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Latest podcast episodes about Bloomberg

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for May 21, 2022 is: paradox • PAIR-uh-dahks • noun Paradox refers to a statement that is seemingly contradictory or opposed to common sense and yet is perhaps true. It can also refer to something or someone having seemingly contradictory qualities or phases. // The statement "less is more" is a common paradox. // It is a paradox that computers need time-consuming updates so often since they are meant to save people time. See the entry > Examples: "Demand for semiconductors has never been higher…. Yet chip stocks are one of the worst-performing sectors in the U.S. market this year. That paradox reflects the cliff that investors see looming for the economy and the stock market...." — Subrat Patnaik and Jeran Wittenstein, Bloomberg, 12 Apr. 2022 Did you know? The ancient Greeks were well aware that a paradox can take us outside our usual way of thinking. They combined the prefix para- ("beyond" or "outside of") with the verb dokein ("to think"), forming paradoxos, an adjective meaning "contrary to expectation." Latin speakers used that word as the basis for a noun paradoxum, which English speakers borrowed during the 1500s to create paradox.

Bloomberg Businessweek
Bloomberg Businessweek Weekend - May 20th, 2022

Bloomberg Businessweek

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 63:14


Featuring some of our favorite conversations of the week from our daily radio show "Bloomberg Businessweek." Hosted by Carol Massar and Tim Stenovec Hear the show live at 2PM ET on WBBR 1130 AM New York, Bloomberg 106.1 FM Boston, Bloomberg 960 AM San Francisco, WDCH 99.1 FM in Washington D.C. Metro, Sirius/XM channel 119, on the Bloomberg Business App, Radio.com, the iHeartRadio app and at Bloomberg.com/audio. You can also watch Bloomberg Businessweek on YouTube - just search for Bloomberg Global News. Like us at Bloomberg Radio on Facebook and follow us on Twitter @carolmassar @timsteno and @BW See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Bloomberg Businessweek
Bloomberg Businessweek Weekend - May 20th, 2022

Bloomberg Businessweek

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 63:14


Featuring some of our favorite conversations of the week from our daily radio show "Bloomberg Businessweek." Hosted by Carol Massar and Tim Stenovec Hear the show live at 2PM ET on WBBR 1130 AM New York, Bloomberg 106.1 FM Boston, Bloomberg 960 AM San Francisco, WDCH 99.1 FM in Washington D.C. Metro, Sirius/XM channel 119, on the Bloomberg Business App, Radio.com, the iHeartRadio app and at Bloomberg.com/audio. You can also watch Bloomberg Businessweek on YouTube - just search for Bloomberg Global News. Like us at Bloomberg Radio on Facebook and follow us on Twitter @carolmassar @timsteno and @BW See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly
What bear markets of the past can tell us about today

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 20:47


It’s Friday, and the S&P 500 is at risk of becoming what economists call a bear market — when stock prices fall for a prolonged time. But how bad is that, actually? We’ve got some context. Plus, the Law School Admissions Test may become optional, and our hosts share their thoughts on the strong dollar and a pizza musical. We end with a round of Half Full/Half Empty. Here’s everything we talked about today: “The S&P 500 narrowly averts a bear market. How long do they last once they arrive?” from MarketWatch “No LSAT Required? Law School Admissions Tests Could Be Optional Under New Proposal” from The Wall Street Journal “Archbishop: Pelosi will be denied communion over abortion” from AP News “Tesla's Removal From S&P Index Sparks Debate About ESG Ratings” from Bloomberg “New York Now Has More Airbnb Listings Than Apartments for Rent” from Curbed “What does a strong dollar mean for the U.S. and world economies?” from Marketplace “In This Economy, Getting Fired Takes Hard Work” from The Wall Street Journal “Dolly Parton Joins the Star-Studded Cast of Taco Bell’s Tik Tok Musical, ‘Mexican Pizza’” from Taste of Country Tell us what you think about today's show. Email us at makemesmart@marketplace.org or leave us a voice message at 508-827-6278, or 508-U-B-SMART. Your donation powers the journalism you rely on. Give today to support “Make Me Smart.”

Marketplace All-in-One
What bear markets of the past can tell us about today

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 20:47


It’s Friday, and the S&P 500 is at risk of becoming what economists call a bear market — when stock prices fall for a prolonged time. But how bad is that, actually? We’ve got some context. Plus, the Law School Admissions Test may become optional, and our hosts share their thoughts on the strong dollar and a pizza musical. We end with a round of Half Full/Half Empty. Here’s everything we talked about today: “The S&P 500 narrowly averts a bear market. How long do they last once they arrive?” from MarketWatch “No LSAT Required? Law School Admissions Tests Could Be Optional Under New Proposal” from The Wall Street Journal “Archbishop: Pelosi will be denied communion over abortion” from AP News “Tesla's Removal From S&P Index Sparks Debate About ESG Ratings” from Bloomberg “New York Now Has More Airbnb Listings Than Apartments for Rent” from Curbed “What does a strong dollar mean for the U.S. and world economies?” from Marketplace “In This Economy, Getting Fired Takes Hard Work” from The Wall Street Journal “Dolly Parton Joins the Star-Studded Cast of Taco Bell’s Tik Tok Musical, ‘Mexican Pizza’” from Taste of Country Tell us what you think about today's show. Email us at makemesmart@marketplace.org or leave us a voice message at 508-827-6278, or 508-U-B-SMART. Your donation powers the journalism you rely on. Give today to support “Make Me Smart.”

The No Proscenium Podcast
Your (Un)natural Garden's Adam Schwerner

The No Proscenium Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 37:39


Artist Adam Schwerner joins us to discuss Your (Un)natural Garden, currently delighting visitors to LA's Descanso Gardens. We talk about the interactive installations, botanical gardens as a canvas for art, and what he's learned about large-scale art as part of the executive team of the most iconic venue in themed entertainment.Plus: The Pick of the WeekHeadlinesApple Mixed Reality Device Details Begin To Emerge (Daring Fireball highlights The Information)Report: Apple Board Gets Mixed Reality Demo (Bloomberg)Two Bit Circus Announces Merger, New Venture (Blooloop)Hunt-A-Killer's New, More Mainstream Offerings (Press Release)Associate Producer: Parker SelaMusic: Chris Porter Headlines: Kathryn Yu, Executive Editor of No ProsceniumProducer and Host: Noah Nelson   Get bonus content on Patreon See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Big Show Hosted By Brad Hanewich
Remembering Jim Bloomberg Of Illinois

The Big Show Hosted By Brad Hanewich

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 2:42


Working Capital The Real Estate Podcast
Land-Use Regulation and the Growing Cost of Housing with Emily Hamilton | EP100

Working Capital The Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 42:59


Emily Hamilton Emily Hamilton is a Senior Research Fellow and Director of the Urbanity Project at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University. Emily's research focuses on urban economics and land-use policy.  In this episode we talked about: -Emily's  Bio & Background -Land use regulation -The evolution of zoning regulations -Single Family Housing Ownership -Housing Regulations Challenges -Affordable Housing -Rent Control -Vacancy Decontrol -Policy Restrictions -Accessory Apartments -BANANA - Build Absolutely Nothing -Anywhere Near Anybody -Resources and Lessons Learned Useful links: Book: “Green Metropolis” by David Owen https://www.mercatus.org/scholars/emily-hamilton @ebwhamilton Twitter Transcriptions: Jesse (0s): Welcome to the working capital real estate podcast. My name is Jesper galley. And on this show, we discuss all things real estate with investors and experts in a variety of industries that impact real estate. Whether you're looking at your first investment or raising your first fund, join me and let's build that portfolio one square foot at a time. Ladies and gentlemen, my name is Jesper galley and you're listening to working capital the real estate podcast. My special guest today is Emily Hamilton. Emily is a senior research fellow and director of their abandon the project at the Mercatus center at George Mason university.   Emily's research focuses on urban economics and land use policy. And she joins us today to talk about housing in the United States and a little bit more broadly in general, in Canadian and other north American markets. Emily has, how's it going today?   Emily (48s): Good. Thanks for having me, Jessie.   Jesse (50s): Yeah. Thank you so much for, for joining the podcast for listeners that aren't, aren't familiar with your work at Emily. Maybe you could give us a little bit of a high level description of how you got into the space that you're in right now, as it pertains to, you know, economics land use policy and the like   Emily (1m 9s): Sure. Yeah, I'm an economist studying mostly the effects of land use regulations, local zoning roles and their effect on housing affordability. I first got interested in this policy area when I wound up in an internship in the planning department of my hometown in Colorado, before that I really had not been aware that all of these local zoning roles have such a large role of shaping what our cities and neighborhoods look like.   But once you learn about all the intricacies of rules, like parking requirements and height limits and setback requirements, it's really changes. I think how, how we see the built world around us.   Jesse (1m 60s): So I've always been fascinated with urban economics, as it relates to the work we do in commercial real estate. A triumph of the city was, was a book that was recommended to me a few years ago. I thought it was another interesting avenue into how these policies that you're describing or that you research play into the actions of individuals. And I guess economics in general, how that, how people kind of adapt and the incentives that we set up, how people use those incentives and collectively make certain decisions.   Maybe you could give us a little bit of a background of land use regulation in general. You know, we didn't invent the wheel and suddenly somebody is like, you need three meters or four feet to build a that there. So what was kind of the evolution of, of a lot of the modern policies that, that we see?   Emily (2m 49s): Sure. In the U S context, the first zoning regulation was implemented in New York city. There were land use regulations prior to the New York ordinance, but that's the first one that looks like what we think of as a complete zoning ordinance today. And that was in 1916 in New York. But when that went into effect, there were already people in other localities across the U S thinking about implementing these types of, of land use restrictions and the spread very quickly across the country.   After that land use ordinances started off being focused primarily on Euclidean zoning. So separating different types of land uses from each other, having office districts and industrial districts and residential districts, but got much more binding over time to the point that in the 1940s, fifties, sixties, we see much more focus on single family zoning and large lot single family zoning becoming the kind of defacto primary land use designation in, in localities across the country   Jesse (4m 15s): And the, the restrictions or the zoning itself. It sounds very similar to kind of the local environment that we have in, in my area in Toronto. But I think across the, across the country here and across the United States, the, the push for these different types of zonings at the, when they first started was the push primarily from a government standpoint, was it from a, you know, a developer standpoint who, what was the thrust or the lobbyists that were pushing for these initial zoning ordinances?   Emily (4m 47s): In the New York context, there was an organization called the fifth avenue commission that was made up primarily of the owners of very fancy department stores on fifth avenue. And they were concerned that garment workers who worked in factories, making clothing, primarily Jewish immigrants were spending too much time near their fancy department stores because these garment manufacturing buildings were right up next to these department stores because the manufacturers wanted to be able to see what was going on in the department stores.   You know, what, what do people want what's selling? What should we be making? So they pushed the, the fifth avenue commission pushed for zoning in an effort to prevent the factory workers from being, from working so close to where their stores were. And this is something that's really a common thread throughout zoning is we're separating land uses directly, but we're separating people on the basis of their income or whatever background factors people have indirectly.   Jesse (6m 7s): So you could sorry, go ahead.   Emily (6m 10s): Oh, no, no, please.   Jesse (6m 12s): So I was just going to say, you can have what seems to be an innocuous regulation that would have a disparate income on, on, you know, different types of people, different classes of people, like you said, income or, or other classifications.   Emily (6m 25s): Exactly. Yeah. Us lawyers refer to this as being facially neutral, that it doesn't look like these regulations are enforcing segregation on the basis of race or income, but they are indirectly. Hmm. And then following the fifth avenues commission or concurrent with the fifth avenues commissions work and efforts to implement this stoning ordinance in New York city, there was also a lot of work in the federal level led by the Hoover administration initially in the U S to support the adoption of zoning rules across the country.   And that really became ingrained in, in federal housing policy, following world war two, when the federal government limited its underwriting of mortgages to locations that implemented land use regulations that met with federal standards. And that included single-family zoning as one, one factor that the federal government saw as lowering risks of mortgage default.   Jesse (7m 50s): So I'm curious about that because there is one distinction. I mean, there's a few distinctions between the Canadian and us context when it comes to real estate. One of the big ones is the fact that if any main Freddie Mac, you have government agencies that do encourage home ownership, where in Canada or crown corporations, they don't encourage home ownership. They encourage affordable housing, a very European take of, of the U S version. I'm curious though that the impetus to have that type of housing policy or the result of that housing policy, I know through Bush, through Clinton, the percentage of home owners have, has gone up and down.   It's kind of, I think in the 70% area in that time, I'm not sure what it is today, but was there a reason that there was, there was such favoritism to single family housing and ownership in the states? Was that just something in the DNA, you know, as a country,   Emily (8m 46s): I wish I wish I had a better answer to why that is such an important part of housing policy in us history. Perhaps it goes all the way back to kind of Jeffersonian ideal. So a nation of landowners, but it, yes, it, it goes very far back in, in us housing policy that there is a federal objective of encouraging and subsidizing home ownership rather than the broader lens of government policies that support housing affordability, regardless of whether it's rented or owned.   Jesse (9m 33s): So like all regulation, I feel like most of the time it be gets more regulation and then that regulation gets more regulation. Where do you see the w what do you see the state of regulation? I didn't know. It's a huge question because there's so many different states with different regulation, but are there a couple areas that you focus in your research that you think these are, these are some of the biggest issues or the biggest challenges or problems with housing regulation in the states or land use regulations?   Emily (10m 5s): Yeah. Well, I think one place where we really see the, the issue of regulation, begetting more regulation is in inclusionary zoning. I'm not sure what that looks like, or if there's a comparable policy in Canadian cities, but in the U S it's becoming more and more common for localities to require a certain percentage of units in a new development to be affordable to households, making a certain level of income, is that being implemented in Canada.   Jesse (10m 39s): And I'm not sure if this would tie in. I find a lot of times they're similar things with different names, but a lot of, you know, if you're, if you are buying a, an apartment building, tearing it down and putting up condos, you have to rental replace that you have rental replacement there, as there is a certain percentage of new developments that need to be affordable housing, like you're saying, and then some, some good and not so good policy outcomes of that, you know, cause then it's, you know, sometimes you have the lottery system of people that, you know, how you determine what's affordable, not, and is not affordable sounds, you know, similar or scary sounds easy.   It's, you know, this amount of income, but then what happens when you have more people than, than units available. So, yeah, I think, I think we're, we're very similar on that front.   Emily (11m 25s): Yeah. What I've studied inclusionary zoning in the Washington DC region. And what I found is that localities that have adopted this policy have experienced faster rising market rate housing than what they could have expected without the policy. So this policy that's intended to help housing affordability is making the problem worse for all the households that don't get to benefit from the inclusionary zoning units.   And similarly, those are generally allocated by lottery here. I wouldn't say that inclusionary zoning is one of the primary regulations to worry about. I think that minimum lot size requirements and in general, having a very small amount of, of land area in many localities where multi-family housing can be built are, are the primary causes of housing affordability problems in the U S but we can just see with inclusionary zoning that the, as you say, regulation breeds more regulation and it becomes this web that gets harder and harder to untangle as opposed to tackling the exclusionary zoning rules more directly.   Jesse (12m 58s): Yeah, I was reading today. I think it is being proposed like usually very seemingly at least my point of view, not to get political, but seemingly radical ideas that our, our government has talked about. Basically not allowing or putting more a moratorium on foreign investment in real estate in Canada. And what I'm curious about is you have these regulations and the actually actual ability to create affordable housing. I'm not sure if you're aware of it, or if there are other American cities that are similar, but in Toronto we call it the shadow rental market, it's condo ownership and where somebody like you and I might buy a condo and rent that condo because a pretty insane stat to me is that 90% of the, or 85% of the rental stock in Toronto in the greater Toronto area, you know, 3 million in GT, even more people, 85% of that rental stock was built prior to 1990 or sorry, 1970.   So we have extremely old rental stock. We cannot build enough multi-family and it's reflected in the pricing. And when we put these government policies in, and this is where I think it's like a lot of U S cities where we put these government policies and, and say, you got to build a certain amount of affordable housing, but at the same time, you won't allow, you know, David and Janet that own a house just outside of Toronto, like have a rental in their basement. You know, that regulation is more cumbersome where you can call the one affordable housing, but you could easily say that you can unlock affordable housing and other ways from a regulatory standpoint, any thoughts on that?   Emily (14m 36s): Yeah, absolutely. Sometimes people in the U S call it capital a affordable housing. When we're talking about housing that is designated to be affordable to people, making a certain income level. Versus I often prefer to talk about housing affordability, which is just having an abundance of housing that fits within people's budgets comfortably and allows them to live in a place where they have access to their own best opportunities, as opposed to housing.   That's set aside on the basis of your exact income.   Jesse (15m 17s): Yeah. Now we had a Richard Epstein on from NYU. I think he's at Hoover now, but he was basically giving us a history of the New York rental or rent control. And it was at the time, I think we're right in the Biden presidency was talking about the eviction moratoriums and a lot of the listeners who are investors, you know, there's that frustration at that time. One thing I love about the states is that it's exactly that you have different states. If you like policies in Florida, you can go to Florida. If you like plot policies in Washington, you can go to Washington in the Canadian context.   We're pretty uniform when it comes to rent control. I'm pretty sure every province has some version of, of rent control policies. Has your work touched at all into kind of the, the actual policies as it pertains to landlord and tenants within, within locales?   Emily (16m 10s): No. I have not done a lot of research on tenant landlord law generally, or rent control more specifically, but I am familiar with, with some of the research, particularly in the bay area on rent control. What's been the case. There is, it seems that rent control does have benefits for reducing displacement among households in rent controlled apartments, unsurprisingly.   But this comes at the cost of reducing the overall supply of rental housing by both discouraging investment in new rental properties, and also encouraging the conversion of apartment buildings to condos. So sometimes when, when people are creating policy, they think that, well, as long as we don't apply rent control to new construction, we won't affect a supply, but there are always ways to reduce the supply of rental housing, if you give landlords a motivation to do so.   Jesse (17m 30s): Yeah, that has been, it's been a policy I know in some states, but also up here that, you know, that caveat, you know, we're going to have rent control or rent stabilization, but we're going to let you build, you know, new construction is not going to be it's, it's not going to apply to new construction. And for, from at least as best I can tell that really doesn't make developers feel, give them the warm and fuzzy, because it just gives them the idea that so wait, you can put that policy in place and take it away just as quickly.   Emily (17m 58s): Exactly. Yeah. Now there haven't been a couple of cases in the U S where reforms on the supply side have been paired with relatively liberal rent stabilization laws. So for example, the state of Oregon passed a statewide law that applies to many of its localities, replacing single families owning with two to four unit zoning, depending on the exact situation of the locality.   And that was paired with rent stabilization that I believe is limited to CPI the rate of inflation plus 5%. So that's pretty, you know, it's going,   Jesse (18m 46s): I was going to say, we would take that all day.   Emily (18m 48s): Yeah. Yeah. That's going to stand in the way of some rental increases that landlords would, would want to do, but not a lot. So it's relatively minor rent stabilization in exchange for liberalization of some local zoning rules.   Jesse (19m 8s): Yeah. It's always fascinating to me where, I mean, that example to me, I would, I would take that every day of the week with us right now, the way our rental stabilization works is that we are pretty much a CPI, inflation, inflator, or numbers, really all, you can raise it by. And the only time you could really mark to market your rents or, you know, have them, you know, if you had a tenant for a long time, that was under market, the only way you can move that up is if a tenant vacates. So you are pretty much stuck until you have a vacancy and to further complicate that once your tenant is done their term and they're on month to month, you can not just the victim if they choose to stay.   So we're in a weird position where, and I have, I have sympathy as a landlord, as an investor. I have sympathy for individuals and their security of having a, having a home and having a place. But it also, you know, like everything where the policy has to these outcomes that you don't expect. And, you know, part of that is, is maybe people not following the rules explicitly or doing other things because, you know, they're, they're not investing in upgrades to their buildings and, and the likes.   So yeah, it's, it's definitely one of those complicated things, but we would definitely, we would definitely take that over kind of what we have right now, which is, I think as of 20, 22, this year, we're allowed to raise rent 1.2%. So, I mean, you look at the world that's kind of happening around us. It's not, it's not a really significant increase. Yeah.   Emily (20m 46s): Yeah. New York state recently reformed their rent control policy and set big limits on vacancy decontrol. And one thing that we're seeing now in New York city is some building owners are requiring new tenants to go through brokers and to pay a several thousand dollar fee to, to start renting an apartment.   So it's kind of like key money from, from the old day.   Jesse (21m 22s): Yeah. And for those that don't know, when you say vacancy decontrol, you're talking about what, what kind of, I was alluding to there that, that when a, a unit becomes vacant, you can now capture that higher rent with a Newton. Is that right?   Emily (21m 36s): That's right. Yes. There are still some conditions. I believe where with a certain level of renovations buildings can, or units can go back up to, to market rate, but there, it's very difficult now to increase rates even when, when you get a new tenant in New York city.   Jesse (22m 0s): Yeah. And in fairness, I should, I should have been clear. You reminded me, we call them AGI as above guideline increases. You have to show that you've done enough work that, you know, shows that we can raise above the posted guideline. But it's funny you say key money. I mean, that is exactly what I'm talking about from, from an economics point of view where a very similar thing it was, I'm not sure if you're familiar, but in, on the brokerage side, when office real estate was really crazy, three, four years ago, and people tenants or couldn't find space fast enough, we were, I think 1.7% vacant.   What started to happen was subleases where most institutional landlords don't allow you to profit. Once they achieved their rent, they couldn't profit. So suddenly furniture that would probably cost 5,000 was costing 500,000. So, you know what I mean? It would be like one of those things where, okay, here's the lease deal. And here's the side agreement for furniture for a hundred thousand. And it's really, you look at the value of furniture is pretty much nil after it gets used for seven years.   Emily (22m 59s): Right? Exactly. And one thing we see in the U S context is that the places where rent stabilization laws and tenant protections more broadly are the strongest regions like New York, Boston, San Francisco, these are probably the parts of the country where it's worst to be a tenant or someone looking for a new apartment, even though on paper, it might look like they offer a lot of benefits to tenants.   Jesse (23m 33s): Yeah, no, that's a great point. It's again, it really goes back to a lot of these policies. I find it, you know, anytime a government policy happens, I feel like there should be a committee that just analyzes the things that you don't expect to be an implication of the policy, because oftentimes it seems like the exact opposite is the outcome of the intent.   Emily (23m 53s): Yeah, definitely.   Jesse (23m 54s): So why don't we move? We move over to a little bit of on the policy side, the work that you do, you know, you're, you're looking at urban economics, you're looking at land use regulation from a policy prescription outcome. Are there certain things that you think are more effective than others or certain things that you've researched that you find is in the literature that is really a path forward for, you know, for the states or, you know, by, by extension other markets?   Emily (24m 26s): Yeah. In the U S there's been a lot of recent focus on allowing a little bit more density in single family neighborhoods. And with very good reason, as we talked about this is often the largest zoning designation at least of a residential land in us cities. And we, we talked about its history of being a tool for segregating residents on the basis of their income directly and by race or background indirectly.   But in, in some cases it's difficult for, to, to craft these reforms in such a way that they actually lead to a lot of new housing getting built. So for example, there's been a lot of work to permit accessory dwelling units in the U S this has been really successful in some cases in Los Angeles, perhaps most notably following a lot of state-level reforms that required localities across California to make it easier to build accessory dwelling units.   They're really taking off in LA and in some other parts of the state, but we see a lot of accessory dwelling unit knit ordinances at both the state and the local level that are not getting units built because they place a lot of limits on how these units can be built. And in some cases make it really hard to finance these units.   I am more optimistic about reducing minimum lot size as a tool to get more housing being built in, in areas that are currently zoned for single family housing relative to allowing ADU or duplexes or triplexes or fourplexes on these lots in part, because there are so many ways to make it difficult to build those additional units on a lot.   And in part, because I'm reducing minimum lot size and allowing a single lot to be subdivided into more, lots fits very naturally with a lot of home builders and home buyers or renters model as compared to something like ADU use or duplexes that are going to require some changes to the, the home building industry and what people are expecting.   Not that those, those changes would be bad by any extent, I think duplexes are wonderful, just they're not, they haven't been proven to lead to a lot of new housing construction in the U S context in many cases.   Jesse (27m 32s): So I'm curious about that when you say the, the minimum lot size, a lot of the regulation that we have. I mean, one, when you want to say, add density to a site, a lot of times, you know, parking requirements, you may need a variance. You may need to actually go to a committee of adjustments. Then the other piece of it is, you know, certain areas will have X time coverage that they're allowed to have on a certain site. So when you say reduce the lot size, and are you talking, so you have this single family, you know, say it's half an acre, are we talking about severances where you could separate and have different uses for that for different severed pieces?   Emily (28m 10s): Yes. In, in the U S context, it's usually called subdivision. So splitting that say half acre, lot into, you know, four, 5,000 square foot lots.   Jesse (28m 25s): Okay. And, and that, so just to back up your first point there on accessory apartments, I think we've one of the first rental properties I bought was in close to the university of Waterloo for, for anybody that's, it's about an hour and a half west of Toronto. And I remember we had an accessory apartment attached to the single family home. And I remember, you know, we have other apartment buildings that we own now, but I remember at the time that I had to do more to get that approved, or like the annual maintenance on that of fire code, exit egress, you know, the, the licensing fee for that accessory apartment unit.   But I guess the alternative is, is worse. If you, if you don't even have, we're not even allowed to actually have the accessory apartments.   Emily (29m 11s): Right. Certainly I live in Washington DC and here the big barrier on building accessory apartments is that the natural place to put them is in the basements of DC row houses. But there have to be a certain ceiling height met in order for a basement to be a legal place for one of these, even if it has like its own front door, it is, seems to be the perfect location for a little, but if the ceiling's not tall enough, it won't get permitted there.   And it costs over a hundred thousand dollars generally to dig out the basement to raise the ceiling height, which is just a lot of investment in what we want to see as an easy, low cost way to add a housing unit.   Jesse (30m 3s): Yeah. I think it gets back to the parental aspect of government. It's. I mean, I come from the commercial real estate world, so it's easy for me to say, we're so used to this idea of contracting adults. You know, if I want a five foot ceiling, you know, I have signed an agreement for five foot ceiling, but, you know, I always picture like John Stossel and like 2020 when I was a kid where like, you know, you've got to protect the consumer. So there's like this balance of individuals that, you know, the governments that wants to protect, but also have the ability to have consumer demand be met, whatever that demand is.   Emily (30m 36s): Certainly. Yeah. And I think there's very much a role for governments to set some safety standards in housing, particularly with things that are hard to observe, like, you know, the, the building being, being sound, not at risk of collapse or anything, but with things like ceiling Heights, that's very easy for a prospective tenant to observe assuming they can, can visit the, the apartment where at least the landlord would be required to disclose ceiling Heights below a certain height.   But that's something that people can very much decide if it's worth it to them to save some money on rent by having an apartment that's maybe not as ideal as, as all of us would like, or if they want to pay more to live elsewhere.   Jesse (31m 35s): Yeah. I, it just gets back to this idea of the government is so, so far removed from, you know, when you have a regulation that says this, this, this, that needs to be two inches taller to conform to, to, you know, to the rules in that area. And you know, on the other side, you have a mechanic in that shop saying, I work here every day. This is the way it should be, or that is acceptable. You know, for that context, I wanted to touch base on this before, before we end the podcast, what is the state of, well, I've heard a new one.   I don't know if I was listening to you on the podcast, but nimbyism not in my backyard. This kind of, you know, seems to be every, no matter what city you go to, there's some aspect of this, but was it you, that was talking about banana?   Emily (32m 20s): I'm not sure   Jesse (32m 21s): You're   Emily (32m 22s): Familiar, familiar with,   Jesse (32m 23s): Could you, could you define that or just tell our listeners what that term means?   Emily (32m 27s): Yes. A banana means build absolutely nothing anywhere near anyone. And we, we see this, Catherine Einstein is a professor in, in the Boston area and she and her colleagues wrote a great book called neighborhood defenders, which talks about nimbyism going beyond just people, opposing things, right near their house in their almost literally in their backyard or that are, are going to have a big effect on their immediate area and moving towards the broader goal of, of stopping development more broadly, when we see demands for things like growth caps on a locality's general population as a whole, that gets into banana territory,   Jesse (33m 26s): Go ahead. Caps. I've actually never heard of that term. Is that the, for the actual, like the real estate stock or, or the individual amount of people? Okay.   Emily (33m 35s): Stock of housing, Boulder, Colorado has a famous one here.   Jesse (33m 40s): Wow. So the, okay, so the nimbyism piece, I live in an area in Toronto that is if 30 years ago, or even less than that, it was a very industrial area, not particularly great in terms of crime. This is in the east end of Toronto. And now it is a very bougie area you're in queen east. It's kind of, a lot of boutique shops are in this area. And it seems like the individuals that were living there 20, 25 years ago slowly shifted more and more east and are kind of getting to that point where 15 years ago, a lot of people that moved into this area, they wanted the inexpensive housing, but now, you know, they want it built for them.   But now that it's built for them, they don't want any more building for them. So how do we, you know, what is the solution to these type of PO or these types of outcomes, because it's just seems no matter what happens when you go into an area and gentrify, it just seems that the people that end up getting comfortable in that area, you know, it, then the buck stops with them from their point of view.   Emily (34m 44s): Yes, certainly a problem in, in many us cities as well. I think the, the solution is to move land, use decisions up to higher levels of government, perhaps a provincial level in Canada, because when land use decisions are made, particularly at a neighborhood level, the, the benefits of new housing being built are very far off.   They're not going to go to the people who live in that neighborhood. They're going to go to the people who are going to live in say a new apartment building, who, who knows where they live right now. And they're going to go to the people who build the apartment building and firms who can hire workers, because they have a place to live that they can afford in that area. Whereas at the local level, the costs of housing construction are very visible and highly concentrated in the people, particularly who live right next to that new development.   So at higher levels of, of government, it, it's easier for people to see that we need new housing and we need to weigh the benefits of that new housing against the costs, not just consider the costs alone.   Jesse (36m 7s): You know, that's, that's pretty fascinating in that if, if you're a more free market oriented kind of person in real estate, and it's very counterintuitive to you because it's almost like you for, for most decisions, at least from my kind of my view is that it's better to have it at the, at the most granular level. But it sounds like in this case, it's, it's kind of similar to political capture that yes, that is the case. You should have it granular, except once these people move in, they're captured by their own, whatever it is, like the, they, they just, they don't want any more.   And it's, I think it's a very human thing. You know, they have their, their situation, but, you know, when it, before they moved in yeah. Build, you know, for my house that is in that area. So it seems like it's almost, it is like a bit of capture that the people that end up moving to these areas and gentrifying them, they don't want anything else to happen after, you know, they, they close on their dealer, you know, they're living there for a few years.   Emily (37m 3s): Yeah, that's right. And what we've seen with some state level reforms in the U S is state governments setting limits on the extent to which local governments can block housing construction. So essentially the state government is protecting individual property owners rights from some local level limits. So in a way it's devolving decision-making to an even more local level down to the individual property owner.   Jesse (37m 35s): Yeah. That's great. It's also this idea of like a lot of these, these groups that are consider themselves these kind of community activist groups, oftentimes politically are left leaning. And that's one of the things that triumph of the city I thought was, was so compelling in that book was talking about how, how much more green cities are to rural areas. It's very counterintuitive because when somebody thinks of the city, I think of the godfather reunion was just, or a series was on TV. And I, to your point of Jewish immigrants, Italians, too, where you look at these tenements in New York, that's what you think of, oh, it must be a very polluted, very bad area.   Where if you look at the output, I guess, per acre of, of greenhouse gas emissions, it's much, much worse outside of the city.   Emily (38m 22s): Yes, that's right. And unfortunately, in, in the U S I'm sure in Canada, too, the places where carbon emissions per person are lowest, are also places where it's extremely difficult to build more housing and therefore extremely difficult for more people to live in these places where they would be using less carbon.   Jesse (38m 46s): Yeah. And, and we have, we have a lot of things in land is one of them, but yeah, it would definitely be, be the case as well. Well, I want to be mindful of the time here before we let our guests go. We typically ask four questions, they're softballs, so don't worry. And, and then we'll, we'll, we'll connect our listeners to wherever they can kind of reach out to find your work and go from there. So if you're okay, I'll kick us off.   Emily (39m 12s): Yeah. Sounds good.   Jesse (39m 14s): So since you're in the academic space as well, maybe this will pertain not just to the real estate industry, but what's your advice for younger individuals that want to get into our industry, and maybe let's focus it on a, on a academic point of view, a academic stream. If somebody wants to get into research or wants to get into the type of work you do, you know, what, what type of things would you encourage them to do while they're, you know, say pre pre college or in college?   Emily (39m 41s): I would definitely recommend internships in, so either in the field where they want to work, or if they're interested in, in academia in say a think tank or in working with a professor, for example, at their university over the summer, both as a, a good way to make the connections that they would need to get a job in that field later. And as a way to, to try it out without making a big commitment, like signing up for grad school.   Jesse (40m 19s): Yeah. Which is which that is a, what is a podcast or book that you are really digging or recommending right now?   Emily (40m 27s): Well, on the topic of the environmental efficiency of urban living, I'd recommend the green metropolis by David Owen   Jesse (40m 38s): Pretty much. Okay. And we'll put a link up to that. One thing that you know, now in your career, whether it's business real estate academics, that you wish you knew when you, when you started out,   Emily (40m 53s): I wish that I had gotten more involved in Twitter earlier in my career. Housing. Twitter is such a great resource for, for learning about the industry. Particularly from, from my standpoint, as I'm reading, I'm studying the effects of land use regulations. It's really helpful to be able to follow home builders, infill developers on Twitter and see how these regulations are affecting their work.   Jesse (41m 26s): You're also in Washington DC, which I think Twitter is just table stakes. Okay. Emily first car make and model   Emily (41m 34s): Honda accord.   Jesse (41m 35s): Oh, that was a quick answer. Perfect. I feel like that question. I always ask that because I w I like Barry Ritholtz on a master's of business and Bloomberg, and that's the last question. And it's funny how we're now phasing into the point where people are like, that's a bit of an offensive question, like with the younger generation, as we're getting to the point where, like, we, we don't drive cars, so I'm like   Emily (41m 56s): No longer on a car.   Jesse (41m 58s): Oh, there you go. Fair enough. So Emily work in people reach out aside from a Google search to, to take a look at your work or, you know, see what you're up to.   Emily (42m 8s): Well, by most of my work is available@mercatus.org, where I have a scholar page and links to my, my research in shorter form writings there. And as I mentioned, I am very into housing, Twitter, and I'm on there at E B w Hamilton.   Jesse (42m 27s): My guest today has been Emily Hamilton, Emily, thanks for being part of working capital.   Emily (42m 32s): Thanks so much, Jesse.   Jesse (42m 35s): Thank you so much for listening to working capital the real estate podcast. I'm your host, Jesse for galley. If you liked the episode, head on to iTunes and leave us a five star review and share on social media, it really helps us out. If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to me on Instagram, Jesse for galley, F R a G a L E, have a good one take care.  

Bloomberg Westminster
Bloomberg Westminster: Jobs, Pay & Political Pressure

Bloomberg Westminster

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 22:23


What more will the Chancellor do for households squeezed by the spiraling cost of living? As consumer confidence plummets to its lowest in nearly 50 years, we look at how employers and workers are adapting to high prices and low unemployment. Bloomberg's Joe Mayes discusses the political pressure on Rishi Sunak. Gary Smith from the GMB trade union tells Bloomberg's Caroline Hepker and Stephen Carroll that employees are ‘hurting really really badly', and pushing for pay rises. Jack Kennedy, UK economist with recruitment website Indeed, says job openings are starting to slow in some sectors, but remain 45% above pre-pandemic levels. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Planet Upload
Creator Clash Update, Discord, Twitch and Responsibility – Buffalo Shooting – and YouTube's Brandcast

Planet Upload

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 33:14


In this week's episode: Creator Clash, a “sporting” event that helps give creators a mental health break?  Lauren has questions. Josh explains how boxing helps with burnout, plus all proceeds go to charity.Do platforms like Discord, Twitch and Facebook have a responsibility when it comes to violence and hate speech? The Buffalo shooting is just the latest. What can they do, and what should they do.YouTube Brandcast 2022 summarized – get the scoop on Lizzo and something about Tom Cruise being a national treasure.As always, this week's upload – it's so good (hint: TikTok, YouTube and  MrBeast's Chocolate).As always, catch a new episode every Friday on your favorite podcasting site. Please leave a comment and visit our website www.creatorupload.com – please subscribe and send us a message - We'd love to hear from you! One of our sponsors (who we luv!), Jellysmack is promoting its amazing Creator Program – be sure to check it out! ~From the Team at Creator Upload 

The Stack Overflow Podcast
Make your open-source project public before you're ready

The Stack Overflow Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 29:44


Highly-touted cryptocurrencies like TARA don't always solve the problems they're supposed to, as Bloomberg reports.If you're looking for a compelling deep-dive into a crypto scammer, Cassidy recommends BBC podcast The Missing Cryptoqueen.Ceora is working to improve the quality of her commit messages in order to turn what's now a personal project into an open-source project that others can contribute to. One great resource she's found: Zen and the art of writing good commit messages.Attention devs: if you have tips for basic project maintenance and hacks for improving commit messages, Ceora wants to hear from you.Read up on the benefits of test-driven development.Today's Lifeboat badge goes to user Nina Scholz for their answer to What's the difference between Object.entries and Object.keys?.

Business Matters
Russia accused of weaponising food in Ukraine war

Business Matters

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 49:20


Vivienne Nunis is joined by Alexander Kaufman from the Huff Post in New York, and Jeanette Rodrigues from Bloomberg in Mumbai. We start with the war in Ukraine and the ripple effects it's having on global food supplies. Plus we look at Indonesia resuming palm oil exports next week - one of the world's most important commodities. The leader of the US House of Representatives Nancy Pelosi again warns that the US will not support a bilateral free trade agreement if the UK does anything to undermine the Good Friday Agreement. Plus after another volatile day on the markets, we try to work out whether the US is heading towards a recession. Image credit: Volunteers prepare food in the kitchen of "World Central Kitchen" for war refugees from Ukraine staying in Przemysl, Poland, 15 April 2022. EPA/DAREK DELMANOWICZ POLAND

Emily Chang’s Tech Briefing
Mark Gurman: Apple close to releasing mixed reality headset

Emily Chang’s Tech Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 3:44


Apple may be close to releasing a headset that combines augmented and virtual reality. For more, KCBS Radio news anchor Margie Shafer spoke with Bloomberg tech reporter Mark Gurman.

Ping - The Enemy
A Arábia Saudita comprou um pedacinho da Nintendo

Ping - The Enemy

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 24:50


O Fundo de Investimento Público da Arábia Saudita agora é dono de 5% da Nintendo, como informado pela Bloomberg e o Ministério das Finanças do Japão. Isso torna o órgão o quinto maior acionista da Nintendo, de acordo com dados da Bloomberg. Nesta edição do Ping, Guilherme Dias e PH Lutti Lippe discutem essa e outras notícias como jogo brasileiro Fobia vai ser lançado no mês que vem e o estúdio Techland, de Dying Light, quer fazer seu próprio Witcher. Confira! Peça agora seu cartão de crédito Santander sem anuidade: https://bit.ly/3F7T8tv  

The Business Power Hour with Deb Krier

Vladimer Botsvadze is a globally renowned, multi-award-winning, digital transformation and social media influencer, Fortune 500 consultant, thought leader, futurist, professor, keynote speaker, startup advisor, C-Suite mentor, and media personality, who has always been at the forefront of fast-paced industries. He has more than 15 years of international experience in marketing and innovation with a proven track record guiding executives and top brands worldwide to initiate change, drive growth, and position brands as market leaders in their industries. Vladimer is currently ranked as the No. 1 Global Marketing Thought Leader by Thinkers360. He has been featured in Forbes, Bloomberg, Yahoo Finance, Irish Tech News, and other media outlets. He's been invited by Social Media Club and Startup Grind as a speaker. Vladimer has been committed to inspiring business executives with his impressive career success, who utilized his natural entrepreneurialism to become a self-made influencer. Established globally as a marketing thought leader, Vladimer has changed the face of global marketing with his presence and contribution. He is the innovative mind behind global events, projects, and publications. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Bloomberg Westminster
Bloomberg Westminster: Police Party Probe

Bloomberg Westminster

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 23:05


After the Met Police conclude their probe into rule-breaking gatherings at Downing Street during lockdown, we get the latest from Westminster with our reporter James Woolcock. Plus: what are Russians being told about the war in Ukraine? We discuss the media landscape with Jade McGlynn from Oxford University. She tells Bloomberg's Yuan Potts and Stephen Carroll that many young people, who have grown up under Putin, are as supportive of the war as older people. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Sound On
Sound On: McCarthy Peloton Rant, Musk Switches to GOP

Sound On

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 41:02


Bloomberg's Abigail Doolittle discusses today's market selloff, Lincoln Mitchell, writer and political analyst discusses the Pennsylvania primary elections and the outlook for the midterms, Bloomberg power reporter Naureen Malik discusses the blackouts risk this summer as heat, drought, shuttered power plants and supply-chain woes strain the electric grid, and Bloomberg Politics Contributors Jeanne Sheehan Zaino and Rick Davis discusses Elon Musk's declaration by tweet that he's giving up on Democrats and voting for Republicans and House minority leader's Kevin McCarthy's rant about Peloton memberships in Congress.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Back in Control Radio
How to Become a High Performer

Back in Control Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 32:00


In this episode, Dr. David Hanscom continues his discussion with bestselling author Dan Coyle.  He shares how repetition, engaging with fear of failure and getting the most out of mistakes are key to the process of Deep Practice. He explains how pausing for reflection and being able to see a new vision of yourself can provide the energy and focus needed to become a high performer (Ignition).  He also discusses how being guided by Master Coaches who understand the skill you are trying to develop and communicate how to improve it effectively creates the environment for achieving high performance. Daniel Coyle is the New York Times bestselling author of The Culture Code, which was named Best Business Book of the Year by Bloomberg, BookPal, and Business Insider. Coyle has served as an advisor to many high-performing organizations, including the Navy SEALs, Microsoft, Google, and the Cleveland Guardians. His other books include The Talent Code, The Secret Race, The Little Book of Talent, and Hardball: A Season in the Projects, which was made into a movie starring Keanu Reeves. Coyle was raised in Anchorage, Alaska, and now lives in Cleveland Heights, Ohio, during the school year and in Homer, Alaska, during the summer with his wife Jenny, and their four children. For more information, visit: https://www.danielcoyle.com.

Dr David Hanscom Blog Show
How to Become a High Performer

Dr David Hanscom Blog Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 31:09


In this episode, Dr. David Hanscom continues his discussion with bestselling author Dan Coyle.  He shares how repetition, engaging with fear of failure and getting the most out of mistakes are key to the process of Deep Practice. He explains how pausing for reflection and being able to see a new vision of yourself can provide the energy and focus needed to become a high performer (Ignition).  He also discusses how being guided by Master Coaches who understand the skill you are trying to develop and communicate how to improve it effectively creates the environment for achieving high performance.Daniel Coyle is the New York Times bestselling author of The Culture Code, which was named Best Business Book of the Year by Bloomberg, BookPal, and Business Insider. Coyle has served as an advisor to many high-performing organizations, including the Navy SEALs, Microsoft, Google, and the Cleveland Guardians. His other books include The Talent Code, The Secret Race, The Little Book of Talent, and Hardball: A Season in the Projects, which was made into a movie starring Keanu Reeves. Coyle was raised in Anchorage, Alaska, and now lives in Cleveland Heights, Ohio, during the school year and in Homer, Alaska, during the summer with his wife Jenny, and their four children. For more information, visit: https://www.danielcoyle.com.

Future Women Leadership Series
Staying on top of your industry as it grows

Future Women Leadership Series

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 20:09


What does the future of your work look like? And how can you best prepare yourself for what the future brings? This discussion from the 2022 Future Women Leadership Summit features Nabila Ahmed, Asia Finance Correspondent at Bloomberg, Fiona Simson, President of the National Farmers Federation and Andrea Clarke, Founder of FutureFit. Co. The panel shares what sectors are growing the fastest, what skills will be most crucial in the future, and how to stay on top of a developing work environment, moderated by Chief strategy officer at Cyber CX, Alastair MacGibbon. The Future Women Leadership Series is hosted by Helen McCabe. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Media Show
Wagatha Christie and celebrity journalism

The Media Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 28:08


This week we discuss the Wagatha Christie trial and what it told us about celebrity journalism. Simon Boyle, Executive Showbiz Editor at The Sun, tells us how the newspaper managed to keep their journalists out of court. John Micklethwait, editor-in-chief of Bloomberg, on new UK expansion plans and who Britain's libel laws are really serving. Also in the programme: Jim Waterson, Media Editor at The Guardian and Pandora Sykes, co-host of Unreal: A Critical History of Reality TV.

Talking Real Money
The Bogle Effect

Talking Real Money

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 30:01


We have always been huge fans of the work of the later John Bogle, founder of Vanguard. We had the opportunity to spend time with him on several occasions. Bloomberg's Eric Balchunas also spent many hours with "Jack" Bogle in the years prior to his death and compiled his acheivements and wisdom into a fascinating book.

Leadership and Loyalty™
2/2 Totally Reimagining the Engagement Model: Carson Tate

Leadership and Loyalty™

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 34:42


Think about it, we're all here at the moment in time that has rattled our work-life reality. As employees and employers, we are in the middle of what's become known as The Great Resignation. However, is resigning the answer, or could there be other opportunities you never even considered?  In many of my articles, I've spoken about how the Great Resignation is in fact, The Great Pause. We've all been given an extraordinary moment to examine what matters most to us. But does that always mean walking away from the job you are in? Or might there be an opportunity to co-create your dream job? You might be amazed. Our guest for the next two episodes is Carson Tate. Carson serves as a consultant and coach to executives at Fortune 500 companies including Deloitte, FedEx, Johnson & Johnson, Kraft, Heinz, Synchrony, Wells Fargo, and many others. Her work has been featured in top-tier business media including Bloomberg, Businessweek, Business Insider, CBS Money Watch, Fast Company, Forbes, Harvard Business Review Blog, The New York Times, USA Today, Working Mother, and more.  Carson Tate knows that when employees thrive, business thrives. She is the author of two books, Work Simply, and Own It. Love It. Make it Work. How to Make Any Job Your Dream Job. Carson's practical, tactical, science-backed strategies and methodologies have enabled Fortune 500 companies to amplify team performance, engage their employees, and increase workforce productivity. Website  http://www.workingsimply.com Social media  https://www.linkedin.com/in/carsontate Part 2) Totally Reimagining the Engagement Model What's wrong with the Multi-billion-dollar Engagement model  Are You Building an Empire on Sand? Culture - Connection - Collaboration - with Courage Are you a "to me," "for me," or "With me"? The Future of Work: Reciprocal Relationship Sunk Cost Bias and Committing to What No Longer Works Curious to discover how tapping into the Anatomy of Meaning can #actualize your #business, #culture, #Leadership and #tribe DovBaron.com "Those Who Control Meaning for The Tribe, Also Control The Movement of That Tribe" Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Bloomberg Westminster
Bloomberg Westminster: Only a Small Windfall

Bloomberg Westminster

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 22:59


Mike Wood, Conservative MP for Dudley South, says a windfall tax on energy companies is worth serious consideration, but it would probably only mean £50 a year off domestic fuel bills. He tells Bloomberg's Stephen Carroll and Yuan Potts, the Government should look at uprating pensions and benefits to compensate for higher inflation. Plus: Katy Hayward, from Queen's University Belfast on the Northern Irish border and why it's such an intractable issue.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Lit Up: Big Ideas in Cannabis Technology & Innovation
Starting Massachusetts first vertically integrated social equity cannabis operation, Trade Roots, with Co-Founder's Carl Giannone & "The Captain" Jesse Pitts

Lit Up: Big Ideas in Cannabis Technology & Innovation

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 85:48


You're about to hear the story of two co-founders; one a social equity applicant from the legacy market, the other, a trader from New York who found the plant through the end of life care for his mother. From their love of early morning walks, complementary skillsets, and not freaking out on the same day, they have become the first vertically integrated social equity participant in Massachusetts. There is A LOT to be said about Cannabis social equity programs across the Country. Many affected by Cannabis prohibition drug laws, with criminal records, don't have the    opportunities to earn the business acumen and financial resources needed to start such an organization in the legal market. This is a story of how this team did it! Things you may learn in today's episode: How NOT to transport a quarter of a million dollars in cash. How to choose a business partner. What a Wareham is. How to lose a physical building. How to fundraise. Hint: It's closer than you think. What a freezer war is and how to win it. The appropriate answer to the age of an instagram account of a 3 year old cannabis business. Finally, what a tremendous amount of patience and perseverance looks like. One thing you will not learn: Throwing a cigarette butt on Mr T's lawn is a very bad idea. No one needs to learn that. We all pity that fool; especially Carl :) Please enjoy our founders journey of starting Massachusetts first Vertically Integrated Social Equity Participant, Trade Roots, with Co-Founder's Carl Giannone & "The Captain" Jesse Pitts Professional Summary: Jesse Pitts: An experienced construction foreman and small business owner who has extensive knowledge of the building codes and amendments here in Massachusetts. A native to our host town, Jesse has deep roots within the community. With an enduring interest and passion for cannabis, Jesse has been a licensed medical cannabis patient and caregiver in Massachusetts since the inception of the program. He has  vast experience in plant cultivation and has recently received a certification in advanced extraction technologies at Havelick & Associates LLC in Golden Colorado. Jesse co-founded The Center For Alternative Life Medicine (C.A.L.M.) out of New Bedford Ma. C.A.L.M. is a not-for-profit entity that was prepared to apply for a medical cannabis license in Ma. C.A.L.M. was acquired and merged with New England Treatment Access (N.E.T.A.) Jesse was a paid consultant and helped co-author N.E.T.A's application. This lead to the company being awarded two licenses.  Jesse is a registered Social Equity Program (SEP) participant. Carl Giannone: After graduating Lafayette College with degrees in Economics & Business, Carl began his career as an equities trader at Heartland Securities/Trillium Trading in 1999. After being promoted to trading desk manager and Registered Principal, Carl left to trade his own account with Schonfeld Securities before building his own desk, first under Assent LLC/Sungard (2006) and then T3 Capital Management/T3 Trading Group (2010).  By 2014, his desk employed over 100 traders in two offices deploying myriad strategies across a range of asset classes. After 17 years of performing roles ranging from trader to risk manager to recruiter to brand manager, Carl left his trading desk (and Manhattan) to work as an independent outside recruiter for a large multinational proprietary trading firm while taking care of an ill parent. As a result of seeing the benefits of medical cannabis first hand (in moderating cancer symptoms), Carl shifted his focus from investments to cannabis. He has been quoted in Bloomberg and on CNBC as well as niche industry publications. He previously held his Series 7, 24, 55, 56, 62 and 63 licenses. Company Summary: “Produced in Mass., not en masse.” As an artisanal purveyor of "Craft Cannabis at The Gateway to Cape Cod," Wareham-based Trade Roots is a locally-owned, operated, and staffed business...

Top of Mind
The Risks and Opportunities in Today's Housing Market

Top of Mind

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 58:38


In this episode of the Top of Mind podcast, Mike Simonsen sits down with Rick Sharga, EVP of Market Intelligence at ATTOM, for a deep dive into the state of the current housing market. Rick talks about areas of risk for housing in today's economy, shares some surprising insights into the foreclosure situation, discusses which policies might impact demand, and more. About Rick Sharga Rick Sharga is the Executive Vice President of Market Intelligence at ATTOM, one of the country's leading providers of real estate data for real estate, financial services, insurance companies, and government agencies. An accomplished executive with over 25 years of experience in consumer and B2B marketing, Rick has held numerous senior leadership positions in the real estate and mortgage industries and has also developed and executed sales and marketing programs for tech companies such as Fujitsu, JD Edwards, Toshiba, and Hitachi; start-ups like Tickets.com; and consumer brands including Pizza Hut, Acura and Cox Communications.  One of the country's most frequently-quoted sources on real estate, mortgage, and foreclosure trends, Rick has appeared regularly over the past 15 years on CNBC, the CBS Evening News, NBC Nightly News, CNN, ABC World News, FOX, Bloomberg, and NPR.  Rick has also been named twice to the Inman News Inman 100, an annual list of the most influential leaders in real estate. Here's a glimpse of what you'll learn:  Which segments of borrowers are most at risk in the current environment Surprising insights about the foreclosure situation Which regulatory changes might further dampen buyer demand this year Why new buyers are facing a “triple whammy” of challenges Rick Sharga's outlook for what's next in the industry Featuring Mike Simonsen, CEO of Altos Research A true data geek, Mike founded Altos Research in 2006 to bring data and insight on the U.S. housing market to those who need it most. The company now serves the largest Wall Street investment firms, banks, and tens of thousands of real estate professionals around the country. Mike's insights on the market have been featured in Forbes, New York Times, Bloomberg, Dallas Morning News, Seattle PI, and many other national media outlets. Resources mentioned in this episode: Rick Sharga on LinkedIn Rick Sharga on Twitter ATTOM RealtyTrac Mike Simonsen on LinkedIn Altos Research Follow us on Twitter for more data analysis and insights: https://twitter.com/altosresearch https://twitter.com/mikesimonsen See you next week!

World's a Mess
GAIDEN #11 SIM Cards and Simulacrum

World's a Mess

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 21:24


GAIDEN #11-- Today James avoids talking about the major news stories of the day in favor of getting in and out as fast as he can, like some sort of a tactical f*ck-up unit. It's a quick one, but we got plenty of garbage to go around. Today he talks about Russia's dumbest assassin, a Florida man's one-man-war on God, and two quick stories about absconded apes and a famous Japanese landmark. And that's it. Told you it was a quick one. Support our show at Patreon.com/quality! Follow WaM on Twitter @WorldsAMessPod. Follow James on Twitter @kislingtwits and at https://linktr.ee/JimboKberryBt . Follow Alex @giraffetermath. Thanks to Sef Joosten for our show art (http://spexdoodles.tumblr.com). Our theme music is "The World's a Mess" by X. Outro is "Devil's Haircut" by Beck. Today's sources are Bloomberg, NY Post, NPR, Sun Sentinel, and Vice.

Emily Chang’s Tech Briefing
Margi Murphy: Hackers find ways to control certain Tesla models

Emily Chang’s Tech Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 3:46


Hackers have found a way to unlock and drive off with certain Tesla models.  For more, KCBS Radio news anchor Melissa Culross spoke with Bloomberg's Margi Murphy.

Monocle 24: The Briefing
Tuesday 17 May

Monocle 24: The Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 30:00


Turkey's president says that he is opposed to Finland and Sweden joining Nato but what does that mean for security in the region? We profile France's new prime minister Élisabeth Borne, the first woman to hold the post in 30 years, and get the latest business news from Bloomberg.

Bloomberg Westminster
Bloomberg Westminster: More Help Needed

Bloomberg Westminster

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 23:01


Households will need more support with energy bills sooner rather than later, says Conservative MP Tim Loughton. He tells Bloomberg's Yuan Potts and Caroline Hepker that he's open-minded about a windfall tax, but says it must not cut investment by energy companies. Plus the latest on the NHS and rising waiting times for ambulances, with Jon Restell, Chief Executive of the trade union Managers in Partnership.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Wolf Of All Streets
How Bullish Is Building A New Generation Crypto Exchange | Chris Briseno, Bullish.com

The Wolf Of All Streets

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 18:33


From doorman/club promoter to Bloomberg to Bullish. Our guest today left the financial powerhouse Bloomberg to be on the cutting edge of tech and crypto at Bullish. Now the Global Head of Marketing, Chris Briseno explains how Bullish is bridging the gap between centralized and decentralized exchanges. Learn from Chris himself about the advantages of using Bullish and why he calls Bullish the Google of the crypto world. JOIN THE FREE WOLF DEN NEWSLETTER

Marketplace Tech
The not-so-stable stablecoin economy

Marketplace Tech

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 7:59


Last week, we got a stark reminder of the volatility of cryptocurrencies. Bitcoin plummeted to its lowest value in 16 months. This time, the source of the cascade of selling came from an unexpected quarter. The market crashed after investors fled a type of crypto called stablecoins, whose worth is pegged to a traditional currency, like the U.S. dollar. Last week, that kinda fell apart. Marketplace’s Kimberly Adams speaks with Emily Nicolle, a crypto blogger for Bloomberg, about how stablecoins work. Your donation powers the journalism you rely on. Give today to support “Marketplace Tech.”

Marketplace All-in-One
The not-so-stable stablecoin economy

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 7:59


Last week, we got a stark reminder of the volatility of cryptocurrencies. Bitcoin plummeted to its lowest value in 16 months. This time, the source of the cascade of selling came from an unexpected quarter. The market crashed after investors fled a type of crypto called stablecoins, whose worth is pegged to a traditional currency, like the U.S. dollar. Last week, that kinda fell apart. Marketplace’s Kimberly Adams speaks with Emily Nicolle, a crypto blogger for Bloomberg, about how stablecoins work. Your donation powers the journalism you rely on. Give today to support “Marketplace Tech.”

Hacker Valley Studio
Something To Say In Cyber With Jon DiMaggio

Hacker Valley Studio

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 28:29


“If you believe in yourself and you're willing to put in that work, it WILL happen.” - Jon DiMaggio In this episode, Ron and Chris are joined by author and Chief Security Strategist, Jon DiMaggio, to talk about the power of believing in yourself and following through on your dreams. Jon shares the story behind writing his book, The Art of Cyber Warfare, and how he learned to overcome rejection.   Sponsor Links:  Thank you to our sponsors Axonius and Uptycs for bringing this episode to life! Life is complex. But it's not about avoiding challenges or fearing failure. Just ask Simone Biles — the greatest gymnast of all time. Want to learn more about how Simone controls complexity? Watch her video at axonius.com/simone With Uptycs, modern defenders can prioritize, investigate and respond to threats across the entire attack surface—all from a common solution. Check them out at Uptycs.com and be sure to stop by their booth #435 at RSA 2022   Guest Bio: Jon DiMaggio is the chief security strategist at Analyst1 and has over 15 years of experience hunting, researching, and writing about advanced cyber threats. As a specialist in enterprise ransomware attacks and nation-state intrusions, such as”Ransom Mafia: Analysis of the World's first Ransomware Cartel”,“Nation State Ransomware” and a “History of REvil”. He has exposed the criminal cartels behind major ransomware attacks, aided law enforcement agencies in federal indictments of nation-state attacks, and discussed his work with The New York Times, Bloomberg, Fox, CNN, Reuters, and Wired. You can find Jon speaking about his research at conferences such as RSA. Additionally, in 2022, Jon authored the book “The Art of Cyberwarfare: An Investigator's Guide to Espionage, Ransomware, and Organized Cybercrime” published by No Starch Press.   Links: Stay in touch with Jon DiMaggio on LinkedIn and Twitter Connect with Ron Eddings on LinkedIn and Twitter Connect with Chris Cochran on LinkedIn and Twitter Purchase a HVS t-shirt at our shop Continue the conversation by joining our Discord Check out  Hacker Valley Media and Hacker Valley Studio

Inspired Minds
William D. Cohan

Inspired Minds

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 47:56


William D. Cohan, a former senior Wall Street M&A investment banker for 17 years at Lazard Frères & Co., Merrill Lynch and JPMorganChase, is the "New York Times" bestselling author of three non-fiction narratives about Wall Street: "Money and Power: How Goldman Sachs Came to Rule the World," "House of Cards: A Tale of Hubris and Wretched Excess on Wall Street" and "The Last Tycoons: The Secret History of Lazard Frères & Co.," the winner of the 2007 FT/Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year Award. His book, "The Price of Silence," about the Duke lacrosse scandal was published in April 2014 and was also a "New York Times" bestseller. His book, "Why Wall Street Matters," was published by Random House in February 2017.  His most recent book, "Four Friends," about four of his friends from high school and what happened to them in their lives, was published in July 2019 by Flatiron Press. His new book, to be published in November 2022, is titled "Power Failure: The Rise and Fall of an American Icon." It is about the astounding rise and precipitous fall of the General Electric Company, once the world's most valuable and respected company.A former longtime special correspondent at “Vanity Fair,” he is a founding partner of “Puck,” a daily digital news and opinion publication. His focus at “Puck” is on Wall Street and the business world, writ large. He is a former columnist for the DealBook section of the “The New York Times.” He also writes for “The Financial Times,” “The New York Times,” “Air Mail,” “Barron's,” “Bloomberg BusinessWeek,” “The Atlantic,” “Town & Country,” “The Nation,” “Fortune,” “The Hollywood Reporter,” and “Politico,”among other publications. He previously wrote a bi-weekly opinion column for “The New York Times” and an opinion column for “BloombergView.” He also appears regularly on CNN, on CNBC, where is a contributor, on MSNBC and the BBC-TV. He has also appeared three times as a guest on the Daily Show, with Jon Stewart, The NewsHour, The Charlie Rose Show, The Tavis Smiley Show, and CBS This Morning as well as on numerous NPR, BBC and Bloomberg radio programs. He was formerly a contributing editor on Bloomberg TV.He is a graduate of Phillips Academy, Duke University, Columbia University School of Journalism and the Columbia University Graduate School of Business. He grew up in Worcester, Massachusetts and now lives in New York City and upstate New York with his wife and, on occasion these days, their two sons.

Wall Street Week
Bloomberg Wall Street Week: Bianco, Moore, Altman

Wall Street Week

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 32:07


One of the most iconic brands in financial television returns for today's issues and today's world. On this edition of Wall Street Week, Kate Moore, BlackRock Global Allocation Team Head of Thematic Strategy & David Bianco, DWS Americas CIO wrap up the stormy week in markets. Roger Altman, Evercore Senior Chairman talks about the chances of a recession. Plus, Former U.S. Treasury Secretary Lawrence H. Summers weighs in on inflation, price gouging, Musk and more. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Disciplined Investor
TDI Podcast: The Invisible Hand Part 1 (#766)

The Disciplined Investor

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 46:53


David Tepper - calling the bottom - seems like everyone wants to be the market hero these days. Panic selling and panic buying - amateur hour out there. A quick less on Buying the Dip - or maybe not buying the dip. A best of episode of Andrew's rants and issues with the Fed heads. Follow @andrewhorowitz Looking for style diversification? More information on the TDI Managed Growth Strategy - https://thedisciplinedinvestor.com/blog/tdi-strategy/ eNVESTOLOGY Info - https://envestology.com/ Friday Pre-Market Run-Down Webinar Registration - https://www.triggercharts.com/webinar-pre-market-rundown-fridays/ Stocks mentioned in this episode: (TLT), (PTON), (UPST)

Equity
What's ahead for crypto startups?

Equity

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 8:29


Hello and welcome back to Equity, a podcast about the business of startups, where we unpack the numbers and nuance behind the headlines. Every Monday, Grace and Alex scour the news and record notes on what's going on to kick off the week.What was on our minds this morning? The following:Global markets are generally down, albeit nothing too terrifying. The American stock market is trying to regain its footing after weeks of selling.What's ahead for crypto startups in the wake of the Terra/Luna meltdown? Bloomberg wonders about a general slowdown, and we look at the Crunchbase data of who backed the ill-fated stablecoin.Startup layoffs are accelerating -- not as bad as before, but enough to warrant our attention. Layoffs.FYI is back, y'all!The Topship round, invested in by Y Combinator and Flexport, has our recent look at CVC hitting just right.It was an awful weekend in America, which leaked into the show somewhat. Take care of one another.A few housekeeping notes before we go: This is not a live-show week, so Equity will simply come out on Wednesday and Friday mornings. And this week is our TC Sessions: Mobility event, which you can learn more about here.

The Passive Income MD Podcast
#107 Interview with ChristinaLA

The Passive Income MD Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 25:12


Welcome Vincent Chan of ChristinaLA to Passive Income MD Podcast! Vincent Chan is the Chief Operating Officer of Christina. He is responsible for establishing financial & operational policy, & working closely with the Christina management team to execute strategies & business plans. Christina is a Malibu-based real estate developer, manager, & sponsor founded in 1977. For 45+ years the firm has made investments in the Westside Region of Los Angeles, primarily via 8 submarkets including Beverly Hills, Brentwood, Century City, Malibu, Santa Monica, Silicon Beach, West Hollywood, & Westwood.  Christina provides accredited investors with the opportunity to own coveted investment properties in these ultra-prime neighborhoods that would otherwise be unobtainable.  The firm has been featured in Bloomberg, Forbes, Los Angeles Times, & Yahoo Finance. Visit ChristinaLA.com to learn more.

乱翻书
58.中美数据服务对比:差异与机会

乱翻书

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 77:37


【本期嘉宾】桑文锋、任栋霓、唐建法桑文锋(神策数据创始人&CEO)任栋霓Tony(一面数据创始人&CEO)唐建法(钛铂数据创始人&CEO)主播:潘乱(乱翻书主理人)【时间线】03:58 中国的数据服务行业内有没有机会出现类似于彭博(Bloomberg)这样的企业?07:43 中美所在的企业服务的市场有什么不同?16:38 在数据服务领域里面,大家要做全球化吗?26:32 中国有没有机会就是出现Palantir Technologies这样的企业?29:39 在未来5~10年左右,数据服务的哪个细分领域里面最有可能跑出来超级公司?40:33 神策D轮融资两亿美金,这么一大笔钱打算怎么花、用在什么方向上?44:22 大家不同的背景,对于自己做公司的路径选择上会有什么影响吗?50:50 嘉宾分享:创业路程上的艰辛历程与应对53:58 嘉宾分享:数据服务不易被外界感知,如何去跟客户、市场沟通?57:10 嘉宾分享:并入国际化公司后,团队的磨合是否顺利,文化上有没有什么冲突?59:37 国内服务出海的话,什么样的行业的产品或者服务是更适合做国际化?63:22 今天市场大环境对大家有什么样的影响?71:14 「创业者表现的都是一致的乐观,因为不乐观的话早就倒下了,早就被压力打趴了」72:15 怎么看数据合规形势下的发展?【开场&结尾音乐】Vexento - Happy Robot【推荐阅读】1、 本节目第43期《中美SaaS对比:差距与潜力》https://www.xiaoyuzhoufm.com/episode/622462d6e294c5b2ffc9788c?s=eyJ1IjoiNjEyNWQ0OTJlMGY1ZTcyM2JiZjYxMmZkIn0%3D2、《企业服务从零到一》桑文锋 著微信公众号:乱翻书视频号:潘乱商业合作:联系微信 tongxing717本期编辑:怀杭

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™
272 The Culture Playbook with NYT Bestselling Author Daniel Coyle

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 46:10


Many people are asking how do we create legendary cultures in a digital / hybrid work environment. On this episode of Christopher Lochhead: Follow Your Different, we ask Daniel Coyle this question: how can we create legendary cultures? Daniel Coyle is a New York Times bestselling author. His book, The Culture Code, was named the Best Business Book of the Year a little while back by Bloomberg. He has a new book out now, called The Culture Playbook: 60 highly effective actions to help your group succeed. He is the man on all things culture, so stay and listen to learn more. Daniel Coyle on Writing His New Book The conversation starts of with congratulating Daniel Coyle on publishing his latest book, The Culture Playbook. Daniel follows up on his thoughts on how he feels when launching a new project or book. “We are living through a moment, aren't we? It's like, when you start a project like this, you're never quite sure when it's going to land. And everybody's trying to figure out, “How are we going? How are we going to do this? How are we going to work together now? Everybody's having that conversation now. It is a moment, and it's kind of fun to explore what's possible” – Daniel Coyle The Transition Period Daniel was then asked about his thoughts on certain huge companies that are telling their people to go back to the office. Another thing to note was that those who are pushing for these things are usually those who are Native Analogs – people whose life don't revolve in the digital sphere. Daniel thinks that this current period is a transitional phase, and it's a way for companies to see what works and what doesn't. “Is it transition and it is totally fascinating to see us people self-organize in this new world. And there's basically two schools of thought about it. The first school of thought is, this was a rupture. People things will never go back to the way they were, people discovered that they had lives outside of work. Then there's another school of thought, which says, Yeah, this is kind of part of a larger, longer journey, there was a sort of zoom out where people realized, hey, life's a lot bigger than work. But at the same time, that there is kind of a joy and a pleasure and a positivity and a productivity that comes out of being in the office. It's maybe not five days a week, maybe it's three, maybe it's two.”    – Daniel Coyle Daniel admits that he himself falls under the second school of thought, and that going to the office can be quite beneficial for productivity, even if it's just 2 to 3 days off a week. Organizing Your Office for the New Work Experience On the topic of adopting the hybrid workplace, one of the issues brought up was the lack of coordination. For example, one could be scheduled to be at the office, yet the people who they have to work or have a meeting with are staying at home. Daniel agrees that this is currently happening in a lot of offices, and is something that the teams and management need to address. They have to be intentional and work out schedules where everyone in the team is in the office at the same time, so they can meet and collaborate on what needs to be done for their projects. Management can also help in coordinating schedules, so that different teams that need to work together can have overlapping schedules. But at the end of the day, the initiative to coordinate should come from the teams themselves. Otherwise, you'll be stuck in your cubicle, still doing zoom calls with your teammates. To hear more from Daniel Coyle and how to create a legendary culture in your workplace, download and listen to this episode. Bio Daniel Coyle is the New York Times best-selling author of The Culture Playbook, The Culture Code, The Secret Race, The Little Book of Talent, The Talent Code, Lance Armstrong's War, Hardball: A Season in the Projects and the novel Waking Samuel. Winner (with Tyler Hamilton) of the 2012 William Hill Sports Book of the Year Prize,

Loving Liberty Radio Network
05-13-2022 Liberty RoundTable with Sam Bushman

Loving Liberty Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 109:38


Hour 1 * Sam From Mount Vernon: George Washington – Was he the greatest leader of all time? * The US stockpile of diesel fuel, which is vital for the transportation sector and economy at large, hit a nearly two-decade low as fuel prices hit a record high Wednesday. * East Coast inventories declined to 21.3 million barrels of diesel fuel or about two weeks worth of supply – “I wouldn't be surprised to see diesel being rationed on the East Coast this summer,” John Catsimatidis, the CEO of United Refining Co., told Bloomberg. * Migrants are receiving ample supplies of baby formula, according to Republican Florida Rep. Kat Cammack, while Americans are experiencing severe formula shortages. Hour 2 * Guest: Dr. Scott Bradley – To Preserve The Nation – FreedomsRisingSun.com * There is Order in the Universe, Our Founders new it – Do You? * To Preserve the Nation: In the Tradition of the Founding Fathers – Scott N. Bradley – (This series of lectures is available in both DVD video format and in audio formats) This study course requires both this book and the lecture presentations to be complete. Each chapter in this book correlates with a lecture in the series. * Chapter 15. George Washington: “The Elegant Exercise of Power” * God “raised up wise men” for the “very purpose” of writing the Constitution of the United States. * Naomi Judd died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound, daughter Ashley says. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/loving-liberty/support

Broken Pie Chart
Why Interest Rates Effect Stock Market Valuations

Broken Pie Chart

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 24:56


Derek Moore explains why commentators on CNBC and Bloomberg have been talking about valuations coming down due to interest rates increasing. Why do interest rates matter to stock valuations? How would you explain it to someone? Plus, how all these inputs are estimates and can change over time.   How to understand the present value of future cash flows DCF or discounted cash flow model Earnings estimates on the market for 2022, 2023, and 2024 Intrinsic valuation of the S&P 500 Index based on different index rates What is the equity risk premium? What is the discount rate? How does the 10-year treasury bond interest rate factor in? What is the terminal rate of growth for markets?       Mentioned in this Episode:   Jurrien Timmer of Fidelity 2-Year Treasury Yield Implied PE vs Forward PE S&P 500 Index https://twitter.com/TimmerFidelity/status/1525190396413894657   Professor Aswath Damodaran S&P 500 valuation estimate worksheet https://aswathdamodaran.blogspot.com/2022/05/in-search-of-steady-state-inflation.html   Contact Derek Moore derek.moore@zegafinancial.com   ZEGA Financial www.zegafinancial.com   Derek Moore's Book Broken Pie Chart https://www.amazon.com/Broken-Pie-Chart-Investment-Portfolio/dp/1787435547?ref_=nav_signin&

Leadership and Loyalty™
1/2: Own it. Love it. Make it Work. Carson Tate

Leadership and Loyalty™

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 34:23


Think about it, we're all here at the moment in time that has rattled our work-life reality. As employees and employers, we are in the middle of what's become known as The Great Resignation. However, is resigning the answer, or could there be other opportunities you never even considered?  In many of my articles, I've spoken about how the Great Resignation is in fact, The Great Pause. We've all been given an extraordinary moment to examine what matters most to us. But does that always mean walking away from the job you are in? Or might there be an opportunity to co-create your dream job? You might be amazed. Our guest for the next two episodes is Carson Tate. Carson serves as a consultant and coach to executives at Fortune 500 companies including Deloitte, FedEx, Johnson & Johnson, Kraft, Heinz, Synchrony, Wells Fargo, and many others. Her work has been featured in top-tier business media including Bloomberg, Businessweek, Business Insider, CBS Money Watch, Fast Company, Forbes, Harvard Business Review Blog, The New York Times, USA Today, Working Mother, and more.  Carson Tate knows that when employees thrive, business thrives. She is the author of two books, Work Simply, and Own It. Love It. Make it Work. How to Make Any Job Your Dream Job. Carson's practical, tactical, science-backed strategies and methodologies have enabled Fortune 500 companies to amplify team performance, engage their employees, and increase workforce productivity. Website   http://www.workingsimply.com Social media  https://www.linkedin.com/in/carsontate Part 1) Make Any Job Your Dream Job It all starts with Self-Awareness The Pause and Ask Strategy! The Right Reason to Divorce or Stay December 26th - The Moment of No Return The Universal Need All Employers MUST meet Employees and Employers Pretending to be Psychics.  What's the Framework for Healthy Negotiation?  Curious to discover how tapping into the Anatomy of Meaning can #actualize your #business, #culture, #Leadership and #tribe DovBaron.com "Those Who Control Meaning for The Tribe, Also Control The Movement of The Tribe" Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices