  [13:13] An explanation of the concept of innovation impact, and the process that was developed to measure outputs.   [16:06] Two quantifiable variables of innovation impact.  [18:01] As cliché as innovation impact sounds, it is actually very meaningful.  [18:55] Universities which were included in the innovation impact ranking done by the Bush Institute and Opus Faveo.  [20:09] Problems with the way innovation impact has been measured in the past, and why this method was better (although not perfect).  [22:34] A limitation of the data used in the study.  [23:40] Fear that some Tech Transfer offices have around looking at rankings, and why this fear is unfounded.  [24:48] Scrutiny that a lot of higher education institutions are currently under, and how measuring innovation impact can help to relieve them of this.  [26:25] What can be learned from looking at the licensing revenues coming into institutions compared to the amount they are spending on research.  [27:42] Universities which came out top of the rankings.  [28:45] The number of high-ranking universities that are private.  [29:33] How the innovation impact productivity rankings were calculated.  [30:30] Results of the innovation impact productivity rankings (including some that were very surprising).  [32:36] Major differences that exist between institutions in terms of innovation impact productivity, and why this finding excites Cullum and Christian. [35:12] Value of basic versus applied research [38:12] Case studies that were done on the top institutions in each category, and an overview of the learnings from these. [41:55] Christian shares a story of a university which changed a city.  [43:47] How leaders should be thinking about innovation impact.  [44:07] Cullum shares the top 10 rankings in the small and medium size categories.  [45:38] Top ranking medical and pure research institutions. [46:40] The two goals of the rankings report.  [47:16] How the size of an institution relates to innovation impact productivity.  [48:31] Ways that a university's geographical position impacts innovation impact productivity. [49:12] The correlation between foreign born/immigrant populations and innovation impact productivity.  [51:10] Surprising and unsurprising findings about how the technology transfer office of a university affects its innovation impact productivity ranking.  [53:20] Why the findings about the contribution of technology transfer offices to innovation impact productivity make Christian feel optimistic.  [54:51] The negative correlation between innovation impact productivity and research funded by industries.  [57:01] Possible explanations for the negative correlation between innovation impact productivity and research funded by industries.  [01:00:33] Work that needs to be done to align university and industry cultures.  [01:01:11] Examples which highlight the mismatch between industry and university cultures.  [01:04:30] What anecdotal evidence shows about younger faculty members at universities.   [01:05:36] How innovation impact plays a role in the competition amongst universities for students. [01:06:00] The role of innovation impact in attracting philanthropists.  [01:07:20] Recommendations for universities looking to improve their innovation impact productivity rankings. [01:09:33] Problems with the programmatic approach adopted by many universities. [01:10:53] An argument to increase public sector and philanthropic funding for high quality research.   [01:13:25] Something that funders of institutions should take into account.  [01:14:07] What places (towns, cities etc.) should be doing to improve innovation impact.  [01:17:11] The circular nature of the previously mentioned factors. [01:18:26] What the people making resource allocation decisions need to realize about technology transfer offices.   [01:19:12] Discoveries that Cullum and Christian have made about the heads of technology transfer offices. [01:21:42] Findings that came out of the quartile analysis that was done for this report. [01:23:00] Acknowledgments of the colleagues who worked with Cullum and Christian on the report. [01:24:40] The global potential of the findings from this study.   Find Cullum: Email   Find Christian:  Email  

The Fiona Show
Episode 112: Germany's Increased Scrutiny

The Fiona Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 64:58


Germany's recent compliance initiatives are picking up more speed than the Autobahn. On today's episode, CrossBorder Solutions Tax Director Hasker Hoogenberg and independent German-based transfer pricing  specialist Oliver Treidler examine the transforming audit environment in Germany, and how MNEs can insulate themselves from further examination.

Requiem for a Tuesday
Jeopardy, Media Scrutiny, Panic Room, etc

Requiem for a Tuesday

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 63:44


Ya boi comes through with some hot takes on some hot topics. The Jeopardy debacle is one for the ages, Mike Richards is a crook. I talk a little bit about the Naomi Osaka incident juxtaposed to it before closing with some early Kristen Stewart flicks, Panic Room & Zathura. Subscribe, like, comment, or whatever.  MERCH: http://rfat.bigcartel.com  RFAT Audio Podcast Network: http://linktr.ee/rfataudio  Everything Else: http://linktr.ee/rfat    "I RFAT, YOU RFAT, WE RFAT"  #ifeelliketuesday #rfat

OE OrthoPod
OE Headlines: Procedures Under Scrutiny, Humeral Shaft Fractures, Olympic Injuries & McGregor Update

OE OrthoPod

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 31:48


OE Headliner: 10 Procedures Under Scrutiny:  https://www.bmj.com/content/374/bmj.n... Fast Five:1.      A New Gold Standard for Humeral Shaft Fractures?https://myorthoevidence.com/AceReport...2.      The Ongoing Delta Variant Disaster https://myorthoevidence.com/Blog/Show...3.      Olympic Injuries: Genevieve Gregson's Achilles Tendon Rupture https://www.myorthoevidence.com/AceRe...4.      Olympic Injuries: Kasia Gruchalla-Wesierski's Clavicle Fracture https://myorthoevidence.com/AceReport...5.      Conor McGregor's Injury Update

WSJ Tech News Briefing
Elon Musk Doubles Down on A.I. Ambitions Despite Regulatory Scrutiny

WSJ Tech News Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 12:50


Tesla has been catching regulatory scrutiny for the company's assisted-driving features that rely on artificial intelligence. But despite the pressure, the company appears to be ramping up its use of the technology: Last week, CEO Elon Musk lifted the curtain on an upcoming Tesla robot. Reporter Rebecca Elliott joins host Amanda Lewellyn to explain. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

OE OrthoPod
OE Headlines: Procedures Under Scrutiny, Humeral Shaft Fractures, Olympic Injuries & McGregor Update

OE OrthoPod

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 31:48


OE Headliner: 10 Procedures Under Scrutiny:   https://www.bmj.com/content/374/bmj.n1511Fast Five:1.      A New Gold Standard for Proximal Humerus Fractures?https://myorthoevidence.com/AceReports/Report/36022.      The Ongoing Delta Variant Disaster: https://myorthoevidence.com/Blog/Show/1423.      Olympic Injuries: Genevieve Gregson's Achilles Tendon Rupture https://www.myorthoevidence.com/AceReports/Report/112294.      Olympic Injuries: Kasia Gruchalla-Wesierski's Clavicle Fracture https://myorthoevidence.com/AceReports/Report/120485.      Conor McGregor's Injury Update

MPR News with Angela Davis
The #FreeBritney effect: Conservatorships under scrutiny

MPR News with Angela Davis

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 48:35


The #FreeBritney movement has highlighted the immense power that court-ordered guardians wield over their wards and raised alarms about the potential for abuse. Guest host Chris Farrell will examine guardianships and conservatorships, and discuss what steps can be taken to reduce the risk of exploitation.  Guests:  Pamela Teaster is a professor of human development and family science at Virginia Tech and director of the Virginia Tech Center for Gerontology. Marit Peterson is associate director of the Minnesota Elder Justice Center.

MPR News with Kerri Miller
The #FreeBritney effect: Conservatorships under scrutiny

MPR News with Kerri Miller

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 48:36


The #FreeBritney movement has highlighted the immense power that court-ordered guardians wield over their wards and raised alarms about the potential for abuse. Guest host Chris Farrell will examine guardianships and conservatorships, and discuss what steps can be taken to reduce the risk of exploitation.  Guests:  Pamela Teaster is a professor of human development and family science at Virginia Tech and director of the Virginia Tech Center for Gerontology. Marit Peterson is associate director of the Minnesota Elder Justice Center.

Committed Capital
Sidecar: Increased Foreign Direct Investment Scrutiny – How Are PE Firms Impacted?

Committed Capital

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 11:43


The foreign direct investment review landscape around the world is evolving rapidly. In our fifth Sidecar episode, antitrust partner Clemens York and associates Marjolein De Backer and Hrishi Hari discuss how these reviews impact private equity firms, including considerations for transaction structure and timing.

Tax Readiness
Policy on Demand: Increased scrutiny ahead of inbound deals

Tax Readiness

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 20:56


The US Treasury is expected to increase its examination of inbound deals that may be a risk to national security. Craig Stronberg discusses the latest developments that businesses should care about and what they should expect.  Learn more at https://www.pwc.com/us/policyondemand.Speakers:Craig Stronberg, PwC's Intelligence's leader for Business Acumen, PwC USSindhu Blume, Host, Policy on Demand, PwC US

Tore Says Show
Tue 10 Aug: Vax Attax - Lie Fails - Re Anthrax - World Eyes - Real Scrutiny - The Cyber Symposium - Truth Rain

Tore Says Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 183:47


Quoting once again "We've already won." But it's still a long hard fight. Ego problems incoming. You better believe the credit is due. It's you, Tore listeners, that have made a real difference. FAG reps and the evil they push. Anthrax is back, just like in the 911 era. What the vax's have done to the military is a crime. Under a bridge level of homeless. The red team looks good. Cyber Symposium, patriots and the mountains of proof. CaC cards can modify software too. The greatest scrutiny of all is the public kind. Hold on to your seats, because we're driving, not riding. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

WSJ Tech News Briefing
Crypto Faces Prospect of New Scrutiny

WSJ Tech News Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 13:15


Gary Gensler, head of the Securities and Exchange Commission, says his agency will step up regulatory enforcement of cryptocurrencies. That may not be welcome news for an industry that has mostly dodged oversight. But it won't be an easy task for the SEC either. Reporter Dave Michaels joins host Zoe Thomas to discuss the proposals and challenges facing both the industry and the agency. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

BFM :: Morning Brief
P-Hailing Industry Players Under Scrutiny

BFM :: Morning Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 11:49


We speak to Iskandar Ismail from MYCC (Malaysia Competition Commission) on the P-hailing industry following the recent announcement that the Domestic Trade and Consumer Affairs Ministry is giving Foodpanda and Grab 14-days to present suggestions to improve their services. Image credit: Shutterstock.com

Shared Interest Podcast
Team Good II - Strict Scrutiny

Shared Interest Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 20:56


Belief, evidence, and assholes 

The CyberWire
Public Wi-Fi advice from NSA. South African ports recover from ransomware. Iranian rail incident was a wiper attack. Developments in the criminal-to-criminal market. Intercept vendors under scrutiny.

The CyberWire

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 27:06


Advice on WiFi security from NSA. South African ports are recovering from their ransomware attack. The attack on Iranian railroads was a wiper, of unknown origin and uncertain purpose. Developments in the criminal-to-criminal market. Israel undertakes an investigation of NSO Group. Josh Ray from Accenture Security on the road back to the office. Our guest is Duncan Godfrey from Auth0 with insights on managing digital identities. And a bad password is revealed on an open mic during an Olympic broadcast. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news briefing: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/10/145

Konkani Fundays
E28: View - Are our Sportspersons failing under the constant scrutiny and pressure to win?

Konkani Fundays

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 12:25


We started off well with Mirabai Chanu winning the silver in weight lifting. But as the days have progressed our archers and shooters have disappointed. Before they left for the games, many were touted as sure shot medal winners, but performances have not supported the claim. There is still some way to go in these games with boxing, wrestling and badminton to go which may bring in some good news. But the questions still remains if we are putting too much pressure on these athletes to win that they buckle under the pressure or the pre tournament ranking performances are giving us false hope which need to be checked. I see that some of our less watched/followed sports like fencing, swimming, sailing have done better than expected, which backs my theory of undue pressure bring down the athlete. Let me know your thoughts at konkanifundays@gmail.com. You can also follow us on twitter @konkanifundays #tokyoOlympics #konkani #goa #olympics2021 #mirabaichanu

Be Impactful by Impact Fashion
Scrutiny with Adina Miles-Sash

Be Impactful by Impact Fashion

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 48:23


I talk with Adina Miles-Sash,an activist and public figure, about how she reverse engineered eyeballs to break into the marketing world. She shares why she's so passionate about women's faces in print, the stance she regrets taking, her relationship with online vitriol and I ask if she just wants attention. Adina Miles Sash is an AMerican Orthodox Jewish activist and social media influencer. Sash gained notability within Orthodox Judaism for her stage character, FlatbushGirl on Instagram. Her comedic brand of activism focuses on the everyday lives of Orthodox Jewish women and their challenges with Jewish Law. @flatbushgirl Click here to shop the clearance section at impactfashionnyc.com. Click here to sign up for emails and be the first to know when new styles launch. You'll also get subscriber only discounts. Click here to see new spring/summer styles, including The Blossom Dress and The new foil Flutter Dress Click here to order The Most Perfect Pleated Skirt Click here for The Most Perfect Mask Click here for a collection of at home fashion activities. To hear more episodes, subscribe and head over to Impactfashionnyc.com/blog/podcast. Be Impactful is presented by Impact Fashion, your destination for all things size inclusive modest fashion  

The Innovative Mindset
Business Advisor, Entrepreneur, Chris Niemeyer

The Innovative Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 56:33


Business Advisor, Crypto Aficionado, Husband, and Father, Chris Niemeyer On How to Forge Your Business Life So You Can Prioritize Your Goals Chris Niemeyer helps business owners design a business lifestyle they love by working smarter, not harder. As a business advisor and consultant, Chris' FREEDOM Business System™ helps you work in your sweet spot so you work less, make more - and spend more time with your loved ones. For years Chris ran his first multi-million dollar company mostly alone. When he became a father, he systematized, hired, and raised up a team to run his business so he could be more engaged at home and travel with his family. Nowadays you'll find him coaching and consulting other entrepreneurs on how to work smarter, not harder by systematizing your business. He's a family man to the core and is likely with his wife and 4 young kids at a beach in Florida or coaching their sports activities when not traveling the world together. I believe we were all created for a purpose and need to get realigned to that. I help people overcome the obstacles that get them stuck so they can work in their sweet spot and live an extraordinary lifestyle. This show is about talking with purpose-driven people. Connect with Chris Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/chrisniemeyer LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/niemeyerchris Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/niemeyerchris Website: www.ChrisNiemeyer.com   Episode Transcript Chris Niemeyer [00:00:00] Chris Niemeyer: [00:00:00] One thing that I I'll even tell clients or friends that asked me a similar question about this is, you know, they say, boy, it's just seems so risky to go on your own to, to be an entrepreneur. And, you know, there's so much risk involved and that could be true on one hand, but I still, you know what, it's also kind of risky to stay in a job that maybe you don't love and really at the end of the day, Your employer calls the shots. [00:00:30] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:00:30] Hi, welcome to the innovative mindset podcast. I'm your host Izolda Trakhtenberg on the show. You get my conversations with peak performing thought leaders, creatives, and entrepreneurs. We explore how you can innovate through creativity, compassion, and collaboration. I believe that innovation combined with compassion and creative thinking can save the world and I aim to bring you ways. [00:00:52] You can do it too. If you're enjoying the show, I'd be super grateful. If you could support it by buying me a cup of coffee, you can buy [00:01:00] me a cup of@buymeacoffee.com slash Izolda tea. And now let's get on with the show. [00:01:15] Hey there and welcome to the innovative mindset podcast. I'm your host. Izolda Trakhtenberg. I am so happy that you're here and I'm really honored and happy to have this gentleman here on the show today. And there are myriad reasons. One of which is we've both been students in the same. Classes. So you're going to hear us probably giggle about certain things. [00:01:34] Might Kim Lauren Davis, if you're listening, you know, we're talking about you, Chris Niemeyer helps business owners design a business lifestyle. They love by working smarter, not harder as a business advisor and consultant Chris Chris's freedom business system. You know, I love that already helps you work in your sweet spot. [00:01:53] So you work less, make more and spend more time with your lover. For years, Chris ran his multi [00:02:00] check this out. His first multimillion dollar company, mostly alone. When he became a father, he systematized hired and raised up a team to run his business. So he could be more engaged at home and travel with his family. [00:02:12] Nowadays, you're going to find him coaching and consulting other entrepreneurs, how to work smarter, not harder by systematizing your brain. I need all the help I can get with that. So I'm really excited to talk to Chris about it. Chris is a family man to the core and is likely with his wife and four young kids at a beach in Florida or coaching their sports activities when not traveling the world together. [00:02:32] Wow. Chris, thank you so much for being here. [00:02:34]Chris Niemeyer: [00:02:34] . Izolda thank you. It is a pleasure. You have some amazing guests and I have listened. You have. A great communicator and interviewer. So I'm just excited to be here. Thank you again for the opportunity. Oh, it's [00:02:46] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:02:46] my pleasure. My pleasure. I appreciate your kind words. [00:02:49] That's very sweet. I, I wanna just, I want to jump into something that you said. And I adore it. You said that you believe that we were [00:03:00] all created for a purpose and we need to get realigned to that. I would love to hear from you what you mean. First of all, we were all created for a purpose. And what purpose would that be? [00:03:10] Is it individual or is it something that's, that's bigger than one individual person and how do we get realigned to our purpose? What's the process someone would go through to, to be able to do that. [00:03:24] Chris Niemeyer: [00:03:24] Yeah, great question. Well, and, and I, I, I'm going to speak through and kind of talk through, I guess my, uh, my, my lens of faith. [00:03:30] So I just believe that there's a greater purpose that we all have. And, um, and so I think that regardless of your, your belief system or whatever, we're here for a reason, and there's those kind of three existential questions that I'd like to talk about. Who am I, why am I here? And where am I going? And I think sitting with those questions actually frequently, you know, whether that's on a, an annual basis, if you're kind of a planner and it's like, okay, turn of the turn of the calendar year is about to happen. [00:03:58] What did I learn this year? You know, what, what am I [00:04:00] good at? What am I interested in it? And how can I apply that toward a purpose here on this earth to serve others. So I've, I've just been able to. Take action on that over the years. And, and let me tell you, and then we can talk about a story about this, but it's not always been pretty and I've. [00:04:17] Misaligned in seasons two and had to kind of get back into that. So, uh, I'm, I'm a huge fan of just finding your purpose and, and living that out. [00:04:29] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:04:29] I'm taking all that in for a second. It's so interesting to hear you say that you're a fan of finding your purpose and living it out because I know that there are a lot of people out there who, uh, sort of, they, they, they, they live their lives to do their work. [00:04:45] And they perhaps watch jeopardy and this is not insulting jeopardy. Right? I love jeopardy. But, but the point is that it sounds to me like you're talking something that, that is a calling that's bigger than the day-to-day stuff of life. And I'm wondering [00:05:00] what the process is. What is, what is that, that you go. [00:05:04] Uh, is it a dissatisfaction like, oh, I, I, I don't want to watch jeopardy tonight instead. I want to go out and change the world or whatever. What happens to someone when they get to that place of either doing that assessment like you do, or finding that they're perhaps dissatisfied with their status quo and want to change it? [00:05:22] What would you expect someone to be going through at that moment? [00:05:27] Chris Niemeyer: [00:05:27] Well, I guess if I may then let me just share it a personal experience. Probably your listeners here and others that have these kinds of stories. And sometimes frankly, we don't want to talk about them, but, um, I've just. Okay, to be more open about it. [00:05:41] So my first career back in my early twenties of, of all things was in the political world, which is frankly, in our political climate, embarrassing to say, but, but you know, at an early age I got, I got thrown into, uh, leading, uh, the largest political action committee in Southern California. [00:06:00] And so I was around all these, you know, movers and shakers and big business people and had access to, you know, congressmen and all this stuff. [00:06:07] As an, as an early 20 something, it was a fascinating experience. And I learned a little bit about that whole world for a few years there, but it was also never ending. It was one of those. Do you remember the Blackberry w seven connected to the Blackberry? Oh, yes. There'll be iPhone today, but, uh, uh, yeah, these are early years, so. [00:06:29] It, it was just this kind of frenetic pace. You know, we, we were identifying candidates to run for office fundraising for them doing some lobbying. It was a never ending cycle. And I just remember this, this particular evening. And it's just one that you'll never forget, right. Is I'm just considering just the pace of life, by the way. [00:06:48] My, we had gotten married early on as a couple. And so my wife had gone back to school and we were just living this fast paced life and. There was this particular evening where I'm just [00:07:00] driving home. This is from downtown San Diego. You know, city skyline is in the background, uh, in my rear view mirror. [00:07:07] And I'm driving up, uh, north, north San Diego, right near the Miramar air force base. There's these fighter jets only as, you know, brave pilots going by is where they filmed part of top gun. Right. And I'm just thinking about man, what it must be like to be one of them. And they're just, they're they're bravery and, and no limits and all this stuff. [00:07:25] And I'm reflecting on just I'm feeling kind of boxed in and, and running ragged, you know, and, and just am I doing what I'm supposed to be doing? And a song comes on the radio. I'm listening to the radio song comes on the radio and it's by a band called Switchfoot and it's. It's lyrics starts singing out over the radio, says, this is your life. [00:07:46] Are you who you want to be? This is your life. Is it everything you dreamed it would be? And, uh, you know, I, I don't know how God speaks to people, but sometimes maybe it's in different ways. He's spoken through donkeys before. To me, it was, he was [00:08:00] speaking through the radio that day. And, and I think, I just remember pondering those words and then starting to just literally cry out. [00:08:09] This is not the life I meant to live. This, this is not in alignment with who I am and my values. Um, I found myself, you know, compromised in certain situations in that political world. And I literally had to pull over to the side of the road because I had to wipe the tears from my eyes. Cause I couldn't see. [00:08:26] And it was that evening when I waited for my wife to get home. That I said, you know, honey things have got to change. We've got to get back to, we have misaligned. I have misaligned my life and let's get back to what we're supposed to do and who we are. And literally that night as all of this is when we started this kind of process on a back of a napkin, we started listing out the things, what are we interested in? [00:08:51] You know, what do we start. What, what do we, you know, decent good at? Where do we want to go? What, what, what, what just motivates us and fuels us. And that was the [00:09:00] start of my first kind of entrepreneurial journey, again, just realigning. So I think there's people that have those stories where they either hit rock bottom, or they realize that. [00:09:09] I watched too many Jeopardy's in your example, I need to get off the couch and do something. [00:09:15] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:09:15] Yeah. It, it is interesting that what you just said, that you, that you went okay, what, what, what am I good at? What do I, what do I love? What, what are the things that bring me joy? And it took a huge amount of self-awareness I think, to be able to do that, that you went, that you'd realize something had to change, but then you had the. [00:09:36] Okay, let me step back and figure out what that is. And so when you did that, when you were in that space and you and your wife, and, and it's wonderful that she was there with you, you know, that she, that she supported these, these changes that you wanted to make. What was the next step? How did you go from, I work in politics and I'm not happy to the Chris I'm [00:10:00] talking to today who is, seems to be super happy. [00:10:03] And, and, and you're doing your own entrepreneurial journey all the way to today. How did that happen? [00:10:12] Chris Niemeyer: [00:10:12] Yeah. So literally taking that first list that we created, uh, along alongside that list, we had a values list and kind of what we anticipated for the next five years of our life as well. So really kind of vision casting too, and going from a, you know, a young, young, married couple to, Hey, we want to have kids. [00:10:29] And if we're one of kids and raise these kids intentionally and well, What's that going to look like and what is our, our time availability with them. So we, we outlined, I want to have a, a business that if she chooses to, she can stay home and raise the kids. And, and so I, I began literally that next week approaching some of my mentors and saying, Hey, I'm making a pretty big decision here, but I'm gonna leave this political world. [00:10:54] And, and what are your thoughts? And a few of them in the same week gave various [00:11:00] similar recommendations. And they said, Chris, you know, you, you're the kind of guy that you need to own and operate your own company. You need to find out what it is. You're passionate about. What is you're good at? So taking that list that we did and, and something bubbled to the top at that point in our lives. [00:11:17] This was back in 2006. And, uh, my wife had worked for travel companies in the past. So she was engaged with that. We love to travel. We also had background in, in missions and kind of giving back to the community and the world. And so missions and travel. We were married together and took my business experience and kind of her marketing and that awareness of that area. [00:11:37] And that was our first business. It was mission travel. We still own it to this day. Um, just the travel coordination, all that comes with these amazing trips that people take around the world to make the world a better place to, to give back. And so that was the foundation of our journey and it was one where, Hey, it's a home-based business. [00:11:55] I'm working from my laptop. I can choose, you know, when I want to take it. [00:12:00] Break to play with the kids or, or not. And, and, and so that was for us kind of how we started that next step. [00:12:07] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:12:07] I love that you're location independent. That's really cool. And it's, I feel like I'm dancing around a question that I want to ask, and I'm not quite sure how to ask it. [00:12:18] You went from, you went from being someone who had a job who was working for others too. Too, you know, you shifted to having your own business. What, what, what was that like? What was the, what was, you know, this is the innovative mindset. How did you innovate? What did you do after the, the business that you've the first business that you started to get you okay with it? [00:12:43] Because the thing that concerned. Honestly is that there are a lot of people who think that they could be entrepreneurs, but actually they might not be well suited for it. Or there are a lot of people who are well-suited to be entrepreneurs, but they are staying sort of stuck in [00:13:00] a job because they might be nervous or scared. [00:13:03] How do you tell what is the, the best way for your mindset to shift in order to be able to do what you've done? [00:13:15] Chris Niemeyer: [00:13:15] Yeah. Great, great question. And some complexities there too, but, um, you know, one thing that I I'll even tell, tell clients or friends that asked me similar question about this is, you know, they say it's point it's just seems so risky to go on your own, to, to be an entrepreneur. [00:13:31] And you know, that there's so much risk involved. And that could be true on one hand. Um, but I say, you know what, it's also kind of risky to stay in a job that maybe you don't love. Really at the end of the day, your employer calls the shots, your employer or your market, or your industry is the one that is deciding, well, you have a job or not, to me, that's risky because you don't have control. [00:13:58] You don't have the power to [00:14:00] make and pivot when, uh, an industry shifts or something happens as an entrepreneur. We have that ability and that maneuverability to. Tick and tack and Zig and zag. Right. And so I think there's, there's that awareness that it's like, well, I feel comfortable and, and safe in this job, but am I really, and I think that's a big step to just have some people understand is entrepreneurship while it might sound risky. [00:14:29] For me, it's pretty exhilarating because you have, you have quite a bit of control over how things go and, and, um, I think that's a big mindset shift mindset shift that people, uh, need need to do. [00:14:41] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:14:41] Hmm, there's something in. So, so fascinating about that. I don't know if you know who Tom Peters is. He's he's, uh, an author he wrote in, in search of excellence. [00:14:53] He's sort of a leadership guru. One of the things that he says is that the leader's job is [00:15:00] to support the people they're leading so that they can shine. And so if you're an entrepreneur and you are. And you're the business, the owner of the business. How do you reconcile this notion that you just, that you just stated about, about, you know, you, you have a lot of control too, I guess, hiring or developing the team that will help the business, but also that you can support so that they shine. [00:15:36] Does that. Th I, I hope that that question makes any sort of sense because it's a complicated one. [00:15:43] Chris Niemeyer: [00:15:43] Yeah, no, it is. And there's, there's a lot to unpack there. I think, um, you know, predominantly. In our culture, you know, perhaps, and maybe worldwide, there are just a lot of unsatisfied employees because they don't have the right kind of leaders, whether that's the [00:16:00] manager or the CEO or the C-suite folks, a lot of people are, they're just punching a clock. [00:16:04] And so they're not in satisfaction or alignment with their job, but there are those great exceptions of leaders who say, let's, let's make sure that everyone here feels they've got a purpose. They've got a role, you know, Starting as an entrepreneur, especially as, as a, as a solo preneur to, to start with like a lot of us, we're the ones wearing all those hats, right? [00:16:26] We're we're the salesperson, we're the founder. We're the chief marketing officer. We're the finance bookkeeper. We're, you know, janitor, whatever it is. And as I explained to my coach in class, A lot of those hats are uncomfortable. A lot of those hats, frankly, don't fit because you're supposed to be wearing maybe one, maybe two hats roles in general. [00:16:47] And there's other great people that fit those other roles with their own abilities and skillsets. And so it's your job as, as the leader, as the entrepreneur to bring in those right people. And I got [00:17:00] to that point, you know, years after mission travel, when I was still a preneur who was busy doing that at all, and then realized like, you know what, in order to. [00:17:09] Scale this and keep, I keep my sanity, frankly. Um, I needed to hire the right people who are gifted, talented, and motivated in those areas. Does that help answer that question? It [00:17:22] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:17:22] does. It's just, you know, like I follow Gary Vaynerchuk, I follow Tim Ferris and the things that they say are very similar to what you just said, that you have to hire the right people. [00:17:35] And Gary Vaynerchuk goes, go so far as to say, you know, hire. And fire fast. Right? So, so that if it's not the right person, uh, then, then no harm, no foul. You've had your 90 days you're out. And that sounds kind of harsh, but that's kind of, it looks like what he does or what he used to do. I don't know if that's what he does still with VaynerMedia. [00:17:56] So, so what is your thought on that, on that [00:18:00] notion? How do you find. The right people so that you can eventually sort of delegate and systematize your business so that you can play to your strengths. [00:18:11] Chris Niemeyer: [00:18:11] Yeah. I mean, there's a lot of common, common answers there in terms of making sure that there's an alignment with various tests or assessments or programs that, you know, to kind of screen and vet employees. [00:18:22] And I think that those are good. And I use, I use a lot of those, you know, everything from. Myers-Briggs and disks and all those kinds of assessments that we probably hear about in the work workforce. Um, but then, you know, I have a lot of things just in the interview process too, where it's like, tell me what you would do in this situation, you know, and just give them a lot of like this open-ended questions to really kind of understand their mindset, who they're, who they are, who they're coming from. [00:18:47] Um, you know, they're, they're joining you in, in a different culture too. And so you need to make sure that the culture is a good fit. You know, with my travel company, that's all worked from home. I [00:19:00] have employees that are scattered across the country. So I need to make sure that if you're coming from a, a regular brick and mortar retail store down the street, that you're going to be comfortable working really kind of isolated. [00:19:13] Um, you know, we've got. Chat features and video and all that kind of stuff. But at the end of the day, you're, you're kind of isolated and how are you with your time? And so just asking some of those questions about some of those things, to ensure that it is a good fit, um, you know, resumes, assessments that all helps, but sometimes just those really qualified open-ended questions can spur some dialogue and, and maybe raise some flags as well. [00:19:39] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:19:39] Yeah, I can, I can, I can imagine that notion of. Sort of disseminating, figuring out who, who is right for a role and who might not be right. Would be, would be, you know, it is important. And it's also, it seems to me that your. Uh, sort of [00:20:00] perspective and correct me if I'm wrong, because I'm just sort of putting words in your mouth, but your, your perspective seems to be that you can't do it all and you shouldn't do it all right. [00:20:08] In, in, in, in, in building or, or running your business. So if that's the case, If you can't do it all, how do you get to that mindset shift? We're going to be talking about shifts a lot, I guess. How do you get to that mindset shift that makes you go okay. I, for me personally, I I'm just accounting, accounting. [00:20:29] I, I want to run away screaming every time I have to do it. So, so if that's the case, how do I, as, as the, as the, um, I'll be the test subject here. How do I do that? How do I let go of the, of the need to do it all? A and how do I, uh, how do I assess someone in something I'm not good at? Like, if I were to hire an accountant and I'm not good at it, how, how do you know as a leader? [00:20:58] How do you know if you're not good at the [00:21:00] thing that you're trying to hire for? What do you need to do in order to make sure that you will find the right people. [00:21:08] Chris Niemeyer: [00:21:08] Yeah. Great. Great question. Um, so from a mindset perspective, I think it's just understanding too, that again, back to that hat analogy of all that you're having to do and all the hats you're wearing your business, understanding, recognizing I don't have to wear them all. [00:21:24] In fact, I shouldn't wear them all. If my business is going to grow and scale to where I want it to be. And for me to just work in my sweet spot, I've got to delegate. I've got to let other people. Do that. And that's, that's one thing. I mean, just taking a look at your business and go, if you have to show up every day, day in, day out, you know, hour by hour doing the routine maintenance tasks that you're doing in your business. [00:21:48] I hate to tell you, but you don't really have a business. You have a job and you've got multiple jobs. All [00:21:54] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:21:54] right. Many, many [00:21:55] Chris Niemeyer: [00:21:55] hats, right. Hats. Yes. And so you've got to understand that. [00:22:00] If I want to make this a business, things need to change. And, um, gosh, if we have time in another story that was really foundational for my business to, to pivot and to shift in a big way, was that realization, um, cause I mentioned, you know, we start our business without kids and, and then now we have. [00:22:18] Well, I remember when we got pregnant, right. My wife and I was, we were still in the business and she was like, okay, I'm pregnant. I'm having, I'm having this baby. This business is your baby. Now I'm running it. You know? And I just remember being so excited to be a dad for the first time. You know, we'd waited several years to have kids and, and just eager to, to meet him, to bond with him. [00:22:40] And so when that first baby came, I mean, I was pretty, pretty darn involved. I mean, really to like the point. You know, I roll here because it was like, you know, the, the baby would get up in the middle of night and cry and need to be fed. And I'm like, you know, flipping the light on honey. I'll, I'll get him from the crib and I'll bring him to you and I'll rub your back and we'll fight over who gets to do the diapers and all that [00:23:00] stuff. [00:23:00] And, and I really felt a close bond, you know, with him at that time. Well, fast forward a couple of years later, okay. Our business had grown substantially. We had, we had scaled a bit more, but I was still. Really wearing too many hats. I was doing too many of those roles, bookkeeping, like you just said, I was still doing bookkeeping at the time and just kind of going, oh my gosh, if I'm not at my desk or on the phone, like business, isn't getting done. [00:23:28] Well, sun number two comes around and, and I'm just busy and I, I, I need the sleep. And so, you know, maybe I was, I was maybe useful the first few nights or a week, but it quickly turned into. You know, eyes are closed the middle of night, honey, the baby's crying. Can you go get 'em I'm going, gonna, I'm going to roll over and go back to bed. [00:23:53] Well, something happens and it was, it was it's rocked us to the right. Uh, two months [00:24:00] into, into his birth and I'm not feeling the bond with them because I'm not around them and doing all this stuff. Uh, my brother and sister-in-law were coming down to, to spend the weekend and get to meet Noah for the first time. [00:24:12] And we're waiting up by the fire forum and they call in and say, Hey, you know what, we're going to be late. Just go to bed. And we'll, we'll catch up with the guys in the morning when we get there. And so we threw a few extra logs on the fire head upstairs, put Mila down in his crib. Well in the middle of the night, about one o'clock in the morning, we get this loud knock on our bedroom door and seconds later, my brother bursts in the door and says, Chris, your house is on fire. [00:24:36] Get out. And you know, we're just bewildered. I'm not sure what's going on. And, and my sister-in-law comes in. Grabs no out of his crib meeting him for the first time. And we throw on some blankets and jackets and rushed out of the house and sure enough, our, our roof was on fire. And, you know, we call the call, the fire department. [00:24:57] They were able to come pretty quickly and extinguish the [00:25:00] fire. Well, the next morning when we, I go back to the house to meet the fire chief and our insurance adjuster. And, and as he brings us in the house and starts assessing the damage and talking about what they've discovered, we begin walking upstairs and, uh, I'm getting goosebumps now, but just, I'll never forget that that feeling of when he flung the door open. [00:25:24] And he's talking and we look up and there's a big gaping hole in the ceiling and you can see right to the sky. And as he's talking, I looked down and right down there is our son's crib that was crushed and with charcoal and he is describing that this is the first place that the structure fell. Wow. And I just remember being cut to the core. [00:25:54] And going, I almost lost my son, who I didn't even feel a great bond with at that [00:26:00] time. And I remember driving back to the hotel where we're staying and just processing all that and realizing Chris, some things have to change in your business. You just have a job and multiple jobs. And so you've got to get the right people. [00:26:17] To come in and help you out. And that was a really pivotal time for us to make some big adjustments, make some big hires. And I remember going into that hotel room and my wife didn't know any of this, the time I had to tell her a lot about that, that circumstance later. But I just remember grabbing no in my arms. [00:26:36] It's two months old now just kissing his little bald head and going things are going to be right. Um, and, and that was just the start of a new chapter in our business, a new chapter in our life where, you know, I wanted to be a super present father. I didn't care what the business was going to do or how it was going to scale. [00:26:55] I just wanted to be engaged and active as a, as a daddy. That was my biggest [00:27:00] role in the, in the most comfortable hat that I wanted to wear and knew that everything else would, would work itself out. So for me, that's just one of those examples stories of going. You have to get to a point where you realize those roles. [00:27:15] Aren't going to work and you've got to find the right people to getting engaged with them. So for what it's worth, I don't know if that answers fully your question, but, uh, but that was a foundational time to have that shift in the business mindset. [00:27:30] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:27:30] Oh, well you answered a thousand questions there. I don't think it was just one. [00:27:35] Thank you so much for sharing that. And I'm so glad that that Noah and all of you were w w you know, that you were all okay. Wow. Uh, Let, I just want to honor that for a second. I'm just so glad that you ha uh, wow. I it's, you know, and it's funny because the, the notion of being purpose driven or [00:28:00] purpose led, uh, yeah. [00:28:03] It's it's very clear to me that you, that you have that, that you are purpose-driven and, and, and work from that truth, obviously, obviously. And so, so to, to bring it back to application, to, to, to sort of being practical, how. When you had that realization, when you realize that being a daddy was the most important thing, being a dad, a husband, a family member, uh, how did you take that into your business and systematize it and make it so that you could focus the bulk of your energy on your family? [00:28:45] Chris Niemeyer: [00:28:45] Yeah. Yeah. And I use this in, in how I lead coaching clients now, too, that are, that are entrepreneurs that want to get out of their grind. Like I was. Um, and I give this analogy that, you know, you need to take a look [00:29:00] at your business as a big skyscraper. So just pick a skyscraper from your, you know, nearest downtown and look at that building and go that building represents my business and every floor on that build. [00:29:13] Represents a department, a function of your business. So on one level, you've got your sales and one level you've got customer service one, then we've got finance or HR or whatever it is for your business. Where do you want your suite to be? Which level, which floor, where do you want your sweet spot to be? [00:29:31] And to understand you need to work in that, in that room. And you can take the proverbial elevator and, and, you know, go back and forth every once in a while and check in on the sales team or the marketing team or whatever, but you need to be in your sweet spot. And so just identifying that to take a look at your business from a 30,000 foot view and go, what are the key components of my business? [00:29:53] And then practically speaking, it's looking at okay. Is still inside my head, which [00:30:00] is, is usually the case for founders and CEOs. There's so much in your head that you've never documented that you've never systematized or put a standard operating procedure in place. And so I remember literally after that whole fire experience going okay, I need to do a really much better job of documenting everything that I do in my day. [00:30:23] And what are the. Top 10 procedures or SOP is I need to put in place. So literally that's what I did. I mean, for those next few weeks, I'm logging time I'm taking on calls or emails or bookkeeping. Getting back to that, all those things where I'm like, you know what, I need to start training people. And, and considering if I want to get a higher director of operations, if I want to hire a director of sales, what is it that I'm doing now that I can. [00:30:52] Document and explain to them, and then they can add even more from there. So that's just a very practical thing that anyone [00:31:00] can do is in terms of document in their time and how they're spending it and then getting the systems in play. [00:31:06] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:31:06] Mm. Yeah, I, I use something called toggle track, which allows me to. [00:31:12] Document exactly what I'm working on because otherwise I personally, my brain, the way it works, I wouldn't know. I wouldn't remember. So I have to, I've just spent 45 minutes on X and that's that's because otherwise I, I, you know, the way, the way my brain works. So, so how do we do that? If, if, if I'm an entrepreneur and if I want to do this system systematization, wow. [00:31:35] That's a long word. If I want to systematize again, I, and I'm not. I'm not good at it. My brain doesn't work that way or whatever it is. Do you have any, any guidance, any materials, any, anything that you would be willing to share? Uh, that, that someone would go, oh yeah. I need to know X in order to be able to do [00:32:00] Y is there anything that you can recommend, any books that you've read, anything like that, that you would be willing to share? [00:32:07] Chris Niemeyer: [00:32:07] Yeah, let me, let me think about the book's perspective, but you know, one of the things that we, instead of just logging undocumented stuff too, is really understanding what, what are the resources that you need in terms of software or hardware, if it, whatever your business might look like, um, you know, what, what checklists do you need in your business too? [00:32:29] To show someone and document kind of the process and procedures that you, that you go through. Um, you know, like I had to, I had to develop call scripts. I had a very certain way of doing things with certain perspective clients or, or in the process right. Of a sale. And so just what are some of the scripts or the, uh, email templates? [00:32:48] Right. We, we developed a whole library of email templates because we realized if you're sending the same kind of email more than twice. Just put it as a template or as a canned response. Right. So things like [00:33:00] that process flows are, are good. Um, I use a lot of tools like, like loom is an example of a video recording and messaging where you can document what you're doing in terms of ScreenFlow. [00:33:13] So if I'm trying to just describe to an employee, Hey here, here's how I do this. Or even to a VA, I use this a lot now with, with virtual assistance. If I'm going to give a project, I'll start that out and just hit record on my screen, talk into the mic process, what I'm doing in my own mind, out loud to them, and then take it from there. [00:33:34] So those are just little tips and tricks to use. [00:33:38] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:33:38] I love that. I love that notion of here's here's exactly what you would do and, and it would be okay. It would be something that relates to other types of, of professional services and businesses and nonprofits and all of that. It sounds like these are universally applicable. [00:33:56] Is that the case, do you think, or do you think that there are some things in the [00:34:00] sort of more for-profit realm that would not relate well to the nonprofit. [00:34:06] Chris Niemeyer: [00:34:06] No, I think they would. I mean, any, any business profit or nonprofit has certain functions, right? They have certain processes a way of doing things. [00:34:14] Um, I think really, if you, if you peel back the onion, a system or a systemization or whatever that mouthful is, it's really just a way of doing things and, and anyone. You know, uh, a child, a parent, a CEO, you have a way of doing things, so that can apply to just about anything. [00:34:36] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:34:36] Yeah. I wonder about that. I mean, I work a lot in, in the space of people who are doing, uh, as I said, social impact and environmental impact. [00:34:44] I was, I worked at NASA for over 20 years. What can I say? It, it, it doesn't go away. And so, so if that's the case, like someone like me or someone who's, you know, working for an animal shelter and all. Are there ways do you think for them to systematize as [00:35:00] well to make it so that for example, they could do more rescues or things like that, or again, do you think that, that something that's very, non-profit, that's very, almost volunteer driven would be able to do that. [00:35:14] And how do you handle if you're working on this, how do you handle people who are VAs? How do you handle people who are volunteers? How does that work? [00:35:24] Chris Niemeyer: [00:35:24] Yeah, no, I think you do. I mean, whether you're a, again, whether you're NASA or whomever you're working for, right. Um, there's a way of doing things. And so let's just say you're a volunteer and you're working for rescues. [00:35:36] You have a way of doing something when you get that call or that lead, that there's an opportunity. What do you do next? You know, who do you call? How do you vet, if that's an actual, real live opportunity, what, what are the metrics or whatever that might look like in terms of the industry language that's in place for you to say, I've got to make [00:36:00] this call or do this, or do that. [00:36:02] It's kind of like that if, then, then this scenario, which there's, you know, technology for now, but, but how, how would you do that? Or taking it to an extreme. You know, a pilot has something like 130 point checklist that he's got to tick off before he even turns on the propellers. And so that's just a huge, you know, huge safety precautionary type of checklist, but I think anyone profit or nonprofit has that ability. [00:36:29] And then the second part of your question about, uh, you know, training a VA or checking in or whatever, I'm just a big fan of, of checking in with people routinely. Um, so whether it's a VA or, you know, I do a lot of real estate deals these days on the side. Um, if I've got a contract to work on a project, You know, four months or six months project in our contract, we actually have something in play. [00:36:52] It's where it says, Hey, every two weeks, we're just gonna have a five minute call. I just want to check in how's it going? Give me some updates. You know, I do a lot of [00:37:00] stuff out of state, so I'm not even near where these projects are going on, but just to hear here's how things are going or snap, a couple pictures the same. [00:37:08] Are you done with a VA or an employee? Whether they're working, you know, the next desk over or. Countries away. Um, those kinds of things can be done. [00:37:19] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:37:19] That's that gives me such hope for myself. I certainly hope so. Yeah, I, that it I'm at that point, you know, where this podcast requires more help, more work than I can do in, in, in. [00:37:35] You know, in 1 24 hour, 7, 24 hour periods. So you mentioned something about real estate deals. And we talked a little bit about this before we started recording this chat that you have gotten into both real estate and cryptocurrency. Can you talk a little bit about that? What does, first of all, cryptocurrency is one of those things that I've read about, and I don't, I honestly have no real. [00:37:58] Fundamental [00:38:00] idea of what cryptocurrency is. So could you take a second and describe what it is and also what you're doing with it? [00:38:08] Chris Niemeyer: [00:38:08] Sure. Yeah. This is something I've just been talking a lot more openly about here in the past several months, especially on social media, but. Uh, and unless the first part of the question after by cryptocurrency really is, is a digital currency. [00:38:22] And so, you know, we're all now used to having it in our hands and our, our phones. We can do just about anything. Digitally, right. Whether you want to or not, you have the capability to load your credit cards and check out at the grocery store or, you know, Nordstrom and, and it's all done digitally. So we're used to that now. [00:38:43] And so cryptocurrency and Bitcoin's kind of the gold standard in that that people might hear about on in headlines. Is built on a technology called the blockchain. And, and again, this, this could be a whole nother episode, but, but the technicality of the blockchain [00:39:00] is just, it's an open, open sourced ledger of transactions. [00:39:07] And so. Let's go back to like bookkeeping as an example, coming up on this episode, for whatever reason, buy a bookkeeper, [00:39:17] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:39:17] because I'm so terrible at it. I keep gnawing away at it. That's that's what it is. [00:39:21] Chris Niemeyer: [00:39:21] Right. Right. So let me give this example. Right? So in the old days we had a file cabinet, right. And the file was in our, in our own office and we kept the ledger. [00:39:33] We can. The books, so to speak, but only we had access to that. Right. And the blockchain and technology, it's all open source out there in the, in the network. We can see exactly what's there. And so I give this example in, in, uh, The previous decade, there was this massive accounting scandal that was by Wells Fargo. [00:39:58] Wells Fargo created three and a half [00:40:00] million fake accounts, fake credit card accounts, fake checking accounts, savings accounts, all this stuff. They created that internally in people's names so they can get bonuses and kickbacks and commissions on this stuff. It was exposed. Wow. If that were on the blockchain, that couldn't happen, but because it was in house. [00:40:19] They had full control. They had secrecy on it. Blockchain provides the transparency. And so, again, there's a lot of complexities to cryptocurrency, but it's just a medium of exchange that can be bought or sold, transferred over, uh, if you own it and you can, you can start using it. People literally now. Buy a Tesla with Bitcoin, they can transfer funds into their Starbucks app and buy a coffee with it. [00:40:43] So it's it's usage is, is exponentially being, uh, being utilized in new ways these days. [00:40:51] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:40:51] Okay. That's very cool. And also immediately I go, what are the governments of different countries [00:41:00] going to say about something that does not seem to require their oversight? How does that work? [00:41:06] Chris Niemeyer: [00:41:06] Yeah. And that's a great question because I think you're gonna see a lot more. [00:41:11] Scrutiny and, and regulation about this. Um, you know, right now, even just here in this country, whether it's the sec or the IRS, they're looking at different ways as cryptocurrency currency, is it an asset there's, there's ramifications for how they classify that? Um, in India, there's a bill going through parliament right now to ban cryptocurrency. [00:41:34] And so how could that happen? You know, frankly, there's a lot of people in speculation saying they can't really do that because it's not something that's like a physical, you know, thing you can combine. And so there's a whole discussion about what will happen with that. Um, you know, I, I just got involved because I'm curious and, um, you know, back to my mentors, 16 years ago, [00:42:00] they, they outlined said, Chris, there's kind of three areas of. [00:42:04] A great way to, to make a living, make a life, you know, perhaps generational wealth for yourself. And that is number one was entrepreneurship, you know, owning and operating a company. Number two was, uh, real estate and various aspects of that development or construction business or top realtor. And number three was financial markets, you know, be a hedge fund, be a trader or whatever they said. [00:42:28] And these guys were respected greatly and they were very successful, uh, financially. Anyway, um, they said the secret though is if you're going to go that first route as a business owner, an entrepreneur is to take your profits and dump them in those two other classes as quickly as possible to really kind of grow the three-legged stool of, of financial wealth and independence. [00:42:49] And so I've just followed that advice over the years and become more focused on that recent. In terms of just building up a real estate portfolio of rental properties and [00:43:00] then crypto, I just sort of dabble in and have fun with and trade and, and investor speculate in because I, I like, uh, I like the technology behind it. [00:43:09] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:43:09] It's so fascinating that, that, that, that the three legged stool to me, what. What that does. What, what made me go, Ooh, sit up and take notice is the notion that if you want to have, like you said, independence for you, it, it seems to be time with your family and, and being, uh, being the best dad you can be. [00:43:31] And that's fabulous. And for someone who. For example like me, we have a nonprofit that, that works to stop poachers in Africa. Uh, then, then those kinds of investments, those kinds of activities would, would go well to free up the time, you know, so that I could focus on those things. So, so talk to me a little bit about that. [00:43:52] If you would, the allocation. You know, the way, the way I live is you've got one life, make it count. So, [00:44:00] so for me, I want to see what are the possibilities, right? And so it sounds to me like you are sort of the poster boy for, for this kind of, sort of triple threat, if you will, what are your thoughts on that? [00:44:14] As far as allocating that purpose driven life, maybe it's. For business, maybe it is for you, you, you set it up so that you can have your business, have your real estate or cryptocurrency or whatever those things are for each individual person so that you can then be free to do what else you want to do. [00:44:38] How do you feel about that? [00:44:40] Chris Niemeyer: [00:44:40] Yeah, it's a great question. I mean, it gets back to again, purpose and values too. And so like you described each person needs to understand clearly what, what it is they're focused on. What makes an ideal lifestyle for you? You know, is it involved in some nonprofit activities or. [00:45:00] [00:44:59] Things halfway around the world or across the street. That's gonna fill you up and fill up your purpose cup. So to speak. Uh, again, for me, it's, it's all about family, you know, and being the best husband and father I can be and raising these kids in a way that gives them. Um, opportunity and purpose within themselves. [00:45:18] And I'm involved in other, other things as well. And, and non-profits and such, but for me, that's, that's my biggest focus in this season of life. Um, you know, my youngest is five, so I've got what maybe 13, 14 years of. I've heard, possibly being under the roof. You know, I don't know how that's going to boomerang effect thing works, but we'll see, we've got four kids. [00:45:39] I'm pretty sure we'll have some kids around for awhile. Uh, but I think that that is my focus. Right. And so if that is the focus and I've been blessed to have some of these business ventures and, and, and just taking some of those profits to reinvest. The allocation question then becomes, you know, [00:46:00] what's, what's your risk tolerance, what's your, um, you know, asymmetric risk. [00:46:05] So for me, and this gets a little more into the weeds too, but cryptocurrency for example, is very volatile. And so the risk reward can be pretty high, but there's a major price fluctuations and swings. And so you're not going to bet the farm. You're not going to put your entire investment portfolio into something like that. [00:46:26] But if you. 2%, 5%, 10%, let's say. And that has the potential to go. 10 X or 50 X or these crazy values that some people have realized the last couple of years, um, that can do something pretty substantial for your own portfolio and net worth. And so, so you have to kind of look at that and evaluate that from a real estate perspective. [00:46:49] There's multiple, multiple ways to be involved in that. Whether you want to be a bit more active like men and finding deals and vetting them and putting offers in or buying cash or [00:47:00] whatever. Uh, but there's also. You know, REITs real estate investment trusts that you can buy, uh, from the stock market. And so that's just a question of your own allocation and risk tolerance, I think is, is, uh, the best answer there. [00:47:14] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:47:14] It's a, it's a, it's a, it's a valuable answer because a lot of people think they should be involved in things like this, but maybe they're not well suited for it. You know, that they're, that's not their temperament there to me. But that this whole notion of cryptocurrency and, and, and, and, you know, they say playing the stock market, it's not playing it's, it can be actually quite intense. [00:47:36] And yet, and yet the way for example, I live with all of this is don't invest anything you can't afford to lose a hundred percent. Right. So, so that seems to be, I am very low I'm risk averse, I guess. And, and yet the thing is that within that, when we're talking about this notion of it comes back, I guess, to self-awareness when we're talking about, you know, what [00:48:00] are you prepared to lose and how much are you prepared to risk? [00:48:04] And it sounds to me like that goes for everybody, whether or not you're working a job or whether or not you're an entrepreneur or business owner, et cetera, you have to know that about yourself. You have to know what are you prepared to lose and what are you prepared to risk? And so what do you think, how would, how would someone, how would someone figure that out? [00:48:24] What they're prepared to lose? [00:48:28] Chris Niemeyer: [00:48:28] Boy, that's a, that's a complex problem. Situation, uh, for most people, but I guess it boils down to, like you said, do you feel like you can just lose it all and be comfortable with that? Or do you feel like, yeah, cause there's extremes, right? There's people that would bet the farm and be like, okay, well I'll go save it again and make it up. [00:48:49] And, and that's fine. There's also those that are like, I'm going to stick this under my mattress. Cause I don't want to lose it. You know? So somewhere on the spectrum, we all lie. And so I think [00:49:00] just understanding. That and taking a look at, let's just say, you know, the whole wall street experiment, so to speak because really frankly, it's only been less than a hundred years that a normal individual can go and buy a stock. [00:49:15] So that whole financial services industry is, is relatively new. And, and that's what we get pushed. All the time, it's a massive, massive industry. And so, you know, are you, are you comfortable with seven, 8% and, and taking that slow growth approach of it's going to take 40 or 50 years of working or whatever to get to that retirement point, or are you comfortable maybe taking five or 10 or 20% or whatever that might be into these, you know, quote unquote riskier, uh, play. [00:49:47] Again, that's a personal decision you've got to just set with and go, how, how would I feel if this dropped 50% or whatever, do you need more money in the mattress or money over [00:50:00] here? Right. [00:50:00] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:50:00] And it's absolutely. And, and it's interesting. I mean, we're not giving financial advice here and I have to say that because no, no, no. [00:50:08] I am not qualified. I am the least qualified person to give financial advice for sure. And yet, this is something that I think it behooves us to think about because everybody is looking and assessing, especially this year of COVID, you know, where they are and, and how they're going to. Proceed, you know, I know a lot of people, a lot of my guests actually have, have made significant changes because of the time in, you know, in the pandemic and sort of really think being, being alone with your thoughts, like you said, being kind of isolated and being alone with your thoughts. [00:50:43] So I I'm wondering what were the realizations, if you had any that you had during that time, when you were sort of sequestered, if you will. [00:50:53] Chris Niemeyer: [00:50:53] Yeah. I, I think, uh, that whole, that whole year for a lot of us, right. [00:51:00] Probably brought on some awareness of, um, you know, am I financially secure or safe or whatever. I mean, everyone, everyone was losing their job or their, their company was, uh, you know, frozen for awhile or whatever that might be. [00:51:15] We, we all had a lot of fear grip us and. And I remember just having to sit with that and go, okay, where were we? Let's just throw everything out there on the table and take a look at that picture. So that's something that we can all do and go, okay, what are there changes that need to be made? You know, the savings rate went through the roof there for awhile because we were also. [00:51:40] Scared and scattered, oh my gosh. Um, I've been living paycheck to paycheck and you know, now I need to save up three to six months like Dave Ramsey says, or whatever the case may be, um, which is not bad advice, frankly. Right. Uh, to I'm looking outside and I'm looking at squirrels right now. I mean, they, they sock away their, their stuff for the winter [00:52:00] because they know that you need to do that. [00:52:02] And so I think there's a bit of that personal introspection to go, you know, where are we. Data in front of you doesn't lie, you know, w whether it's your paycheck or your business, or your bank accounts or whatever, and, and what are you more comfortable with? That's that's always a good place to start. [00:52:22] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:52:22] Yeah. Again, what, what are you willing to risk and what are you not willing to risk? Absolutely. Chris, I am so grateful that you took the time to chat with me today. This is I could keep you for another four hours and we could, you know, cause I have many more questions, but uh, but I know you've got, oh, thank you so much. [00:52:40] Yeah. You, I know you've got, you've got kids to get back to, so I, and, and, and I want to respect your time and. So I would love it. Actually, if you wouldn't mind, uh, I have just a couple more questions, but the big one is, would you mind sharing? How is someone goes that Chris guy, he knows what he's talking about. [00:52:59] I want to, I [00:53:00] want to go find him on social. Would you mind sharing where someone could find you if they were interested in learning more about what you're doing and how you're doing it? [00:53:09] Chris Niemeyer: [00:53:09] Yeah, absolutely. Well, and thank you again. This is really a pleasure. You're a masterful, uh, Conversation starter. So interviewer, so I really appreciate the time, but yeah, you can find me on Instagram at Chris Niemeyer. [00:53:24] Uh, maybe put that in, in the links there Niemeyers in I E um, and Facebook saying. And LinkedIn as well. So I'm pretty active on Instagram and Facebook. And then my website is Chris niemeyer.com. [00:53:37] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:53:37] Perfect. And actually I will put all of this in the show notes, but just so you know, the LinkedIn is actually Niemeyer Chris. [00:53:45] And so is Facebook. It's Chris Niemeyer on Instagram and LinkedIn. It's Niemeyer, Chris, N I E M E Y E R. Chris. And if you don't know how to spell Chris, I'm sorry. [00:54:01] [00:54:00] Yeah, that one, that one. Hopefully won't be, I mean, my name is older and I recently got a piece of a piece of snail mail address to  and I have no idea how they got from Izolda to a Zimbra, but I thought that was really amusing anyway. So. Yeah, it was, it was very strange. So I, again, I want to thank you. And I have just one more question. [00:54:23] It's a question. I ask everybody who comes on the show and it's a silly question, but I find that it yields some poignant answers. And the question is this. If you had an airplane that could sky write anything for the whole world to see, what would you say. [00:54:40] Chris Niemeyer: [00:54:40] Um, mine would be live on purpose, live on purpose. [00:54:46] And I think that would help people understand or at least to ask themselves what does that mean? And am I. That's [00:54:54] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:54:54] fabulous. I love it. That's so succinct. I love it. Love it. Love it. Thank you, Chris. Once again for being [00:55:00] here, I really appreciate it. I I'm so grateful. I learned so much just talking with you and I'm sure if you're listening, you learned a lot from this as well, and you need to go find Chris Niemeyer on. [00:55:13] Instagram, LinkedIn Facebook and on his website. See what he's up to because obviously he's doing some really cool stuff. This is his older Trakhtenberg for the innovative mindset podcast. If you're liking what you hear, do me a favor. Go to. Apple podcast rate and review. Tell me what you're thinking. I'd love to hear about it until next time. [00:55:31] Once again, this is his older. Trakhtenberg reminding you to listen, learn, laugh, and love a whole lot. [00:55:43] Thanks so much for joining me today. I really appreciate you being here. Please subscribe to the podcast if you're new and if you like what you're hearing, please review it and rate it and let other people. And if you'd like to be a sponsor of the show, I'd love to meet you on [00:56:00] patrion.com/innovative mindset. [00:56:00] I also have lots of exclusive goodies to share just with the show supporters there today's episode was produced by Izolda Trakhtenberg and his copyright 2020. As always, please remember, this is for educational and entertainment purposes. Only past performance does not guarantee future results, although we can always hope until next time, keep living in your innovative minds.  

Squawk on the Street
Stocks Erase Losses from Monday's Sell-off, Dow Components Join the Earnings Parade, Netflix's Subscriber Growth Slowdown, United Sees Profitablilty Ahead, J&J's COVID Vaccine Under Scrutiny, and Chipotle's Results Heat Up the Stoc

Squawk on the Street

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2021 43:12


Jim Cramer and David Faber took an in-depth look at a busy day for the markets with a slew of earnings reports in the mix -- as stocks recouped all of their losses from Monday's sell-off. Dow components Coca-Cola, Johnson & Johnson and Verizon all beating analyst expectations with their quarterly results, Netflix falling amid concerns about a slowdown in subscriber growth, and Chipotle shares up sharply on earnings, revenue and sales as indoor dining continues to rebound. The anchors reacted to what United Airlines CEO Scott Kirby told CNBC about the carrier's outlook: He's "confident" United will return to profitability in the third quarter. They also highlighted Capitol Hill's "bipartisan bailout" of the airlines during the pandemic, and the lessons to be learned as lawmakers negotiate a bipartisan infrastructure bill. Cramer sounds off about a new study that claims J&J's COVID vaccine is much less effective against the Delta and Lambda variants than against the original virus. Also in focus: Electric vehicle maker Lucid Motors and the Churchill Capital IV SPAC scramble for shareholder approval votes ahead of a key deadline, billionaire investor Leon Cooperman's bullish take on big tech and FAANG, AMC Entertainment CEO Adam Aron taking on the additional role of Chairman and what it could mean for the stock, what's ahead for GameStop in wake of Netflix's foray into video games, the stocks that are benefiting from investors pushing aside worries about the Delta Variant, and JPMorgan Chase awards Jamie Dimon a bonus aimed at keeping him as Chairman & CEO for several more years.

BJ & Jamie
Richard Sherman's Wife's 911 Call Under Scrutiny 7/20

BJ & Jamie

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2021 5:57


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

FULCRUM News with David Seaman
Vaccine Manufacturer Moderna Faces Scrutiny, NASA Warns of Lunar "Wobble" That Could Trigger Natural Disasters - News 7.15.2021

FULCRUM News with David Seaman

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2021


Vaccine maker Moderna has been accused of structured tax avoidance by investigators. The company allegedly passed profits it made from sale of the vaccine to at least one shell company in Switzerland as a tax strategy. In space news, NASA has warned that unusual ‘wobbling' in the Moon's rotation will likely cause devastating floods and natural disasters in the 2030s.https://www.amazon.com/Winner-Take-All-Bitcoin-Ether/dp/B08Z4CNTVN/

This Day in Maine
July 14, 2021: Child Welfare System Under Scrutiny; Opponents to Hydropower Corridor Allege Permit Violations

This Day in Maine

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2021 13:20


Using the Whole Whale Podcast
245:(news) Fundraising Scrutiny & Frontline SMS Closes

Using the Whole Whale Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2021 17:34


  Online Fundraising Platforms Face Fresh Scrutiny New scrutiny is being applied to the donation fundraising tactics of political fundraising platforms. After a New York Times expose highlighting potentially deceptive practices was released in April, fresh criticism has come in the form of an open inquiry being led by four democratic state attorneys general. The inquiry is into both the Republican platform WinRed and the Democratic platform ActBlue. Nonprofits, particularly those in the political and advocacy spaces, should watch this narrative closely as new rules may arise regarding how campaign-affiliated companies and organizations can procure online donations from the public. Read more ➝ FrontlineSMS Closes After 15 Years The professional SMS messaging service FrontlineSMS has announced that it will be closing. The service, which provided users with a primarily free platform to communicate via SMS, will continue to be available as a free, fully open-source software on Windows, Mac, and Linux. In an open letter, FrontlineSMS CEO writes that “our products have been continuously used by community groups, service providers, and national governments alike, reaching tens of thousands of people a year. Over the last 15 years, we've supported users in 200 countries around the world with primarily free tools and support. We've been part of peer-reviewed academic studies, ground-breaking journalism, and the transformational change of life-saving systems – both as subject and as service provider.” Read more ➝     Summary Black women push for racial equity at nonprofits Gates Foundation staff are 'freaking out' about the nonprofit's future as Bill and Melinda divorce, an insider reportedly said Attorney generals looking into online fundraising practices: reports How nonprofit leader Catherine Howarth got HSBC to swear off coal

RT
Boom Bust: Chinese crackdown on ByteDance IPO dreams amid data security scrutiny

RT

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2021 24:47


ByteDance, the company behind social media giant TikTok, is shelving its plans for an IPO amid scrutiny in China. The Beijing-based social media giant, last valued at $180 billion in a funding round in December, had been weighing an initial public offering of all or some of its businesses in the US or Hong Kong. Plus, we speak with Michele Schneider from Marketgage Group, who is following the controversy around the long-awaited IPO plans for Robinhood. We take a look at why Reddit has turned its back on the stock-trading app. Finally, we breakdown Richard Branson's successful launch of Virgin Galactic. We show you the amazing video and reveal which space company threw Branson a little shade. We are also joined by Hilary Fordwich of the British American Business Association to discuss the rise in trade between Britain and the EU. She tells us what this could mean in a post-Brexit world.

The Beat with Ari Melber
New scrutiny on rioters 6 months after insurrection

The Beat with Ari Melber

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2021 43:37


MSNBC's Dr. Jason Johnson fills in for Ari Melber to host "The Beat" on Tuesday, July 6, and reports on the Capitol Hill riot, the probe into the Trump Organization, and the latest on the coronavirus. MSNBC's Joy Reid, Neal Katyal, and Rep. Ted Lieu join.

RNZ: Morning Report
Covid-19: Canterbury vaccine rollout under close scrutiny

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2021 3:25


The Covid-19 vaccine rollout for Canterbury is under close scrutiny after the District Health Board admitted it won't be getting started on group four until mid-September. It was already well behind on the plan for Group three which includes the over 65s - RNZ revealed in May that injections for those people wouldn't be starting until July, two months behind the national plan, because it didn't have enough doses to start before then. The Covid-19 Response Minister has told the District Health Board to stick to the government's timeframe, but that doesn't look likely to happen. Kim Moodie has more.

StateImpact Oklahoma Report
‘We should know': Glossip supporter, Oklahoma lawmaker wants more scrutiny in death row cases

StateImpact Oklahoma Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021 4:31


An Oklahoma lawmaker's belief that an innocent man is on death row inspired him to call for the creation of a special unit to review death penalty convictions.

Late Night Live - Separate stories podcast
The 'Stomp Reflex': do emergency powers need more scrutiny?

Late Night Live - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2021 19:05


There are concerns that if left unchecked, the use of emergency powers could be prone to abuse and that stricter regulations introduced in these extraordinary circumstances may quickly become the norm.

The Fiona Show
Episode 104: Denmark's Increased Scrutiny

The Fiona Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2021 50:17


The Danish Tax Authority's recent win against Tetra Pak Processing Systems can only mean one thing: increased scrutiny for taxpayers. Chief Economist Mimi Song and international corporate income tax expert Johann Muller analyze how the Tetra Pak win could bolster the tax authority's confidence, leading to a likely increase in audits.

VPR News Podcast
Some Proud Boys Are Moving To Local Politics As Scrutiny Of Far-Right Group Ramps Up

VPR News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2021 4:54


The future of the far-right Proud Boys is murky after at least 30 alleged members are facing charges in the Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol riot. Now a former member and the current leader describe their plans.

Zen & the Art of Social Media
2021 Inflation, Economy News & Big Tech Scrutiny

Zen & the Art of Social Media

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2021 25:43


Predictions by the fed on upcoming inflation is revealed, the bizarre paradox of unemployment at all times highs while there's a labor shortage from too MANY jobs needing workers and Lina Khan sworn into the  - does this mean Big Tech is going to be scrutinized more? Tune in to find out!Need done for you social media marketing? www.trevorwgoodchild.com You know how businesses running ads on Facebook get frustrated when ads get disapproved and Facebook stays silent on why this happens? As if that's not bad enough Facebook also doesn't explain what to do to solve this. As someone who worked at Facebook I reveal what ad policy was triggered and provide solutions on getting compliant. And after working with me clients have peace of mind, knowing their ads aren't getting taken down again and they have ads that work better than they ever did before working with me. Does that sound like the kind of journey you want to go on with me? Schedule a call - Start getting results: https://calendly.com/trevorwgoodchild/fbexpert Past clients include E-commerce, celebrities such as Tony Robbins & Harv Eker and small to medium sized ad agencies. Tune in to my business blog with startup tips, how-to and business news: www.jetskishaman.com Want to get pro tips on FB ad policy while you're driving? Listen to the Zen & the Art of Social Media Marketing podcast on iTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/zen-the-art-of-social-media-maintenance/id1537737004 Watch this podcast live on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC324DI9qMDHhYZcvKwG2yfQ/videos Other places to listen to Zen & the Art of Social Media: https://pandora.app.link/6vx9wRpl8bb https://deezer.com/show/1909922 https://podcasters.spotify.com/podcast/3cbaFGE5w0TXHNkGHudied/overview https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/79968946-cbb7-46b9-9c57-0e80f929376f/Zen-the-Art-of-Social-Media-Maintenance https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/zen-the-art-of-social-media-maintenance https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-zen-the-art-of-social-medi-73943123/ https://player.fm/series/zen-the-art-of-social-media https://radiopublic.com/zen-the-art-of-social-media-Wzr0Kw https://www.breaker.audio/p/zen-and-the-art-of-social-media https://podcasts.gaana.com/feed/11784 https://amp.pandora.com/user/94a4df4692bd74fde3c751ee3636d9de/podcasts https://calendly.com/trevorwgoodchild/fbexpert

B-Schaeff Daily
Ep. 145: Acknowledgement of lapses in Cardinals' preparation invites scrutiny as St. Louis loses laugher to Pirates

B-Schaeff Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2021 55:44


Brenden Schaeffer breaks down--well, a ton of stuff from the Cardinals blowout loss to the Pirates Thursday. Not only did the losing skid continue in familiar fashion, but we got a glimpse of insight from Tommy Edman as to the notion that the Cardinals have not adequately game-planned and prepared for games from an offensive standpoint during their recent skid... What??? Oh, we had a ton to discuss tonight, so strap in for a fully-loaded episode. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/bschaeffer12/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bschaeffer12/support

This Week in Oklahoma Politics
Tobacco Cessation Criticism, Epic Spending Scrutiny, Police Chase Fatalities and More

This Week in Oklahoma Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2021 25:31


This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and Civil Right Attorney Ryan Kiesel about a new report from the Legislative Office of Fiscal Transparency against the Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust's spending on cessation programs, Epic Virtual Charter School's new board giving $2.5M to a company owned by the brother of its former chairman and a study looking at 18 fatalities from police pursuits over a five year period. The trio also discusses the closing of the William S. Key minimum security prison in northwest Oklahoma and a new committee to oversee how the state spends $1.9B expected from the federal government on COVID-19 relief funds. Support this podcast

Tap into Tax
Tax controversy - addressing risk in a world of increased tax scrutiny

Tap into Tax

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2021 31:40


In this episode of Tap into Tax, Julie Allen and Margie Dhunjishah interview David Swenson, a partner in PwC's National Tax Services and former global Tax Controversy and Dispute Resolution Leader about the controversy environment, focusing on current audit activity, the tactics and approaches taken by tax authorities during audits, and the key drivers for increased audit activity. The trio also discuss steps companies can take to avoid potential controversy, the dispute resolution mechanisms available, as well as how governments reach agreement in an environment of increased pressure to offset deficits resulting from the pandemic. Speakers:Julie Allen,  National Tax Services Market leader, PwC USMargie Dhunjishah, Tax Reporting & Strategy leader, PwC US David Swenson, Global Network Leader, Tax Controversy and Dispute Resolution, PwC US

The Capitol Pressroom
Renewed scrutiny of New York's bar exam

The Capitol Pressroom

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2021 16:19


June 23, 2021 - The New York State Bar Association says it's time to overhaul the content on the bar exam and potentially create new pathways to practicing law in the Empire State.

5 yard Rush Fantasy Football
Sophomore Scrutiny QB &TEs

5 yard Rush Fantasy Football

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2021 55:38


Are you QBs too overpriced as dynasty assets? Liam and Rich talk through the major 5 QBs as well as discussing the few TEs that could be fantasy relevant down the line.They also launch two exciting competitions a FFCC giveaway as well as an incredible "Unique" raffle with some fantastic prizes. Enter the Raffle by donating here https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/5-yard-rushSign up to the Patreon to gain access to our personalised scoring cheat-sheets and ranking tools. prices from less than a cup of coffee a month. Get over to www.5yardrush.co.uk and grab your copy of The Fantasy Football Playbook right now. It's going like hotcakes. Grab your FFCC T-Shirt here https://5yardrush.co.uk/product/the-ffcc-white-t-shirt/Stay safe everyone, practice social distancing and keep washing those hands. Head over to NFL Europe Shop and use code '5YARDRUSH' for 10% off your order using the link, https://europe.nflshop.com/stores/nfl/en/c/super-bowlFollow the Podcast on Twitter @5yarddynastyHead over to the website www.5yardrush.co.uk To check out the latest articles and more.

The Federalist Radio Hour
Why American Exceptionalism Stands Up To Leftist Scrutiny

The Federalist Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2021 45:18


On this episode of The Federalist Radio Hour, Daily Signal columnist Jarrett Stepman joins Culture Editor Emily Jashinsky to break down why the progressive left’s rage tends to always be aimed at America. Comments like Ilhan Omar’s comparison of the U.S. to Hamas are spurring on that hatred inward instead of at other foreign enemies.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Federalist Radio Hour: Why American Exceptionalism Stands Up To Leftist Scrutiny

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2021 45:18


On this episode of The Federalist Radio Hour, Daily Signal columnist Jarrett Stepman joins Culture Editor Emily Jashinsky to break down why the progressive left’s rage tends to always be aimed at America. Comments like Ilhan Omar’s comparison of the U.S. to Hamas are spurring on that hatred inward instead of at other foreign enemies.

3:59
Ahead of Prime Day, Amazon faces scrutiny over working conditions (The Daily Charge, 6/16/2021)

3:59

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2021 13:28


We dig into some of the issues facing employees of the online retail giant.  Story: https://cnet.co/3gtt3dF Text us: https://cnet.co/dailycharge Leave a voicemail: 862-250-8573 Follow us: twitter.com/thedailycharge Homepage: cnet.com/daily-charge   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

5 yard Rush Fantasy Football
Sophomore Scrutiny Series - WRs

5 yard Rush Fantasy Football

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2021 66:12


Liam and Rich are back to continue their Sophomore Scrutiny Series this week taking a look at the WR position. Are they as negative as they were on the RB's? Who should you be buying? Who is overpriced? And will Rich stop hyping up CeeDee Lamb?Sign up to the Patreon to gain access to our personalised scoring cheat-sheets and ranking tools. prices from less than a cup of coffee a month. Get over to www.5yardrush.co.uk and grab your copy of The Fantasy Football Playbook right now. It's going like hotcakes. Grab your FFCC T-Shirt here https://5yardrush.co.uk/product/the-ffcc-white-t-shirt/Stay safe everyone, practice social distancing and keep washing those hands. Head over to NFL Europe Shop and use code '5YARDRUSH' for 10% off your order using the link, https://europe.nflshop.com/stores/nfl/en/c/super-bowlFollow the Podcast on Twitter @5yarddynastyHead over to the website www.5yardrush.co.uk To check out the latest articles and more.

Wayne Dupree Show
S10E1330: BLM Under Major Scrutiny; Where Did $90M Go

Wayne Dupree Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2021 63:29


Black Lives Matter took in $90 million in 2020, and was left with a balance sheet of $60 million by January 2021. Around $8 million was spent on expenses, including staffing costs with the other $20 million donated to local chapters and nonprofits. Those numbers – and news of Cullors' property portfolio – has led to questions about how BLM is spending its money, and complaints over a lack of transparency from bereaved families previously supported by the group. Support our show! Visit https://cbdlion.com/waynedupree and get 20% off your product order! Support the show: https://patreon.com/wdshow See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

By Any Means Necessary
US Relationship To Europe Under Scrutiny As G7 Begins In UK

By Any Means Necessary

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2021 15:42


In this segment of By Any Means Necessary, hosts Sean Blackmon and Jacquie Luqman are joined by Don Debar, host of the Weekday World show on Radio Justice LA, to discuss the meeting of G7 nations currently taking place in the UK, the group's endorsement of a 15% global minimum corporate tax, and doubts among the European nations about the viability of US global leadership.

5 yard Rush Fantasy Football
Sophomore Scrutiny - RBs

5 yard Rush Fantasy Football

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2021 65:57


Liam and Rich begin their sophomore scrutiny series by discussing the plethora or sophomore RB's. What should you be doing with them in Dynasty? Who is overpriced? Who is the best player at cost.Sign up to the Patreon to gain access to our personalised scoring cheat-sheets and ranking tools. prices from less than a cup of coffee a month. Get over to www.5yardrush.co.uk and grab your copy of The Fantasy Football Playbook right now. It's going like hotcakes. Grab your FFCC T-Shirt here https://5yardrush.co.uk/product/the-ffcc-white-t-shirt/Stay safe everyone, practice social distancing and keep washing those hands. Head over to NFL Europe Shop and use code '5YARDRUSH' for 10% off your order using the link, https://europe.nflshop.com/stores/nfl/en/c/super-bowlFollow the Podcast on Twitter @5yarddynastyHead over to the website www.5yardrush.co.uk To check out the latest articles and more.

By Any Means Necessary
Regime's Big Tech Collaborators Face Scrutiny As Outrage Grows Over Israeli Apartheid

By Any Means Necessary

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2021 16:40


In this segment of By Any Means Necessary, hosts Sean Blackmon and Jacquie Luqman are joined by Tech for the People editor Chris Garaffa for another edition of our weekly segment “Tech For The People.” They discuss the outcry over Facebook's planned “Instagram for kids” expansion, the new cloud services deal between Israel, Amazon, and Google, and the Jewish employees at Google demanding the company stop favoring the Israeli regime at the expense of Palestinians.

TWFS
Max Castr’s Verse; WWE Zombies Backlash; AEW Dynamite Scrutiny | TWFS 05/19/2021

TWFS

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2021 173:23


Kevin Scampoli and Ryan Van Vleet watch Kane cry on http://twfs.live The lost YouTube archive is on https://subscribestar.com/twfs and shirts are available on https://twfs.etsy.com

The CyberWire
The US Executive Order on cybersecurity is out. Colonial Pipeline, its security and response under scrutiny, resumes deliveries. Verizon’s DBIR is out.

The CyberWire

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2021 25:47


The US Executive Order on Improving the Nation’s Cybersecurity is out. Colonial Pipeline partially resumed delivery of fuel yesterday evening, as its preparation for and response to the cyberattack it sustained receive scrutiny. The DarkSide’s extortion of the US pipeline company seems likely to prompt regulatory revision. DarkSide operators say they’ve gotten busy against other targets. Our own Rick Howard speaks with Aaron Sant-Miller, Chief Scientist at BAH, on developments in artificial intelligence. And Verizon’s Database Investigations Report is out. I check in with Verizon’s Chris Novak for highlights from the DBIR. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/10/92