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Best podcasts about north american

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Latest podcast episodes about north american

Mexico Matters
Rebalancing Relationships with Former USTR Robert Lighthizer

Mexico Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 42:56


In this episode, Mariana Campero speaks with former United States Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer about USMCA and the principles and goals that guided its creation versus the old NAFTA. They also discuss the benefits and limits of the North American market, the issues behind supply chain disruptions, the importance of protecting jobs and livelihoods, and why Mexico matters to the United States.

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast
Podcast #58: Crystal Mountain, Washington President and CEO Frank DeBerry

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 84:51


The Storm Skiing Podcast is sponsored by Mountain Gazette - Listen to the podcast for discount codes on subscriptions and merch.WhoFrank DeBerry, President and CEO of Crystal Mountain, WashingtonRecorded onOctober 18, 2021Why I interviewed himBecause Crystal is one of the under-appreciated giants of North American skiing. It has more inbounds skiable terrain than Jackson Hole and gets more snow than any ski area in Colorado. It’s not overlooked nationally because it’s hidden. It’s owned by Alterra, is the Pacific Northwest star on the Ikon Pass, and is seated in the shadow of Mt. Rainier, just two hours from downtown Seattle. But Crystal lacks the substantial bed base that would promote it from ski area to ski resort, that would make someone from New York or LA line it up beside the Wasatch or Tahoe or the I-70 corridor as a vacation option. So it’s mostly a local. A damn big one, with lights-out skiing and a voracious skier base. Maybe too voracious, judging from the recent pow-day traffic jams dozens of miles long. This is a big mountain with big plans, and I wanted to talk to the conductor of all this madness to find out exactly where it was headed.What we talked aboutWorking at Mountain Creek when Intrawest bought the place and replaced the entire lift system in one summer; “it’s almost impossible to run Mountain Creek”; why Intrawest sold the mountain and others, including Whistler; West Virginia skiing and why you need to hit Snowshoe; Crystal’s “extraordinary” terrain and enormous snowfall; the culture shock of moving from the snow-starved East to the snow-choked West; why Mountain Creek and Crystal are “not that dissimilar”; avalanche mitigation; the “rabid” Pacific Northwest ski culture; why Crystal went from perennial hidden gem to one battling chronic overcrowding; whether the ski area could ever build up a larger bed base; the enormous challenge of Crystal’s endless two-lane, un-expandable access road; why Crystal was initially unlimited on the Ikon Base Pass and why that proved to be unsustainable; what happened to passholder numbers when Alterra moved unlimited Crystal access to the full Ikon Pass; why the mountain had to stop selling day tickets in early 2020; why you may want to ski holidays at Crystal; why Crystal is moving to paid parking and how that will fund a mass transit system from Enumclaw; the amazing number of parking spaces Crystal loses to snowbanks each season; operating buses amid Covid; what might replace the Rainier Express; the difference between out-of-base lift capacity and overall lift capacity; a bold proposal to move the current gondola and add another; potential expansion up Bullion Basin; why Crystal abandoned that terrain several decades ago; whether the second base area or the Kelly’s Gap high-speed quad proposed on the 2004 master plan could still happen; why we may see groomed terrain in Northway; whether Crystal would ever upgrade capacity on the Northway or Chair 6 doubles; why we’re unlikely to see a chair up Silver King; which terrain could be included in a night-skiing expansion and what it would take to make it happen; and the tradition of the long season at Crystal and why that’s in no danger of ending.Why I thought that now was a good time for this interview“Crystal Mountain Resort is the sleeping giant of the Northwest.” – Peak Ski Guide & Travel Planner, 1994“Outside of Seattle, Crystal Mountain remains largely unknown. Too bad, because Crystal is 2,300 acres and 3,100 vertical feet of romping grounds.” – Skiing, October 1995“The region gets little press, is ridden almost exclusively by locals, and received biblical precipitation. … One of my guides claims it takes a few days to tear up Crystal after a big dump.” – Skiing, October 1999Welp, things have changed. The 1990s version of Crystal was, according to Lift Blog, a time machine owned by a ski cooperative. Boyne bought the joint, fixed it up, and, after a brief stint as an indie, Crystal ended up in Alterra’s quiver. So: a modern ski area, on the Ikon Pass, in the shadow of an increasingly affluent metro Seattle population that has exploded from around 2.5 million to nearly 4 million in the past 25 years, 100 percent of whom access the ski area via an endless two-laner.It’s quite a mess. This offseason, Crystal made two huge moves to address the chronic overcrowding that’s now as predictable as the mountain’s monster snowstorms: significantly reduce Ikon Base Pass access and implement a paid parking program. These short-term moves are the first steps in an evolving master plan that should address parking shortages, increase out-of-base lift capacity, and improve the overall ski experience. Crystal has huge plans, especially around its lift fleet, and I wanted to give frustrated skiers a window into how their current ski-day woes may eventually subside.Questions I wish I’d askedIn August, I rode the Crystal gondola to the summit with my family. Base area signs warned of limited visibility, but we had driven all the way out there already and I like riding lifts anyway and so up we went. Wildfire smoke, everywhere erasing the horizon. Rainier, normally looming epochally over the ski area’s summit, was invisible. With Sierra-at-Tahoe facing a limited season after extensive wildfire damage and Heavenly and Kirkwood facing down fire threats, the ski industry is reckoning with climate change as an all-seasons threat. I would have loved to have gotten DeBerry’s take on what this means, both for Crystal and for the industry at large.Why you should ski CrystalI mean, well, just look at the place:When ski writers talk about a “skier’s mountain,” this is what they mean. Vast dominions of raging terrain dumping thousands of feet off the summit. Very little grooming. Buckets of snow. This is trailblazing skiing – pick your own route, any route, do your best not to die. And why not? They don’t have 5,000 tourists at the base area to keep happy. Let the other mountains string traverses across the fall line to zigzag green circle boulevards from the summit. Crystal is a mega-mountain that still feels primarily like a ski area for skiers. It’s a must-hit.Just go, you know, on a weekday.Additional reading/videosLift Blog’s inventory of Crystal Mountain liftsArchival Crystal trailmapsDeBerry refers to “John” frequently throughout our interview. He’s referencing John Kircher, former owner of Crystal Mountain and brother of Boyne Resorts CEO Stephen Kircher. Here’s a really good overview of why he sold the mountain to Alterra shortly after Vail bought Stevens.More on the great powder-day fiasco of 2020 that forced huge changes in how Crystal manages skiers and traffic.Gregory Scruggs wrote an outstanding compare-and-contrast of the trajectories of Crystal under Alterra and Stevens Pass under Vail:The two biggest rival corporations in ski resort management staked their claims in Washington state in 2018 by purchasing two of the Central Cascades’ most beloved ski areas.Vail Resorts, based in Broomfield, Colorado, bought Stevens Pass, the lovably crusty ski area on one of the continent’s snowiest mountain passes reachable by road; meanwhile, Denver-based Alterra Mountain Company snapped up Crystal Mountain, a resort founded by Seattle ski bums at the edge of Mount Rainier National Park.…Numerous interviews with season pass holders from both resorts show that Crystal Mountain provided customers with a premier experience amid tough pandemic conditions — though this comes at a premier price. Meanwhile, Stevens Pass slashed the price of its Epic Pass last month in an attempt to make skiing more affordable after a season in which its operational struggles frustrated many longtime pass holders. Get on the email list at www.stormskiing.com

Thinking Critical Comic Book Podcast
The Comic Wrap: DC/Marvel Comics Are Agenda, Manga Dominance Continues, Most Hated DC Story and More

Thinking Critical Comic Book Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 173:40


Wes is back with another episode of the The Comic Wrap. Wes runs down the biggest comic book and pop culture news and best conversations of the week. Comic writer and journalist Doug Ernst and Wes discuss how the direction of DC, Marvel and other entertainment leave customers with no alternatives. The powers that be want to leave customers no quarter from far-left ideological and political propaganda. (00:00:00) Perch drops by to discuss whether the debate over comic books shipped vs sold holds water in today's market. (00:31:51) Indie artist Tim Lim joins the pod to talk about Manga's dominance in the North American comic market. Manga are delivering Western fans what they want and are poised to leave DC and Marvel behind. (00:49:15) DC Comics announced Superman no longer fights for the American Way at DC FanDome. Not surprisingly, as Superman hasn't used his Truth, Justice and The American Way motto in years. (01:12:57) DC also announced their Milestone Initiative, a program aimed at developing black comic book writers and artists. Gevian Dargan discuss why this is good business for comics. (01:33:25) Actress Ruby Rose laid out a host of claims about nightmarish conditions during her time on The CW's Batwoman. Rose claims execs at WarnerMedia and the Batwoman show runner abused their positions and endangered staff. (01:51:05) Josh and Wes look back at the most hated story in modern DC Comics, Heroes in Crisis. (02:11:05) Finally, John Leone from The 616 Comics joins Wes to update the Marvel Penguin Random House shipping issues plaguing comic book retailers. (02:34:50)   Support Thinking Critical at Ko-fi. Monthly subscriptions receive bonus content and early access to some channel content. Ko-fi.com/thinkingcritical Thank you for supporting the channel!

Water In Real Life
EP110: Innovation Inside and Out

Water In Real Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 59:11


https://www.theh2duo.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/PodcastGraphic_cristina-scaled.jpg () Innovation is a buzzword beyond the water industry. We met with our innovation guru, Cristina Ahmadpour, and broke open the buzz to get to the nitty-gritty. We discussed concrete ways organizations can create cultures of innovation that result in increased deployment of innovative practices and technologies. Guess what...communication is a key component. Culture change, gaining buy-in for your innovation program, collaboration, and creativity all require an ability to not only communicate your vision but to do so in a manner that inspires others to come along with you. We also dive into ways you can innovate your team culture, even when managing a fully remote team. Cristina serves as Managing Director of Isle's North American business. She leads a team that supports the most progressive water utilities in their interest to identify, evaluate, and engage best-available solutions that drive value to their services and business operations. Facilitating an assessment of needs and identifying solutions that respond to top priorities, and how to build a culture of innovation, is an integral part of how she works with water utility leaders today. Cristina is a graduate of WEF's Water Leadership Institute and has been recognized by the Water and Wastewater Digest in 2016 and 2018 as a top water professional under the age of 40. Cristina is married to her middle school sweetheart and enjoys life in San Diego with their cat Vera Rubin. Backpacking and being in nature is her most cherished pastime, followed by traveling, cycling, and tending to her plants. Support this podcast

Mining Stock Daily
The Evolution of Vrify Technology and the Beginnings of a Commodity Super Cycle

Mining Stock Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 71:51


In this week's long-form, we reconnect with Steve de Jong, a co-founder and CEO of Vrify Technology. We chat about the latest promotional pieces from the company and how COVID accelerated the use of the platform. Steve also talks about moving from mining to technology in his career. We then turn to Doc Jones, private resource investor, regarding the recent moves in oil, energy and metals. We'd like to thank our sponsors: Integra Resources is advancing the past-producing DeLamar Project in southwestern Idaho. The Company has continued to demonstrate resource growth and conversion through greenfield and brownfield exploration and plans on delivering a pre-feasibility study in Q4 2021 to further de-risk and advance the project towards permitting. Integra Resources trades on the TSX-V under ITR and the NYSE American under ITRG. Corvus Gold is a North American gold exploration and development company, focused on its near-term gold-silver mining projects in southwestern Nevada. The Company holds a commanding land position within the Bullfrog Mining District. Neighbouring, adjacent projects controlled by AngloGold Ashanti, Kinross Gold and Coeur Mining highlight this active District. The two 100% owned North Bullfrog & Mother Lode projects have a combined nearly 4-Million oz gold of in-pit resource and continues to grow with an on-going, successful, resource expansion drill program. Corvus trades on the TSX and the Nasdaq with the symbol KOR. Western Copper and Gold is focused on developing the world-class Casino project in Canada's Yukon Territory. The Casino project consists of an impressive 11 billion pounds of copper and 21 million ounces of gold in an overall resource. Western Copper and Gold trades on the TSX and the NYSE American with WRN. Be sure to follow the company via their website, www.westerncopperandgold.com. Rio-2 is advancing the Fenix Gold Project in Chile, the largest undeveloped gold heap leach project in the Americas. Fenix consists of 5 million ounces in the measured and indicated resource category and 1.4 million ounces in the inferred resource category. With a robust PFS in place, Fenix is set up for fast-tracked construction and production. You can find a list of project and company information on their website, rio2.com.

Quick to Listen
Does God Really Want Missionaries to Risk Their Lives?

Quick to Listen

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 47:01


On Saturday, a gang kidnapped 17 North American missionaries in Haiti as the party returned from an orphanage in a suburb of Port-au-Prince. Since then, the group, known as 400 Mawozo, has demanded a ransom of $17 million for the victims, who include five men, seven women, and five children. While many locals have been kidnapped in recent years as security on the country's roads has been increasingly threatened, this incident has drawn significant international attention. This kidnapping comes roughly two months after US troops withdrew from Afghanistan. America's departure and the chaos that ensued led many expats, including aid workers and missionaries, to leave the country. Anna Hampton is the author of Facing Danger: A Guide Through Risk, which is based on her doctoral dissertation at Trinity Seminary in Newburg. She's been in full-time ministry for 28 years, more than 17 of those years in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Turkey and other parts of Central Asia and the Middle East. She and her family are now based in the US, but still doing work in Central Asia, so Anna Hampton is a pseudonym. Hampton joined global media manager Morgan Lee and executive editor Ted Olsen to discuss how the Bible discusses risk, what has shaped Western Christians' perspectives on this issue, and how saviorism affects how we make these decisions. What is Quick to Listen? Read more. Rate Quick to Listen on Apple Podcasts Follow the podcast on Twitter Follow this week's hosts on Twitter: Morgan Lee and Ted Olsen Music by Sweeps Quick to Listen is produced Morgan Lee and Matt Linder The transcript is edited by Faith Ndlovu Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Mining Stock Daily
Integra Resources Drill 160m of 1.51 g/t AuEq at Sullivan Gulch

Mining Stock Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 8:29


New drill results from Integra's DeLamar project. Piedmont Lithium and Elevation Gold both publish new mineral resource estimates. A NorZinc PEA for Prairie Creek. New Found Gold raise $48M. We'd like to thank our sponsors: Integra Resources is advancing the past-producing DeLamar Project in southwestern Idaho. The Company has continued to demonstrate resource growth and conversion through greenfield and brownfield exploration and plans on delivering a pre-feasibility study in Q4 2021 to further de-risk and advance the project towards permitting. Integra Resources trades on the TSX-V under ITR and the NYSE American under ITRG. Corvus Gold is a North American gold exploration and development company, focused on its near-term gold-silver mining projects in southwestern Nevada. The Company holds a commanding land position within the Bullfrog Mining District. Neighbouring, adjacent projects controlled by AngloGold Ashanti, Kinross Gold and Coeur Mining highlight this active District. The two 100% owned North Bullfrog & Mother Lode projects have a combined nearly 4-Million oz gold of in-pit resource and continues to grow with an on-going, successful, resource expansion drill program. Corvus trades on the TSX and the Nasdaq with the symbol KOR. Western Copper and Gold is focused on developing the world-class Casino project in Canada's Yukon Territory. The Casino project consists of an impressive 11 billion pounds of copper and 21 million ounces of gold in an overall resource. Western Copper and Gold trades on the TSX and the NYSE American with WRN. Be sure to follow the company via their website, www.westerncopperandgold.com. Rio-2 is advancing the Fenix Gold Project in Chile, the largest undeveloped gold heap leach project in the Americas. Fenix consists of 5 million ounces in the measured and indicated resource category and 1.4 million ounces in the inferred resource category. With a robust PFS in place, Fenix is set up for fast-tracked construction and production. You can find a list of project and company information on their website, rio2.com.

Roadie Free Radio
217: RFR Rewind: Erik Rogers |Get Paid To Learn

Roadie Free Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 6:34


Erik Rogers is a FOH Audio Engineer based in Florida who has been touring steadily for the last 15 years. He has spent the greater part of this year on the road with Godsmack and is preparing for another North American run to finish out the year. Throughout his career he has worked with Hunter Hayes, Testament, Death Angel, Avenged Sevenfold, Scott Stapp, and many more. In 2010 while on tour with Taylor Swift he was nominated for a Parnelli Award as Systems Engineer of the Year. He has also been featured in several trade magazines such as Live Sound International, FOH Magazine, Sound Pro Live, and AVNetwork Magazine. When not on the road, he spends as much time with his daughter as he can balancing the life of a touring professional and a single dad. Full Episode here: https://soundcloud.com/roadiefreeradio/147-erik-rogers-foh-engineer?si=c1bc869592ca4528a2d57100439ed6c8

Freightvine
Understanding the Domino Economy and Its Impact on Trucking | Dean Croke

Freightvine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 43:38


Chris Caplice is joined by Principal Analyst at DAT, Dean Croke. Dean has held several positions across the supply chain industry. Currently you can see him appear weekly on DAT iQ Live. Dean also makes frequent radio appearances and publishes written work discussing freight market trends. During his conversation with Chris, Dean discusses the Domino Economy, U.S. imports and a prediction on the supply chain's return to normalcy.To wrap things up, Dr. Inam Iyoob joins Dr. Chris Caplice for the latest North American truckload market rate trends and forecast powered by DAT iQ. 

Zoo Logic
To Be Accredited or Not To Be?

Zoo Logic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 46:37


Recent headlines about major zoological institutions not retaining their accreditation status have raised troubling questions about the inspection process, the role of trade associations, and the relevance of peer-reviewed seals of approval. As a zoo professional with more than 40 years of experience, Brad Andrews has not only overseen the largest zoological collection in the world, he has served in leadership roles among several North American and European trade and third party animal welfare organizations. That Sounds Wild: dromedary camels. Animal Care Software KONG Zoo Zoo Logic ZOOmility    

Alopecia Life
S3E5 Let's Talk Gut Makeovers & Autoimmunity! How Easy is it to Heal Your Gut?

Alopecia Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 28:27


Welcome to this episode of Alopecia Life. Today's guest is Lisa Taylor. She is an Integrative Nutrition & Gut Health Coach, and the founder of Your Best Life with Lisa. Gut health has been gaining traction over the last few years as a possible trigger for autoimmunity. With a standard North American diet that lacks essential nutrients, and the introduction of toxins in our personal care products, pollution in the air and so much more - our gut is taking a beating. Lisa is here today to share about her personal transformation after leading a high-paced, high stress life that culminated in many diagnoses, one of which was alopecia areata. More about Lisa: "Lisa's health journey began five years ago when she discovered a bald spot on her scalp the size of a loonie. After about a month, she'd lost most of her hair to a massive Autoimmune induced, Alopecia Areata flare.Fast forward to today and Lisa's living her best life - with hair! Something told her to reject the traditional "treatment" of steroid injections in the scalp and to see a Naturopathic Doctor instead. From there, Lisa healed her gut and made healthy changes to both her diet and lifestyle. The total health transformation that followed was incredible to Lisa. Chronic symptoms she'd been dealing with for years disappeared and she had regrowth across her entire scalp! Lisa's amazing health transformation inspired her to attend the Institute of Integrative Nutrition to become an Integrative Nutrition Health Coach so she can empower others to harness the power of food and lifestyle; in order to manage chronic disease, reclaim their health, and truly thrive. Lisa believes (and is living proof) that a healthy gut along with healthy diet and lifestyle habits are the foundation for good health. When used correctly, they have the power to heal the body and completely transform our health." Thank you for joining us today on Alopecia Life. For more information about Lisa's group program and 1-on-1 coaching, please check out the show notes for those links.  More info on Your Best Life with Lisa: www.yourbestlifewithlisa.comDownload Lisa's free guide to thriving with Alopecia: yourbestlifewithlisa.ck.page/podcastDownload Lisa's healing guide to 4 critical changes you can make today: https://yourbestlifewithlisa.ck.page/alopeciacriticalFollow Lisa on Instagram for lots of gut healthy, holistic Alopecia management content: https://www.instagram.com/yourbestlifewithlisa/Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/deeanngraham)

Basilica of Saint Mary Podcast
Episode 263: Father James Waalkes Performs in Concert as Part of the Basilica of Saint Mary's Faith and Culture Series

Basilica of Saint Mary Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 77:33


Father James Waalkes, a Parochial Vicar at St. Anthony of Padua Church in Falls Church, performed in a concert last night at the Lyceum Auditorium at the Basilica of Saint Mary. His concert was the last event in the Fall 2021 Faith and Culture Series at the Basilica. He played an American folk music-styled concert in honor of the North American martyrs. 

Mining Stock Daily
Discovery Metals Shares Updates Resource at Cordero

Mining Stock Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 9:18


We report the updated mineral resource for Discovery Metals. New drill results from Liberty Gold, ValOre Metals and Getchell Gold. Roscan back drilling at Kandiole. We'd like to thank our sponsors: Integra Resources is advancing the past-producing DeLamar Project in southwestern Idaho. The Company has continued to demonstrate resource growth and conversion through greenfield and brownfield exploration and plans on delivering a pre-feasibility study in Q4 2021 to further de-risk and advance the project towards permitting. Integra Resources trades on the TSX-V under ITR and the NYSE American under ITRG. Corvus Gold is a North American gold exploration and development company, focused on its near-term gold-silver mining projects in southwestern Nevada. The Company holds a commanding land position within the Bullfrog Mining District. Neighbouring, adjacent projects controlled by AngloGold Ashanti, Kinross Gold and Coeur Mining highlight this active District. The two 100% owned North Bullfrog & Mother Lode projects have a combined nearly 4-Million oz gold of in-pit resource and continues to grow with an on-going, successful, resource expansion drill program. Corvus trades on the TSX and the Nasdaq with the symbol KOR. Western Copper and Gold is focused on developing the world-class Casino project in Canada's Yukon Territory. The Casino project consists of an impressive 11 billion pounds of copper and 21 million ounces of gold in an overall resource. Western Copper and Gold trades on the TSX and the NYSE American with WRN. Be sure to follow the company via their website, www.westerncopperandgold.com. Rio-2 is advancing the Fenix Gold Project in Chile, the largest undeveloped gold heap leach project in the Americas. Fenix consists of 5 million ounces in the measured and indicated resource category and 1.4 million ounces in the inferred resource category. With a robust PFS in place, Fenix is set up for fast-tracked construction and production. You can find a list of project and company information on their website, rio2.com.

DIY MFA Radio
380: World Building and the Fantasy YA Serial - Interview with Stephanie BwaBwa

DIY MFA Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 66:28


Today, I have the pleasure of interviewing Stephanie BwaBwa. Stephanie is a Jesus-centered, young adult and fantasy author, writing in the universe of Elledelle about black angels in magical worlds with impressive powers that mirror the human condition. She loves writing stories centered around feisty angels with complicated pasts, unexpected futures, learning to take up causes bigger than themselves, who may or may not fall in love along the way. Stephanie is a Canadian-born, Haitian-raised, Congolese descended, North American dweller who lived a colorful life in south Florida that cultivated a perspective on the world as unique as her background. As the author of The Seraphim Resistance Prequels and The Transcendents serial, Stephanie has built her own self-publishing empire. She is also an avid reader of fantasy and fiction, and columnist for DIY MFA.   In this episode Stephanie BwaBwa and I discuss: How comic books helped her develop the world in her YA fantasy universe. Her method for crafting a serial series and dealing with the unknowns. Why she loves world building and how she avoided sharing too many details at once.   Plus, her #1 tip for writers. For more info and show notes: diymfa.com/380

Forefront 360
Interview: Dr. Jessica Hooten Wilson

Forefront 360

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 57:47


In this special episode, Forefront director Nate Mancini talks to professor, author and speaker Dr. Jessica Hooten Wilson. This episode was recorded with a live studio audience at the Imagination Redeemed conference in Colorado Springs. In the first half we discuss which of today's authors give Jessica hope for the future of fiction literature, how artists should read books differently from others, how to build an online presence without losing your soul, and of course, how our faith drives us to excellence in the arts. The second half features virtual audience questions from authors such as Dr. Russell Moore, Dr. Karen Swallow Prior, Dr. Benjamin Myers, and Dr. Ralph C. Wood. Jessica Hooten Wilson is the Louise Cowan Scholar in Residence at the University of Dallas. She is the author of Giving the Devil his Due: Flannery O'Connor and The Brothers Karamazov, which received a 2018 Christianity Today Book of the Year Award in the Culture & the Arts; as well as two books on Walker Percy: The Search for Influence: Walker Percy and Fyodor Dostoevsky (Ohio State University Press, 2017) and Reading Walker Percy's Novels (Louisiana State University Press, 2018); most recently she co-edited Solzhenitsyn and American Culture: The Russian Soul in the West(University of Notre Dame Press, 2020). She has received numerous fellowships, grants, and awards, including a Fulbright Fellowship to the Czech Republic, an NEH grant to study Dante in Florence in 2014, and the Biola Center for Christian Thought sabbatical fellowship.  In 2018 she received the Emerging Public Intellectual Award given by a coalition of North American think tanks in collaboration with the Centre for Christian Scholarship at Redeemer University College, and in 2019 she received the Hiett Prize in Humanities from The Dallas Institute of Humanities and Culture. Jessica has two books releasing in 2022, which you can preorder today: The Scandal of Holiness: Renewing Your Imagination in the Company of Literary Saints and Learning the Good Life: Wisdom from the Great Hearts and Minds that Came Before.

IEDA Podcast
Please Stop Saying ‘Unprecedented' (Give Me Something Useful...Like a Machine to Sell)

IEDA Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 36:32


We get it: It's a bizarre market of exploding demand and imploding supply. But dealers – and everyone in the heavy equipment industry, for that matter – are sick of hearing the word “unprecedented” inserted in front of whatever the latest phenomenon is in this year's comedy of errors. So says OTR's director of Cyclicals Research, Jarrett Harris, who personally and regularly engages with North American industry players, including IEDA members, and oversees a global team to report on key market trends and intelligence. OTR stands for Off The Record, but Jarrett goes on the record with IEDA this month to discuss predictions (and a little advice) about equipment supply chains, lead times, pricing, '22's winter auctions, and more. Follow Jarrett: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jarrettharris/ Official OTR Global Site: http://www.otrglobal.com/ Official IEDA Group Site: https://www.iedagroup.com/  

Mining Stock Daily
FPX Nickel Drills New Discovery at the Van Target

Mining Stock Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 9:42


FPX Nickel makes a new discovery at their Van Target in British Columbia. More new drill results from Golden Minerals, Palladium One and Maritime Resources. The latest updates from SolGold and B2Gold. We'd like to thank our sponsors: Integra Resources is advancing the past-producing DeLamar Project in southwestern Idaho. The Company has continued to demonstrate resource growth and conversion through greenfield and brownfield exploration and plans on delivering a pre-feasibility study in Q4 2021 to further de-risk and advance the project towards permitting. Integra Resources trades on the TSX-V under ITR and the NYSE American under ITRG. Corvus Gold is a North American gold exploration and development company, focused on its near-term gold-silver mining projects in southwestern Nevada. The Company holds a commanding land position within the Bullfrog Mining District. Neighbouring, adjacent projects controlled by AngloGold Ashanti, Kinross Gold and Coeur Mining highlight this active District. The two 100% owned North Bullfrog & Mother Lode projects have a combined nearly 4-Million oz gold of in-pit resource and continues to grow with an on-going, successful, resource expansion drill program. Corvus trades on the TSX and the Nasdaq with the symbol KOR. Western Copper and Gold is focused on developing the world-class Casino project in Canada's Yukon Territory. The Casino project consists of an impressive 11 billion pounds of copper and 21 million ounces of gold in an overall resource. Western Copper and Gold trades on the TSX and the NYSE American with WRN. Be sure to follow the company via their website, www.westerncopperandgold.com. Rio-2 is advancing the Fenix Gold Project in Chile, the largest undeveloped gold heap leach project in the Americas. Fenix consists of 5 million ounces in the measured and indicated resource category and 1.4 million ounces in the inferred resource category. With a robust PFS in place, Fenix is set up for fast-tracked construction and production. You can find a list of project and company information on their website, rio2.com.

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Tuesday, October 19, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsMemorial of Saints John de Brébeuf and Isaac Jogues, Priests, and Companions, Martyrs Lectionary: 474All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saints Isaac Jogues, Jean de Brbeuf, and CompanionsIsaac Jogues and his companions were the first martyrs of the North American continent officially recognized by the Church. As a young Jesuit, Isaac Jogues, a man of learning and culture, taught literature in France. He gave up that career to work among the Huron Indians in the New World, and in 1636, he and his companions, under the leadership of Jean de Brébeuf, arrived in Quebec. The Hurons were constantly warred upon by the Iroquois, and in a few years Father Jogues was captured by the Iroquois and imprisoned for 13 months. His letters and journals tell how he and his companions were led from village to village, how they were beaten, tortured, and forced to watch as their Huron converts were mangled and killed. An unexpected chance for escape came to Isaac Jogues through the Dutch, and he returned to France, bearing the marks of his sufferings. Several fingers had been cut, chewed, or burnt off. Pope Urban VIII gave him permission to offer Mass with his mutilated hands: “It would be shameful that a martyr of Christ not be allowed to drink the Blood of Christ.” Welcomed home as a hero, Father Jogues might have sat back, thanked God for his safe return, and died peacefully in his homeland. But his zeal led him back once more to the fulfillment of his dreams. In a few months he sailed for his missions among the Hurons. In 1646, he and Jean de Lalande, who had offered his services to the missioners, set out for Iroquois country in the belief that a recently signed peace treaty would be observed. They were captured by a Mohawk war party, and on October 18, Father Jogues was tomahawked and beheaded. Jean de Lalande was killed the next day at Ossernenon, a village near Albany, New York. The first of the Jesuit missionaries to be martyred was René Goupil who with Lalande, had offered his services as an oblate. He was tortured along with Isaac Jogues in 1642, and was tomahawked for having made the sign of the cross on the brow of some children. Father Anthony Daniel, working among Hurons who were gradually becoming Christian, was killed by Iroquois on July 4, 1648. His body was thrown into his chapel, which was set on fire. Jean de Brébeuf was a French Jesuit who came to Canada at the age of 32 and labored there for 24 years. He went back to France when the English captured Quebec in 1629 and expelled the Jesuits, but returned to his missions four years later. Although medicine men blamed the Jesuits for a smallpox epidemic among the Hurons, Jean remained with them. He composed catechisms and a dictionary in Huron, and saw 7,000 converted before his death in 1649. Having been captured by the Iroquois at Sainte Marie, near Georgian Bay, Canada, Father Brébeuf died after four hours of extreme torture. Gabriel Lalemant had taken a fourth vow—to sacrifice his life for the Native Americans. He was horribly tortured to death along with Father Brébeuf. Father Charles Garnier was shot to death in 1649 as he baptized children and catechumens during an Iroquois attack. Father Noel Chabanel also was killed in 1649, before he could answer his recall to France. He had found it exceedingly hard to adapt to mission life. He could not learn the language, and the food and life of the Indians revolted him, plus he suffered spiritual dryness during his whole stay in Canada. Yet he made a vow to remain in his mission until death. These eight Jesuit martyrs of North America were canonized in 1930. Reflection Faith and heroism planted belief in Christ's cross deep in our land. The Church in North America sprang from the blood of martyrs, as has been true in so many places. The ministry and sacrifices of these saints challenges each of us, causing us to ask just how deep is our faith and how strong our desire to serve even in the face of death. Saints Isaac Jogues, Jean de Brébeuf, and Companions are the Patron Saints of: North America Norway Saint of the Day Copyright Franciscan Media

Daybreak
Daybreak for October 19, 2021

Daybreak

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 51:15


Tuesday of the 29th Week in Ordinary Time Memorial of Saints Isaac Jogues, Jean de Brebeuf, and companions, the North American martyrs; arrived in Quebec in 1636 to work among the Huron Indians; Isaac Jogues was captured by a Mohawk party, and was tomahawked and beheaded on October 18, 1642; Jean de Brebeuf composed catechisms […] All show notes at Daybreak for October 19, 2021 - This podcast produced by Relevant Radio

The WrassleCast – The CSPN – The CSPN

@DonDelarente and @DancingElf88 share their commentary with color on NXT 2.0, which featured the long awaited showdown between Santos Escobar and Swerve Scott for the North American title

Under Our Feet
3: Breaking Up Is Hard To Do

Under Our Feet

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 47:57


Episode 3 brings us to a billion years ago, when the North American continent tried to split in two. This rift failed, but left behind a legacy of scenic beauty, strange rocks, and vast quantities of copper. Featuring Jeremy Randolph-Flagg and Jim Miller. More at UOFpod.org. Support the show at Patreon.com/RudyMolinek Music is the song Arizona Moon by the Blue Dot Sessions.

Mining Stock Daily
Global Exploration Budgets Jump 35% for the Year

Mining Stock Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 9:05


We report the latest exploration analysis from S&P Global. We also have new drill results from Aurelius Mineral, Radisson Mining and Kodiak Copper. Latest updates from Aurion and I-80 Gold. We'd like to thank our sponsors: Integra Resources is advancing the past-producing DeLamar Project in southwestern Idaho. The Company has continued to demonstrate resource growth and conversion through greenfield and brownfield exploration and plans on delivering a pre-feasibility study in Q4 2021 to further de-risk and advance the project towards permitting. Integra Resources trades on the TSX-V under ITR and the NYSE American under ITRG. Corvus Gold is a North American gold exploration and development company, focused on its near-term gold-silver mining projects in southwestern Nevada. The Company holds a commanding land position within the Bullfrog Mining District. Neighbouring, adjacent projects controlled by AngloGold Ashanti, Kinross Gold and Coeur Mining highlight this active District. The two 100% owned North Bullfrog & Mother Lode projects have a combined nearly 4-Million oz gold of in-pit resource and continues to grow with an on-going, successful, resource expansion drill program. Corvus trades on the TSX and the Nasdaq with the symbol KOR. Western Copper and Gold is focused on developing the world-class Casino project in Canada's Yukon Territory. The Casino project consists of an impressive 11 billion pounds of copper and 21 million ounces of gold in an overall resource. Western Copper and Gold trades on the TSX and the NYSE American with WRN. Be sure to follow the company via their website, www.westerncopperandgold.com. Rio-2 is advancing the Fenix Gold Project in Chile, the largest undeveloped gold heap leach project in the Americas. Fenix consists of 5 million ounces in the measured and indicated resource category and 1.4 million ounces in the inferred resource category. With a robust PFS in place, Fenix is set up for fast-tracked construction and production. You can find a list of project and company information on their website, rio2.com.

Sandy K Nutrition - Health & Lifestyle Queen
Episide 82 Finding Yourself Again Through Menopause with Expert Sally Bartlett

Sandy K Nutrition - Health & Lifestyle Queen

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 62:29


Exciting announcement:  I will be giving away a biological age DNA kit to a lucky winner, valued at $300 US in a draw.  To enter, follow myDNAge on Instagram here:  https://www.instagram.com/mydnage/, and subscribe, rate, and review with a few kind words for my podcast.  In order to be considered, proof must be provided via email to sandy@sandyknutrition.ca.  North American entries only.  To review with a few kind words, go here:  https://lovethepodcast.com/sandyknutrition.Sally Bartlett is an author and she created the Varsity Menopause framework.  Women can find the support and encouragement they need as they navigate the second chapter of their life with clarity never thought possible.  She offers tools and courses and has free resources on her website to get you started here:  https://www.sallybartlett.com/about.If you enjoyed this episode, please share.  It means the world to us podcasters when you do this!  Also, follow me!  I'm on Twitter, YouTube, TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Pinterest - Sandy K Nutrition everywhere!Disclaimer:  This is intended for educational purposes only and is not medical advice.  See your own practitioner for what's right for you.

Newshour
North American missionaries kidnapped in Haiti

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 48:18


Officials from Port-au-Prince claim that a notorious gang is behind the kidnap of at least 17 North American missionaries. The 400 Mawozo gang is also being blamed for the kidnap of Catholic clergy in April. Also in the programme; we speak to an activist about the continued protests in Sudan, and we hear from the founder of a new campaign to help migrants on the Poland-Belarus border. (Picture: A view of Port-au-Prince. CREDIT: REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares/File Photo)

PolliNation
195 - Maddie Carpenter - What is the North American honey bee?

PolliNation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 44:01


Honey bees are not native to North America, but they have been here for hundreds of years. In this episode we dive into the deep history of honey bee importations to North America and learn how molecular technologies can provide insight into the subspecies character of contemporary North American honey bee populations.

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
How Many Times Per Week Are You Being Cyber Attacked? From Where? How? Why?

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 84:46


How Many Times Per Week Are You Being Cyber Attacked? From Where? How? Why? We've got a new study out showing that North American organizations, businesses, and others, are being hit with an average of 497 cyber attacks per week, right here in the good old USA. [Following is an automated transcript] This is a study by checkpoint software technologies. Checkpoint, I used, oh my gosh. It would have been back in the nineties back then. They were one of the very first genuine firewall companies. And it was a system that I was putting in place for my friends over at troopers. I think it was New England telephone. It might've been Verizon by then. I can't even remember, man. [00:00:41] It's been a little while, but it was, a system we were using in front of this massive system that I designed, I made the largest internet property in the world. At that time called big yellow. It morphed into super pages. It might be familiar with. But it was me and my team that did everything. We built the data center out. [00:01:05] We wrote all of the software. Of course they provided all of the yellow pages type listing so we can put it all in. And we brought it up online and we were concerned. Well, first of all, You know, I've been doing cyber security now for over 30 years. And at this point in time, they wanted something a little more than my home grown firewall. [00:01:29] Cause I had designed and written one in order to protect this huge asset that was bringing in tens of millions of dollars a year to the phone company. So they said, Hey, listen, let's go ahead and we'll use checkpoint and get things going. We did, it was on a little, I remember it was a sun workstation. If you remember those back in the. [00:01:52] And it worked pretty well. I learned how to use it and played with it. And that was my first foray into kind of what the rest of the world had started doing, this checkpoint software, but they've continued on, they make some great firewalls and other intrusions type stuff, detection and blocking, you know, already that I am a big fan, at least on the bigger end. [00:02:17] You know, today in this day and age, I would absolutely use. The Cisco stuff and the higher end Cisco stuff that all ties together. It doesn't just have the fire power firewall, but it has everything in behind, because in this day and age, you've got to look at everything that's happening, even if you're a home user. [00:02:37] And this number really gets everybody concerned. Home users and business users is. Businesses are definitely under bigger attacks than home users are. And particularly when we're talking about businesses, particularly the bigger businesses, the ones that have a huge budget that are going to be able to go out and pay up, you know, a million, $10 million ransom. [00:03:05] Those are the ones that they're after and this analysis. Point software who does see some of those attacks coming in, showed some very disturbing changes. First of all, huge increases in the number of cyber attacks and the number of successful ransoms that have been going on. And we're going to talk a little bit later, too, about where some of those attacks are coming from, and the reason behind those attack. [00:03:36] According to them right now, the average number of weekly attacks on organizations globally. So far, this year is 40% higher than the average before March, 2020. And of course that's when the first lockdowns went into effect and people started working from home in the U S the. Increase in the number of attacks on an organizations is even higher at 53%. [00:04:07] Now you might ask yourself why, why would the U S be attacked more? I know you guys are the best and brightest, and I bet it, I don't even need to say this because you can figure this out yourself, but the us is where the money is. And so that's why they're doing it. And we had president Biden come out and say, Hey, don't attack the. [00:04:27] well, some of those sectors are under khaki for more after he said that then before, right. It's like giving a list to a bad guy. Yeah. I'm going to be gone for a month in June and yeah, there won't be anybody there. And the here's the code to my alarm. Right. You're you're just inviting disaster checkpoints. [00:04:49] Also showing that there were more. Average weekly attacks in September 21. That's this September than any time since January, 2020. In fact, they're saying 870 attacks per organization globally per week. The checkpoint counted in September was double the average in March, 2020. It's kind of funny, right? [00:05:14] It's kind of like a before COVID after COVID or before the Wu Han virus and after the Wu Han virus, however, we might want to know. So there are a lot of attacks going on. Volume is pretty high in a lot of different countries. You've heard me say before some of my clients I've seen attack multiple times a second, so let's take a second and define the attack because being scanned. [00:05:40] I kind of an attack, the looking to see, oh, where is there a device? Oh, okay. Here's a device. So there might be a home router. It might be your firewall or your router at the business. And then what it'll do is, okay, I've got an address now I know is responding, which by the way is a reason. The, we always configure these devices to not respond to these types of things. [00:06:04] And then what they'll do is they will try and identify it. So they'll try and go into the control page, which is why you should never have when. Configuration enabled on any of your routers or firewalls, because they're going to come in and identify you just on that because all of a sudden them brag about what version of the software you're running. [00:06:26] And then if it's responding to that, they will try and use a password. That is known to be the default for that device. So in a lot of these devices, the username is admin and the password is admin. So they try it and now off they go, they're running. Some of these guys will even go the next step and we'll replace the software. [00:06:52] In your router or firewall, they will replace it so that it now directs you through them, everything you are doing through them. So they can start to gather information. And that's why you want to make sure that the SSL slash TLS. That encryption is in place on the website. You're going to, so if you go to Craig peterson.com right now, my website, I'm going to go there myself. [00:07:22] So if you go to Craig peterson.com, you're going to notice that first of all, it's going to redirect you to my secure site and it doesn't really matter. You won't see it. Okay. But you are there because if he. Typically at the left side of that URL bar where it says, Craig peterson.com. You'll see, there's a little lock. [00:07:44] So if you click that lock, it says connection is secure. Now there's a lot more we could go into here. But the main idea is even if your data is being routed through China or. Both of which have happened before many tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands of time times. I'm not even sure of the number now. [00:08:06] It's huge. Even if your data is being routed through them, the odds are, they're not going to see anything. That you are doing on the Craig Peterson site. Now, of course you go into my site, you're going to be reading up on some of the cybersecurity stuff you can do. Right. The outages what's happened in the news. [00:08:27] You can do all of that sort of thing on my side, kind of, who cares, right? Um, but really what you care about is the bank, but it's the same thing with the bank. And I knew mine was going to be up there. And when everybody just check it out anyway, so. So the bad guys, then do this scan. They find a web page log in. [00:08:47] They try the default log in. If it works, the Le the least they will do is change. What are called your DNS settings. That's bad because changing your DNS settings now opens you up to another type of attack, which is they can go ahead. And when your browser says, I want to go to bank of america.com. It is in fact, going to go out to the internet, say is bank of America, the bad guys. [00:09:18] Did, and they will give you their bank of America site that looks like bank of America feels like bank of America. And all they're doing is waiting for you to type into your bank of America, username and password, and then they might redirect you to the. But at that point, they've got you. So there are some solutions to that one as well, and Firefox has some good solutions. [00:09:44] There are others out there and you had to have those that are in the works, but this is just an incredible number. So here's what I'm doing, right. I have been working for weeks on trying to figure out how can I help the most people. And obviously I needed to keep the lights on, right? I've got to pay for my food and gas and stuff, but what I'm planning on doing and what we've sketched out. [00:10:10] In fact, just this week, we got kind of our final sketch out of it is we're going to go ahead and have a success path for cyber security. All of the basic steps on that success path will be. Okay. So it will be training that is absolutely 100% free. And I'll do a deeper dive into some of these things that I'm doing that I'm doing right now here on the radio, because you can't see my desktop. [00:10:40] It's hard to do a deep dive and it's open to anybody, right? If you're a home user or if you're a business user, all of the stuff on that free. Is going to help you out dramatically. And then after that, then there'll be some paid stuff like a membership site. And then obviously done for you. If the cybersecurity stuff is just stuff that you don't want to deal with, you don't have the time to deal with. [00:11:05] You don't want to learn, because believe me, this is something that's taken me decades to learn and it's changing almost every day. So I understand if you don't want to learn it to. That is the other option. I'll give you, which is done for you, which we've been doing now for over 20, 30 years. Stick around. [00:11:25] We'll [00:11:25] So which sectors are economy are being hacked? I mentioned that in the last segment, but yeah, there are some problems and the sectors that president Biden lined out laid out are, are the ones that are under, even more attack after his message. [00:11:42] 497 cyber attacks per week. On average here in the US, that is a lot of attacks. And we started explaining what that meant so that we talked about the scan attacks that are automated and some person may get involved at some point, but the automated attacks can be pretty darn automated. Many of them are just trying to figure out who you are. [00:12:09] So, if it shows up, when they do that little scan that you're using a router that was provided by your ISP, that's a big hint that you are just a small guy of some sort, although I'm shocked at how many bigger businesses that should have their own router, a good router, right. A good Cisco router and a really good next generation firewall. [00:12:34] I'm shocked at how many don't have those things in place, but when they do this, That's the first cut. So if you're a little guy, they'll probably just try and reflash your router. In other words, reprogram it and change it so that they can start monitoring what you're doing and maybe grab some information from. [00:12:56] Pretty simple. If you are someone that looks like you're more of a target, so they connect to your router and let's say, it's a great one. Let's say it's a Cisco router firewall or Palo Alto, or one of those other big companies out there that have some really good products. Uh, at that point, they're going to look at it and say, oh, well, okay. [00:13:18] So this might be a good organization, but when they get. To it again, if when access has turned on wide area, access has turned down, that router is likely to say, this is the property of, uh, Covina hospital or whatever it might be, you know? And any access is disallowed authorized access only. Well, now they know. [00:13:42] Who it is. And it's easy enough just to do a reverse lookup on that address. Give me an address anywhere on the internet. And I can tell you pretty much where it is, whose it is and what it's being used for. So if that's what they do say they have these automated systems looking for this stuff it's found. [00:14:02] So now they'll try a few things. One of the first things they try nowadays is what's called an RDP attack. This is a remote attack. Are you using RDP to connect to your business? Right? A lot of people are, especially after the lockdown, this Microsoft. Desktop protocol has some serious bugs that have been known for years. [00:14:25] Surprisingly to me, some 60% of businesses have not applied those patches that have been available for going on two years. So what then button bad guys will do next. They say, oh, is there a remote desktop access? Cause there probably is most smaller businesses particularly use that the big businesses have a little bit more expensive, not really much more expensive, but much better stuff. [00:14:51] You know, like the Cisco AnyConnect or there's a few other good products out there. So they're going to say, oh, well, okay. Let's try and hack in again. Automate. It's automated. No one has to do anything. So it says, okay, let's see if they patch, let's try and break in a ha I can get in and I can get into this particular machine. [00:15:14] Now there's another way that they can get into their moat desktop. And this apparently has been used for some of the bigger hacks you've heard about recently. So the other way they get in is through credential stuff. What that is is Hey, uh, there are right now some 10 billion records out on the dark web of people's names, email addresses, passwords, and other information. [00:15:43] So, what they'll do is they'll say, oh, well this is Covina hospital and it looks it up backwards and it says, okay, so that's Covina hospital.org. I have no idea if there even is a Gavino hospital, by the way, and will come back and say, okay, great. So now let's look at our database of hacked accounts. Oh, okay. [00:16:04] I see this Covina hospital.org email address with a password. So at that point they just try and stuff. Can we get in using that username and password that we stole off of another website. So you see why it's so important to be using something like one password, a password generator, different passwords on every site, different usernames on every site, et cetera, et cetera. [00:16:29] Right. It gets pretty important per te darn quickly. So now that they're in, they're going to start going sideways and we call that east west in the biz. And so they're on a machine. They will see what they can find on that machine. This is where usually a person gets some. And it depends in historically it's been about six days on average that they spend looking around inside your network. [00:17:00] So they look around and they find, oh yeah, great. Here we go. Yep. Uh, we found this, we found that. Oh, and there's these file server mounts. Yeah. These SMB shares the, you know, the Y drive the G drive, whatever you might call it. So they start gaining through those and then they start looking for our other machines on the network that are compromised. [00:17:23] It gets to be really bad, very, very fast. And then they'll often leave behind some form of ransomware and also extortion, where that extort you additionally, for the threat of releasing your data. So there, there are many other ways they're not going to get into them all today, but that's what we're talking about. [00:17:43] Mirman, we're talking about the 500 cyber attacks per week against the average. North American company. So we have seen some industry sectors that are more heavily targeted than others. Education and research saw an 60% increase in attacks. So their education and I've tried to help out some of the schools, but because of the way the budgets work and the lowest bidder and everything else, they, they end up with equipment. [00:18:17] That's just totally misconfigured. It's just shocking to me. Right. They buy them from one of these big box online places. Yeah. I need a, a Cisco 10, 10. And I need some help in configuring it and all, yeah, no problems or we'll help you. And then they sell it to the school, the school installs it, and it is so misconfigured. [00:18:38] It provides zero protection, uh, almost zero, right. It provides almost no protection at all. And doesn't even use the advanced features that they paid for. Right. That's why, again, don't buy from these big box. Guys just don't do it. You need more value than they can possibly provide you with. So schools, 1500 attacks per week research companies, again, 1500 attacks per week, government and military. [00:19:10] Entities about 1100 weekly attacks. Okay. That's the next, most highest attacked. Okay. Uh, health care organizations, 752 attacks per week on average. Or in this case, it's a 55% increase from last year. So it isn't just checkpoints data that I've been quoting here. That, that gives us that picture. There are a lot of others out there IBM's has Verizon's has all of these main guys, and of course in the end, They've got these huge ransoms to deal with. [00:19:50] Hey, in New Hampshire, one of the small towns just got nailed. They had millions of dollars stolen, and that was just through an email trick that they played in. K again. I T people, um, I I've been thinking about maybe I should put together some sort of coaching for them and coaching for the cybersecurity people, even because there's so much more that you need to know, then you might know, anyways, if you're interested in any of this. [00:20:22] Visit me online. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. You will get my weekly newsletter, all of my show notes, and you'll find out about these various trainings and I keep holding. In fact, there's one in most of the newsletters. Craig peterson.com. Craig Peterson, S O n.com. Stick around. [00:20:43] We've been talking about the types of attacks that are coming against us. Most organizations here in north America are seeing 500 cyber attacks a week, some as many as 1500. Now, where are they coming from? [00:21:00] Whether they're scanning attacks, whether they're going deeper into our networks and into our systems who are the bad guys and what are they doing? Microsoft also has a report that they've been generating, looking at what they consider to be the source of the attacks. Now we know a lot of the reasons I'm going to talk about that too, but the source is an interesting way to look at. [00:21:29] Because the source can also help you understand the reason for the attacks. So according to dark reading, this is kind of an insider, a website you're welcome to go to, but it gets pretty darn deep sometimes, but they are showing this stats from Microsoft, which you can find online that in the last year rush. [00:21:53] Has been the source of 58% of the cyber cat tax. Isn't that amazing now it's not just the cyber attacks. I, I need to clarify this. It's the nation state cyber tech. So what's a nature's nation state cyber attack versus I don't know, a regular cyber attack. Well, the bottom line is a nation state cyber attack is an attack that's occurring and is actually coordinated and run by and on behalf of a nation state. [00:22:31] Uh, So Russia at 58% of all nation state attacks is followed by North Korea, 23% Iran, 11% China, 8%. Now you probably would have thought that China would be. Right up there on that list, but Russia has 50% more of the nation state cyber attacks coming from them than from China. And then after China is south Vietnam, Viet, or I should say South Korea, Vietnam, and Turkey, and they all have less than 1%. [00:23:14] Now, this is this new pool of data that Microsoft has been analyzing. And it's part of this year's Microsoft digital defense report, and they're highlighting the trends in the nation state threat cyber activity hybrid workforce security. Disinformation and your internet of things, operational technology and supply chain security. [00:23:35] In other words, the whole gambit before, before all of this, now the data is also showing that the Russian nation state attacks are increasingly effective, calming from about a 21% successful compromise rate last year to 32%. So basically 50% better this year at effectiveness there, Russians are also targeting more government agencies for intelligence gathering. [00:24:10] So that jumped from 3% of their victims last year to 53%. This. And the Russian nation state actors are primarily targeting guests who us, right? The United States, Ukraine and the United Kingdom. Now this is all according to the Microsoft data. So why has Russia been attacking us? Why is China been attacking us and why the change this. [00:24:38] Well, Russia has been attacking us primarily to rent some us it's a cash cow for them just like oil and gas. They are making crazy money. Now that president Biden has made us dependent on foreign oil supplies. It's just insanity and even dependent on. Gas coming from other places. Well guess where the number one source of gases now for Europe and oil it's Russia. [00:25:08] So we are no longer going to be selling to Europe. Russia is so they're going to be making a lot of money off of. But before then they were actually counted on ransomware to help fund the Russian federal government, as well as of course, these Russian oligarchs, these people who are incredibly rich that have a substantial influence on the government. [00:25:33] Don't if you're wondering who they might be, just think of people like, oh, I don't know. Bill gates and, uh, w who are on the, some of the other big guys, you know, Tim cook, uh, Amazon's Jeff bayzos Elon Musk, right? Those are by my definition and looking it up in the dictionary, they are all a. They get exemptions to laws. [00:25:58] They get laws passed that, protect them. In fact, most of regulations actually protect these big companies and hurt small companies. So I would call them oligarchs and that's the same sort of thing in Russia in Russia. Okay. They probably have a little bit more underhanded stuff than these guys here do, but that's what Russia has been. [00:26:21] China has been continually going after our national secrets, national defense, the largest database of DNA of Americans DNA, of course, is that unique key. If you will building block for all of us, that's what DNA is. And the largest database of all of that uniquely identifying information is in. China stole from the office of personnel management records of a federal employees, their secret clearance, all of their background check information who was spoken with, what did they have to say? [00:27:03] And on and on. So China has been interested in infiltrating our businesses that provide things to the military and the military themselves and the federal state, and even the local governments that's who they've been targeting. And that's why there's 8% number might seem small. Although, as I just mentioned this year, Russia moved, moved dramatically. [00:27:30] They used to be about 3% of their attacks or against the government agencies. And now it's 53%. So Russia. And China are going after our national secrets and they can use them in a cold war, which as I've said, I think the first shots of the third world war have been fired. And frankly, they're all cyber, it's all online and Russia. [00:27:57] Isn't the only nation state actor who's changing its approaches here as espionage is the most common goal amongst all nation state groups as of this year. Tivity of hackers reveals different motivations in Iran, which quadrupled its targeting of Israel. Surprise, surprise. Over the last year. And Iran has been launching destructive attacks, things that will destroy power, power plants, et cetera, and North Korea, which is targeting cryptocurrency companies for profit. [00:28:29] So they're stealing these various crypto coins again, funding their government. So it's, it's a problem. Absolute problem. Government sectors are some of the most targeted 48%. These NGOs non-government organizations that act kind of a quasi government functions and think tanks are 31%. Uh, and Microsoft, by the way, has been alerting customers of nation, state attack, attack attempts. [00:29:01] Guess how many this year that they had to warn about 20,500 times in the past three years. So that's a lot and Microsoft is not a company that's been out there at the front lines. It never has been it's in behind. So to have them come out and say, this is. And okay, by the way, your stolen username and password run for a buck per thousand, and it's only gonna take you hundreds of hours to get it all cleared up. [00:29:32] Isn't that nice spear fishing for a hire can cost a hundred to a thousand dollars per successful account takeover and denial of service attacks are cheap from protected sites, roughly $300. Per month. And if you want to be ransomware king, it's only going to cost you 66 bucks upfront 30% of the profit. [00:29:54] Okay. Craziness. Hey, visit me online. Sign up Craig, peter.com/subscribe. [00:30:03] I had an interesting mastermind meeting this week. There's six of us. We're all business owners and it opened my eyes pretty dramatically because one of the members got hacked, but that's not what I really want to emphasize. [00:30:20] This whole cybersecurity thing gets pretty complicated, pretty quickly. And a friend of mine who is in one of my mastermind groups had a real problem. And the here's here's what went on. We'll call him Walt for back of a letter, lack of a better name since that is his name. [00:30:40] And he doesn't mind me sharing this with you. Walt has a very small business that he and his wife run, and they have a couple of contractors that help out with some things, but his business is very reliant on advertising and primarily what he does is Facebook advertising. Now I've been talking for two years, I think in this mastermind group about cyber security and the fact that everyone needs good cyber security. [00:31:13] And he always just kind of pole hum to, uh, wow. You know, and it's just too complicated for me. I got to thinking for a, you know, a bit, really a few weeks, what does he mean to complicated? Cause there's some basic things you can do. So this week on Tuesday, I was on our mastermind groups meeting and I explained, okay, so here's what happened to Walt. [00:31:42] He had $40,000 stolen, which by the way, it's a lot of money for a teeny tiny husband wife company. And. Uh, well, here's what we did. He, we helped them. We got the FBI involved and, you know, with our direct ties, cause we work with them on certain types of cases and he got back every dime, which is just totally unheard of. [00:32:06] But um, without going into all of the details there, I spent a problem. 1520 minutes with the whole group and the mastermind explaining the basics of cyber security. And that really kind of woke me up, frankly, because of their responses. Now these are all small business owners and so they're making pretty decent money. [00:32:31] In fact, every one of them and they all have some contractors and some employees all except for Walt and his wife, they had just have contractors and. I had two completely different responses from two members of this group that no. Let me tell you this was really eye opening for me. And this is why you might've heard me in the first segment talking about this, but this is why I have really changed my view of this stuff, this cybersecurity stuff, because I explained. [00:33:08] If you're using things like Norton antivirus or McAfee, antivirus, or really any of them, even the built-in Microsoft defender this year, those standard antivirus system. I have only been able to catch about 30% of the malware out there, 30%, you know, that's like having a house and you've got a security guard posted out front. [00:33:39] He's armed, he's ready to fight. And yet all of your windows are open and all of your doors are unlocked. And all someone has to do is crawl in the side window because that guy that's posted up front, he's not going to be able to stop. So 30% effectiveness. And of course, Walt had all of the basic stuff. [00:33:59] He thought he was good enough. It's not worth spending time or money doing any of this. And of course it turned out to be well worth the time and money if he had done it. But he has a friend who has contacts and, and made things happen for him. So I guess he's kind of, kind of lucky in that regard, but I explained that and I said, do you know the, the way you. [00:34:21] To go. If you're a small business, it's about $997 a month for a small business, with a handful of employees to get the type of security you really need. There's going to catch. 90 something 98%. Maybe if, if things go well of the stuff going on, in other words, you don't just have an armed guard at the front door. [00:34:46] You've got all the windows closed and blocked and the doors closed and locked as well. So yeah, somebody can still get in, but they got to really want to get in and risk getting caught. So that's kind of the analogy that I used now. One of the members of my. Of my mastermind thought, well, okay. Cause you're just being Frank with me. [00:35:09] Right? We're all friends. She said, well, initially I thought, oh Craig, I'm going to have to have you help out with stuff here. Cause my, you know, I'm concerned about my security. I make some good money. Uh, she's the one that has employee. She has a million dollar plus a year business and she wants to keep it safe. [00:35:26] But then she. Uh, you know, but, but you know, you were talking about all of this Norton and stuff and that it doesn't work. So I, I just, I don't have any hope. And that's when the another member jumped in and this other member said, well, Uh, oh, that's not what I got at all. I got the, the normal off the shelf stuff that you buy that you're going to get from Amazon, or you're going to get from PC connection or wherever that stuff is not going to work, but there is stuff that does, but it's only professional stuff. [00:36:02] You can only get it from professionals that are trained in certified. Which is the right message. Right. That was the message I was trying to relay. Yeah. Don't try and do it yourself because you can't even get the right tools that you need. That is frankly a problem. So that really got me to think. In, in a very big way, because here are two people that have heard me talk about cybersecurity and their eyes probably glazed over, but now their eyes, I know at least one of these ladies definitely glazed over. [00:36:36] So I've come to the realization that sometimes I. A little too deep into things. And although I can explain it quite well to many people, sometimes people glaze over and I get emails from you guys saying kind of the same thing. I really appreciate it. I don't understand a lot of what you're saying, Craig, but thanks for being there. [00:36:59] Listen to you every week here on the radio. Uh, then that's good. That's reassuring, but now I've come to realize a few things. One is. The I've got to be a lot clearer in my messaging, because even when talking to my friends, it is a little bit overwhelming for them sometimes. Right. And then the next thing is everybody needs help because you're being lied to. [00:37:29] Right. How are people getting ransomware? If the stuff that they're buying work. Maybe it's just me, but I think there's a disconnect there. So a lot of you guys have gone out and you've hired people and I want to spend just a few minutes right now, going through some red flags that you need to be looking out for in vendor security assessment. [00:37:56] Now I'm putting one together. As well, right yet another one. Uh, and what I'm trying to do is help you out, right? This is not as sales tool. It is trying to help you figure out where you're at. I'm putting together a webinar that I'm going to be holding these what I'm calling bootcamps, where I go through and show you exactly how to do the basic steps that you need to do in order to be safe on. [00:38:25] Okay. If an online, all that means is your, is plugged in, right. Okay. It doesn't mean you're going out and doing a lot of stuff out there on the internet just means it's connected. So those are going to be coming out. I will send an email out as soon as all of that. Stuff's ready. Cause. Absolutely free. And these assessments, I have the basic one that you can do yourself. [00:38:47] It's a self-assessment. And then I have the more advanced ones that I do that are five grand. Okay. So you've got to be a decent sized business for this to make sense where we look for all of the security problem. On all of your computers and your networks, and then give you a list of things you need to do and how to do them. [00:39:10] Okay. So it's well worth it for them, but if you're a very small company and you're trying to do some of this yourself, I want to help you. So that's what these boot camps are going to be all over. And also what the scorecard is going to be all about. So that's coming up, but here are some good red flags and an assessment. [00:39:30] I found this again on dark reading. This is kind of an insider website for those of us in the cybersecurity business, but, um, How can you verify the information that vendors are giving you about their own cybersecurity posture? We've heard in the news and I've talked about them all year, this year, and for years past. [00:39:56] That are we're vendors can be our worst nightmare because some of these hacks come in through our vendors. So you've got yourself, a cybersecurity company. How do you know if they are really telling you the truth? And man, is that hard for you to know? Right. You're going to ask him questions and the salesmen are going to say, oh yeah, yeah, yeah. [00:40:21] That's why we don't have salesmen. Right. We have engineers. You talk to me, you might talk to my son or my daughter, people who have been doing this with me, who I have trained and helped out. So this guy who wrote the article and there's this on attributed, I don't see an attribution on here on this page. [00:40:41] I definitely want to give him, probably I heard is John Babinec wrote this thing and he is a principle threat hunters. What he calls himself over at net and rich. So he says, here's what you got to do. And if you're trying to be cost-effective, he puts it in. What I call an ed month clause. And one of these days I'll tell you that story, but he calls it a validity check question so that an honest vendor would tell you, no, they don't do X and give you a good reason why they don't like it's not cost effective. [00:41:17] It's outside of a reasonable risk model. Does that make sense to you? So when you're trying to evaluate a vendor, who's going to be doing your cyber security put in one of these validity checks put in one of these questions. It doesn't really matter to you, but it's something that would be very hard for one of these cybersecurity companies to do. [00:41:42] And maybe it doesn't fit the risk model that you have. I think it's just absolutely brilliant. Probably one of the better ways when you're trying to evaluate an MSSP as cybersecurity managed or otherwise provider stick in something like that. So you have a red flag that just stands out for you. All right. [00:42:04] Make sure you are registered online. Craig Peter sohn.com/subscribe. So you can find out about all of these trainings coming up. [00:42:17] If you've never heard of the Carrington event, I really hope, frankly, I really, really do hope we never have to live through one of these. Again, there is a warning out there right now about an internet apocalypse that could happen because of the Sun. [00:42:34] Solar storms are something that happens really kind of all of the time. The sun goes through solar cycles. About every seven years, there are longer cycles as well. You might know. I have an advanced class amateur radio license I've had for a long time, and we rely a lot when we're dealing with short wave on the solar cycle. [00:42:59] You see what happens is that the sun charges, the atmosphere. You see that if you've ever seen the Northern light, that is. Part of the Sunzi missions, hitting our magnetic field and kind of getting sucked into the core of the earth, if you will, as they get caught in that field. And the more charged the atmosphere is, the more bounce you get. [00:43:24] That's what we call it bounce. And the reason us hams have all these different frequencies to use is because of the battle. We can go different frequencies with different distances, I should say, using different frequencies. So think about it right now. You've got the earth and I want to talk from Boston to Chicago. [00:43:47] For instance, I know about how many miles it is, and I have to figure out in the ionosphere up in the higher levels of the atmosphere, what frequency. To use in order to go up into the atmosphere, bounce back, and then hit Chicago. That's the idea. It's not quite as simple or as complex in some ways, as it sounds, a lot of people just try different frequencies and a lot of hams just sit there, waiting for anybody anywhere to talk to, particularly if they are. [00:44:20] It's really quite fun. Now what we're worried about, isn't so much just the regular solar activity. We get worried when the sun spots increase. Now, the solar cycle is what has primary image. On the temperature on earth. So no matter what, you might've heard that isn't your gas, guzzling car or a diesel truck that causes the Earth's temperature to change. [00:44:49] Remember the only constant when it comes to the Earth's temperature has been changed over the millions of years. We had periods where the earth was much warmer than it is now had more common that carbon dioxide in the atmosphere than it does now had less. In fact, right now we are at one of the lowest levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere in earth, long, long. [00:45:15] So the sun, if you might remember, comes up in the morning, warms things up, right? And then it cools down. When the sun disappears at nighttime, it has a huge impact. It's almost exclusively the impact for our temperatures. If there's other things too, for instance, eruption can spew all to hold a lot of carbon dioxide. [00:45:40] In fact, just one, just Mount St. Helens wanted erupted, put more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere than man has throughout our entire existence. Just to give you an idea, right? So these alarms that are out there, uh, you know, come on, people. Really, and now we're seeing that in, uh, this last year we had a 30% increase in the ice cap up in the, in, up in the north, up in Northern Canada, around the polls. [00:46:12] Uh, we also had some of these glaciers growing. It was so funny. I saw an article this year, or excuse me, this week that was showing a sign that was at one of our national parks. And it said this glacier will have disappeared by 2020. Of course it hasn't disappeared. In fact, it has grown now and it's past 2020. [00:46:34] Anyhow, the sun has a huge impact on us in so many ways. And one of the ways is. Well, something called a coronal mass ejection. This is seriously charged particles. That tend to be very, very directional. So when, when it happens, when there's one of these CMS coronal, mass ejections, it's not just sending it out all the way around the sun everywhere. [00:47:02] It's really rather concentrated in one. One particular spot. Now we just missed one not too long ago. And let me see if I can find it here. Just mast, a cm E near miss. Here we go. There a solar super storm in July, 2012, and it was a very, very close shave that we had most newspapers didn't mention it, but this could have been. [00:47:33] AB absolutely incredible. We'd be picking up the pieces for the next 50 years. Yeah. Five, zero years from this one particular storm. And what happens is these, these solar flares, if you will, are very, very extreme, they CME. You're talking about x-rays extreme UV, ultraviolet radiation, reaching the earth at the speed of light ionizes, the upper layers of atmosphere. [00:48:02] When that happens, by the way, it hurts our communications, but it can also have these massive effects where it burns out saddle. And then causes radio blackouts, GPS, navigation problems. Think about what happened up in Quebec. So let me just look at this call back, uh, hit with an E and yeah, here we go. And March 13th, 1989. [00:48:33] Here we go. Here's another one. Now I remembered. And this is where Quill back got nailed. I'm looking at a picture here, which is, uh, looking at the United States and Canada from the sky and where the light is. And you can see Quebec is just completely black, but they have this massive electrical blackout and it's becomes. [00:48:57] Of this solar storm. Now they, these storms that I said are quite directional, depending on where it hits and when it hits things can get very, very bad. This particular storm back in 1989 was so strong. We got to see their Rora Borealis, the Northern lights as far south, as Florida and cue. Isn't that something, when we go back further in time to this Carrington event that I mentioned, you could see the Northern lights at the equals. [00:49:35] Absolutely amazing. Now the problem with all of this is we've never really had an internet up online. Like we have today when we had one of the storms hit. And guess what we're about to go into right now, we're going into an area or a time where the sun's going to be more active, certainly on this, this 11 year cycle and possibly another bigger cycle too, that we don't really know much about. [00:50:07] But when this hit us back in the 1850s, what we saw was a, uh, a. Telegraph system that was brought to its knees. Our telegraphs were burned out. Some of the Telegraph buildings were lit. They caught on fire because of the charges coming in, people who were working the telegraphs, who are near them at the time, got electric shocks or worse than that. [00:50:34] Okay. 1859 massive Carrington event compass needles were swinging wildly. The Aurora Borealis was visible in Columbia. It's just amazing. So that was a severe storm. A moderate severity storm was the one that hit in Quebec here, knocked out Quebec, uh, electric. Nine hour blackout on Northeast Canada. What we think would happen if we had another Carrington event, something that happened to 150 years ago is that we would lose power on a massive scale. [00:51:13] So that's one thing that would happen. And these massive transformers that would likely get burned out are only made in China and they're made on demand. Nobody has an inventory. So it would be at least six months before most of the country would get power back. Can you believe that that would be just terrible and we would also lose internet connectivity. [00:51:39] In fact, the thinking that we could lose internet connectivity with something much less than a severe storm, maybe if the Quebec power grid solar, a massive objection here. Maybe if that had happened, when. The internet was up. They might have burned out internet in the area and maybe further. So what we're worried about is if it hits us, we're going to lose power. [00:52:07] We're going to lose transformers on the transmission lines and other places we're going to lose satellites and that's going to affect our GPS communication. We're going to lose radio communication, and even the undersea cables, even though they're now no longer. Regular copper cables. It's now being carried of course, by light in pieces of glass. [00:52:32] The, those cables need to have repeaters about every 15 miles or so under underwater. So the power is provided by. Copper cables or maybe some other sort of power. So these undersea cables, they're only grounded at extensive intervals, like hundreds or thousands of kilometers apart. So there's going to be a lot of vulnerable components. [00:52:59] This is all a major problem. We don't know when the next massive. Solar storm is going to happen. These coronal mass ejections. We do know they do happen from time to time. And we do know it's the luck of the draw and we are starting to enter another solar cycle. So be prepared, everything. Of course, you're listening to Craig Peterson, cybersecurity strategist. [00:53:28] If you'd like to find out more and what you can do, just visit Craig peterson.com and subscribe to my weekly show notes. [00:53:39] Google's got a new admission and Forbes magazine has an article by Zach Dorfman about it. And he's saying you should delete Google Chrome now after Google's newest tracking admission. So here we go. [00:53:55] Google's web browser. Right? It's been the thing for people to use Google Chrome for many years, it's been the fastest. Yeah, not always people kind of leapfrog it every once in a while, but it has become quite a standard. Initially Microsoft is trying to be the standard with their terrible browser and yeah, I to Exploder, which was really, really bad and they have finally completely and totally shot it in the head. [00:54:29] Good move there on their part. In fact, they even got rid of their own browser, Microsoft edge. They shot that one in. They had to, I know I can hear you right now saying, oh, Craig, I don't know. I just use edge browser earlier today. Yeah. But guess what? It isn't edge browser. It's actually Google Chrome. The Microsoft has rebranded. [00:54:52] You see the guts to Google Chrome are available as what's called an open source project. It's called chromium. And that allows you to take it and then build whatever you want on top of. No, that's really great. And by the way, Apple's web kit, Kat is another thing that many people build browsers on top of and is part of many of these browsers we're talking about right now, the biggest problem with the Google Chrome. [00:55:22] Is they released it so they could track you, how does Google make its money? Well, it makes us money through selling advertising primarily. And how does it sell advertising if it doesn't know much or anything about you? So they came out with the Google Chrome browser is kind of a standard browser, which is a great. [00:55:43] Because Microsoft, of course, is very well known for not bothering to follow standards and say what they have is the actual standard and ignoring everybody else. Yeah. Yeah. I'm picking on Microsoft. They definitely deserve it. Well, there is what is being called here in Forbes magazine, a shocking new tracking admission from. [00:56:05] One that has not yet made headlines. And there are about what 2.6 billion users of Google's Chrome worldwide. And this is probably going to surprise you and it's frankly, Pretty nasty and it's, I think a genuine reason to stop using it. Now, as you probably know, I have stopped using Chrome almost entirely. [00:56:31] I use it when I have to train people on Chrome. I use it when I'm testing software. There's a number of times I use it, but I don't use. The reality is the Chrome is an absolute terror. When it comes to privacy and security, it has fallen way behind its rivals in doing that. If you have an iPhone or an iPad or a Mac, and you're using safari, apple has gone a long ways to help secure your. [00:57:09] Well, that's not true with Chrome. In fact, it's not protecting you from tracking and Dave up data harvesting. And what Google has done is they've said, okay, well, we're going to get these nasty third party cookies out of the whole equation. We're not going to do that anymore. And what they were planning on doing is instead of knowing everything specifically. [00:57:34] You they'd be able to put you in a bucket. So they'd say, okay, well you are a 40 year old female and you are like driving fast cars and you have some kids with a grandkid on the way, and you like dogs, not cats, right? So that's a bucket of people that may be a few hundred or maybe up to a thousand. As opposed to right now where they can tell everything about you. [00:58:04] And so they were selling that as a real advantage because they're not tracking you individually anymore. No, we're putting you in a bucket. Well, it's the same thing. Right. And in fact, it's easier for Google to put you in a bucket then to track everything about you and try and make assumptions. And it's easier for people who are trying to buy ads to place in front of you. [00:58:28] It's easier for them to not have to kind of reverse engineer all of the data the Google has gathered in instead of. To send this ad to people that are in this bucket and then that bucket. Okay. It makes sense to you, but I, as it turns out here, Google has even postponed of that. All right. They really have, they're the Google's kind of hiding. [00:58:54] It's really what's going on out there. Uh, they are trying to figure out what they should do, why they should do it, how they should do it, but it's, it's going to be a problem. This is a bad habit. The Google has to break and just like any, anybody that's been addicted to something it's going to take a long time. [00:59:16] They're going to go through some serious jitters. So Firefox is one of the alternatives and to Google Chrome. And it's actually a very good one. It is a browser that I use. I don't agree with some of the stuff that Mozilla and Firefox does, but again, right. Nobody agrees on everything. Here's a quote from them. [00:59:38] Ubiquitous surveillance harms individually. And society Chrome is the only major browser that does not offer meaningful protection against cross cross site tracking and Chrome will continue to leave users unprotected. And then it goes on here because. Uh, Google response to that. And they admit that this massive web tracking out of hand and it's resulted in, this is a quote from Google and erosion of trust, where 72% of people feel that almost all of what they do online is being. [01:00:19] By advertisers, technology firms or others, 81% say the potential risks from data collection outweigh the benefit by the way, the people are wrong. 72% that feel almost all of what they do on online is being tracked. No, no. The answer is 100% of what you do is probably being tracked in some way online. [01:00:41] Even these VPN servers and systems that say that they don't do log. Do track you take a look at proton mail just last week. Proton mail it's in Switzerland. Their servers are in Switzerland. A whole claim to fame is, Hey, it's all encrypted. We keep it safe. We don't do logging. We don't do tracking, uh, guess what they handed over the IP addresses of some of the users to a foreign government. [01:01:10] So how can you do that? If you're not logging, if you're not tracking. Yeah, right. They are. And the same thing is true for every paid VPN service I can think of. Right. So how can Google openly admit that their tracking is in place tracking everything they can, and also admit that it's undermining our privacy and. [01:01:38] Their flagship browser is totally into it. Right? Well, it's really, it's gotta be the money. And Google does not have a plan B this anonymized tracking thing that they've been talking about, you know, the buckets that I mentioned, isn't realistic, frankly. Uh, Google's privacy sandbox is supposed to Fitbit fix it. [01:02:00] I should say. The, the whole idea and the way it's being implemented and the way they've talked about it, the advertisers on happy. So Google's not happy. The users are unhappy. So there you go. That's the bottom line here from the Forbes article by Zach Dorfman, delete Google Chrome. And I said that for a long time, I do use some others. [01:02:27] I do use Firefox and I use. Which is a fast web browser, that some pretty good shape. Hey, if you sign up for my show's weekly newsletter, not only will you get all of my weekly tips that I send to the radio hosts, but you will get some of my special reports that go into detail on things like which browser you shouldn't be using. [01:02:52] Sign up right now. Craig peterson.com. [01:02:57] Many businesses have gone to the cloud, but the cloud is just another word for someone else's computer. And many of the benefits of the cloud just haven't materialized. A lot of businesses have pulled back and are building data centers again. [01:03:14] The reason I mentioned this thing about Microsoft again, and the cloud is Microsoft has a cloud offering. [01:03:23] It's called Microsoft Azure. Many people, many businesses use it. We have used it with some of our clients in the past. Now we have some special software that sits in front of it that helps to secure. And we do the same thing for Amazon web services. I think it's important to do that. And we also use IBM's cloud services, but Microsoft is been pitching for a long time. [01:03:51] Come use our cloud services and we're expecting here probably within the next month, a big announcement from Microsoft. They're planning on making it so that you can have your desktop reside in Microsoft's cloud, in the Azure cloud. And they're selling really the feature of it doesn't matter where you are. [01:04:17] You have your desktop and it doesn't matter what kind of computer you're on. As long as you can connect to your desktop, using some just reasonable software, you will be able to be just like you're in front of a computer. So if you have a Chromebook or a Mac, Or a windows or tablet, whatever, and you're at the grocery store or the coffee shop or the office, you'll be able to get it, everything, all of your programs, all your files. [01:04:47] And we, Microsoft will keep the operating system up to date for you automatically a lot of great selling points. And we're actually looking into that. Not too heavily yet. We'll give them a year before we really delve into it at all. Cause it takes them a while to get things right. And Microsoft has always been one that adds all kinds of features, but most of the time, most of them don't work and we can, we can document that pretty easily, even in things like Microsoft. [01:05:18] Well, the verge is now reporting that Microsoft has warned users of its as your cloud computing service, that their data has been exposed online for the last two years. Yeah, let me repeat that in case you missed it, you, uh, yeah. I'm I'm I might've misspoken. Right. Uh, let me see, what does it say? It says, um, users of Azure cloud competing service. [01:05:48] So that's their cloud. Microsoft's big cloud. Okay. Um, their data has been. Exposed online. Okay. So that means that people could get the data, maybe manipulate the data that sort of exposed means for the last two years. Are you kidding me? Microsoft is again, the verge. Microsoft recently revealed that an error in its Azure cosmos database product left more than 3,300 as your customers data. [01:06:24] Completely exposed. Okay guys. So this, this, this is not a big thing, right? It can't possibly be big thing because you know who uses Azure, right. Nobody uses a zer and nobody uses hosted databases. Come on, give me a break. Let me see, what else does this have to say? Oh, okay. It says that the vulnerability was reported, reportedly introduced into Microsoft systems in 2019, when the company added a data visualization feature called Jupiter notebook to cosmos DB. [01:06:59] Okay. Well, I'm actually familiar with that one and let's see what small companies let's see here. Um, some Azure cosmos DB clients include Coca Cola. Liberty mutual insurance, Exxon mobile Walgreens. Hmm. Let me see. Could any of these people like maybe, maybe Liberty mutual insurance and Walgreens, maybe they'd have information about us, right. [01:07:26] About our health and social security numbers and account numbers and credit cards. Names addresses. Right, right. That's again, why I got so upset when these places absolutely insist on taking my social security number, right? It, it, first of all, when it was put in place, the federal government guaranteed, it would never be used for anything other than social security. [01:07:53] And the law even said it could not be used for anything other than social security. And then the government started expanding it. Right. And the IRS started using it. To track all of our income and you know, that's one thing right there, the government computers, they gotta be secure. Right. All of these breaches we hear about that. [01:08:12] Can't be true. Uh, so how about when the insurance company wants your personal information? Like your social security number? What business is it of? There's really no. Why do they have to have my social security number? It's a social security number. It's not some number that's tattooed on my forehead. [01:08:36] That's being used to track me. Is it this isn't a socialist country like China is, or the Soviet union was right. It's not socially. So why are they tracking us like that? Walgreens? Why do they need some of that information? Why does the doctor that you go to that made the prescription for Walgreens? Why do they need that information? [01:09:00] And I've been all over this because they don't. Really need it. They want, it makes their life easier, but they don't really need it. However, it exposes us. Now, if you missed the email, I sent out a week ago, two weeks ago now, I guess. You missed something big because I, in my weekly newsletter went through and described exactly what you could do in order to keep your information private. [01:09:35] So in those cases where websites asking for information that they don't really need, right? You don't want to lie, but if they don't really need your real name, why you're giving them your real name? Why do you use a single email address? Why don't you have multiple addresses? Does that start make sense to you guys? [01:09:54] And now we find out that Microsoft Azure, their cloud services, where they're selling cloud services, including a database that can be used online, a big database, uh, 3,300 customers looks like some of them are actually kind of big. I don't know. ExxonMobil pretty big. Yeah. I think so. Walgreens, you think that that might be yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. [01:10:22] Y. Why are we trusting these companies? You know it, if you have a lot of data, a lot of customers, you are going to be a major target of nation states to hack you and bat just general hackers, bad guys. But you're also, if, if you've got all this information, you've also got to have a much higher level of security than somebody that doesn't have all of that information. [01:10:52] Does that make sense too? Did I say that right? You don't need the information and, and I've got to warn anybody that's in a business, whether you're a business owner or you're an employee, do not keep more data than you need the new absolutely need to run your company. And that includes data about your customers. [01:11:16] And maybe, maybe it's even more specifically data about your customer. Because what can happen is that data can be stolen and we just found. That? Yes, indeed. It could have been, it was exposed Microsoft the same. We don't know how much it was stolen. If anything was stolen. Um, yeah, Walgreens. Hey, I wonder if anyone's going to try and get some pain pills illegally through, uh, this database hack or a vulnerability anyways. [01:11:47] All right, everyone. Stick around. We'll be back. Of course, you listening to Craig Peterson. I am a cybersecurity strategist for business, and I'm here to help you as well. You can ask any question any time, uh, consumers are the people I help the most, you know, I wish I got a dime for every time I answered a question. [01:12:09] Just email me@craigpeterson.com me@craigpeterson.com and stick around. [01:12:18] Whether or not, you agree with the lockdown orders that were put in place over this COVID pandemic that we had. Uh, there are some other parts of the world that are doing a lot more. [01:12:34] Australia has, I don't know. I think that they went over the deep end. The much, the same thing is true right next door to them. [01:12:45] And I am looking at a report of what they are doing with this new app. Uh, you might be aware that both apple and Google came out with an application programming interface. That could be used for contract tack tracking, contact tracking. There you go. Uh, it wasn't terribly successful. Some states put some things in place. [01:13:13] Of course you get countries like China. I love the idea because heaven forbid you get people getting together to talk about a Tannen square remembrance. Now you want to know who all of those people were, who were in close proximity, right? So, you know, good for China a while, as it turns out, Australia is putting something in place they have yet another COVID lockdown. [01:13:39] They have COVID quarantine orders. Now I think if you are sick, you should stay on. I've always felt that I, you know, I had 50 employees at one point and I would say, Hey, if you're sick, just stay home. Never required a doctor's note or any of that other silliness, come on. People. If someone's sick, they're sick and let them stay home. [01:14:04] You don't want to get everybody else in the office, sick and spread things around. Right. Doesn't that just kind of make sense. Well, they now in Australia, don't trust people to stay home, to get moving. Remember China, they were, they were taking welders and we're going into apartments in anybody that tested positive. [01:14:22] They were welding them into their apartment for minimum of two weeks. And so hopefully they had food in there and they had a way to get fresh water. Australia is not going quite that far, but some of the states down under. Using facial recognition and geolocation in order to enforce quarantine orders and Canada. [01:14:47] One of the things they've been doing for very long time is if you come into the country from out of the country, even if you're a Canadian citizen, you have to quarantine and they'll send people by your house or you have to pay to stay for 10 days in a quarantine hope. So you're paying the course now inflated prices for the hotel, because they're a special quarantine hotel. [01:15:14] You have to pay inflated prices to have food delivered outside your door. And that you're stuck there for the 10 days, or if you're at home though, they, you know, you're stuck there and they'll send people by to check up on you. They'll make phone calls to check up on you and. They have pretty hefty find. [01:15:36] Well, what Australia has decided to do is in Australia is Charlene's even going from one state to another state are required to prove that they're obeying a 14 day quarantine. And what they have to do is have this little app on their phone and they, the app will ping them saying, prove it. And then they have to take a photo of themselves with geo location tag on it and send it up via the app to prove their location. [01:16:15] And they have to do all of that within 15 minutes of getting the notification. Now the premier of the state of south Australia, Steven Marshall said we don't tell them how often or when on a random basis, they have to reply within 15 minutes. And if you don't then a police, officer's going to show up at the address you're supposed to be at to conduct an in-person check. [01:16:43] Very very intrusive. Okay. Here's another one. This is a, an unnamed government spokesperson who was apparently speaking with Fox news quote. The home quarantine app is for a selected cohort of returning self Australians who have applied to be part of a trial. If successful, it will help safely ease the burden of travel restrictions associated with the pandemic. [01:17:10] So there you go. People nothing to worry about. It's just a trial. Uh, it will go away. Uh, just like, uh, for instance, income tax, as soon as rule, number one is over, it will be removed and it will never be more than 3% and it will only apply to the top 1% of wage-earners. So there you go. Right. And we all know that world war one isn't over yet. [01:17:34] Right. So that's why they still have it in somehow. Yeah, some of the middle class pays the most income tax. I don't know. Interesting. Interesting. So there you go. Little news from down under, we'll see if that ends up happening up here. News from China, China has, uh, China and Russia have some interesting things going on. [01:17:55] First of all, Russia is no longer saw. Country, they kind of are. They kind of aren't, they are a lot freer in many ways than we are here in the United States. Of course, China, very heavily socialist. In fact, they're so socialists, they are communist and China. And Russia both want their kids to have a very good education in science, engineering, and mathematics. [01:18:23] Not so much on history, not so much on, on politics. Right. But definitely heavy on the, on the sciences, which I can see that makes all the sense. I think everybody should be pretty heavily on the science. Well, according to the wall street journal this week, gamers under the age of 18 will not be allowed to play online games between 8:00 PM and 9:00 PM on Friday, Saturdays and Sundays. [01:1

Driven Car Reviews
The 2022 Porsche 911 Targa 4 GTS Is Fast Access To Sun And Fun

Driven Car Reviews

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 13:38


The Porsche 911 is available in coupe, cabriolet and Targa models. But the GTS version of the 992 has been missing in action. That wrong will be righted in early 2022 when the GTS returns to slot in perfectly between the Carrera S and Turbo S. A bit of a bargain (for a Porsche) it's available in all three body styles with Porsche's 8-speed PDK dual-clutch automatic transmission or 7-speed manual. All but the Targa 4 can be had with rear and all-wheel drive. Can't decide which one to buy? Collect them all! Tom Voelk travels to Porsche's North American headquarters in Atlanta, GA to drive the Targa 4.

Mining Stock Daily
Copper, Gold and a Rejuvenating Junior Mining Market

Mining Stock Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 75:17


Today we connect with 3 CEO's from throughout the junior mining industry. First, we talk all things copper related with Western Copper and Gold's Paul West-Sells. We then turn to Great Bear's Chris Taylor on their latest drill results and his thoughts on the gold sector. Finally, Doug Ramshaw of Minera Alamos gives his thoughts on a change in junior resource sentiment, mistakes of the past, and a look into Santa's project future. We'd like to thank our sponsors: Integra Resources is advancing the past-producing DeLamar Project in southwestern Idaho. The Company has continued to demonstrate resource growth and conversion through greenfield and brownfield exploration and plans on delivering a pre-feasibility study in Q4 2021 to further de-risk and advance the project towards permitting. Integra Resources trades on the TSX-V under ITR and the NYSE American under ITRG. Corvus Gold is a North American gold exploration and development company, focused on its near-term gold-silver mining projects in southwestern Nevada. The Company holds a commanding land position within the Bullfrog Mining District. Neighbouring, adjacent projects controlled by AngloGold Ashanti, Kinross Gold and Coeur Mining highlight this active District. The two 100% owned North Bullfrog & Mother Lode projects have a combined nearly 4-Million oz gold of in-pit resource and continues to grow with an on-going, successful, resource expansion drill program. Corvus trades on the TSX and the Nasdaq with the symbol KOR. Western Copper and Gold is focused on developing the world-class Casino project in Canada's Yukon Territory. The Casino project consists of an impressive 11 billion pounds of copper and 21 million ounces of gold in an overall resource. Western Copper and Gold trades on the TSX and the NYSE American with WRN. Be sure to follow the company via their website, www.westerncopperandgold.com. Rio-2 is advancing the Fenix Gold Project in Chile, the largest undeveloped gold heap leach project in the Americas. Fenix consists of 5 million ounces in the measured and indicated resource category and 1.4 million ounces in the inferred resource category. With a robust PFS in place, Fenix is set up for fast-tracked construction and production. You can find a list of project and company information on their website, rio2.com.

The Big Story
How can we fix North American cities?

The Big Story

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 28:51


Many North American cities are locked in a damaging cycle, whereby new suburban expansion is needed to subsidize the infrastructure costs of old development. The pattern has left many municipalities teetering on the brink of insolvency, and led to the decimation of once vibrant streetscapes to make way for unsightly, car-friendly strip malls.What went awry in this continent's approach to urban planning? And to the extent that it's even possible, how can we even begin to correct the mistakes of the past?GUEST: Jason Slaughter, Creator and Host of the Youtube channel, Not Just Bikeshttps://www.youtube.com/c/NotJustBikes

Just Animals
The North American Badger, with Special Guest D. J. McHale

Just Animals

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 60:03


This week we discuss the notorious badger. Joining us as well is the one and only legendary  D.J. McHale writer and producer of the Nickelodeon Tv series, "Are You Afraid Of The Dark?" writer and director of the movie "Tower of Terror" and also writer of various young adult books and series.  Not only are we discussing the badger but also the creative process for a writer when it comes to creating an animal character! You guys are really going to enjoy this episode!  Thanks again to D.J. for coming on the show, we hope to have you back again To learn more about D.J. click the link below! https://djmachalebooks.com/the-author/ Merch is finally here! Take a look and order something you like here https://shop.spreadshirt.com/just-animals-podcast/   As always send us an email at justanimalspod@gmail.com   Find us on Instagram @justanimalspod --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/justanimals/message

Stark Reflections on Writing and Publishing
EP 215 - The Fusion of Horror, Culture, and Entertainment with Patricio X. Maya

Stark Reflections on Writing and Publishing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 48:49


Mark interviews Patricio X. Maya, who writes in both English and Spanish. They talk about his writing, his essays, his first novel, Reggaetón Cruise, which has been called "a techno-beat The Great Gatsby" about cultural exile, multiculturalism, and so much more. Prior to the main content, Mark shares a personal update, thanks Patreon supporters and shares a word from this episode's sponsor. You can learn more about how you can get your work distributed to retailers and library systems around the world at starkreflections.ca/Findaway. - What drew Patricia to writing in the first place, and those early teenage poems written in Spanish Being inspired by Columbian writer Gabriel García Márquez Patricio's move to the United States when he was 13 and his introduction to the English world Writing prose in English and poetry in Spanish Patricios's first book, a collection of essays and philosophies The theme of cultural exile in Patricio's second book Cherished early memories and defining half of his life from the age of 13 The origin of the poem "80 Miles Per Hour" The stylized American circus that's a part of Patricio's novel The Reggaetón Cruise and how it explores the contemporary moment of American culture where horror and entertainment marry and fuse Patricio's publishing partnership with Grady Miller Books that allows mutual growth together The media manager that Patricio works with for promotional appearances Thoughts about multiculturalism and super-multiculturalism in the US, Canada, the UK and other places What is the cost of becoming cosmopolitan? And more... After the interview Mark reflects on a few things the conversation made him think about. Links of Interest: The Reggaetón Cruise Findaway Voices Announcing Marketplace Self-Publishing Insiders Chat with Will Dages (YouTube) The 2nd Annual Online Sci-Fi & Fantasy Writers Conference (Oct 16, 2021) Business Bootcamp for Authors - Paths to Publication: Alternatives to Traditional Publishing (Panel) - (Oct 19, 2021) SelfPubCon: The Writing Craft Conference (ALLI) - The Craft of Writing Short Books The 2021 NaNoWriMo Writing Tools Storybundle Patreon for Stark Reflections The Relaxed Author Buy eBook Direct Buy Audiobook Direct Publishing Pitfalls for Authors An Author's Guide to Working with Libraries & Bookstores Wide for the Win Mark's Canadian Werewolf Books This Time Around (Short Story) A Canadian Werewolf in New York Stowe Away (Novella) Fear and Longing in Los Angeles Fright Nights, Big City   Patricio X. Maya was born in Quito, Ecuador, and moved to California at age 12. He writes in English and Spanish. His first book, Walking Around with Fante and Bukowski, is made up of 21 essays grouped into sections about art, politics, and autobiography. His second book, 80 MPH, is a collection of eighty powerful poems written in Spanish. His first novel, Reggaetón Cruise, has been called "a techno-beat The Great Gatsby." Some of the novel's themes are globalization, viral fame, and hyper-reality. The narrative plot is complex and the characters from all over the world. Though the novel touches upon immigration, terrorism, exile, and murder, parts of it are humorous, while others have been called thought-provoking, and even unnerving. Too Much Sweetie, his second novel, is about René, a young Ecuadoran artist trapped between a moneyed upbringing and his current down-and-out North American reality. René's tense world view collapses when he falls for Meaw-Meaw, an ambitious Thai masseuse who loves him for all that he wants to leave behind. Too Much Sweetie, that strangest of things -a sensual novel of ideas- is set to be published later this year under the Hollywood publisher Grady Miller Books, which has also published the writer's previous books. Along Miller, Maya has gathered the collected poems of Aldo Tambellini for publication. He has also acted as editor-in-chief of 80 MPH Anthology, which showcases the work of various Hispanic and American writers. Maya holds an M.A. in Arts Journalism from the Newhouse School at Syracuse University and a B.A. in English from CSULA. He has been a Visiting Scholar at the CalArts' Aesthetics and Politics program and a poetry lecturer at the Los Angeles Public Library Summer Lecture Series.   The introductory, end, and bumper music for this podcast (“Laser Groove”) was composed and produced by Kevin MacLeod of www.incompetech.com and is Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

Getting Over: Wrestling Podcast
NXT offers best '2.0' show with a surprise, AEW gets combative with WWE

Getting Over: Wrestling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 41:44


NXT put its best foot forward since the beginning of its new era, while AEW owner Tony Khan has taken personally WWE's decision to air an extra 30 minutes of SmackDown on Friday after being moved to FS1 due to the MLB playoffs. Host Adam Silverstein opens the show by diving into the latest edition of NXT [3:40], including the surprise of Carmelo Hayes winning the North American championship, whether Toxic Attraction can actually work and why this edition of NXT is the closest to what we can likely expect from the brand. Next, "The Silver King" breaks down AEW Rampage [26:45] -- CM Punk's latest match, Jade Cargill's squash and Ricky Starks vs. Brian Cage for the FTW title -- before wrapping up a look at why AEW must be careful not to cede the high ground to WWE. Plus, a quick take on MLW Fightland. Follow Getting Over on Twitter @GettingOverCast.

Mining Stock Daily
A Broad Rebound in the Metals Complex

Mining Stock Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 8:41


We'd like to thank our sponsors: Integra Resources is advancing the past-producing DeLamar Project in southwestern Idaho. The Company has continued to demonstrate resource growth and conversion through greenfield and brownfield exploration and plans on delivering a pre-feasibility study in Q4 2021 to further de-risk and advance the project towards permitting. Integra Resources trades on the TSX-V under ITR and the NYSE American under ITRG. Corvus Gold is a North American gold exploration and development company, focused on its near-term gold-silver mining projects in southwestern Nevada. The Company holds a commanding land position within the Bullfrog Mining District. Neighbouring, adjacent projects controlled by AngloGold Ashanti, Kinross Gold and Coeur Mining highlight this active District. The two 100% owned North Bullfrog & Mother Lode projects have a combined nearly 4-Million oz gold of in-pit resource and continues to grow with an on-going, successful, resource expansion drill program. Corvus trades on the TSX and the Nasdaq with the symbol KOR. Western Copper and Gold is focused on developing the world-class Casino project in Canada's Yukon Territory. The Casino project consists of an impressive 11 billion pounds of copper and 21 million ounces of gold in an overall resource. Western Copper and Gold trades on the TSX and the NYSE American with WRN. Be sure to follow the company via their website, www.westerncopperandgold.com. Rio-2 is advancing the Fenix Gold Project in Chile, the largest undeveloped gold heap leach project in the Americas. Fenix consists of 5 million ounces in the measured and indicated resource category and 1.4 million ounces in the inferred resource category. With a robust PFS in place, Fenix is set up for fast-tracked construction and production. You can find a list of project and company information on their website, rio2.com.

Thoughts on the Market
Special Episode: Planes, Trains and Supply Chains

Thoughts on the Market

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 9:26


With supply chain delays in air, ocean and trucking on the minds of investors worldwide, what could it mean for the labor market and consumers headed into the holiday season?----- Transcript -----Ellen Zentner Welcome to Thoughts on the Market. I'm Ellen Zentner, Chief U.S. Economist for Morgan Stanley Research. Ravi Shanker And I'm Ravi Shanker, Equity Analyst covering the North American transportation industry. Ellen Zentner And on this episode of the podcast, we'll be talking transportation - specifically the role of freight in tangled supply chains. It's Wednesday, October 13th at 10:00 a.m. in New York. Ellen Zentner So, Ravi, many listeners have likely heard recent news stories about cargo ships stuck off the California coast waiting to unload cargo into clogged ports or overworked truck drivers struggling to keep up. And there's a very human labor story here, a business story and an economic story all rolled together, and you and your team are at the center of it. So, I really wanted to talk with you to give listeners some clarity on this. Maybe we can start first with the shipping. You know, talk to us about ocean and air. You know, where are we now? Ravi Shanker So, this is a very complicated problem. And like most complicated problems, there isn't an easy explanation for exactly what's going on and also not an easy solution. What's happening in ocean is a combination of many issues. You obviously have a surge in demand coming out of Asia to the rest of the world because of catch up following the pandemic and low inventory levels. In addition to that, you've had some structural problems. For instance, the giant Panamax container ships that they started using in recent years have created a bit of a boom-and-bust situations at the ports - dropping off far too many containers that can be processed, and then there's like a lull and then many more containers show up. So that's a bit of an issue. Third, there's obviously issues with labor availability of the ports themselves, given the pandemic and other reasons. Ravi Shanker And lastly, as we'll touch on in a second, there is a shortage of rail and truck capacity to evacuate these containers out of the ports. And it's a combination of all of these, plus the air freight situation. Keep in mind that kind of one of the statistics that has come out post the pandemic is that roughly 65% of global air freight moves in the in the belly of a passenger plane rather than a dedicated air freighter. And a lot of these passenger planes obviously have been grounded because of the pandemic over the last 18 months. This has eliminated a lot of the airfreight capacity. Some of that has spilled over into ocean. And so, all of this has kind of created a cascading problem, and that's kind of where we are right now. Ellen Zentner So let me ask a follow up there. You know, in terms of international air flights, it looks like international travel is picking up. But when would you expect it to be back to normal levels? Ravi Shanker So I think that actually happens at some point in 2022. So, we also cover the airlines and we saw a significant amount of pent-up demand in U.S. domestic air traffic when people started getting vaccinated and when mobility restrictions were dropped. We think something very similar will happen on the international side when international restrictions are dropped, and we're already starting to see some of that take place. Whether that fixes the ocean problem completely or not is something we need to wait and watch for. Ellen Zentner So, you know, once we get goods here, we have to move them around. And I know I've heard you say before just how much of it has to move on the back of a truck. So, let's talk about the trucking industry. You know, there's been some structural and labor issues there, but that's even before the pandemic, right? Ravi Shanker That is even before the pandemic. Kind of, you and I collaborated to write a pretty in-depth piece as early as December 2019. We revisited that last year. There are a bunch of new regulations that have gone into place in the trucking industry over the last few years. It's no coincidence that we've had two of the tightest truck markets in history in the last three years. And these factors, whether it's the ELD mandate in 2018, the Driver Drug and Alcohol Clearinghouse in 2020, some of the insurance issues that the industry has seen over the last year; those have really created a structural tightness in the trucking industry. The pandemic made things a lot worse. Obviously, it pushed some driver capacity temporarily, maybe even permanently out of the marketplace. The driving schools were largely closed for the last 18 months, and so that limited the influx of new drivers into the space. And so, some of this pressure will ease, but we think a lot of the driver and the insurance issues that we're seeing in the trucking side the last 18 months are structural and not cyclical. Ellen Zentner So, Ravi, it certainly does seem like the labor supply issues could stretch on for longer. If we think about demographic trends in the U.S., it does appear that generations Y and Z are really leaning away from trucking jobs and toward gig economy like jobs. Some call them new generation jobs. When you think something like driverless trucks would be in place in a way that could alleviate some of those issues, or is that so far off on the horizon? Ravi Shanker We've been writing about driverless trucks since 2015, even longer than that, and we are now getting to a point where we think this can be quite real on somewhat of an investable time horizon. We think the first level for autonomous trucks will be ready for commercial use by the end of 2023 or early 2024. And we actually expect to see some very clear demonstrations of the viability of the technology and the commercial deployment of the technology within the next few months, actually. So, we think autonomous trucks can be a solution to fill that gap for the driver shortage if the demographics kind of are going to be against us for a while, and that could start happening pretty soon. Ravi Shanker With the outlook in mind on the supply chain disruptions you've seen so far and what's currently taking place, Ellen, how does that inform how you look at the inventory cycle and your forecast for inflation for the overall economy? Ellen Zentner It's been very complicated as, you know, about as complicated as you having to cover freight. You know, I think about the relationship that we have with our equity analysts across the firm, you know, these conversations I have with you are extremely important because it gives me a view of when can we get goods to where they need to go. Ellen Zentner So the inventory cycle has been delayed. There are many sectors that are running below normal inventory to sales ratios. And so, we do need production to pick up globally and we can see that exports globally are picking up. So, if I think of building a composite view of, you know, you saying air could be normalized first half of the year, but say certainly by the middle of the year. Trucking is probably going to continue to be a drag for a bit, but when I think about what you say about ocean, it sounds like all together by the middle of the year, things should start to look and move more normally. So, you're going to have a lot of inventory building that happens next year, that should have happened this year. And ironically, that's going to really add to growth, to GDP growth next year. Ellen Zentner Now all of this taking longer to normalize means that inflation pressures due to supply chain bottlenecks and COVID related pressures are going to remain higher for longer. All that's going to start to get alleviated around the middle of the year, but it means that we have to wait longer. And so that's how I'm thinking about it in terms of the inventory cycle and inflation. You know, it's going to support inventory building next year, but it's going to keep inflation elevated for longer. Ravi Shanker Right. So, looks like light at the end of the tunnel by middle of next year, but a tricky few months still to navigate. Obviously, the biggest thing to look forward to in the next couple of months, I think, is its holiday season. And I know that in the transportation and supply chain world, everyone is working overtime to make sure that Christmas isn't canceled. What do you think Christmas season means for retailers and the broader economy? Ellen Zentner Yes, I think our retail team is pretty constructive on the consumer, as are we. Buying power from consumers is very strong. That's helped by labor income, continued government support, as well as some of the savings, excess savings that we have available to pull from. But the goods have to be there as well. We know that shelves are going to be lighter. Let's put it this way, this season than normal. You know, I've heard media reports crying out, you know, do your holiday shopping now. I've heard reports of big retailers using their own ships to transport goods here, although you would sit there and tell them “Yeah, but who's going to unload it for you when it gets here?" Ellen Zentner But all in all, it doesn't sound like from our retail analysts, it's a bad set up for retail. I mean, one thing that I would think about as an economist is if you've got fewer goods through the holiday season with strong consumer demand, which we expect, well then you certainly don't have to go through a big markdown season on the other side of the holiday, which is going to support prices for longer after that. So, I think that's all an interesting combination. Ellen Zentner Well, I think this was a really interesting conversation, Ravi, and I think it starts to tie in some of the themes and what everyone's really focused on. It certainly has far-reaching effects across the broad economy and the global economy. So, thank you so much for taking time to talk today, Ravi. Ravi Shanker Well, thanks for having me on. It's great talking with you as well, Ellen. And I think if there was one major takeaway for our listeners from this podcast, it is please shop early this holiday season. Ellen Zentner Shop early, shop often. That's what I do. Ellen Zentner Thanks for listening. If you enjoy the show, please leave us a review on Apple Podcasts and share Thoughts on the Market with a friend or colleague today.

Coffee With Gringos
Episode 155: American Folklore from Paul Bunyan to Johnny Appleseed

Coffee With Gringos

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021


Folk tales are basically stories that have both elements of truth and myth that are passed down from generation to generation and they end up becoming a really important part of history in some cases. A They usually have multiple authors and so the story is changed as it is passed down from generation to generation. Join us for this episode as we discuss some commonly know North American folktales such as Johnny Appleseed, John Henry, and more. Read the full transcript here: https://www.dynamicenglish.cl/coffee-with-gringos-podcast-clases-particulares-de-ingles/episode-155-american-folklore

Mining Stock Daily
Santa Cruz Picks Up a Glencore Bolivian Asset While Zinc Rises

Mining Stock Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 8:17


Glencore monetizes a Bolivian asset. We have new drill results from Amex Exploration, High Gold and Hawkmoon Resources. Mako Mining initiates share buybacks. We'd like to thank our sponsors: Integra Resources is advancing the past-producing DeLamar Project in southwestern Idaho. The Company has continued to demonstrate resource growth and conversion through greenfield and brownfield exploration and plans on delivering a pre-feasibility study in Q4 2021 to further de-risk and advance the project towards permitting. Integra Resources trades on the TSX-V under ITR and the NYSE American under ITRG. Corvus Gold is a North American gold exploration and development company, focused on its near-term gold-silver mining projects in southwestern Nevada. The Company holds a commanding land position within the Bullfrog Mining District. Neighbouring, adjacent projects controlled by AngloGold Ashanti, Kinross Gold and Coeur Mining highlight this active District. The two 100% owned North Bullfrog & Mother Lode projects have a combined nearly 4-Million oz gold of in-pit resource and continues to grow with an on-going, successful, resource expansion drill program. Corvus trades on the TSX and the Nasdaq with the symbol KOR. Western Copper and Gold is focused on developing the world-class Casino project in Canada's Yukon Territory. The Casino project consists of an impressive 11 billion pounds of copper and 21 million ounces of gold in an overall resource. Western Copper and Gold trades on the TSX and the NYSE American with WRN. Be sure to follow the company via their website, www.westerncopperandgold.com. Rio-2 is advancing the Fenix Gold Project in Chile, the largest undeveloped gold heap leach project in the Americas. Fenix consists of 5 million ounces in the measured and indicated resource category and 1.4 million ounces in the inferred resource category. With a robust PFS in place, Fenix is set up for fast-tracked construction and production. You can find a list of project and company information on their website, rio2.com.

Your Longevity Blueprint
Pluck Seasoning with James Barry

Your Longevity Blueprint

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 61:10


Getting the whole family eating healthy can be a challenge, especially when there are food intolerances to contend with. James Barry, a former private celebrity chef, and creator of Pluck seasoning speaks about his experiences in the food industry. He gives his top tips for picky eaters, getting more organ meat in your diet, and encouraging your partner to eat healthier, too.   Common Food and Nutrition Mistakes from a Chef Self Assessing any Intolerances You Don't Have to be Good at Cooking Not Meal Planning: It Doesn't Have to be Hard   About James Barry James Barry's 16+ years in the culinary field started as a private chef. His inauguration into restaurant-style cooking came later when he was the vegan/vegetarian chef on the Van's Warped Tour, which traveled to 50 North American cities in 60 days.  Upon returning to Los Angeles, James continued to private chef and had the fortune of cooking for celebrities such as Tom Cruise, Mariska Hargitay, George Clooney, Gerard Butler, Sean “Puffy” Combs, Barbra Streisand, and John Cusack.  Not wanting to limit the audience of his healthy and tasty style of cooking, James started Wholesome2Go, a healthy, high-quality food delivery company that served under his leadership in the Los Angeles area for 8 years.  Most recently, James launched his first functional food product, Pluck, an organ-based, all-purpose seasoning. It's the first of its kind and an amazingly easy and delicious way for people to get organ meats into their diet. James also co-authored the recipes in Margaret Floyd's book Eat Naked and co-authored the follow-up cookbook The Naked Foods Cookbook.   Top Food Tips from a Chef to the Stars James Barry shares his experiences working as a celebrity chef, and why he started his professional cooking career in the vegan space. With his background in veganism, James understands how limiting it can feel when you're faced with food intolerances. However, he says that there are ways to make substitutions for even the most restricted. We talk about the different ways of cooking and agree that frying food is the least healthy way to eat. If you are going to eat fried food, James recommends five oils, stating that no other oil contains any nutritional benefit - in fact, they're nutritionally detrimental. James shares some of the most common food mistakes people can make. First, any kind of self-assessing of food intolerances. He encourages us to get checked for intolerances so that we can stay aware of how our markers change, if at all.   Encouraging Your Household to Eat Healthier James is also insistent that you don't actually need to be good at cooking to make healthy meals at home. One of the secrets is to meal plan each week and to follow a recipe. Recipes really are a step-by-step guide to making nutritious meals. It can be difficult to make dietary changes when everyone in the house isn't on board, especially your partner. James gives some great tips for how to get the rest of the family eating better, from helping them understand the benefits to tapping into the primal side of your relationship. Finally, James talks about cooking for even the pickiest of eaters. He gives some incredible tips for including picky children in the whole food preparation process. He also says we should always have a backup vegetable you know your kids will eat on hand.  James's product, Pluck, is an organ-based spice blend that even the pickiest of eaters love! Do you include organ meats in your diet? What are some of your favorite recipes that include organs? Call the Integrative Health and Hormone Clinic today and schedule your first appointment at 319-363-0033.   Quotes “The future of health is not necessarily in figuring out what the magic pill is. It's actually figuring out how we can take the tried and true health habits that already exist, like nature's gift is already there, and somehow making it so that we don't have to establish new habits around it.” [6:45] “There's no pressure needed to make food. We think that we have to be good at cooking or we need to be creative in the kitchen, but you really don't. I don't look at things as recipes, I look at things as formulas.” [27:07] “There's this concept of like supports like, that's why I included all five organs in Pluck: liver, kidney, heart, spleen, and pancreas. There's a Native American thought that says if you eat animal organs, then they're going to support your own organs. If you're eating those five, you're supporting all five organs in your own body.” [52:53]   In This Episode How to make delicious food substitutions for your health [18:00] The five best oils [21:30] The most common food mistakes from a chef [25:15] The benefits of meal planning [29:00] How to make diet changes when your partner doesn't want to [31:30] How to cook for picky eaters [37:00]   Links & Resources Use Code OMEGA3 for 10% Off Omega 3 Your Longevity Blueprint Couse Now 50% Off Use Code DRGRAY10 for 10% Off Pluck: This Link Only! Find James Berry and Pluck Online Follow James Berry and Pluck on Instagram | Facebook | Pinterest Find Your Longevity Blueprint Online Follow Your Longevity Blueprint on Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | YouTube | LinkedIn Get your copy of the Your Longevity Blueprint book and claim your bonuses here Find Dr. Stephanie Gray and Your Longevity Blueprint online    Follow Dr. Stephanie Gray on Facebook | Instagram | Youtube | Twitter | LinkedIn Integrative Health and Hormone Clinic Podcast Production by the team at Counterweight Creative    Related Episodes Episode 63: Childhood Trauma Healing With Dr. Aimie Apigian Episode 57: 5 Keys To Raising Healthy Kids With Dr. Brian Stenzler Episode 53: Keto Green Approach To Hormones With Dr. Anna Cabeca

Backcountry Marketing
Roberto Gutierrez | Bringing Jack Wolfskin to North America | Jack Wolfskin

Backcountry Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 39:26


Jack Wolfskin is a major German outdoor company. Headquartered in Idstein, they were founded in 1981 and are now one of the biggest suppliers of outdoor goods in Germany. After a couple of previous attempts to enter the North American market, Jack Wolfskin has recently started the journey of trying again. Roberto Guiterrez recently took on the Director of Marketing role and discusses the intricacies of bringing a heritage brand to a new market. We discuss cultural differences, implications, and unique approaches to storytelling. Follow Jack Wolfskin @jackwolfskin_na Produced by: @portsideproductions @backcountrymarketing @coleheilborn

ARC ENERGY IDEAS
EV Adoption: The North American Plug-in Problem

ARC ENERGY IDEAS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 31:47


In this week's podcast, Peter and Jackie talk about why the lack of charging infrastructure in North America is holding back the adoption of electric vehicles (EV). The charging problem is amplified because Canada and the United States do not mandate a standard electrical plug-in. Read Jackie's commentary “Canada EV Mass Adoption: Are We There […] The post EV Adoption: The North American Plug-in Problem first appeared on ARC Energy Research Institute.

Mining Stock Daily
Global Copper Exploration and Q3 Production Numbers

Mining Stock Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 9:55


We report latest copper exploration results from Arizona Metals, Solaris Resources and Surge Copper. Ivanhoe has development news. And a round of quarterly production news. We'd like to thank our sponsors: Integra Resources is advancing the past-producing DeLamar Project in southwestern Idaho. The Company has continued to demonstrate resource growth and conversion through greenfield and brownfield exploration and plans on delivering a pre-feasibility study in Q4 2021 to further de-risk and advance the project towards permitting. Integra Resources trades on the TSX-V under ITR and the NYSE American under ITRG. Corvus Gold is a North American gold exploration and development company, focused on its near-term gold-silver mining projects in southwestern Nevada. The Company holds a commanding land position within the Bullfrog Mining District. Neighbouring, adjacent projects controlled by AngloGold Ashanti, Kinross Gold and Coeur Mining highlight this active District. The two 100% owned North Bullfrog & Mother Lode projects have a combined nearly 4-Million oz gold of in-pit resource and continues to grow with an on-going, successful, resource expansion drill program. Corvus trades on the TSX and the Nasdaq with the symbol KOR. Western Copper and Gold is focused on developing the world-class Casino project in Canada's Yukon Territory. The Casino project consists of an impressive 11 billion pounds of copper and 21 million ounces of gold in an overall resource. Western Copper and Gold trades on the TSX and the NYSE American with WRN. Be sure to follow the company via their website, www.westerncopperandgold.com. Rio-2 is advancing the Fenix Gold Project in Chile, the largest undeveloped gold heap leach project in the Americas. Fenix consists of 5 million ounces in the measured and indicated resource category and 1.4 million ounces in the inferred resource category. With a robust PFS in place, Fenix is set up for fast-tracked construction and production. You can find a list of project and company information on their website, rio2.com.

Selling With Social Sales Podcast
The New Wave of Modern Sales Engagement with Michael Labate, #187

Selling With Social Sales Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 49:43


Sinking time and money into outdated sales techniques is why so many organizations are struggling to increase their results.  That's why the question should shift to focus on how to implement the most cutting-edge sales tools to identify prospects faster and nurture deeper relationships. My guest in this episode of The Modern Selling Podcast is a tech-savvy sales leader who has his finger on the pulse of modern sales in the digital age. Make sure to tune into my in-depth conversation with the one and only Michael Labate to get a digital front row seat to the incredible social selling tools, strategies, and insights he's using to 3x the sales conversations of his team. Michael Labate, North American President of Intellias has a remarkable career spanning over two decades in various industries including Technology, Banking, and Sales & Marketing, serving midsize and large enterprise clients.  Combining his extensive business background with his Executive MBA from Northwestern University's Kellogg School of Management, Michael was instrumental at SAP, and, now Intellias, in establishing profitable revenue-enabling and revenue-generating business activities across regions with a focus on digital sales strategy, innovation, go-to-market, and operational excellence. The incredible insights Michael shares in this episode are exactly what sales leaders need to quickly gain an insider's advantage to master the art of social selling. Download this episode so you can hear how mastering social selling can land sales teams 100% better leads for 50% of the cost. How to adapt to remote selling the right way. The pandemic has changed how sales leaders are approaching customer touchpoints, for the first time in some organizations.  So, I was curious to know what Michael has seen emerging in this space and what Intellias, a global enterprise, has done to adapt to remote selling. Michael shares, “If the pandemic did anything, it accelerated what I call social selling – it's broader than just social – it also includes the social tools and technologies behind doing this… For Intellias, it was a major adaptation we had to make. There was some of this in place, but never implemented in the North American market.” Even for sales teams with large technology budgets, it can be challenging to make that shift to more social-driven outreach in the current virtual selling world. Plus, without the right digital transformation training, many sales leaders have a host of remote sales tools and strategies but lack the clear vision to know how to execute. Michael encountered a similar challenge with moving Intellias into leveraging social selling. He solved that with mandatory sales leadership training, like the courses we offer here at Vengreso, for example, our Modern Sales Mastery program. “We had to establish baselines to see how well we were actually doing. We noticed very quickly, with doing online engagement, that being proactive and moving the conversation from email or phone call to social platforms that we started seeing a significant uplift in our results. But, we had to invest in training first.” Tune into the full episode to hear what Michael recommends that sales leaders and executives do before making the remote selling leap. Does remote selling work for every customer segment? At Vengreso, we always promote hyper-personalization in sales – no matter the client, like we do following our PVC sales methodology. And, I was curious to hear Michael's approach and if he saw Intellias moving back toward using more traditional sales methods, at some point in the future. His answer is exactly why selecting the right sales strategy for your customer segments is so important. “We have both SMB and enterprise clients. On the SMB side, social selling drives these important interactions, especially since we are doing a lot of cross-border outreach. But, on the enterprise side, the initial outreach is not happening on LinkedIn, it's happening very differently…” Listen to the episode (particularly around the 15-minute mark) to hear Michael's actionable advice on how to approach enterprise prospects in the digital age to consistently nail sales meetings. What are sales leaders really missing? Sales data proves that the fastest way to get into someone's office is not through a cold call or a cold email, but rather through a referral. Yet, despite 60% of referrals resulting in a sales conversation, it always amazes me how many sales leaders don't start an outbound cadence with the referral. This is such an important sales tool that so many teams aren't using that could powerfully move the needle on their company's growth. At Vengreso, our longest article is about prospecting and it outlines why the first step of any outbound cadence must be securing a digital referral.  After all, why go after new business with cold outreach, when you can easily tap into the network you have at your fingertips? I wanted to pick Michael's brain and see what he believed was holding sales leaders back from using the power of referral. His insight was very telling, “When I ask sales leaders this same question, I often hear that it takes time to try to find that referral… sales executives are up against quota, so they'd rather ‘spray and pray' because they think it's easier or faster.” That's why Michael highly recommends that sales leaders take a very unique approach to get better sales referrals.  Check out the episode to hear the strategy Michael uses to get more quality referrals – in less time. How do you win the cold outreach game? I knew if anyone could answer this question, it would be Michael. In our conversation, I asked him to share some of the data he's collected within a global sales engine that points to what's really working in cold outreach. Because I'm always surprised when I speak to experienced sales leadershow much emphasis they place on the number of dials they can make in a day. That's not what we consider modern selling at Vengreso.  Instead, we focus on targeting specific accounts, with varied buyer personas and using that to make hyper-personalized outreach to a highly selective group. The data Michael shares validates that point too, “We tracked the likelihood that an outreach method would produce a strong lead over an entire year. The data says it all. Our cold calls had a 0.15% success rate, generic automated emails bumped up to 0.3%, highly personalized emails jumped up to 1% success rate, but LinkedIn was closer to 2.5-3%!” This new discussion around social selling is so powerful and immediately relevant for ALL sales leaders. We dive deeper into conquering cold outreach on LinkedIn throughout this entire episode. So, make sure to tune in to hear Michael's approach to social selling and how you can use it to consistently book more sales meetings. What's the modern selling wave of the future? Almost by accident, Michael shared this powerful statistic, “This method was 50% cheaper but it  produced 100% more inbound responses.” So, naturally, I had to know what he was referencing. Michael calls it intent- or signal-based outreach and according to his results, it is THE best way to win the remote selling game. His approach to intent-based outreach follows five key steps: Identify a source to provide intent-based data. Look for trends in who is searching on key parameters. Based on the data, put these contacts into an immediate outreach sequence. Leverage integration tools to target these audiences with specific sales messaging. Follow-up with personalized messages that speak to the pain points (that you know they have). In today's technology-driven world, it seems like a straightforward framework to follow, especially when you deploy tools like Bombora and Zoominfo. When you look closely at the sales data – intent-based outreach becomes even more of a no-brainer approach to at least try.  According to Michael, “When you use this targeted approach and reach out with messages that are hyper-personalized to people that you know have a problem that you can solve, then I've seen response rates shoot up another 1-2%.”  But, this is just the tip of the social selling iceberg. Listen to the entire episode to hear Michael's top 10 must-have sales tools that he's used to quickly expand Intelllias into North America and beyond – using powerful social selling.  If you get anything out of this episode, the 10 minutes on this topic alone is well worth the listen!

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast
Podcast #56: Mt. Buller, Australia GM Laurie Blampied

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 94:23


The Storm Skiing Podcast is sponsored by Mountain Gazette - Listen to the podcast for discount codes on subscriptions and merch.WhoLaurie Blampied, General Manager of Mt. Buller, AustraliaRecorded onOct. 4, 2021 in New York City; Oct. 5, 2021 at Mt. Buller, Australia – weird, right?Why I interviewed himOne of the quirks of living on planet Earth is the fact of its tilted axis. Because of this, we not only have seasons, but different seasons in different places at the same time. There’s a multiverse feeling to all this. Landing in Australia is not unlike stepping through a time ripple into a weird alt-America, one where cars drive on the left and the deer have been replaced by giant bouncing rabbity creatures carrying babies in their pockets. And it’s winter in June. If Australia didn’t exist and Luke Skywalker and his motley band of space warriors landed on a planet outfitted with koala bears and vast deserts and deadly animals of every variety we’d all be like, “yes that looks like the kind of crazy planet I’d expect to find on the remote fringes of space.”But it’s real. And there’s skiing. Less, it turns out, than I’d figured: the whole country has just a handful of ski areas. This seems to be mostly a matter of geography: the treeline is low and the snowline is high. Running a ski area in such conditions is a challenge. No matter: Australia is home to an ebullient ski culture. The five largest – Buller, Thredbo, Perisher, Falls Creek, and Hotham – are aligned with the Ikon or Epic passes. This makes sense. Try taking five lift rides at any Western U.S. or Canadian mountain and not running into an Aussie on a five-week holiday bouncing from one resort to the next on their American megapass. These people ski, travel, live. I wanted to know more.What we talked aboutReflections on retiring after nearly three decades in the ski business; The emerging Chinese ski scene; how a decade and a half as a civil engineer led to a career running ski resorts; raising kids at a ski resort; the evolution of the Australian ski industry from the early ‘90s to today; the surprisingly small number of ski areas in Australia and how they’ve consolidated over time; pioneering snowguns-as-firefighting-gear while under siege by wildfire for 38 days; the family that owns Mt. Buller; Vail’s entrance into Australia; who will replace Blampied after retirement; how Mt. Buller finally solved its snowmaking problem; how the Australian ski model compares to the North American and European models; Australia’s unique geography and how that shapes its ski areas; snow gums!; Buller’s origins as a single ski area served by two separate lift companies, requiring two separate lift tickets; Australia’s history as a center of lift innovation and experimentation; the evolution of Buller’s modern lift system; high-speed lifts on low-rise terrain; why the resort removed the Boggy Creek T-bar and what may replace it; shout out to SMI in Midland Michigan represent; the amazing gondola proposal that could knit the entire resort together; average snowfall at Mt. Buller; how snowmaking and snow preservation works above treeline; the art and science of snowmaking in Australia’s marginal temperatures; Buller’s Olympic and World Cup legacy; why the mountain joined the Mountain Collective and Ikon passes and what it took to make that happen; whether Buller passholders may get an option to add on an Ikon Pass, as many U.S. partner mountain passholders now can; Australians know how to live; Mt. Buller’s ISO certification; how Australia reacted to Covid and what that’s meant for the ski industry; and the earthquake that hit Buller last month:Why I thought now was a good time for this interviewI hadn’t thought to proactively reach out to an Australian resort for an interview. I’ve never skied there, and I just expanded the scope of the podcast from the Northeast to the rest of America – that seemed like quite enough terrain to cover for the moment. But Mt. Buller reached out, and this seemed like an excellent chance to learn about a part of the ski world I was more or less ignorant of. Laurie was retiring after a long career and had a unique perspective on how the Australian ski industry had evolved in tandem with and outside of the global ski machine. The story of Mt. Buller itself was compelling – a family-owned mountain latching onto North American megapasses and aggressively upgrading its infrastructure to stay relevant in a whacky, warming world. There was no way I was turning down the opportunity to learn more.It’s a big, big world, and there’s an awful lot of skiing out there. My focus, for now, is the United States, and that’s where I’ll continue to do my deliberate resort outreach. However – if you run a ski resort anywhere in the world, and you want to come on the podcast and talk about it, get in touch with me and we’ll make it happen. What I love about the world of lift-served skiing is the wild and unpredictable variety of it, the way different versions of the same thing can manifest themselves across vastly different cultures and environments. There is no part of this universe that doesn’t interest me, and in an internet-connected world, there are no boundaries we can’t step across to explore.Why you should ski Mt. BullerLike a lot of Australian ski resorts, Mt. Buller seems to be Europe from the waist up, and America from the belt down:I asked Laurie which version of skiing Australia hewed closest to: the yee-haw off-piste American style, or the skinny-skis groomer swishy Euro style? Neither, he said. It’s a thing all its own.And it’s a thing I’d like to explore one day. It’s gonna take me a while. As much as I love skiing, I also love summer, and we don’t get much of it here in the Northeast. And you have to miss a lot of summer to go to Australia. It takes like a week to fly there and a week to fly back and by then you’ve missed two years of work because they’re already in like 2032 over there. And even if you do want to forfeit summer for some skiing, you - like most U.S. Americans - probably only get two to three hours of vacation time per year and it’s not to be taken consecutively, you know, which is not quite enough time to get to Australia and back. Until teleportation is invented. Which it probably already has been in Australia since they are already living in the 23rd century.Extra creditOne of the quirks of Mt. Buller’s history is that two separate lift systems, run by two separate companies, once served the same mountain. That meant you needed two lift tickets to ski the whole area:Over time, the two systems united, but the mountain was left with a ton of redundancy – here’s what the unified lift system looked like in 1992, shortly before Laurie took over:Today, the place is slick and modern, with high-speed burners and big plans for a bomber gondola. With no room left to expand, Mt. Buller is wholly focused on improving the on-mountain experience.A few more items of interest:More historic trailmaps of Mt. BullerA complete historical inventory of Mt. Buller’s chairliftsMt. Buller’s Legends and Personalities Wall (referenced in the podcast) Get on the email list at www.stormskiing.com

Midday
Baltimore is still in the running to host the 2026 World Cup Games

Midday

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 32:16


In 2026, the United States, Canada and Mexico will share the stage of the largest World Cup Soccer Tournament in history. It's expected that 16 different North American venues will host matches between an expanded roster of teams from around the globe. Eleven of those venues will be in the United States. And maybe, one of them will be right here in Baltimore. Baltimore, Maryland is making a bid to be one of the hosts of this global party. Today, we'll talk about what putting our best foot forward looks like. Lt. Governor Boyd Rutherford joins us. Along with Baltimore Mayor, Brandon Scott, he co-chairs the committee that is working to bring the World Cup to Baltimore. Lt. Gov Rutherford joins us on Zoom from Annapolis… Terry Hasseltine is the Executive Director of Maryland Sports (the state's sports commission), and the Vice President of the Maryland Stadium Authority. Mr. Hasseltine joins us on Zoom as well… See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Positive University Podcast
Howard Behar - Former Starbucks President on Putting People First

Positive University Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 41:07


Today Jon Gordon is joined by Howard Behar. Howard was the North American president of Starbucks for 21 years. During his tenure, he helped grow the franchise from 28 stores to more than 15,000 across five continents and served on the Starbucks board of directors for 12 years until his retirement. He'' actually the one who coined the term "We aren't in the coffee business serving people, we're in the people business serving coffee." This entire interview is gold. Howard shares so many great insights on building a great culture and organization by focusing on people. He shares a lot of practical things that Starbucks did and what you can do as well to build something great. If you enjoy this, tell others and encourage them to listen as well. Tag Jon and Howard on social. You can also leave a review on Apple, Spotify or wherever you're listening. Get Howard's book, It's Not About the Coffee. Our featured resource this week is our upcoming Power of Positive Leadership Training. If you want to become a better leader, one who creates positive results, this is for you. It's training that develops resilience, mental toughness, grit and provides strategies to overcome negativity, and lead positive change. You can sign up for our next LIVE training at POPLTraining.com

The Doctor Is In Podcast
696. Detoxing Your Liver

The Doctor Is In Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 26:33


Did you know that 50 to 60% of North Americans have a non-alcoholic fatty liver? Your body would rather have a fatty liver than high blood sugar or diabetes. Dr. Martin looks at a study showing that Alzheimer's may begin in the liver. They discovered that in the presence of a fatty liver, toxic proteins were released and made their way through the bloodstream into the brain. This created inflammation in the brain and caused damage. Dr. Martin uses this study to talk about the importance of detoxing your liver.  

WorldAffairs
Canada's Fight for Truth and Reconciliation

WorldAffairs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 59:01


The discovery of mass graves at residential schools for indigenous children in Canada has shed new light on a disturbing chapter in North American history---the abuse and neglect of Indigenous children at the hands of the American and Canadian governments. This week, we look at Canada's journey towards truth and reconciliation with its native people. From the late 19th century until the last school closed in 1996, the Canadian government took indigenous children from their families and forced them to attend schools run by churches. Little learning happened in these institutions, which were the sites of widespread abuse. Children were separated from their siblings and stripped of their native language and culture. First we speak with Connie Walker, an investigative journalist whose family members were forced to attend these schools. Then, we speak to Ry Moran, an indigenous archivist who works to preserve the testimonies of residential school survivors. Guests: Ry Moran, The University of Victoria Associate University Librarian - Reconciliation Connie Walker, host of Stolen: The Search for Jermain, Gimlet Media   Hosts: Teresa Cotsirilos, senior producer, WorldAffairs Ray Suarez, co-host, WorldAffairs

Sandy K Nutrition - Health & Lifestyle Queen
Episode 81: Does Alkaline Water Really Work? What Kind of Water Are You Drinking & Why It Matters with Santevia

Sandy K Nutrition - Health & Lifestyle Queen

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 57:32


Exciting announcement:  I will be giving away a biological age DNA kit to a lucky winner, valued at $300 US in a draw.  To enter, follow myDNAge on Instagram here:  https://www.instagram.com/mydnage/, and subscribe, rate, and review with a few kind words for my podcast.  In order to be considered, proof must be provided via email to sandy@sandyknutrition.ca.  North American entries only.  To review with a few kind words, go here:  https://lovethepodcast.com/sandyknutrition.What is alkaline water?  Can you make the body more alkaline by drinking it?  Why is clean water so important for our body?  What is reverse osmosis water?  And so many more questions answered today by my guest, co-founder of Santevia, Yvonne Anderson.Want your own Santevia water system with a discount?  Use code SANDYK10 for 10% off and you can check out all your options here:  https://ca.santevia.com.If you enjoyed this episode, please share.  It means the world to us podcasters when you do this!  Also, follow me!  I'm on Twitter, YouTube, TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Pinterest - Sandy K Nutrition everywhere!Disclaimer:  This is intended for educational purposes only and is not medical advice.  See your own practitioner for what's right for you.

The Sci-Files on Impact 89FM
Robert Stanley about Rising From the Ashes

The Sci-Files on Impact 89FM

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 16:53


On this week's SciFiles, your hosts Chelsie and Daniel interview Robert Stanley. The invasive Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus planipennis, EAB), the most destructive forest tree insect in North American history, threatens the majority of the native American ash species. This includes green ash, white ash, pumpkin ash and black ash. Green ash was widely used as a street tree, white ash is famous for baseball bats, pumpkin ash for guitars and black ash for native American baskets. This insect (EAB) can kill over 99% of the ash they encounter, and threaten the industries and communities that utilize these ash resources, costing billions of dollars annually. Robert's collaborators work to find the trees the mount a defense against this insect. What they see in these “lingering” trees is that they somehow manage to kill the insect, and heal over the wound caused by the larvae boring into the wood. Robert's particular work is to figure out how these trees manage to kill the insects. They use traditional plant breeding coupled with 21st-century analysis techniques to examine the chemicals the plants use, as well the as transcripts influencing this response. He works primarily with the plant chemistry, and run considerable amounts of exploratory studies to figure out which chemicals the plants use. This is called untargeted metabolomics, where they look at all the chemicals in the woody tissue. What he finds is that what is important is the ability of the plant to sense and respond to the EAB attack. This is counter to what many people previously hypothesized, that the native green ash doesn't have any defense against these invasive species. In fact, it appears that the majority of the green ash has the capability to make these defensive metabolites, it's just a select few that are able to respond appropriately and fend off the EAB invaders. It's like if you gave a million people different possible ways to make a tank, and only a couple of them were able to put it together. Those ones that happen to be able to put it together will do well and be able to pass it on to their children. It is absolutely incredible to watch a species being saved in real-time.If you're interested in talking about your MSU research on the radio or nominating a student, please email Chelsie and Danny at scifiles@impact89fm.org. Check The Sci-Files out on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, and YouTube! 

Bourbon Lens
144: Metallica's Blackened American Whiskey: Rob Dietrich's Journey From Stagehand to Master Distiller

Bourbon Lens

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 38:01


Taking a break from the metal and rock music at Louisville's Louder Than Life music festival, Rob Dietrich joins the Bourbon Lens to talk whiskey.  Rob Dietrich is Master Distiller for Blackened American Whiskey and has taken over their reins from the late Dave Pickerell. Rob is a talented distiller (formerly of Colorado's Stranahan's) and even has a history of working in the music industry, so landing with Metallica's Blackened brand is a natural fit for him. You'll hear a lot about Rob's philosophy of whiskey, his love for music, and his passion for this brand as they head international.   We are thankful for everyone who has supported us. A huge shoutout to our growing Patreon Community as well! We'd appreciate it if you can take the time to give us feedback on our podcast. If you enjoy our content, consider giving us a 5 star rating on your favorite podcast app, leave us a review, and tell a fellow bourbon lover about our show. Follow  us @BourbonLens on Instagram, Facebook, & Twitter.  And please check out our Patreon to learn how you can support our endeavors, earn Bourbon Lens swag, be part of future barrel picks, and more. If you have any comments, questions, or suggestions, please email us at TheBourbonLens@Gmail.com. Visit our website BourbonLens.com to check out our blog posts, or even purchase your own Bourbon Lens tasting glass or t-shirt. Cheers,Scott, Jake, & MichaelBourbon Lens About Blackened Whiskey: BLACKENED was created in 2018 by Metallica and late Master Distiller Dave Pickerell. It features a blend of the finest North American bourbons and ryes that were hand-selected by Dave and finished in black brandy casks. During finishing, the whiskey undergoes the BLACK NOISE sonic-enhancement where the low frequencies of Metallica's music pummel the finishing barrel, visibly shaking it, causing greater interaction between the whiskey and the wood, thereby extracting more flavor and color. The playlist for the batches are traditionally selected by the members of Metallica and can be found on the website at https://blackenedwhiskey.com/batch-playlists/  The brand recently unveiled its new “Masters of Whiskey Series,” which partners Rob Dietrich with other renowned master distillers to reimagine craft whiskey. The series debuted with the BLACKENED x Willett Kentucky Straight Rye Finished in Madeira Casks created in collaboration with Drew Kulsveen and Willett Distillery. It's crafted from a base of low rye and high rye recipes hand-selected by Rob and Drew from the Willett Family Estate Reserve Selection. The whiskies are married in Madeira Casks where they undergo the BLACK NOISE sonic-enhancement process using a playlist selected by both Master Distillers. It's bottled at cask strength at 109.6 proof. Bottle Stock Image Credit: Blackened American Whiskey Show Links: BLACKENED American Whiskey | Premium Bourbon-Rye Blend 3 ‘Drinking Rules of Engagement' by Rob Dietrich Blackened Batch - Metallica Playlists on Spotify  Robb Report Review: Blackened, the Whiskey That's Aged to the Sounds of Metallica – Robb Report Introducing Blackened American Whiskey... Whiskey Remastered | Metallica.com The Whiskey Wash Interview: Becoming ‘One' With Metallica's Whiskey Brand Guitar World Feature - Metallica's Blackened American Whiskey has been “pummeled by the low-hertz frequencies” of the band's classic tracks Revolver Magazine - Metallica's Black Album Meets Blackened American Whiskey: Inside Batch 114 BLACKENED American Whiskey Introduces Limited Edition "The Black Album" Whiskey Pack SF Gate Feature - The secret ingredient in this whiskey is Metallica...no seriously Vulture.com Review: Metallica 'S&M2' Blackened American Whiskey Men's Journal - Meet the Rebel Distillers Breaking All the Rules on Whiskey Maxim.com - Metallica Celebrates The Black Album Anniversary with Blackened Whiskey Pack The Manual Feature - Metallica Fuses with Willett Distillery To Create an Exclusive Rye Revolver Magazine - Metallica's Blackened American Whiskey: Rob Dietrich's Journey From Stagehand to Master Distiller Forbes Feature - Metal and Rock's Triumphant Return At 2021's Louder Than Life Festival Watch METALLICA Play "Ride The Lightning" At Louder Than Life Blabbermouth.net - METALLICA Releases Pro-Shot Video Of 'Ride The Lightning' Performance From LOUDER THAN LIFE Festival   

Leverage Podcast
176: Adventures in Cross Cultural Dating (ft. Melanie Curtin)

Leverage Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021


Show Notes: Ever dated someone from a different background, or from a different country? What’s sex and relationship like with a language barrier? Melanie and I get down and dirty in terms of our experiences as North Americans dating in Western and Eastern Europe, South America, Japan, the Caribbean, and beyond. If you’ve ever had […] The post 176: Adventures in Cross Cultural Dating (ft. Melanie Curtin) appeared first on Inner Confidence.