Podcasts about Cracking

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Best podcasts about Cracking

Show all podcasts related to cracking

Latest podcast episodes about Cracking

Stateside from Michigan Radio
Unpacking "Packing and Cracking"

Stateside from Michigan Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 11:37


Soon, Michigan will have new congressional and legislative districts. How those lines are drawn will have political consequences that last a decade. But before that happens, the Michigan Independent Citizens Redistricting Council is seeking public comment on the set of draft maps they recently released. Today on the pod, we talk to one of the members of the commission about how that's going, and we hear from a state lawmaker who says he has some major concerns about the maps as they are drawn right now. GUESTS: Sue Hammersmith, executive director of the Michigan Independent Citizens Redistricting Commission. Adam Hollier, Democratic state Senator representing parts of Detroit, Grosse Pointe, Highland Park, Hamtramck and Harper Woods. Information about the remaining public hearings: Friday, Oct. 22, 1-3:30 p.m. and 5-8 p.m. DeVos Place, Steelcase Ballroom 303 Monroe Ave. NW, Grand Rapids Monday, Oct. 25, 1-3:30 p.m. and 5-8 p.m. Treetops Resort 3962 Wilkinson Road, Gaylord Tuesday, Oct. 26, 1-3:30 p.m. and 5-8 p.m. Dort Center 3501 Lapeer Road, Flint Looking for more conversations from Stateside? Right this way. If you like what you hear on the pod, consider supporting our work. Stateside's theme music is by 14KT. Additional music by Blue Dot Sessions. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

S&P Global Ratings
Cracking & Fracking - Episode 14

S&P Global Ratings

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 7:51


Tech Leader Talk
Understanding critical patent filing deadlines – Steve Sponseller

Tech Leader Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 14:42


In this solo episode, I talk about patent filing deadlines that are important to tech companies and inventors. There are three important activities that automatically trigger a 12-month deadline in the United States for filing a patent application to protect your invention. In most situations, if you miss this deadline, you forfeit the ability to protect the invention. This often means your competitors can freely use that invention in their products because you can't protect it with a patent. Unfortunately, many business leaders are unaware of this deadline and inadvertently lose patent rights to their inventions. Too often, I've had to tell company leaders, “It's too late to protect your invention.” Listen to this episode so you understand the deadlines and make an informed business decision before forfeiting your patent rights. Today on the Tech Leader Talk podcast: The three activities that trigger a 12-month patent filing deadline: - Public disclosure of the invention - Sale of a product that contains the invention - An offer to sell a product that contains the invention   Solution: - Identify all of the three triggering activities. - If the invention is valuable to your business, file a patent application BEFORE the 12 month deadline.   Questions? If you have any questions about these deadlines, contact me to schedule a Free Introductory Call so you don't forfeit any critical patent rights. Contact me via email: Steve@SteveSponseller.com Or visit my website: https://www.SteveSponseller.com Thanks for listening! Be sure to get your free copy of my latest book, Cracking the Patent Code, and discover my proven system for identifying and protecting your most valuable inventions. Get the book at https://stevesponseller.com/book.

The Waffle Press Podcast
Serving up Comics #22 CRACKING THE DC FANDOME

The Waffle Press Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 45:32


The boys of Serving up Comics talk the DC Fandome, talking The Batman, Flash, and Black Adam! Our Batman: The Animated Series rewatch continues with the following episodes TWO FACE PARTS.1 &2. ►Follow The Waffle Press: @TheWafflePress ► Follow Gene: @gene9892 ► Follow Nick: @thenickvalero ►Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/thewafflepresspodcast ►YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_SAkQzan606e8RerAFPkTg ►SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/thewafflepress ►Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0wn6x2sfn6eCmg1MYDUW45?si=ZXjQgFFTQ6WzQcPbAdBVHA ►iTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-waffle-press-podcast/id1265467358

Cracking the Vault
Episode 31: Dumbo

Cracking the Vault

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 64:48


80 years ago this month, a lovable elephant with massive ears flew his way into the hearts of millions. On this edition of Cracking the Vault, we discuss this classic gem and some of the...not so loved aspects of Disney's fourth animated feature.  Find Cracking the Vault on Facebook, TikTok, Instagram @CrackingtheVault_Podcast, and give us a follow and a review to leave your thoughts on Apple Podcasts! HUGE shout out to the multi-talented composer Tyler Griffin for the FANTASMIC opening jingle. Find out more about his musical genius at TylerAGriffin.com

Wheelbarrow Profits Podcast: Multifamily Real Estate Investment
200 Multifamily Units At 27 With Michael Orlando

Wheelbarrow Profits Podcast: Multifamily Real Estate Investment

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 27:03


On this episode, Josh and Gino talk with Michael Orlando. Michael is a Cleveland native and grew up on Cleveland's east side. He attended Orange High School and then The Ohio State University obtaining his Bachelor's degree in Operations Management from The Fisher College of Business. After graduating, he worked for two startup companies as a Project and Operations Manager. Shortly after, he discovered his passion for multifamily real estate investing and joined the elite investment community, Jake & Gino, acquired his first units and started real estate investing full-time. Key Insights: 00:10 Introduction 00:25 Multifamily Mastery 4 - www.jakeandgino.com/mm4 01:45 200 Apartments at 27 04:00 Taking small steps 05:26 Finding good value-add multifamily deals 07:18 Cracking the first deal 08:48 Raising capital 10:18 Setting goals and taking responsibility of your own life 12:24 Analyzing multifamily deals 14:32 Advice for those who want to leave 9-5 and embrace abundance 15:34 Significance of getting real estate education and mentorship 18:48 Education x Action = Results 20:44 Sourcing Capital & Sourcing Deals 21:48 Recommended books: Rich Dad's Cashflow Quadrant by Robert Kiyosaki  22:37 Success habits 24:35 “Many people wish they started sooner. Almost nobody wishes they started later.” - James Clear   Visit Michael's website: https://investprospera.com/     About Jake and Gino: Jake & Gino are multifamily investors, operators, and mentors who have created a vertically integrated real estate company that controls over $100,000,000 in assets under management. They have created the Jake & Gino community to teach others their three-step framework: Buy Right, Finance Right and Manage Right®, and to become multifamily entrepreneurs. Subscribe to this channel: https://www.youtube.com/jakeandgino/sub_confirmation=1 Sign up for free training: https://jakeandgino.mykajabi.com/freetraining Apply for Mentorship: https://jakeandgino.com/apply/ #realestate #multifamilyrealestate #multifamilyinvesting #investing   Jake & Gino Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jakeandgino/ Jake & Gino Twitter: https://twitter.com/JakeandGino Jake & Gino Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/jake-and-gino-llc/ Jake & Gino Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jakeandgino/  

ROGUE NEWS Radio
Time Traveling Woman,Colin Powell Dead, Killing SEALS, Lebanon Cracking

ROGUE NEWS Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 5:29


V & Cj break down the latest news. A Woman's warning from Sept 2019 comes true, Colin Powel Great American War Criminal is dead, Biden Admin will cause Navy SEALS recruitment to drop, V Breaks down Lebanon and Bitcoin ETF.

Pixel Gaiden Gaming Podcast
Episode 68 - Fall Acorns Abound! + 6 Good Bloody-Gory Games

Pixel Gaiden Gaming Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 115:37


We're back for Episode 68 In this episode Cody and Eric catch up on the news and discuss 6 Good Bloody / Gory Games. We are doing news for the first monthly episode and then "catching up" later in the month.   Episode Guide --------------- 6:16 Quick Questions  16:34 Patreon  24:38 News  1:00:52 Tea Time With Tim - Acorn Electron  1:16:08 6 Good Bloody / Gory Games    (Tim) - The Pixel Gaiden YouTube channel reached 100 subscribers!! Our 100th subscriber was @yawning_angel so thanks to them and also thanks to all who have subscribed so far.  (Tim) - Evercade VS DELAYED!! The Evercade VS is now delayed until Early to mid December for UK an EU pre-orders and US Pre orders looking like they will not get it now until January.  All units have been completed and are ready to be shipped, however they have not been able until now to secure shipping from the manufacturers. If you have ordered a founder's edition then you may get that by early December.  (Cody) Switch Online releases N64 and Genesis Games along with Controllers for a small additional fee.  https://www.nintendo.com/whatsnew/detail/2021/a-new-nintendo-switch-online-membership-plan-with-expanded-benefits-is-coming/  (Tim) - Thank you to MVG (Modern Vintage Gamer on YouTube) for his video shouting out that over 300 OG Xbox never released demos, game previews and full releases have been published to the internet over at https://hiddenpalace.org they have curated all this and also a similar amount of Dreamcast stuff as part of the ongoing Project Deluge go check out the website and also MVG on YouTube  (Eric) - Dropzone clone on Pico-8 - https://twitter.com/paulhamx/status/1444234004530483202?s=20  (Cody) Actraiser Renaissance Announced and Released the same day!  Actraiser Renaissance | Launch Trailer  (Tim) - Straight Up for the C64 is a new 4 player platformer from Dr Wuro who brought us Frogs, Shadow Switcher and Shotgun. Its out now and is a free download.  https://straightup.drwuro.com/  (Eric) - Lunar Rescue - An upcoming Arcade conversion over to the MSX, ColecoVision and SVI https://shar.es/aWh5WV #retrogaming #gaming #games #gamedev #arcade #gamersunite #colecovision #msx  (Tim) - The GoTek firmware FlashFloppy gets a new full version 3.29 plus an Alpha release of firmware 4.1  https://github.com/keirf/FlashFloppy/releases/tag/v3.29  https://github.com/keirf/FlashFloppy/releases/tag/v4.1a  (Cody) https://www.nintendo.com/whatsnew/detail/2021/nintendo-switch-oled-model-and-metroid-dread-are-now-available-in-stores/  (Eric) - True Galaga port finally coming to c64 - Galaga - An awesome Arcade classic over to the C64 by Arlasoft gets a release https://shar.es/aW6urZ #retrogaming #gaming #games #gamedev #gamersunite #c64 #ec64forum #c64retweets  (Tim) - Anyone remember the Freespin demo a few months back? This is a Demo for the C64 well actually for the 1541 disk drive and plays back directly from the disk drive connected via a cable to a monitor. Well Protovision have released a cable and a copy of the demo on 5.25” floppy so you can experience the demo yourself (if you have the hardware!)  https://www.protovision.games/shop/product_info.php?products_id=348&language=en  (Eric) - Punch, whip, and zipline your way through a post-apocalyptic America in this 16-bit retro-style action platformer! Play as Taro Takahashi, a resistance soldier on a revenge mission against the dictator who lords over the ashes. https://store.steampowered.com/app/1280300/Steel_Assault/  (Tim) MOT's Grand Prix is out for Pico-8   Step back in time to an era when folk were real folk and racecar steering wheels were real steering wheels. Mot's Grand Prix is a pseudo 3D Formula 1 racer inspired by Grand Prix Circuit, Continental Circus and a bunch of other 80s/90s racers I've forgotten :).  https://tommulgrew.itch.io/mots-grand-prix  (Eric) - Mega65 finally available for pre-order! - https://www.vintageisthenewold.com/mega65-available-for-pre-order-next-week  (Eric) - The Fall of Prometheus - A fabulous Mythical action puzzler for the MSX is now playable online https://shar.es/aWGvgE #retrogaming #gaming #games #gamedev #gamersunite #msx #msxdev  (Tim) - Reset 64 and Derek ?! Has revealed a “Cracking” port of Chuckie Egg for the VIC 20. Previously this was one of the few 8 bit Micros (popular in England) that did not get a conversion. Now this has been corrected with this port. Also you should be “eggstatic” that its available as a free download over at Reset 64's Itch.io page:  https://t.co/6hUNtwKvyi?amp=1  Please give us a review on Apple Podcasts! Thanks for listening! You can always reach us at podcast@pixelgaiden.com. Send us an email if we missed anything in the show notes you need. You can now support us on Patreon.    Thank you to Henrik Ladefoged, Roy Fielding, Garry Heather, Matthew Ackerman, Josh Malone, Daniel James, 10MARC, Eric Sandgren, David Motowylak, Team Gray All The Way, Maciej Sosnowski, Paradroyd, RAM OK ROM OK, Mitsoyama, David Vincent, Ant Stiller, CityXen, Hermski, VaderGB, Mr. Toast, Jason Holland, and Dustin Newell for making this show possible through their generous donation to the show.   Support our sponsor Retro Rewind for all of your Commodore needs! Use our page at https://retrorewind.ca/pixelgaiden and our discount code PG10 for 10% off any order!  

Tech Leader Talk
Optimizing website content for each individual visitor – Arthur Root

Tech Leader Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 31:03


On this episode, I have a wonderful conversation with Arthur Root.   Arthur is the founder of Nostra AI, an Artificial Intelligence marketing company that is utilized by a wide range of companies, from publicly traded companies to small businesses. Nostra has developed an easy-to-use content optimization system that uses AI to efficiently optimize web pages.   Arthur is knowledgeable about AI, marketing, raising VC financing, and entrepreneurship.   “AI can do what's impossible for humans.” – Arthur Root Today on the Tech Leader Talk podcast: - The current best practices for web site design - How AI is impacting web site design today - What does your website need before you consider using AI - Managing your website based on consumer sentiment   Resources Mentioned: Book: Code Breakers by Walter Isaacson Connect with Arthur Root: Email: arthurroot@nostra.ai Website: https://www.nostra.ai/ Thanks for listening! Be sure to get your free copy of Steve's latest book, Cracking the Patent Code, and discover his proven system for identifying and protecting your most valuable inventions. Get the book at https://stevesponseller.com/book.

RN Drive - ABC RN
Coalition butt heads over net-zero plan, A Prime Minister's childhood letters made public, And code cracking a 400 year old cipher

RN Drive - ABC RN

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 85:13


Screaming in the Cloud
Changing the Way We Interview with Emma Bostian

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 40:30


About EmmaEmma Bostian is a Software Engineer at Spotify in Stockholm. She is also a co-host of the Ladybug Podcast, author of Decoding The Technical Interview Process, and an instructor at LinkedIn Learning and Frontend Masters.Links: Ladybug Podcast: https://www.ladybug.dev LinkedIn Learning: https://www.linkedin.com/learning/instructors/emma-bostian Frontend Masters: https://frontendmasters.com/teachers/emma-bostian/ Decoding the Technical Interview Process: https://technicalinterviews.dev Twitter: https://twitter.com/emmabostian TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Jellyfish. So, you're sitting in front of your office chair, bleary eyed, parked in front of a powerpoint and—oh my sweet feathery Jesus its the night before the board meeting, because of course it is! As you slot that crappy screenshot of traffic light colored excel tables into your deck, or sift through endless spreadsheets looking for just the right data set, have you ever wondered, why is it that sales and marketing get all this shiny, awesome analytics and inside tools? Whereas, engineering basically gets left with the dregs. Well, the founders of Jellyfish certainly did. That's why they created the Jellyfish Engineering Management Platform, but don't you dare call it JEMP! Designed to make it simple to analyze your engineering organization, Jellyfish ingests signals from your tech stack. Including JIRA, Git, and collaborative tools. Yes, depressing to think of those things as your tech stack but this is 2021. They use that to create a model that accurately reflects just how the breakdown of engineering work aligns with your wider business objectives. In other words, it translates from code into spreadsheet. When you have to explain what you're doing from an engineering perspective to people whose primary IDE is Microsoft Powerpoint, consider Jellyfish. Thats Jellyfish.co and tell them Corey sent you! Watch for the wince, thats my favorite part.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Liquibase. If you're anything like me, you've screwed up the database part of a deployment so severely that you've been banned from touching every anything that remotely sounds like SQL, at at least three different companies. We've mostly got code deployments solved for, but when it comes to databases we basically rely on desperate hope, with a roll back plan of keeping our resumes up to date. It doesn't have to be that way. Meet Liquibase. It is both an open source project and a commercial offering. Liquibase lets you track, modify, and automate database schema changes across almost any database, with guardrails to ensure you'll still have a company left after you deploy the change. No matter where your database lives, Liquibase can help you solve your database deployment issues. Check them out today at liquibase.com. Offer does not apply to Route 53.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. One of the weird things that I've found in the course of, well, the last five years or so is that I went from absolute obscurity to everyone thinking that I know everyone else because I have thoughts and opinions on Twitter. Today, my guest also has thoughts and opinions on Twitter. The difference is that what she has to say is actually helpful to people. My guest is Emma Bostian, software engineer at Spotify, which is probably, if we can be honest about it, one of the least interesting things about you. Thanks for joining me.Emma: Thanks for having me. That was quite the intro. I loved it.Corey: I do my best and I never prepare them, which is a blessing and a curse. When ADHD is how you go through life and you suck at preparation, you've got to be good at improv. So, you're a co-host of the Ladybug Podcast. Let's start there. What is that podcast? And what's it about?Emma: So, that podcast is just my three friends and I chatting about career and technology. We all come from different backgrounds, have different journeys into tech. I went the quote-unquote, “Traditional” computer science degree route, but Ali is self-taught and works for AWS, and Kelly she has, like, a master's in psychology and human public health and runs her own company. And then Sydney is an awesome developer looking for her next role. So, we all come from different places and we just chat about career in tech.Corey: You're also an instructor at LinkedIn Learning and Frontend Masters. I'm going to guess just based upon the name that you are something of a frontend person, which is a skill set that has constantly eluded me for 20 years, as given evidence by every time I've tried to build something that even remotely touches frontend or JavaScript in any sense.Emma: Yeah, to my dad's disdain, I have stuck with the frontend; he really wanted me to stay backend. I did an internship at IBM in Python, and you know, I learned all about assembly language and database, but frontend is what really captures my heart.Corey: There's an entire school of thought out there from a constituency of Twitter that I will generously refer to as shitheads that believe, “Oh, frontend is easy and it's somehow less than.” And I would challenge anyone who holds that perspective to wind up building an interface that doesn't look like crap first, then come and talk to me. Spoiler, you will not say that after attempting to go down that rabbit hole. If you disagree with this, you can go ahead and yell at me on Twitter so I know where you're hiding, so I can block you. Now, that's all well and good, but one of the most interesting things that you've done that aligns with topics near and dear to my heart is you wrote a book.Now, that's not what's near and dear to my heart; I have the attention span to write a tweet most days. But the book was called Decoding the Technical Interview Process. Technical interviewing is one of those weird things that comes up from time to time, here and everywhere else because it's sort of this stylized ritual where we evaluate people on a number of skills that generally don't reflect in their day-to-day; it's really only a series of skills that you get better by practicing, and you only really get to practice them when you're interviewing for other jobs. That's been my philosophy, but again, I've written a tweet on this; you've written a book. What's the book about and what drove you to write it?Emma: So, the book covers everything from an overview of the interview process, to how do you negotiate a job offer, to systems design, and talks about load balancing and cache partitioning, it talks about what skills you need from the frontend side of things to do well on your JavaScript interviews. I will say this, I don't teach HTML, CSS, and JavaScript in-depth in the book because there are plenty of other resources for that. And some guy got mad at me about that the other day and wanted a refund because I didn't teach the skills, but I don't need to. [laugh]. And then it covers data structures and algorithms.They're all written in JavaScript, they have easy to comprehend diagrams. What drove me to write this is that I had just accepted a job offer in Stockholm for a web developer position at Spotify. I had also just passed my Google technical interviews, and I finally realized, holy crap, maybe I do know what I'm doing in an interview now. And this was at the peak of when people were getting laid off due to COVID and I said, “You know what? I have a lot of knowledge. And if I have a computer science degree and I was able to get through some of the hardest technical interviews, I think I should share that with the community.”Because some people didn't go through a CS degree and don't understand what a linked list is. And that's not their fault. It's just unfortunately, there weren't a lot of great resources—especially for web developers out there—to learn these concepts. Cracking the Coding Interview is a great book, but it's written in backend language and it's a little bit hard to digest as a frontend developer. So, I decided to write my own.Corey: How much of the book is around the technical interview process as far as ask, “Here's how you wind up reversing linked lists,” or, “Inverting a binary tree,” or whatever it is where you're tracing things around without using a pointer, how do you wind up detecting a loop in a recursive whatever it is—yeah, as you can tell, I'm not a computer science person at all—versus how much of it is, effectively, interview 101 style skills for folks who are even in non-technical roles could absorb?Emma: My goal was, I wanted this to be approachable by anyone without extensive technical knowledge. So, it's very beginner-friendly. That being said, I cover the basic data structures, talking about what traditional methods you would see on them, how do you code that, what does that look like from a visual perspective with fake data? I don't necessarily talk about how do you reverse a binary tree, but I do talk about how do you balance it if you remove a node? What if it's not a leaf node? What if it has children? Things like that.It's about [sigh] I would say 60/40, where 40% is coding and technical stuff, but maybe—eh, it's a little bit closer to 50/50; it kind of depends. I do talk about the take-home assessment and tips for that. When I do a take-home assessment, I like to include a readme with things I would have done if I had more time, or these are performance trade-offs that I made; here's why. So, there's a lot of explanation as to how you can improve your chances at moving on to the next round. So yeah, I guess it's 50/50.I also include a section on tips for hiring managers, how to create an inclusive and comfortable environment for your candidates. But it's definitely geared towards candidates, and I would say it's about 50/50 coding tech and process stuff.Corey: One of the problems I've always had with this entire industry is it feels like we're one of the only industries that does this, where we bring people in, and oh, you've been an engineer for 15 years at a whole bunch of companies I've recognized, showing career progression, getting promoted at some of them transitioning from high-level role to high-level role. “Great, we are so glad that you came in to interview. Now, up to the whiteboard, please, and implement FizzBuzz because I have this working theory that you don't actually know how to code, and despite the fact that you've been able to fake your way through it at big companies for 15 years, I'm the one that's going to catch you out with some sort of weird trivia question.” It's this adversarial, almost condescending approach and I don't see it in any other discipline than tech. Is that just because I'm not well-traveled enough? Is that because I'm misunderstanding the purpose of all of these things? Or, what is this?Emma: I think partially it was a gatekeeping solution for a while, for people who are comfortable in their roles and may be threatened by people who have come through different paths to get to tech. Because software engineer used to be an accredited title that you needed a degree or certification to get. And in some countries it still is, so you'll see this debate sometimes about calling yourself a software engineer if you don't have that accreditation. But in this day and age, people go through boot camps, they can come from other industries, they can be self-taught. You don't need a computer science degree, and I think the interview process has not caught up with that.I will say [laugh] the worst interview I had was at IBM when I was already working there. I was already a web developer there, full-time. I was interviewing for a role, and I walked into the room and there were five guys sitting at a table and they were like, “Get up to the whiteboard.” It was for a web development job and they quizzed me about Java. And I was like, “Um, sir, I have not done Java since college.” And they were like, “We don't care.”Corey: Oh, yeah, coding on a whiteboard in front of five people who already know the answer—Emma: Horrifying.Corey: —during a—for them, it's any given Tuesday, and for you, it is a, this will potentially determine the course that your career takes from this point forward. There's a level of stress that goes into that never exists in our day-to-day of building things out.Emma: Well, I also think it's an artificial environment. And why, though? Like, why is this necessary? One of the best interviews I had was actually with Gatsby. It was for an open-source maintainer role, and they essentially let me try the product before I bought it.Like, they let me try out doing the job. It was a paid process, they didn't expect me to do it for free. I got to choose alternatives if I wanted to do one thing or another, answer one question or another, and this was such an exemplary process that I always bring it up because that is a modern interview process, when you are letting people try the position. Now granted, not everyone can do this, right? We've got parents, we've got people working two jobs, and not everyone can afford to take the time to try out a job.But who can also afford a five-stage interview process that still warrants taking vacation days? So, I think at least—at the very least—pay your candidates if you can.Corey: Oh, yeah. One of the best interviews I've ever had was at a company called Three Rings Design, which is now defunct, unfortunately, but it was fairly typical ops questions of, “Yeah, here's an AWS account. Spin up a couple EC2 instances, load balance between them, have another one monitored. You know, standard op stuff. And because we don't believe in asking people to work for free, we'll pay you $300 upon completion of the challenge.”Which, again, it's not huge money for doing stuff like that, but it's also, this shows a level of respect for my time. And instead of giving me a hard deadline of when it was due, they asked me, “When can we expect this by?” Which is a great question in its own right because it informs you about a candidate's ability to set realistic deadlines and then meet them, which is one of those useful work things. And they—unlike most other companies I spoke with in that era—were focused on making it as accommodating for the candidate as possible. They said, “We're welcome to interview you during the workday; we can also stay after hours and have a chat then, if that's more convenient for your work schedule.”Because they knew I was working somewhere else; an awful lot of candidates are. And they just bent over backwards to be as accommodating as possible. I see there's a lot of debate these days in various places about the proper way to interview candidates. No take-home because biases for people who don't have family obligations or other commitments outside of work hours. “Okay, great, so I'm going to come in interview during the day?” “No. That biases people who can't take time off.” And, on some level, it almost seems to distill down to no one likes any way that there is of interviewing candidates, and figuring out a way that accommodates everyone is a sort of a fool's errand. It seems like there is no way that won't get you yelled at.Emma: I think there needs to be almost like a choose your own adventure. What is going to set you up for success and also allow you to see if you want to even work that kind of a job in the first place? Because I thought on paper, open-source maintainer sounds awesome. And upon looking into the challenges, I'm like, “You know what? I think I'd hate this job.”And I pulled out and I didn't waste their time and they didn't waste mine. So, when you get down to it, honestly, I wish I didn't have to write this book. Did it bring me a lot of benefit? Yeah. Let's not sugarcoat that. It allowed me to pay off my medical debt and move across a continent, but that being said, I wish that we were at a point in time where that did not need to exist.Corey: One of the things that absolutely just still gnaws at me even years later, is I interviewed at Google twice, and I didn't get an offer either time, I didn't really pass their technical screen either time. The second one that really sticks out in my mind where it was, “Hey, write some code in a Google Doc while we watch remotely,” and don't give you any context or hints on this. And just it was—the entire process was sitting there listening to them basically, like, “Nope, not what I'm thinking about. Nope, nope, nope.” It was… by the end of that conversation, I realized that if they were going to move forward—which they didn't—I wasn't going to because I didn't want to work with people that were that condescending and rude.And I've held by it; I swore I would never apply there again and I haven't. And it's one of those areas where, did I have the ability to do the job? I can say in hindsight, mostly. Were there things I was going to learn as I went? Absolutely, but that's every job.And I'm realizing as I see more and more across the ecosystem, that they were an outlier in a potentially good way because in so many other places, there's no equivalent of the book that you have written that is given to the other side of the table: how to effectively interview candidates. People lose sight of the fact that it's a sales conversation; it's a two-way sale, they have to convince you to hire them, but you also have to convince them to work with you. And even in the event that you pass on them, you still want them to say nice things about you because it's a small industry, all things considered. And instead, it's just been awful.Emma: I had a really shitty interview, and let me tell you, they have asked me subsequently if I would re-interview with them. Which sucks; it's a product that I know and love, and I've talked about this, but I had the worst experience. Let me clarify, I had a great first interview with them, and I was like, “I'm just not ready to move to Australia.” Which is where the job was. And then they contacted me again a year later, and it was the worst experience of my life—same recruiter—it was the ego came out.And I will tell you what, if you treat your candidates like shit, they will remember and they will never recommend people interview for you. [laugh]. I also wanted to mention about accessibility because—so we talked about, oh, give candidates the choice, which I think the whole point of an interview should be setting your candidates up for success to show you what they can do. And I talked with [Stephen 00:14:09]—oh, my gosh, I can't remember his last name—but he is a quadriplegic and he types with a mouthstick. And he was saying he would go to technical interviews and they would not be prepared to set him up for success.And they would want to do these pair programming, or, like, writing on a whiteboard. And it's not that he can't pair program, it's that he was not set up for success. He needed a mouthstick to type and they were not prepared to help them with that. So, it's not just about the commitment that people need. It's also about making sure that you are giving candidates what they need to give the best interview possible in an artificial environment.Corey: One approach that people have taken is, “Ah, I'm going to shortcut this and instead of asking people to write code, I'm going to look at their work on GitHub.” Which is, in some cases, a great way to analyze what folks are capable of doing. On the other, well, there's a lot of things that play into that. What if they're working in environment where they don't have the opportunity to open-source their work? What if people consider this a job rather than an all-consuming passion?I know, perish the thought. We don't want to hire people like that. Grow up. It's not useful, and it's not helpful. It's not something that applies universally, and there's an awful lot of reasons why someone's code on GitHub might be materially better—or worse—than their work product. I think that's fine. It's just a different path toward it.Emma: I don't use GitHub for largely anything except just keeping repositories that I need. I don't actively update it. And I have, like, a few thousand followers; I'm like, “Why the hell do you guys follow me? I don't do anything.” It's honestly a terrible representation.That being said, you don't need to have a GitHub repository—an active one—to showcase your skills. There are many other ways that you can show a potential employer, “Hey, I have a lot of skills that aren't necessarily showcased on my resume, but I like to write blogs, I like to give tech talks, I like to make YouTube videos,” things of that nature.Corey: I had a manager once who refused to interview anyone who didn't have a built-out LinkedIn profile, which is also one of these bizarre things. It's, yeah, a lot of people don't feel the need to have a LinkedIn profile, and that's fine. But the idea that, “Oh, yeah, they have this profile they haven't updated in a couple years, it's clearly they're not interested in looking for work.” It's, yeah. Maybe—just a thought here—your ability to construct a resume and build it out in the way that you were expecting is completely orthogonal to how effective they might be in the role. The idea that someone not having a LinkedIn profile somehow implies that they're sketchy is the wrong lesson to take from all of this. That site is terrible.Emma: Especially when you consider the fact that LinkedIn is primarily used in the United States as a social—not social networking—professional networking tool. In Germany, they use Xing as a platform; it's very similar to LinkedIn, but my point is, if you're solely looking at someone's LinkedIn as a representation of their ability to do a job, you're missing out on many candidates from all over the world. And also those who, yeah, frankly, just don't—like, they have more important things to be doing than updating their LinkedIn profile. [laugh].Corey: On some level, it's the idea of looking at a consultant, especially independent consultant type, when their website is glorious and up-to-date and everything's perfect, it's, oh, you don't really have any customers, do you? As opposed to the consultants you know who are effectively sitting there with a waiting list, their website looks like crap. It's like, “Is this Geocities?” No. It's just that they're too busy working on the things that bring the money instead of the things that bring in business, in some respects.Let's face it, websites don't. For an awful lot of consulting work, it's word of mouth. I very rarely get people finding me off of Google, clicking a link, and, “Hey, my AWS bill is terrible. Can you help us with it?” It happens, but it's not something that happens so frequently that we want to optimize for it because that's not where the best customers have been coming from. Historically, it's referrals, it's word of mouth, it's people seeing the aggressive shitposting I engage in on Twitter and saying, “Oh, that's someone that should help me with my Amazon bill.” Which I don't pretend to understand, but I'm still going to roll with it.Emma: You had mentioned something about passion earlier, and I just want to say, if you're a hiring manager or recruiter, you shouldn't solely be looking at candidates who superficially look like they're passionate about what they do. Yes, that is—it's important, but it's not something that—like, I don't necessarily choose one candidate over the other because they push commits, and open pull requests on GitHub, and open-source, and stuff. You can be passionate about your job, but at the end of the day, it's still a job. For me, would I be working if I had to? No. I'd be opening a bookstore because that's what I would really love to be doing. But that doesn't mean I'm not passionate about my job. I just show it in different ways. So, just wanted to put that out there.Corey: Oh, yeah. The idea that you must eat, sleep, live, and breathe is—hell with that. One of the reasons that we get people to work here at The Duckbill Group is, yeah, we care about getting the job done. We don't care about how long it takes or when you work; it's oh, you're not feeling well? Take the day off.We have very few things that are ‘must be done today' style of things. Most of those tend to fall on me because it's giving a talk at a conference; they will not reschedule the conference for you. I've checked. So yeah, that's important, but that's not most days.Emma: Yeah. It's like programming is my job, it's not my identity. And it's okay if it is your primary hobby if that is how you identify, but for me, I'm a person with actual hobbies, and, you know, a personality, and programming is just a job for me. I like my job, but it's just a job.Corey: And on the side, you do interesting things like wrote a book. You mentioned earlier that it wound up paying off some debt and helping cover your move across an ocean. Let's talk a little bit about that because I'm amenable to the idea of side projects that accidentally have a way of making money. That's what this podcast started out as. If I'm being perfectly honest, and started out as something even more self-serving than that.It's, well if I reach out to people in this industry that are doing interesting things and ask them to grab a cup of coffee, they'll basically block me, whereas if I ask them to, would you like to appear on my podcast, they'll clear time on their schedule. I almost didn't care if my microphone was on or not when I was doing these just because it was a chance to talk to really interesting people and borrow their brain, people reached out asking they can sponsor it, along with the newsletter and the rest, and it's you want to give me money? Of course, you can give me money. How much money? And that sort of turned into a snowball effect over time.Five years in, it's turned into something that I would never have predicted or expected. But it's weird to me still, how effective doing something you're actually passionate about as a side project can sort of grow wings on its own. Where do you stand on that?Emma: Yeah, it's funny because with the exception of the online courses that I've worked with—I mentioned LinkedIn Learning and Frontend Masters, which I knew were paid opportunities—none of my side projects started out for financial reasonings. The podcast that we started was purely for fun, and the sponsors came to us. Now, I will say right up front, we all had pretty big social media followings, and my first piece of advice to anyone looking to get into side projects is, don't focus so much on making money at the get-go. Yes, to your point, Corey, focus on the stuff you're passionate about. Focus on engaging with people on social media, build up your social media, and at that point, okay, monetization will slowly find its way to you.But yeah, I say if you can monetize the heck out of your work, go for it. But also, free content is also great. I like to balance my paid content with my free content because I recognize that not everyone can afford to pay for some of this information. So, I generally always have free alternatives. And for this book that we published, one of the things that was really important to me was keeping it affordable.The first publish I did was $10 for the book. It was like a 250-page book. It was, like, $10 because again, I was not in it for the money. And when I redid the book with the egghead.io team, the same team that did Epic React with Kent C. Dodds, I said, “I want to keep this affordable.” So, we made sure it was still affordable, but also that we had—what's it called? Parity pricing? Pricing parity, where depending on your geographic location, the price is going to accommodate for how the currency is doing. So, yes, I would agree. Side project income for me allows me to do incredible stuff, but it wasn't why I got into it in the first place. It was genuinely just a nice-to-have.Corey: I haven't really done anything that asks people for money directly. I mean, yeah, I sell t-shirts on the website, and mugs, and drink umbrellas—don't get me started—but other than that and the charity t-shirt drive I do every year, I tend to not be good at selling things that don't have a comma in the price tag. For me, it was about absolutely building an audience. I tend to view my Twitter follower count as something of a proxy for it, but the number I actually care about, the audience that I'm focused on cultivating, is newsletter subscribers because no social media platform that we've ever seen has lasted forever. And I have to imagine that Twitter will one day wane as well.But email has been here since longer than we'd been alive, and by having a list of email addresses and ways I can reach out to people on an ongoing basis, I can monetize that audience in a more direct way, at some point should I need them to. And my approach has been, well, one, it's a valuable audience for some sponsors, so I've always taken the asking corporate people for money is easier than asking people for personal money, plus it's a valuable audience to them, so it tends to blow out a number of the metrics that you would normally expect of, oh, for this audience size, you should generally be charging Y dollars. Great. That makes sense if you're slinging mattresses or free web hosting, but when it's instead, huh, these people buy SaaS enterprise software and implement it at their companies, all of economics tend to start blowing apart. Same story with you in many respects.The audience that you're building is functionally developers. That is a lucrative market for the types of sponsors that are wise enough to understand that—in a lot of cases these days—which product a company is going to deploy is not dictated by their exec so much as it is the bottom-up adoption path of engineers who like the product.Emma: Mm-hm. Yeah, and I think once I got to maybe around 10,000 Twitter followers is when I changed my mentality and I stopped caring so much about follower count, and instead I just started caring about the people that I was following. And the number is a nice-to-have but to be honest, I don't think so much about it. And I do understand, yes, at that point, it is definitely a privilege that I have this quote-unquote, “Platform,” but I never see it as an audience, and I never think about that “Audience,” quote-unquote, as a marketing platform. But it's funny because there's no right or wrong. People will always come to you and be like, “You shouldn't monetize your stuff.” And it's like—Corey: “Cool. Who's going to pay me then? Not you, apparently.”Emma: Yeah. It's also funny because when I originally sold the book, it was $10 and I got so many people being like, “This is way too cheap. You should be charging more.” And I'm like, “But I don't care about the money.” I care about all the people who are unemployed and not able to survive, and they have families, and they need to get a job and they don't know how.That's what I care about. And I ended up giving away a lot of free books. My mantra was like, hey if you've been laid off, DM me. No questions asked, I'll give it to you for free. And it was nice because a lot of people came back, even though I never asked for it, they came back and they wanted to purchase it after the fact, after they'd gotten a job.And to me that was like… that was the most rewarding piece. Not getting their money; I don't care about that, but it was like, “Oh, okay. I was actually able to help you.” That is what's really the most rewarding. But yeah, certainly—and back really quickly to your email point, I highly agree, and one of the first things that I would recommend to anyone looking to start a side product, create free content so that you have a backlog that people can look at to… kind of build trust.Corey: Give it away for free, but also get emails from people, like a trade for that. So, it's like, “Hey, here's a free guide on how to start a podcast from scratch. It's free, but all I would like is your email.” And then when it comes time to publish a course on picking the best audio and visual equipment for that podcast, you have people who've already been interested in this topic that you can now market to.This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of "Hello, World" demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking databases, observability, management, and security.And - let me be clear here - it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. This means you can provision a virtual machine instance or spin up an autonomous database that manages itself all while gaining the networking load, balancing and storage resources that somehow never quite make it into most free tiers needed to support the application that you want to build.With Always Free you can do things like run small scale applications, or do proof of concept testing without spending a dime. You know that I always like to put asterisks next to the word free. This is actually free. No asterisk. Start now. Visit https://snark.cloud/oci-free that's https://snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: I'm not sitting here trying to judge anyone for the choices that they make at all. There are a lot of different paths to it. I'm right there with you. One of the challenges I had when I was thinking about, do I charge companies or do I charge people was that if I'm viewing it through a lens of audience growth, well, what stuff do I gate behind a paywall? What stuff don't I? Well, what if I just—Emma: Mm-hm.Corey: —gave it all away? And that way I don't have to worry about the entire class of problems that you just alluded to of, well, how do I make sure this is fair? Because a cup of coffee in San Francisco is, what, $14 in some cases? Whereas that is significant in places that aren't built on an economy of foolishness. How do you solve for that problem? How do you deal with the customer service slash piracy issues slash all the other nonsense? And it's just easier.Emma: Yeah.Corey: Something I've found, too, is that when you're charging enough money to companies, you don't have to deal with an entire class of customer service problem. You just alluded to the other day that well, you had someone who bought your book and was displeased that it wasn't a how to write code from scratch tutorial, despite the fact that he were very clear on what it is and what it isn't. I don't pretend to understand that level of entitlement. If I spend 10 or 20 bucks on an ebook, and it's not very good, let's see, do I wind up demanding a refund from the author and making them feel bad about it, or do I say, “The hell with it.” And in my case, I—there is privilege baked into this; I get that, but it's I don't want to make people feel bad about what they've built. If I think there's enough value to spend money on it I view that as a one-way transaction, rather than chasing someone down for three months, trying to get a $20 refund.Emma: Yeah, and I think honestly, I don't care so much about giving refunds at all. We have a 30-day money-back guarantee and we don't ask any questions. I just asked this person for feedback, like, “Oh, what was not up to par?” And it was just, kind of like, BS response of like, “Oh, I didn't read the website and I guess it's not what I wanted.” But the end of the day, they still keep the product.The thing is, you can't police all of the people who are going to try to get your content for free if you're charging for it; it's part of it. And I knew that when I got into it, and honestly, my thing is, if you are circulating a book that helps you get a job in tech and you're sending it to all your friends, I'm not going to ask any questions because it's very much the sa—and this is just my morals here, but if I saw someone stealing food from a grocery store, I wouldn't tell on them because at the end of the day, if you're s—Corey: Same story. You ever see someone's stealing baby formula from a store? No, you didn't.Emma: Right.Corey: Keep walking. Mind your business.Emma: Exactly. Exactly. So, at the end of the day, I didn't necessarily care that—people are like, “Oh, people are going to share your book around. It's a PDF.” I'm like, “I don't care. Let them. It is what it is. And the people who wants to support and can, will.” But I'm not asking.I still have free blogs on data structures, and algorithms, and the interview stuff. I do still have content for free, but if you want more, if you want my illustrated diagrams that took me forever with my Apple Pencil, fair enough. That would be great if you could support me. If not, I'm still happy to give you the stuff for free. It is what it is.Corey: One thing that I think is underappreciated is that my resume doesn't look great. On paper, I have an eighth-grade education, and I don't have any big tech names on my resume. I have a bunch of relatively short stints; until I started this place, I've never lasted more than two years anywhere. If I apply through the front door the way most people do for a job, I will get laughed out of the room by the applicant tracking system, automatically. It'll never see a human.And by doing all these side projects, it's weird, but let's say that I shut down the company for some reason, and decide, ah, I'm going to go get a job now, my interview process—more or less, and it sounds incredibly arrogant, but roll with it for a minute—is, “Don't you know who I am? Haven't you heard of me before?” It's, “Here's my website. Here's all the stuff I've been doing. Ask anyone in your engineering group who I am and you'll see what pops up.”You're in that same boat at this point where your resume is the side projects that you've done and the audience you've built by doing it. That's something that I think is underappreciated. Even if neither one of us made a dime through direct monetization of things that we did, the reputational boost to who we are and what we do professionally seems to be one of those things that pays dividends far beyond any relatively small monetary gain from it.Emma: Absolutely, yeah. I actually landed my job interview with Spotify through Twitter. I was contacted by a design systems manager. And I was in the interview process for them, and I ended up saying, “You know, I'm not ready to move to Stockholm. I just moved to Germany.”And a year later, I circled back and I said, “Hey, are there any openings?” And I ended up re-interviewing, and guess what? Now, I have a beautiful home with my soulmate and we're having a child. And it's funny how things work out this way because I had a Twitter account. And so don't undervalue [laugh] social media as a tool in lieu of a resume because I don't think anyone at Spotify even saw my resume until it actually accepted the job offer, and it was just a formality.So yeah, absolutely. You can get a job through social media. It's one of the easiest ways. And that's why if I ever see anyone looking for a job on Twitter, I will retweet, and vouch for them if I know their work because I think that's one of the quickest ways to finding an awesome candidate.Corey: Back in, I don't know, 2010, 2011-ish. I was deep in the IRC weed. I was network staff on the old freenode network—not the new terrible one. The old, good one—and I was helping people out with various things. I was hanging out in the Postfix channel and email server software thing that most people have the good sense not to need to know anything about.And someone showed up and was asking questions about their config, and I was working with them, and teasing them, and help them out with it. And at the end of it, his comment was, “Wow, you're really good at this. Any chance you'd be interested in looking for jobs?” And the answer was, “Well, sure, but it's a global network. Where are you?”Well, he was based in Germany, but he was working remotely for Spotify in Stockholm. A series of conversations later, I flew out to Stockholm and interviewed for a role that they decided I was not a fit for—and again, they're probably right—and I often wonder how my life would have gone differently if the decision had gone the other way. I mean, no hard feelings, please don't get me wrong, but absolutely, helping people out, interacting with people over social networks, or their old school geeky analogs are absolutely the sorts of things that change lives. I would never have thought to apply to a role like that if I had been sitting here looking at job ads because who in the world would pick up someone with relatively paltry experience and move them halfway around the world? This was like a fantasy, not a reality.Emma: [laugh].Corey: It's the people you get to know—Emma: Yeah.Corey: —through these social interactions on various networks that are worth… they're worth gold. There's no way to describe it other than that.Emma: Yeah, absolutely. And if you're listening to this, and you're discouraged because you got turned down for a job, we've all been there, first of all, but I remember being disappointed because I didn't pass my first round of interviews of Google the first time I interviewed with them, and being, like, “Oh, crap, now I can't move to Munich. What am I going to do with my life?” Well, guess what, look where I am today. If I had gotten that job that I thought was it for me, I wouldn't be in the happiest phase of my life.And so if you're going through it—obviously, in normal circumstances where you're not frantically searching for a job; if you're in more of a casual life job search—and you've been let go from the process, just realize that there's probably something bigger and better out there for you, and just focus on your networking online. Yeah, it's an invaluable tool.Corey: One time when giving a conference talk, I asked, “All right, raise your hand if you have never gone through a job interview process and then not been offered the job.” And a few people did. “Great. If your hand is up, aim higher. Try harder. Take more risks.”Because fundamentally, job interviews are two-way streets and if you are only going for the sure thing jobs, great, stretch yourself, see what else is out there. There's no perfect attendance prize. Even back in school there wasn't. It's the idea of, “Well, I've only ever taken the easy path because I don't want to break my streak.” Get over it. Go out and interview more. It's a skill, unlike most others that you don't get to get better at unless you practice it.So, you've been in a job for ten years, and then it's time to move on—I've talked to candidates like this—their interview skills are extremely rusty. It takes a little bit of time to get back in the groove. I like to interview every three to six months back when I was on the job market. Now that I, you know, own the company and have employees, it looks super weird if I do it, but I miss it. I miss those conversations. I miss the aspects—Emma: Yes.Corey: —of exploring what the industry cares about.Emma: Absolutely. And don't underplay the importance of studying the foundational language concepts. I see this a lot in candidates where they're so focused on the newest and latest technologies and frameworks, that they forgot foundational JavaScript, HTML, and CSS. Many companies are focused primarily on these plain language concepts, so just make sure that when you are ready to get back into interviewing and enhance that skill, that you don't neglect the foundation languages that the web is built on if you're a web developer.Corey: I'd also take one last look around and realize that every person you admire, every person who has an audience, who is a known entity in the space only has that position because someone, somewhere did them a favor. Probably lots of someones with lots of favors. And you can't ever pay those favors back. All you can do is pay it forward. I repeatedly encourage people to reach out to me if there's something I can do to help. And the only thing that surprises me is how few people in the audience take me up on that. I'm talking to you, listener. Please, if I can help you with something, please reach out. I get a kick out of doing that sort of thing.Emma: Absolutely. I agree.Corey: Emma, thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. If people want to learn more, where can they find you?Emma: Well, you can find me on Twitter. It's just @EmmaBostian, I'm, you know, shitposting over there on the regular. But sometimes I do tweet out helpful things, so yeah, feel free to engage with me over there. [laugh].Corey: And we will, of course, put a link to that in the [show notes 00:35:42]. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. I appreciate it.Emma: Yeah. Thanks for having me.Corey: Emma Bostian, software engineer at Spotify and oh, so very much more. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an incoherent ranting comment mentioning that this podcast as well failed to completely teach you JavaScript.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Cleaning Up. Leadership in an age of climate change.
Ep 58: John Redfern 'Cracking the Geothermal Code'

Cleaning Up. Leadership in an age of climate change.

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 55:11


John Redfern is an investor, advisor and serial entrepreneur in the data analytics, oil service and energy tech verticals. John spent his career in executive roles at multiple international oil and oil service companiess including as a Director at Hess in London, President of Accumap in Calgary and President of IHS Energy in Denver.   Prior to Eavor, John spent 13 years in China co-founding a series of start-ups, the most recent of which is LocalGravity, the leading retail data analytics platform in China. As a director, executive and advisor over the years, John has specialized in commercial strategy, negotiations, alliancing, M&A, and private equity.   John holds a degree in Engineering Physics from Queen's University in Kingston, Law degrees from McGill University in Montreal, and an MBA degree from INSEAD in France. 

The Chief Customer Officer Human Duct Tape Show
It's Time to Rethink Your Leadership Strategies and Business Models

The Chief Customer Officer Human Duct Tape Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 47:41


While I'm taking a break from recording new podcasts and LinkedIn Live conversations, I'll be sharing a few compilations of previously recorded interviews. We have pulled out relevant insights and chunks of conversation from guests that you'll find useful as you lead or take part in the CX undertakings in your organization. Today's episode features two authors, Alain Hunkins, who wrote Cracking the Leadership Code, and Robbie Kellman-Baxter, author of The Forever Transaction. Both guests share examples and tactics from their books to help you elevate your leadership. Their strategies will help you think through ways to better connect with your audience, your team, and perhaps even yourself! Enjoy!

Rumble in the Morning
News with Sean (In for Shelley) 10-8-2021 …William Shatner cracking D jokes on CN

Rumble in the Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 16:16


News with Sean (In for Shelley) 10-8-2021 …William Shatner cracking D jokes on CNN …Google is making some changes

Fitbet with Dilruk Jayasinha and Ben Lomas Podcast

DIL IS MOVING. Cracking fun ep between the Fitbet buddies. Covering everything  from weird collections, NFTs, adopting pets and heaving cattle bells. Also Ben's true love Marie Kondo is back to help with the packing. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Work Smart Hypnosis | Hypnosis Training and Outstanding Business Success

When things are at their best, it is time to consider and act upon what has to happen to scale and grow your business over time. Scale is a word that is gaining popularity around the world, although sometimes, it needs to be stopped and explained because to scale something is different from one business or person to another. The mindset of scaling is to take something you can already do and modify it to bring in a higher income while also serving your audience in a much better way. Build a strong foundation for your hypnosis empire! Register for the ICBCH Train the Trainer Program with Jason Linett & Richard Nongard. Registration is currently open with courses beginning on October 12, 2021. Visit https://hypnotherapyboard.com/t3-online/ to reserve your spot. In today's episode, I reveal how you can scale and expand your business to a level where you can serve even more people and help more of your audience with value going in both directions. I share insights into what needs to happen within a business and reveal what I have been and are currently doing. I share how to expand the reach of what you do and create a better impact in your business. I also explore the risks of ‘superhero syndrome,' why it is vital to see that you can't do it all yourself, and why you need to find ways to duplicate yourself and expand your skills beyond yourself. “Think bigger. By thinking bigger, we suddenly can serve a brand new audience.” - Jason Linett What intent-based branding is and recognizing that it is okay for you to become wealthy on your journey if you are putting out value Competing against yourself and upgrading your services to satisfy the problems and needs of what people out there are asking for Why you need to be willing to stop and review what you're doing and ask yourself what's working, what can be modified, and what you can stop doing? Why the best time to change up your systems and test is when things are working When to automate or outsource and why you should be willing to hire others Examples of how you can put these scaling strategies into use The advantages of surrounding yourself with people doing things on a bigger scale, quality, impact, and income Resources Mentioned: Frank Kern Chris Ducker Podcast: Session #189 – Hypnotic Outsourcing Podcast: Session #152 – Hypnotic Outsourcing Secrets HypnoThoughts ICBCH Train-The-Trainer Podcast: Session #342 – Brian Eslick on Cracking the Hypnotic Marketing Code Http://JasonLinett.com/ Voxer Book: Work Smart Business by Jason Linett Http://velvetropehypnosis.com Http://WorkSmartHypnosis.com/NowOnline/ Podcast Network Solutions Book: The 4-Hour Workweek by Timothy Ferriss Loom Jefit Email: Jason@WorkSmartHypnosis.com Join our next online certification course… wherever you are in the world! https://WorkSmartHypnosisLIVE.com/ Get an all-access pass to Jason's digital library to help you grow your hypnosis business: https://www.hypnoticbusinesssystems.com/ Get instant access to Jason Linett's entire hypnotherapeutic training library: https://www.hypnoticworkers.com/ If you enjoyed today's episode, please send us your valuable feedback! https://www.worksmarthypnosis.com/itunes https://www.facebook.com/worksmarthypnosis/ Join the new WORK SMART HYPNOSIS COMMUNITY on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/groups/worksmarthypnosis/ Want to work with Jason? Check out: https://www.virginiahypnosis.com/call/

Tech Leader Talk
AI apps to turn your website into a conversation – Anu Shukla

Tech Leader Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 35:38


On this episode, I have the pleasure of talking with Anu Shukla.   Anu is a serial entrepreneur with more than 25 years of high-tech industry experience. She is an active angel investor personally supporting and investing in women and minority led enterprises.     Anu has founded and exited several software companies: ranging from a Fintech loyalty currency company to Adtech and marketing automation companies. She has successfully exited two startups with $600M in enterprise value.   In her current role, Anu is a Co-founder and Executive Chair of Botco.ai, an emerging player in the application of AI/NLP to enterprise marketing automation.   And, she is named as an inventor on four patents based on her work in the technology industry.   “You want to turn your website into a conversation.” – Anu Shukla Today on the Tech Leader Talk podcast: - The best way to start integrating chatbots into your business - Current marketing automation breakthroughs using AI and other technologies - Marketing trends that use AI to stay nimble and campaign-driven - The art and data science of marketing   Resources Mentioned: Get a free copy of Anu's Book: 25 Best Practices to Turn Your Website Into a Conversation Connect with Anu Shukla: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/anushukla/ Website: https://www.botco.ai/ Thanks for listening! Be sure to get your free copy of Steve's latest book, Cracking the Patent Code, and discover his proven system for identifying and protecting your most valuable inventions. Get the book at https://stevesponseller.com/book.

The Jordan Harbinger Show
570: Marc Fennell | Cracking California's Nut Jobs

The Jordan Harbinger Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 61:26


Marc Fennell (@MarcFennell) is an award-winning journalist, interviewer, author, and documentary maker. He is also the writer and narrator of Audible Original Nut Jobs: Cracking California's Strangest $10 Million Dollar Heist. What We Discuss with Marc Fennell: Who stole $10 million in nuts (specifically almonds and pistachios) from California's Central Valley farmers -- and why? Why are nuts (and prepackaged food in general) such ideal targets for theft, and how do current security protocols make it so temptingly easy for thieves with the means to haul them away? What makes nuts grown in California's Central Valley valuable enough for organized criminals to take notice, and where do they go? Who wins and who loses when hot nuts change hands? What will it take to stop these heists from continuing? And much more... Full show notes and resources can be found here: jordanharbinger.com/570 Sign up for Six-Minute Networking -- our free networking and relationship development mini course -- at jordanharbinger.com/course! Like this show? Please leave us a review here -- even one sentence helps! Consider including your Twitter handle so we can thank you personally!

Starts With A Vision Podcast RELOADED
SWAV 045: The Magic Of An Offer

Starts With A Vision Podcast RELOADED

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 15:24


In Episode 45 of the Podcast We are Speaking about the Magic of an Offer. An Offer is like the Secret Sauce to Ecommerce and selling on the Internet. Once you Learn how to sell the same Product 3-5 Different ways you are Cracking your Own Code and also Creating your Own Blueprint. 

BADLANDS: SPORTSLAND
Evel Knievel: Cracking Safes, a Beatdown with a Baseball Bat, and Jumping the Shark

BADLANDS: SPORTSLAND

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 33:20


Evel Knievel's name is synonymous with motorcycle stunts and repeated personal injury. But the famous daredevil was more than just the guy who repeatedly broke every bone in his body in pursuit of high-flying glory on Wild World of Sports. Evel Knievel was a burglar, a safecracker, a card cheat, a con man, and the kind of hot-tempered control freak that you didn't want to piss off. You can't make up the things that happened to Evel Knievel when he wasn't riding his motorcycle. You may not even believe them.Follow BADLANDS wherever you get your podcasts to hear new episodes of BADLANDS Season 2: SPORTSLAND each Wednesday. As a bonus, Amazon Music listeners can hear all 10 episodes of BADLANDS Season 2: SPORTSLAND on demand right now at amazon.com/badlands.This episode contains themes that may be disturbing to some listeners, including domestic violence.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Cybrary Podcast
401 Access Denied Podcast Ep. 38 | Password Cracking with Ethical Hacker Dustin Heywood

The Cybrary Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 47:49


X-Force Red Hacker Dustin Heywood aka EvilMog joins us during the first week of Cybersecurity Awareness Month to share how to be cyber smart with your passwords. He shares critical steps for protecting passwords and some insight into his world of password hacking. Don't forget to rate, review & subscribe to us on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and YouTube! Follow Dustin on Social Media! ~LinkedIn ~Twitter Follow Joe on Twitter ~@joe_carson Follow us on Social!! ~Cybrary Twitter ~Thycotic Twitter ~Instagram ~Facebook ~YouTube ~Cybrary LinkedIn ~Thycotic LinkedIn

The Nathan Barry Show
050: Dave Pell - Lessons From Two Decades of Publishing Online

The Nathan Barry Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 62:22


Dave Pell has been writing online for almost as long as the internet has existed. His popular newsletter, NextDraft, has over 140,000 subscribers. NextDraft covers the day's ten most fascinating news stories, delivered with a fast and pithy wit.Dave has been a syndicated writer on NPR, Gizmodo, Forbes, and Huffington Post. He earned his bachelor's degree in English from U.C. Berkeley, and his master's in education from Harvard.Besides being a prolific writer, Dave is also the Managing Partner at Arba, LLC. For more than a decade, Arba has been angel investing in companies like Open Table, GrubHub, Marin Software, Hotel Tonight, Joyus, and Liftopia.In this episode, you'll learn: How Dave merged his two writing passions into a successful product The key to building a strong relationship with your audience How Dave dramatically increased signups to NextDraft Links & Resources Flicker Unsplash Fareed Zakaria Jim Rome The Skimm Morning Brew The Hustle Spark Loop Sam Spratt Dave Pell's Links Dave Pell on Twitter NextDraft newsletter Dave's new book: Please Scream Inside Your Heart NextDraft app PleaseScream.com Episode Transcript[00:00:00] Dave:If you have something to say in one way or another, the internet is a great place for people to figure out a way to receive it. So, that's pretty powerful and still excites me. I still press publish with the same enthusiasm now than I did when the internet first launched.[00:00:23] Nathan:In this episode I talk to Dave Pell, who has been writing for basically as long as the internet has been around. He's been an investor since the early days. He's been writing since the.com bust, and even before then. He writes his popular newsletter with 140,000 subscribers called Next Draft.We have this really fun conversation about writing. His writing process. How he grew the newsletter. Bunch of other things that he cares about. Even a few things that I was interested in, like he doesn't have his face in photos on the internet very much. He has his avatar instead. So, just getting into why that is.He also has a book coming out soon. It's called Scream Inside Your Heart, which is a fun reference to some memes from 2020. So, enjoy the episode. There's a lot in there.Dave. Welcome to the show.[00:01:12] Dave:Thanks a lot for having me on.[00:01:14] Nathan:Okay. So you've been doing this for a long time. You've been writing on the internet since the .com era. So, I'm curious maybe just to kick things off, what have you seen—I realize this is a giant question.What have you seen change? What are some of those trends that you've seen, that you either really miss from the early days, or some of those things that you've held onto from the early days of the internet, that you're really still enjoying?[00:01:46] Dave:Yeah, that is a pretty huge question, but I'll give it a shot. The thing I miss from the early days of the internet is that our democracy was not being destroyed by the internet in the early days of the internet. So, everything we thought we were building, basically it turned out to be the opposite of what actually happened.The part about the internet that I still feel is there, although a little bit less so because of the big companies have sort of taken over all the platforms and stuff, is just the idea that someone can have a passion or a creative output that they want to share with the world, and they can mold internet tools to fit their skills, and then use the internet to broadcast that out, and still become sort of pretty popular withour the “OK” of some gatekeeper at a publication, or at a television studio, or whatever.The indie spirit of the internet still lives on. It ebbs and flows, and has a lot of different iterations. But that was the thing that excited me the most when I first played with the internet. And that's the thing that continues to excite me the most now.[00:02:57] Nathan:I always think of the newsletter, and your newsletter in particular, is that indie spirit. Is that what you see most commonly in newsletters? Or are you seeing it in other places as well?[00:03:10] Dave:I see it in podcasts. I see it in newsletters. I see it in people sharing their art, sharing their photography on Flicker, and up through the more modern tools. I go to a site called Unsplash all the time to look at images, and it's just basically regular people sharing their images.Some of them are professional photographers, some aren't, and they're getting their work out there, and then some of them probably get jobs out of it and stuff like that. So, just the idea that you can have some kind of creative output and have a place to share it. And try to get an audience for that is really inspiring.It's a lot harder than it used to be because there's a few billion more people trying to get attention also, and because there are more gatekeepers now. So, you have to, hope that your app meets Apple's guidelines, or that different products you might want to share on the internet have to meet certain classifications now, whereas they might not have in the very early days of the internet. But in general, if you have something to say in one way or another, the internet is a great place for people to figure out a way to receive it.So, that's pretty powerful, and, still excites me. I still press published with the same enthusiasm now that I did when the internet first launched.[00:04:32] Nathan:Yeah. So let's talk about the main project that you have right now, which is Next Draft. Give listeners the 30-second pitch on Next Draft, of what it is.[00:04:46] Dave:Sure. Basically I call myself the managing editor of the internet. What I basically do is a personality-driven news newsletter where I cover the day's most fascinating news. I cover 10 stories. A lot of times in each section there's more than one link. I give my take on the day's news, each individual story, and then I link off to the source for the full story.When I first launched it, I called it Dinner Party Prep. I provided enough information for you to sort of get the gist of the story. And if there's topics you want to dig deeper, you just click and, you know, go get the story yourself. So that's sort of the overview of it.[00:05:27] Nathan:Nice. And you said that you're obsessed with the news maybe in a somewhat, even unhealthy way. why, where did that come from?[00:05:36] Dave:Yeah. Well, nothing, nothing about my relationship with the internet is only somewhat unhealthy. it's all extremely unhealthy, but, both my parents are Holocaust survivors and, when I was growing up, news was just a very big part of our daily lives, especially when my three older sisters moved out and it was just the three of us, that was sort of our mode of communication.We talked about the news. We watched the news together. Fareed Zakaria is basically the sun my parents always wanted. but so I got really into the news and being able to connect the news to, our everyday lives, which of course my parents had experienced as children and teens and Europe during world war II.And also reading between the lines about why certain politicians might be saying something, why stories are getting published a certain way. So I just got really into that and I've always been into a and college, you know, I, I majored in English, but if we had minors at Berkeley, I would have minored in journalism.I took a bunch of journalism courses. I've always been really into the media, but not so much as quite an insider where I go to work for a newspaper, but more observing, the news and providing sort of a lit review of what's happening and what has momentum in the news. So I sorta got addicted to it and, Also as a writer.My favorite thing to do is counter punch. I like to have somebody give me a topic and then I like to be able to quickly share my take, or make a joke or create a funny headline about that content. So I sorta took those two passions of the way I like to write. I like to write on deadline. I like to write fast and I like to counter punch and the content that I like, which is news, and I sort of merged those two things and created a product, and a pretty cool suite of internet tools to support that.[00:07:35] Nathan:Yeah. So that makes sense that you've identified the constraints that match your style and made something exactly that fits it. the deadline, like having, he, you know, coming out with something on a daily basis, is more than a lot of creators want to do. so what's your process there?[00:07:55] Dave:Yeah. I mean, I should emphasize that I do it every day. Not because I think it's some incredible draw for readers to get Daily Content. I do it every day because I'm addicted to it. If my newsletter had five stories in it, instead of 10, it would do better. If my newsletter came out three days a week instead of five days a week, I'm sure it would do better.If it came out once a week, it would do even better then you know, also if I had a more marketable or not marketable, but a more, business-oriented topic that was more narrow, it would do better. I used to write a newsletter that was just on tech and it was. Really popular in the internet professional community back in the first boom, I had about 50,000 subscribers and there were probably about 52,000 internet professionals.So I just like writing about what I want to write about and I'm addicted to pressing the publish button and I'm just addicted to the process. So I do it because of that. I'm not sure that would be my general advice to somebody trying to market or promote a newsletter.[00:09:01] Nathan:Yep. Are there other iterations, either ever before or things that you tried that you realized like, oh, that's not a fit for your personality, your writing style?[00:09:09] Dave:Yeah. When I first started it, I actually, I'm an angel investor also and have been since, probably right after Google and Yahoo launched. so a while, and I used to, my passion has always been writing, so I wanted to mix writing into that, process. So I would send out 10. Daily stories, but they were all tech news related to the CEOs of the companies I worked with and a few of their employees, so that they wouldn't have to spend their time reading the news or worrying about competitors or worry about what the latest trends in tech, where I would give it to them.And they could focus on doing their jobs and that sorta got shared and got out. so I did that for a few years. really, that was my iteration. I should've kept the brand. It was called David Netflix. not that it was a great name, but I've shifted brands about 40 times in my life. Cause I love branding and naming.I that's another, maybe this is more of a cautionary tale than a lesson and newsletter marketing. I would stick with a brand if anybody has the possibility of doing that, that was a big mistake I've made over the years is having multiple brands. But when the bus came, the first internet bust, I basically was writing an obituary column every day and about companies that had failed.So I just decided, I wanted to expand it and I knew I was interested in much broader topics than just tech news. So I expanded it to all news, a critical point that, really changed Next Draft and got it to catch on and become more popular was when I decided to focus on making it more personality driven and less, less overwhelmingly, providing an overwhelming level of coverage.I used to think that I had to provide all the news in the day because people would sort of, depend on me to provide their news. I was sort of selling myself as your trusted news source. So I would include a lot of stories that I didn't have anything to say about because they were huge news, you know, an embassy closed in Iran or whatever.That was huge international news, but I didn't necessarily have anything to say about that that day. So after a while I decided, no, I'm not going to do that. I'm just going to limit it to 10 items. And I'm going to focus that on what I think is the most fascinating and think of it less like a curation tool and more like, a, modern day column.I think if the column newspaper column were invented today, it would look a lot like Next Draft people would sort of share their takes and then provide links off for more information. once I did that, it was a big change. People started signing up much more readily and, once I stopped trying to be exhaustive.[00:11:56] Nathan:That makes a lot of sense to me. I think that that's something you see from a lot of creators is that they're, they're trying to find some model. That's like, this is my idea of what people should want, you know, rather than what they end up doing, eventually it's coming to, it's like, okay, forget all of that.This is what I want. And I'm going to make that. And then people like me can find and follow it. And people who don't can, you know, do their thing. Can you go find one of the other million sources on the internet?[00:12:21] Dave:Yeah. When I think of the people that I like to follow or have followed forever on the internet, all of them are that ladder. They just do it their way. They have a design, they want, they stick to their guns. They say what they feel like saying. they decide. what the personality of the product is.And, they move within that. I always find that to be the most interesting thing, especially when it comes to something like newsletters. I really think newsletters are more like a radio talk shows than they are like other internet content, podcasts to a certain degree as well. But I always feel like I listened to are used to listen a lot to this radio, sports caster named Jim Rome.And whenever he would have a new city that he was launching and he would always give the same speech on the Monday that they launched saying, just give me a week. You might not.Get the vibe of what we're doing today. You might think it's okay, but not great, but just give it a week and listen, and then decide if you like it or not.And I sort of feel like that's how newsletters are your relationship with your readers sort of creates this, sort of insider-y voice and communication that, you, it takes a little while to get into the rhythm of getting it. But once you do, then it's like this familiar voice or this familiar friend that you feel like, even if you didn't read it for a few weeks, you can start a conversation with that person right away easily.That's how I think the voice of a newsletter is most effective. So that's why I've always thought of it. More of what I do is sort of a textual talk radio, more so than a blog or some other format[00:14:01] Nathan:What do you think, or what would you say to someone who maybe had 10 or 20,000 subscribers and felt like their newsletter had gone a bit stale and maybe their relationship to it had gotten a bit stale or they're in this, this position of writing things that no longer have their voice, how would you coach them through like bringing their voice and personality back into it?[00:14:22] Dave:I mean, it's definitely hard. it's hard doing something that you do alone and, something that is often hard to really get off the ground or get to grow, especially when you're on a platform like the internet, where every day, somebody does something and 10 seconds later, they're like internet famous and you're trying day after day.So, I mean, the first thing. Is that you really have to be interested in what you you're passionate about. and focus in on that, because that will alleviate a lot of that stress. Like, do I feel like sending it today? I'm a too burnt out. What's the point? I mean, not that those feelings don't happen. I had those feelings as recently as an hour ago, when I press publish, I have those feelings and disappointments constantly, you know, that's part of being a creator of any kind.Maybe that word is sort of, sort of goofy, but anybody who's putting themselves out there and putting content out, you know, you have that feeling all the time. If you're an indie, and you're doing it all day in front of the computer by yourself, then that's even more powerful because, you know, if you work at a big company or everybody's working on the same goal, or even in a small group, you can sort of support each other and, maybe even bullshit each other at some cases where, oh, no, this really matters.You know, where, if you're by yourself, that has to be pretty self-sustaining or self-sustaining. I do have a friend or two that I always share blurbs with who, one of my friends Rob's, he proves almost all of my blurbs, so it's nice to have that virtual office mate. He's not really officially part of Next Draft, but you know, I don't think I would do it as easily or as, for as long if it weren't for him because he's like my virtual friend on the internet that says, oh, come on, let's get it out today or whatever.So I think that's helpful to have a support team or a couple people you can count on to sort of give you a boost when you need it. But the key really is, is that it's gotta be something that you are passionate about, both in terms of the product and in terms of what you're focusing on, because if you feel strongly about it, then it really.I don't want to say it doesn't matter if people enjoy it, you should take cues from your readers. What are they clicking on? What are they reading? What are they responding to? But at the core, it's gotta be you because that's what gets you through those down points? you know, I had a weird thing because I write about news.The general news, world basically benefited dramatically from the Trump era because everybody was habitually turning on their news, 24, 7, and refreshing and Whitey and Washington post and checking Twitter every two seconds to see what crazy thing happened next. And we're all poor sorta,[00:17:01] Nathan:Wreck to watch.[00:17:02] Dave:So everybody was really into it and it created.Unbelievable platform for people to become media stars. You know, Trump was bad for democracy, but he was great for media. Great for creating new voices out there. whether we like it or not. for me, it was different because I wrote about all news. I wouldn't say I was apolitical, but I wasn't heavily political.The Next Draft had plenty of readers from both sides of the aisle. when Trump came around, it was like one story every day, basically. So it really limited. I would get emails from longtime readers all the time that said, Hey, can't you cover something other than Trump every day?And I say, Hey, if you can find the story for me, I'll cover it. This is what every journalist is on. Now, the people who used to cover the secret service around Trump, the people who used to cover sports are not talking about Trump because of a pandemic relation ship to it. The people who aren't entertainment are talking about Trump because they can't believe that anybody voted for him, whatever the issue was, every dinner party was about Trump.So it was really a bummer for my brand and my product. Actually, it became boring in some ways to me to have the same story every day. And it became, I think frustrating to my readers.But during that era, when it was happening, I had to make a decision. Do I become more political and go full on with this?Or do I sort of try to. Do what I would call a falsely unbiased view or a, you know, false equivalence view that we saw in the media where there's both sides to every story. And you have to pretend they're both accurate, including one guy saying to put disinfectant into your veins. And the other person's saying to wear a mask and take a vaccine, but those things get treated as equal somehow because the president said it.And I really decided, you know, more important than keeping readers is that I'm true to my own sort of ethical standards. In a moment that called for it, at least for me. So I became more political. went into it and I said, what I believe and still believe is the truth, you know, about what was happening with Trump and Trumpism and our slide towards authoritarianism.And I know that this is a podcast more about newsletterish than it is about politics or news, but I'm just sharing that because that's the kind of thing that kept me going. and the people who really cared about what I was writing, appreciated it and would email me and say they got something out of that.And most importantly, my mom would say, yeah, you made the right call. Or my dad would say, yeah, you got that. Right. And ultimately, When it became a sort of a bummer period for me, which I would say 2020 was because of all the horrible news. And, I was writing a book about the year. So I was like living, July of 20, 20, well writing about March of 2020, which I don't recommend for anybody's emotional health.And I just had to think like, what's really important to me. Yes. I want to be funny, which I try to be in my newsletter every day. I want to be read my narcissism is as strong as ever, but ultimately I want to be able to look myself in the reflection of the, darken screen on the rare times that it is dark and say like, yeah, you told the truth and that kept me going there.So I think whatever your brand is, you know, it can be a newsletter about guitars, but if you have that sort of passion, And you have something you want to say, and you think is important to say it sort of gets you through those levels and your motivation. And if it's not getting you through the lows and the motivation, there's nothing wrong with saying, Hey man, this is not worth it.I'm going to go try to make something else. You know, it doesn't have to be, you don't have to beat a dead horse.[00:20:51] Nathan:On the political side. Are there specific things that you felt like it costs you opportunities that it lost you? Because I think a lot of creators, whether they talk about, you know, finance or photography or whatever, I'll see these things. And they're like this either directly relates to me and my audience and I feel like I should take a stand on it.Or it's like a broader macro issue that I feel like we should talk about. And when you do, then there's immediately, you know, somewhere between three and 300 responses of like, we didn't follow you for the politics, you know, or like something like that. And your Instagram, DMS, or newsletter replies or whatever.[00:21:24] Dave:Yeah. it costs me a lot. Definitely it costs me readers or subscribers. It costs me, psychic pain because I was locked into a story that was just overwhelmingly, emotionally painful, really, and shocking and difficult to understand all the things that cause you sort of emotional exhaustion. We're in the Trump story, especially in 2020, when it became a story about our own health and our kids' health.And the frustration level just went through the roof. for me, professionalizing that content actually helps create a bit of a barrier to the feelings about it. Some of my good friends were probably more bummed during 2020 than I was because when the latest crazy story or depressing story would happen, I felt I had to. Ingest that content and then come up with, something cogent to say about it. And maybe hopefully funny to make it a little bit of sugar to take the medicine and then get it out to people. So I've always felt that being able to do that, sorta created a barrier between myself and actually feeling something.So that's another thing I like about the newsletter probably at least unconsciously. but yeah, there was a lot of costs in terms of readers, for sure. Hate mail. but there always is, you know, Today. I would say I get much more hate mail from the far left. If that's what you want to call them. People who feel like every joke is like an incredible triggering a front to their existence or any hint that you mentioned somebody as attractive.I've gotten hate mail because I implied that Beyonce is appearance was part of her brand. I mean, it's totally crazy, but, It's those extremes. You have to be able to turn off. You know, a friend of mine used to work at a major, be the editor of a major American newspaper. And he said every Friday they would get together and they would play the craziest, calls to the editor.They had a call line. In addition to, you could send a letter or you could call, leave a voicemail about something you were upset about in the coverage. And they would just gather around and have drinks on Friday. Listen to this because of course the people who are calling this line are almost self-selecting themselves as a little bit wacko and their takes were usually pretty extreme.The internet, Twitter, social media, Provides, greases the wheels for those people to be more prevalent in our lives. But I think it's really important to know that that's a real minority of people, somebody who sent you a hate mail, that your joke was so offensive, or they can't believe you mentioned that people ever watch pornography on the internet or any of these other things, it's this tiny minority of people.And then it's one step crazier that they felt like they had to contact you. So that's a really hard thing. I think about being split, particularly the newsletter game, because anybody can hit reply and you're going to get many more replies from people with crazy complaints, than you are from people with really thoughtful responses.Not that those don't come and those are valuable and I love getting those, but you get many more from people that just have really bizarre. I mean I could list probably for hours to crazy things that people send me that they're mad about, you know,[00:24:50] Nathan:Is there something specific that you do? Like one thing when I get those replies, if they're just like completely off the wall or abusive or something like that, I just scroll down and then click their unsubscribe link because, you know, they're never going to know, and then I just have to show up in their inbox[00:25:07] Dave:Right.[00:25:08] Nathan:There's something that you do.[00:25:09] Dave:That's not a bad strategy. I like that. I do do that occasionally for sure. occasionally I'll just go to Gmail and just, create a filter for that email to automatically go to my trash. if it's like a hardcore right-winger, that's telling me how stupid I am about ivermectin and that, you know, people should be taking horse dewormer and I'm just not getting the truth.And that Trump is awesome and that, Whatever. I usually just delete, honestly, because I don't see a big benefit to replying to somebody, especially if it's like a rabbit email, you know, they're looking for a reply, they want the conflict. A lot of people sleep easy with conflict. That's one of the lessons of the internet that I learned when I was first starting on the internet, you know, David edix sort sorta became popular because somebody that had a blog with a similar name, that I hadn't heard of, complained that I sort of stole his name because his name was also Dave.And I had got like, probably about three or 400 emails saying, you know, with expletive saying what a horrible person I was. And I also got about 3000 subscribers and at the time I had about 30, so. I didn't know how to respond. I felt like, wow. Number one, I didn't know that guys had the product with the same name.Number two. My name was different enough. Number two or three were both named Dave. I mean, who cares? You know, and plus I don't want to be attacked by anybody. So your first reaction is to respond and a slightly older, although not noticeably these days with my gray beard, slightly older friend of mine who had been in tech a little longer, said, don't respond.This guy lives for conflict. You guys are going to fight. There's going to be this public thing. You're going to be up all night and he's going to never sleep so easy. So, I took that to heart and didn't respond. And I, I think about that a lot when I get rabid emails from people, Mike exception, actually probably my weak point really is from, more my side of the political spectrum, where people who are generally liberal, but are just so extreme for me.In terms of being triggered or having a joke, be every joke, be inappropriate. That those people, I actually do feel like I want to respond to because, I, I don't think I can really motivate or move, somebody who was on the opposite end of the spectrum and is sending me hate aggressive, hate mail, but maybe I can move somebody who's just a little bit different than me, or a little bit more extreme.I will respond to those, although I'm usually sorry. The one other thing I always respond to is if people have been reading, they say, oh, I've been reading you for years. And, I wanted to ask you a couple of questions about this book that you wrote before ordering it. And I'm like, just order the damn book. that's probably my most common email to people these days. It's actually remarkable how many people says, wow, I I've been reading you for years. I share you with all my friends. something, when my sons come home from college where it's always talking about, Dave said this, Dave said that, before I buy your book, I just wanted to ask you a couple of questions to make sure it's going to be for me.I'm like I worked on something for an hour and it's like, your family is talking about it. What, just by the thing I worked on for a year, you know? So those kind of things, personal frustration, I respond.[00:28:37] Nathan:Yeah, that makes sense. okay. I'd love to talk about the book some more, but before we get into that, there's two things I want to talk about. The first one is like, how do you measure success for the newsletter? What's the thing that you'd like to, cause I don't think it's, you're pursuing the monetary side for this.It sounds like the monetary side comes from investing and, and then what's success for the newsletter.[00:28:59] Dave:I mean, I have had right now, I I'm just marketing my, my own stuff. And during the pandemic I marketed non-profits, but, that had to do with either the pandemic or, the democracy issues that we were facing. but I have made decent money from selling straight sponsorships. Year-long sponsorships to people, which I highly recommend.I think some of the ads that people put into his letters that go by clicks or whatever, unless you have a massive audience, it's hard to make much money, but if you pitch to some company that is a like-minded brand, Hey, you're going to be my only brand for a year. And anytime you have special events, I'm going to mention it.Then you can say, okay, you have like, you know, 20,000 readers or a hundred thousand readers that can make a difference to a brand to say, yeah, it's like a rounding air show. We'll give you 20 grand or a hundred grand or wherever it comes in there that you can actually make a decent. Living in terms of writing.So that always worked better for me, but no, my, my internet life is really all about narcissism and, clicks, you know, the dopamine, I just want reads. I'd rather you subscribe to my newsletter than pitch me your startup company. I just, that's what I want the most. So more numbers, more opens, more reads, more subscribers.And unfortunately that's probably the hardest thing to get also, especially in a product that is sort of viral. I think newsletters are sort of viral, but it's better if you have a team and some tools to really get it going. That's, you know, sites like the Skimm morning brew and the hustle. They have teams that are really growth hacking and focusing on that and having rewards programs and ambassador programs.The reason you see that is because.Newsletters themselves are not really inherently that viral. Yes. Somebody can forward it to one person or whatever, but it's not as viral as a lot of other forms of content where you can click a button and share it with all of your followers, like a Facebook post or a tweet.So yeah, the thing that matters to me most is probably the hardest to get in the newsletter game, but that's the truth[00:31:10] Nathan:Yeah. Well, I think the, the point on like newsletters don't have a distribution engine. There's no Facebook newsfeed, YouTube algorithm equivalent for newsletters. And so it really relies on either you posting your content somewhere else, whether it's Twitter or YouTube or medium or something that has an algorithm or your readers saying like, oh, I read Next Draft.You should too. There's not really something else in there. Have you looked at, or I guess if you have thoughts on that, you comments on it, but then also have you looked at launching an ambassador program or, or an actual referral program?[00:31:44] Dave:Yeah, I've thought about him. And now over the last year, there's been a few tools that have come out a few. I think X people from sites like morning view Ru, and some other sites that have sort of perfected some of these marketing programs have, sort of come out with these tools. I've messed around with them a little bit.Some of them still require I find, some technical ones. so I, I have like an engineer who works with me on Next Draft, like as a freelance basis every now and then, but it's not always easy for me to launch stuff that requires a lot of a moment to moment technical support, and management, because it's just me using a lot of, they're customized, but they're over the counter tools.So I've thought about a lot of them, but I really haven't tried it that much.I want to though I do want to do that. I would like to do one of those programs, especially where you get credit for referrals. I think that's the best kind of model. So there's one called spark loop.[00:32:51] Nathan:Yeah, we actually, I invested in spark loops, so we[00:32:54] Dave:Okay.[00:32:55] Nathan:Decent portion of that business, so good.[00:32:58] Dave:Oh, nice. Yeah. That one, if it was just slightly easier, I know that it's probably difficult to make it easier because, there's so many pieces. They have to have your subscribers. I have to have my subscribers, but that is, does seem like a good product. And especially if they can, I think expand into like letting a person sell a product or whatever, get credited for sharing products that can be even bigger.But yeah, that kind of stuff is really powerful for sure. And I, I do want to get into that. it's more just inertia that I it's just a matter of sitting there for the, an amount of hours that it requires to get it going.But I do think that's a great thing for newsletter writers to do, and I'm pretty surprised that more newsletter platforms don't build it right in.I think that'll probably change over time too. Maybe you guys will get acquired by.[00:33:48] Nathan:Yep. No, that makes sense. I know for convert kit, we wanted to build it in, it looks at the amount of time that it would take and then said like let's invest in a , you know, and then roll it into our offering.[00:33:59] Dave:Yeah, it's hard. It's hard not to take that stuff personally, too, you know, for people that do newsletters, you think you're going to put a thing on there and say, Hey, you know, it's just me here and you always read my newsletter and click. I know you love me so much. Can you just do this to get a free whatever?And it's, you know, sometimes not that many people click, you know, or other times like they click just as long as there's the free item. So there's a lot of ways to get depressed. Like I had things where I say, Hey, the first a hundred people who do this, get a free t-shirt or whatever next strap t-shirt.And those hundred people will literally do what I asked them to do in like 34 seconds, you know? And then it like stops after that. The next time you ask them, if there's not a t-shirt. But it's not you, you know, if you go to a baseball game or a lawyer game or whatever, you know, people sit there, they don't even cheer as much for the team as they cheer when the guy comes out with the t-shirt gun.So it's like, people love t-shirts more than they're ever going to love you. And you have to go into these things with that in mind. there's no way, even if it's, even if you're XX large and the t-shirt is, you know, petite, it's still worth more than you are. And the average mind of the average person.So you have to go into all of these things thinking, I hope this works like crazy, but if it doesn't tomorrow, I open up the browser and start writing.[00:35:19] Nathan:Yeah. That's very true. I want to talk about the growth of the newsletter. I was reading something, which I realized later was back in 2014, that you were at around 160,000 subscribers. I imagine it's quite a bit larger than that now. And then I'd love to hear some of the inflection points of growth.[00:35:35] Dave:Yeah, I'm not, I'm not sure. I might've, I don't know if I lied in 2014, but now I have about,[00:35:41] Nathan:Quoted it wrong.[00:35:42] Dave:No, you might've got it right. I might've exaggerated. Maybe that was a including app downloads and a few other things. Yeah. I have about 140,000 or so now, so that would be making that a pretty horrible seven years now.You're depressing me.Your listeners should just stop, stop writing newsletters. It's not worth the depression[00:36:02] Nathan:Just give up now[00:36:03] Dave:Yeah. And by all means if Nathan goals do not pick up. no, yeah, I probably have it 140,000 on newsletter. Made my newsletter. It's hard to believe in this era of newsletters actually, but when I first launched Next Draft, I noticed that even people who would send in testimonials or that I would ask for testimonials would say, basically something to the extent that even though email is horrible, this is the one newsletter I I'd sign up for whatever.And I kept thinking, man, that's a bummer that I'm starting out at this deficit, that people have a negative feeling about the medium. So I, since then I've always made it my goal to. Have the content available wherever people are. So the newsletter is certainly the main way that people get next job, but there's an app for the iPhone and the iPad there.That's the first thing I launched because I wanted to have an alternative for people who just hate email too much. So now you go to the landing page, it's like, Hey, if you don't like email, here's another version. I have a blog version. I have an apple news version. I have an RSS version. I'm lucky enough to have a really good, WordPress custom WordPress install that I just push one button and it pushes it out to all of those things.But I am, I'm a big proponent of just meeting people where they are. even, as an example, I recently launched a sort of a substance. Version of my newsletter under the radar. but when I redo my site, I'm going to make that more clear because if people already subscribed to like 10 sub stacks and they're using their aggregator and they already have their email saved and they can just click a button, it's like, I don't care.You know, it takes me five extra minutes to paste my content into sub stack. So I just want the reads. I don't really care about how they read it or whether they read it.[00:37:55] Nathan:Yeah. That's fascinating. So then let's shift gears a little bit. I want to hear about the book. first I wanna hear about the title. Would you have it on your shirt?[00:38:03] Dave:Yeah. That's pretty embarrassing. I swear. I didn't know it was video today, but I do have a shirt[00:38:06] Nathan:You're good.[00:38:07] Dave:Otherwise I wouldn't have worn. This would have worn my Nathan Barry's shirt.[00:38:12] Nathan:That's right. It's in the mail actually. It's[00:38:15] Dave:Oh, good, good.[00:38:16] Nathan:Big photo of my face.[00:38:17] Dave:Yeah. Convert kit. My wife converted to Judaism before we got married. So I have my own convert kit.[00:38:23] Nathan:There you go. Exactly. so I want to hear like what the book is about and then particularly where the title came from,[00:38:30] Dave:Sure.[00:38:31] Nathan:It made me laugh a lot when I heard it.[00:38:33] Dave:Oh, cool. That's good. That's a good start then. yeah, the title comes from, in July of the, of 2020 when the pandemic was really setting in and becoming a reality for everybody. this amusement park outside of Tokyo in the shadow of Mount Fuji called the Fuji queue. amusement park reopened.And they found that even though everybody w everybody was wearing masks, people were screaming so much on some of the rides, especially the Fujiyama roller coaster, which was their scariest ride, that they were worried about germs spread. So they sort of put signs around the amusement park saying, no screaming, you can come, you can ride and have fun, but keep your mask on adults scream.And it sort of became a little minor social media thing in Japan, where people were sort of making fun of them like, oh, they're telling us not to scream. How can anybody not scream on the Fujiyama roller coaster? So in response, the, park management had to have their executives with perfectly quaffed hair and tie and colored shirts and masks on ride the roller coaster with a webcam facing them the whole time without moving a muscle.Cracking a smile or grimacing or screaming. And then at the end of the ride, when the rollercoaster stops, it says, please Scream Inside Your Heart.And that was always my favorite meme of, 2020. It went really viral. There was like t-shirts. aside from mine, there were posters memes. It sort of went crazy for about a week or two, which by 2020 standards is a pretty long time for a meme to last.And I just thought that made sense as a title for the book, because that's sort of how we felt, all year that I dunno if we were screaming in our heart, but we were certainly screaming into a void. Like no matter what we sat or yelled on social media or complained to our family members or friends, it just kept getting worse.The year just kept getting worse. And, so the idea is that this book sort of, now you're free to sort of let out the scream. And the book is it's about 2020, certainly, but it's really about the issues that led us to 2020. There's a ton about our relationship to media and including my own relationship to media and how that got us into trouble.Some of the stuff we're talking about today, how, technology has impacted our lives stuff. I've been sort of thinking about it, writing about for the last few decades, and a lot of the political hate that emerged. and, but it's all within this time capsule of the craziest year.[00:41:12] Nathan:Yeah. Yeah. And so that's coming out early in November, November 2nd. so you're, it looks like you're just starting the, you know, mentioning the promotion tour and all of that. is there a big, big push that comes with it or are you kind of, I, I'm always curious with people's book launches, what strategy they take.[00:41:30] Dave:Yeah. I mean, I'm a newbie, so it's, the whole process has been interesting to me working with a publisher, working with others, is not my forte. so I got used to that or I'm getting used to that and they're probably getting used to it also because working with grouchy 50 something in these is probably not ideal, but, yeah, I've just been promoting it so far in Next Draft, but I've been doing, I have a PR company that's helping me and I've been doing a ton of podcasts and I'm marketing it to my own readers.And then as it gets a little bit closer to the November 2nd date, I have a lot more stuff planned rut, a lot of influencers have early copies of the book, and hopefully they'll promote it. And, I'll call out a few favors from bloggers and hopefully newsletter writers. I feel like that should be my in theory.That should be my secret weapon because, in addition to being fun and creative, nothing moves traffic, except maybe Facebook, nothing moves traffic more than newsletters. I know a lot of people who run e-commerce companies and newsletters are always second, if not first, in terms of traffic drivers.So, I really think that, if some of my friends out there at morning brew in the hustle and the scam and all these other sites that sort of, have surpassed my size by quite a bit, put the word out that, one of their fellow warriors is, has a book out. That'll probably move the needle even more. The media, I'm hoping to get stuff like that, but I really don't know. I'm trying not to get my hopes up too much because, unlike a newsletter, it's not just one day's work, you know, you like worry about one word or one sentence in a book for like three weeks and then you put it out there and people are like, oh yeah, I'll check it out sometime.Thanks. So, you know, that's, you know, whatever that's life as a, you put yourself out there, that's how it goes. So I'm hoping it sells well. And, the more people that get it, I think some people, their first reaction is, oh my God, 2020. I don't want to relive that again. But, hopefully people who know my brand and those that they share it with, know that it's, you know, there's a lot of humor and there's, it's probably 30 pages before we even get into the first event of 2020.So it's, there's a lot more to it and it's sort of fun and crazy and tries to have the pace of a roller coaster. that was the other thing I took from the Fujiyama roller coaster.[00:43:59] Nathan:Yeah. So one thing that I'm always curious about with people who have like a prolific newsletter, you know, in your case of writing every day, and then like, for a lot of people, that would be a lot to handle of staying on top of a daily newsletter. And then you're writing a book on top of that. How did you schedule your time?Were you blocking off like, oh, these afternoons are specifically for book, book writing. Cause you turned it around relatively fast.[00:44:24] Dave:Yeah. the newsletter is sort of like a full-time job. People always ask me, you know, when do you work on, or how many hours do you spend on it? I mean, I'm, I'm always looking for news, whether it's on Twitter or friends, emailing me stuff or texting me stories, or just in conversations with people to see what they're into or what stories are interesting them or what I'm missing.In terms of actual time spent like where I'm dedicating time. I probably do like about an hour every night, because the story has changed so quick. So I'll do an hour of looking for stories every night. And then the next day I sort of lock in from about nine to one, usually, or nine to 12, where I'm finding stories, saving those stories, choosing what stories I want to go with and then actually writing the newsletter.All of that takes about anywhere from like two and a half to four hours, depending on the day I go pretty fast. When it came to the book, that was tricky. It was actually more emotionally tricky because like I said before, I was like, had to go back and write about, you know, Briana Taylor while I'm living another horrible act, you know, or even more so the Trump, you know, one crazy Trump thing and another crazy Trump thing and seeing the pandemic getting worse and worse.So that was stressful. But I found at the beginning I would try to write a lot at night and that was okay. But I found actually if I just kept going, in the day when I was already rolling and had written the newsletter and I was already in the group just to add on an hour or two to that was actually easier and more effective for me than trying to get going.But that's just me. I mean, I just go by my it's almost like my circadian rhythm or something like that, I almost never eat or consume anything before I'm done with next job except for coffee. I would keep that going, you know, once I would like, sort of have a sandwich or whatever, then it's like, oh, let me just take a quick nap and then whatever.So, yeah, I tried to just keep it going. I always find the more consistently busy I am, the less I procrastinate. And if I take a day off or I take a few hours off, even then, between writing, it just, it takes me longer to get going.[00:46:37] Nathan:Yep. That makes sense. The habit that I'm in right now is starting the day with 45 minutes to an hour of writing and that's working much better for me than like slotting it in somewhere else. So I think like w what I hear you saying is like, experiment and find the thing that works well for you.[00:46:54] Dave:Yeah. I mean, if you're going to start experimenting almost every writer, I know not like newsletter writers, but just general writers, all do what you just described. They sort of pick a time in the morning and they get their output done. then the rest of the day, if ideas come to them or whatever, they jot it down, but they're sort of powering in that morning hours.[00:47:13] Nathan:Yeah.[00:47:14] Dave:That's probably a good one to try. Although, you know, some people just do it better at different hours. I'm sure.[00:47:19] Nathan:Yeah. another thing I realized, I've always you for years, and until we got on this video call, I had no idea what you looked like. and which is kind of an interesting,[00:47:28] Dave:Well, I'm sorry.It's by design. I have a face for Panda.[00:47:32] Nathan:Tell me more about, well, I guess two sides, one, has there ever been an interesting interaction? You know, because you're like, Hey, I'm, I'm Dave and people are like, I wouldn't have ever recognized you. Or has there been any other benefits and thought behind, you know, why it have an avatar?[00:47:49] Dave:If by interesting you mean horrible? Yes. There's been many interesting interactions with people. I mean, before, before I had my current, avatar, which is, pretty awesome, actually, a guy named Brian Molko designed it. I had this incredible drawing of a character that looked like me that, had sort of ether net, Machinery and cord going into his head and it was like me, but my head was actually lifted.The top of my head was lifted off and you could see all this machinery and it was an incredible graphic, by this guy named Sam Spratt. Who's now done, album covers and book covers. He's like a super talent. If you want to follow somebody fun on Instagram, he's just incredible. And it was a drawing, even though it looked photo realistic.And I used that for a while and then I would go places and people would be like, you are so much fatter and grayer than I imagined. And so instead of having Sam sort of ruin his artwork, I went back with the more, cartoonish or animated, avatar. So since then I don't get too much of that, but, that was a good move.Although that's the best thing about avatars and the internet is that your avatar never ages. It always looks the same. It stays the same weight. My avatar never overeats he exercises right here. Angie really gets along well with others and doesn't have any kind of social anxiety either. So he's pretty cool.Yeah, it goes a little downhill with me in person. So[00:49:21] Nathan:Yeah. So is it, that's something that like, it gives you some distance between you and readers, or it gives you some anonymity that, you know, you don't want to be recognized in the streets?[00:49:32] Dave:No, no, it's, it's, basically just what I described. It's like, I literally prefer the, the attractiveness of my avatar versus me, but also actually my avatar is really awesome. my logo, so it's also iconic and scalable. so it looks awesome on t-shirts even people who don't know what Next Draft is when they see, by son wearing his t-shirt, whatever, it just looks awesome.So that that's that's as much of it as anything. I thought your response was going to be mad. You seem perfectly attractive to me. I don't know what the issue is, but no, you went with, am I doing that for some other reason? Yeah. So, I get this all the time.Cause my wife is a very attractive person also. So when people meet me, they're always like, whoa, we were once a very famous celebrity came up to me and I said, oh, I'm Gina's husband. And she was like, wow, you did well. Oh, you know? So I'm like, thanks a lot. That helps. So just gave her a picture of my, my icon and walked away.[00:50:31] Nathan:Then that worked. I'm sure that she has it framed in her office, from now on. it's just interesting to me. You're you're sort of at this intersection between personal brand and, like media brand. And I think the avatar helps push you over into the media brand side. and I don't have any real commentary on it other than I find it interesting.[00:50:53] Dave:Yeah, no, I think there probably is some of that. I I've never really been a fan of using my actual face, or my actual person as a logo. I love the process of designing or working with people to design logos and taglines and all that. But yeah, probably at some point there was a, a goal with Next Draft to make it seem bigger than it is.I know a lot of people that are solo operators. They regularly say we, when they're talking about their brand to make it seem bigger, I actually think that's sort of been flipped on its head though. in the last few years where so many people are coming into the space, it's very clear that what they're doing is leaving a big brand, leaving a we and going to an eye.And I think it's actually a selling point in a lot of ways. So, I mean, I, I still get a lot of emails that say, I don't know if anybody at Next Draft is going to read this email, you know, or if you do, can you get this message to Dave? He's an asshole or whatever. And it's like, I'm the only one here, you know, or the other one I always get is when I email back to people that go, oh, I can't believe you actually emailed back.I didn't think this would get to anybody. It's like, you hit reply. And it had my email, like where else would it go? Exactly. You know? But I think actually having people thinking of you as a person, instead of a brand, Is a benefit today. Whereas if you would ask me when I was younger, I probably would have said, make it seem like you have a big company behind you.[00:52:24] Nathan:Yeah. And I think that that indie shift overall, like people are looking for that.[00:52:29] Dave:Yeah,[00:52:29] Nathan:Want to ask about the intersection between your investing and the newsletter. like, are you still actively investing today and doing author.[00:52:38] Dave:Yeah, yeah, no, I, I still invest a ton. I usually follow along with people who are a little more in tune with today's companies than I am. I don't really go out there and brand myself as an investor much, but I've been really lucky. I have very little intersection actually, if any, with my newsletter and my investing and I definitely want people to. To think of me as a writer first, for sure. Not as an investor who has this hobby, because that's definitely not in terms of time or passion, the reality. but I've been really lucky over the years that, I've invested with people or co-invested with them that were cool with me. branding myself as a writer first, but still looking at deals that came through their brands because they were branded as BCS or investors or angels.That's probably a bigger deal now than when I first started. There were like five angel investors, basically. Nobody really did small, early stage seed deals. you know, I mean, we all knew each other that did it and now there's like thousands of them. So you really have to be either a really pretty well-known entrepreneur or you have to. Sort of attach yourself to our organization or two who are really branding themselves well, getting out there and building a stable of companies,[00:53:58] Nathan:Yeah.[00:53:59] Dave:It's pretty different, more, much more has changed about that than the newsletter game, actually, which is pretty much the same as it was the day I started actually.[00:54:07] Nathan:Are there a few of those I'm curious who are a few of those, people that you would tag along with, you know, when they're investing where like, oh, this person puts money into something I'd like to be right there with them.[00:54:19] Dave:I mean, I have some people that are like entrepreneurs and former entrepreneurs that do it, and if they like it I'll do it. but generally I co-invest with, at any given time, a different group of people, used to be a larger group. When I first started out, my whole investing career, I've co-invested with this guy named Bob zip who's much smarter and much wiser than I am about all things business and.Startup world. So that was really great. And he used to work at a company called venture law group in the first boom, and they represented Google, Hotmail. eGroups all the big, huge, early internet companies, and so he really knew the space well. And when he became, I used to get deals from him.That's how you used to get deals actually was by a couple of law firms that focused on startups. I've been co-investing with him all along and he's been generous enough to, he left the law firm a long, long time ago and became an investor primarily. And he had a fund and was well-known guy and well-respected guy.So I got to sit in when he would hear pitches. and we sort of, we weren't investing together out of the same fund, but we would sort of make our decisions together. And we still do that a lot. these days, I almost always follow along with a guy named run-on barn Cohen and a really good friend of mine.He was for many years at WordPress, basically, most of the things that make money at WordPress, he did. and now he's a investor at a VC called resolute. If anybody's looking for a good VC, he's like incredible, like Bob zip much, much smarter than I am about this stuff. Unbelievably ethical, great business sense.Great technical sense. so I mostly just follow him. So if he does something that's usually good enough for me. And if I see something that I think it's good, I'll pass it along to him, but it's mostly that, but I've been really fortunate. I can't express that enough, that I've been able to invest in companies without having to spend all of my time, branding myself as an investor.That's just been unbelievably lucky. So, I've been able to focus a ton of my energy on my six.[00:56:31] Nathan:That's right. I'm writing a newsletter about the news. I guess, as you're looking to grow and continue on, right? Like the next phase of readers and, and all of that, since we can just say directly that we're all narcissists and we do this for the attention. what's what's sort of that next thing that you're looking for, it's going from 140,000 subscribers to say 200,000 and beyond.[00:56:54] Dave:Yeah, well, I'm, I'm hoping that, I'm not just trying to sell my book here. I'm hoping that the book and the newsletter will sort of have, a coexistence with them because the new the book is really an extension of the brand and the brand is that icon to Next Draft. So I'm hoping that the tricky part about writing about marketing a newsletter, like we discussed earlier, there's not really a natural virality to them.So. You Have this piecemeal growth from people telling each other or their friends or forwarding it to somebody or maybe occasionally tweeting or sharing a Facebook link. Oh, you should check this out. But it's all sort of small little blips. If you get a news story or a big blog story about it, or another newsletter recommending you, that's probably the fastest way people grow these days is by, co-sponsoring each other's newsletters or co-promoting them.Those big hits are more rare and they usually require like, I've had a ton of stories written about Next Draft, but most of them a long time ago, because it's basically a similar product to what it was when they wrote about it the first time. So they're like, Hey, I'd love to write about it, but what's the hook.What's the new thing, you know? so I'm hoping that the book provides that emphasis. It's like, we're doing now a ton of people who may by either been on a podcast in the past, or they've wanted to do a podcast with me say, okay, now's a great time. I'd probably want to move your book and, we can set something up.So it's sort of as an impetus. So I'm hoping that that will be the next big newsletter thing that most, most people who write about the book will also write about the newsletter and the two things can sort of grow together.[00:58:35] Nathan:I think that's spot on.[00:58:36] Dave:That's in terms of, you know, marketing and promotion, otherwise, I do want to try, one of these referral programs because people definitely do like products.And, I am lucky that my icon looks really good on shirts so that people actually really want them. And I have a great designer named Brian Bell who makes all of my shirts.[00:58:58] Nathan:There's something like when creators thinking about products, often if you spread yourself too thin, you're like into the newsletter, the book, the podcast, and like the 14 other things that you could make all at once you sort of hinder the growth of each thing, but then if you really build one of them up to a significant level, then at that point it can start to stall out and by shifting to another medium or have it like launching another product in this case, the newsletter to a book, then that book can have a bunch more momentum that feeds back into it.And so there's just sort of this interesting balance of like, no, When to like, keep pushing on the thing that you have versus when to add the next thing that like, then they feed off of each other and go from there. So I think you're doing it with good timing.[00:59:45] Dave:Hopefully it'll work. All that kind of stuff is the tricky part of doing this stuff. Especially stuff like podcasts and newsletters that are—it's really a ton of word of mouth, unless you get lucky and get some press, and word of mouth is just slow.There's some point where you're going to hit a tipping point where you're going to go from five or 10,000 to like 50,000 much quicker, more quickly because instead of three people going home and saying, “Hey, did you ever hear of this newsletter?” there's like 30 people going home and saying that. But, even with that they hit a plateau, and then you figure out what's the next thing. That's why doing something you're into is so important.And I don't think it's bad to try those other mediums or stretch yourself out, because you never know you might've been writing a newsletter three years, and then you do a podcast and it catches on. For some reason, you're like awesome. Less typing, more talking, let's go. So, but it's tricky. I wish I was better and had better advice for people on promotion and marketing.I'm not awesome at it, and it's not in my nature. So, begging for favors or telling people, even in my own newsletter, to buy my own book is very painful for me. I'm very sensitive to criticism about it. So, if people just all bought it and then made everybody else buy it, that would be a huge relief for me.[01:01:13] Nathan:That would be great. Well, along those lines, where should people go to subscribe to the newsletter, and then follow you on your preferred channel, and then ultimately buy the book?[01:01:24] Dave:I don't want like two or 300,000 people taking my site down. So let's go with if your last name starts between A and M you can start by going to NextDraft.com and sign up for the newsletter there. Or, you can also just go to the App Store and search for Next Draft. If you're N through Z, you can start with the book, and that's at: PleaseScream.com.It has links to all the various audio, and Kindle, and hardcover versions.[01:01:50] Nathan:That's good. I liked how you split the traffic, that way there's no hug of death, and we'll do well there.[01:01:57] Dave:I don't want to get fireballed.[01:01:58] Nathan:That's right.Dave. Thanks for coming on. This was really fun.[01:02:01] Dave:Yeah, thanks a lot for having me.

Black and Brown
What's Cracking - Season 4 - Finale - BBR2

Black and Brown

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 115:41


The fellas wrap the last What's Cracking with the OG's of the Black Bourbon Run; the second annual joint went off like clockwork. Sixteen bourbon heads hit Louisville, enjoyed Spirits, Distillery tours and the Bar at Willett Family Distillery. There were some major underground spots that you definitely need to know about. Clock in and check out the episode. It's a Black Bourbon Run vibe! Stay Black and Keep it Brown! Follow the show: @dablackandbrownpodcast Follow the fellas: @delvinj33 @agbk06 @my_government_name_is Follow the OG's: @black.bourbon.maverick @qantgetright @swishagboh @rich_life9_99 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/dablackandbrownpodcast/support

Tech Leader Talk
The intersection of art and technology – Sam Fry and Richard Adams

Tech Leader Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 37:52


On this episode, I talk with Sam Fry and Richard Adams.   Sam works at the intersection of innovation, technology, and art. He works for a technology company during the day and speaks to artists about technology at night.   Richard describes himself as an artist, musician, educator, and emerging tech architect. Sam and Richard host a podcast called TECHnique where they where talk to artists about how they are working with technology. In their Design Thinking series on the TECHnique podcast, Sam and Richard talk with several expert practitioners about Design Thinking. “Technology has always been a part of art.” – Richard Adams Today on the Tech Leader Talk podcast: - What Sam and Richard learned from interviews with Design Thinking experts - Learning from the intersection of Art and Technology - Advantages to failing fast and failing often - Using Design Thinking techniques to solve problems - The human element of Design Thinking   Resources Mentioned: UK Design Council's Double Diamond framework: https://www.designcouncil.org.uk/news-opinion/what-framework-innovation-design-councils-evolved-double-diamond Connect with Sam Fry and Richard Adams: LinkedIn (Sam Fry): https://www.linkedin.com/in/samueljfry/ LinkedIn (Richard Adams): https://www.linkedin.com/in/dickyadams/ TECHnique podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/technique/id1123475818 Twitter (Sam Fry): @SamuelJFry Twitter (Richard Adams): @DickyAdams Twitter (Technique Podcast): @TechniqueUK   Thanks for listening! Be sure to get your free copy of Steve's latest book, Cracking the Patent Code, and discover his proven system for identifying and protecting your most valuable inventions. Get the book at https://stevesponseller.com/book.

Dawn of a New Era Podcast with Entrepreneur Dawn McGruer| Marketing | Motivation | Mindset |

In this episode we're joined by Claire Winter, a content and copy coach and host of the Cracking Content Podcast, which has been named one of the top 20 marketing podcasts in the UK. She is also part of my new PowerCircle program - find out more about this at dawnmgruer.com This week we are talking all about online marketing, social media and improving your digital presence, so listen now, follow the podcast and share.   Here are the highlights: {3:11} An exciting time to be alive {7:39} Social media is a listening tool {14:06} Keeping people engaged with your content {16:13} Walking boosts creative output {21:34} Social media is a business behind-the-scenes {24:36} The about page is one of the most visited {28:10} Don't be afraid to share what's unique about you Connect with Dawn Instagram @dawnmcgruer and @businessconsort Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/dawnamcgruer Linkedin https://www.linkedin.com/in/businessconsort/ Web: www.dawnmcgruer.com

End of the Road
Episode 200: Isabeau Maxwell: Intuitive Development/Channeled Knowledge/Cracking Open/The SAGE Method

End of the Road

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 58:46


Isabeau Maxwell is an internationally known medium, author, and teacher, who has touched the lives of people throughout the world.  Known for her compassion and accuracy, Isabeau brings peace and comfort to many through her energy work, transformative sessions, and teachings.   Isabeau is the founder of The SAGE Method, a life-changing intuitive training program that teaches people how to open their intuitive abilities and live an authentic, blissful life.  She is also the creator of The SAGE Circle, Discovery Meditation, and the author of Cracking Open:  Adventures of a Reluctant Medium. To further develop your connection with Isabeau and the spirit world, please see her website which contains a plethora of information, videos and podcasts to further your own journey: https://thesagemethod.com/ Or join the facebook community:  https://www.facebook.com/thesagemethod/ This podcast is available on your favorite podcast feed, or here:  https://endoftheroad.libsyn.com/episode-200-isabeau-maxwell-intuitive-developmentchanneled-knowledgecracking-openthe-sage-method Have an awesome week!

Ink Stained Wretches
Cracking the Whip

Ink Stained Wretches

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 41:54


The media gets the border-patrol story wrong and can't stop complaining that pretty young white women get too much coverage Times 2:50 - Segment: Front Page 3:06 - The fake news about border patrol whipping Haitians at the border 7:30 - Headlines headache: Business Insider and defaulting on debt 10:13 - CNN uses kids to cast blame on Tucker Carlson 14:17 - Trump sues niece over exposé 16:51 - Elizabeth Holmes' texts 20:34 - Segment: Obsessions 20:47 - Coverage of Gabby Petito and "missing white woman's syndrome" 28:45 - MSM finally authenticates Hunter Biden's laptop 34:21 - Segment: Favorite Item of the Week 34:39 - The Spokane Spokesman-Review brings back the afternoon newspaper 38:18 - Casey Michel writes on Hunter Biden's forthcoming art show Links Philip Bump's article in the Washington Post on horse whips Casey Michel's article in The Atlantic on Hunter Biden's art

Tech Leader Talk
Finding the right marketing technology for your business – Mike Geller

Tech Leader Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 30:29


On today's podcast episode, I'm talking with Mike Geller, who is the Chief Technology Officer at Tegrita, a marketing technology consulting firm. He is also a co-author of the book “CMO to CRO – The revenue takeover by the next generation executive.” This book describes how an organizational restructure, combined with effective technology, can exponentially increase a company's revenue.   Mike attended Ryerson University in Toronto and has 15 years of experience with marketing technology. Mike describes himself as a coffee snob, a Trekkie, a husband, and a proud dad to two beautiful children.   “Don't buy technology that is oversized for your business. ” – Mike Geller Today on the Tech Leader Talk podcast: - How to find the best technology for marketing your business - Why “adding more technology” won't fix marketing problems - Current marketing automation trends - What you should do first to boost your marketing effectiveness - Questions to ask when looking at new technology tools   Resources Mentioned: Book: CMO to CRO- The revenue takeover by the next generation executive Connect with Mike Geller: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mikegeller/ Tegrita Website: https://tegrita.com/ Thanks for listening! Be sure to get your free copy of Steve's latest book, Cracking the Patent Code, and discover his proven system for identifying and protecting your most valuable inventions. Get the book at https://stevesponseller.com/book.    

Cracking the Vault
Episode 29: The Black Cauldron

Cracking the Vault

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 78:18


On this edition of Cracking the Vault, we gaze upon the gem that nearly destroyed an entire animation studio. Join us as we struggle through the darkest of the dark ages films, the most metal concept that Walt Disney Studios put to animation...Disney's 25th animated feature, The Black Cauldron.  Find Cracking the Vault on Facebook, TikTok, Instagram @CrackingtheVault_Podcast, and give us a follow and a review to leave your thoughts on Apple Podcasts! HUGE shout out to the multi-talented composer Tyler Griffin for the FANTASMIC opening jingle. Find out more about his musical genius at TylerAGriffin.com

Cracking Aces Podcast
Cracking Aces: EPISODE 100 - Ft. Brad Owen

Cracking Aces Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 56:20


-- Nate, Smitty, & Jake are joined by cash game vlogger/overall legend Brad Owen. We discuss taking the leap into playing poker full-time, what it's like to play in front of 500K people, & what's in store for the future -- Thank you guys so much for listening! 100 episodes!

Cracking Aces
Cracking Aces: EPISODE 100 - Ft. Brad Owen

Cracking Aces

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 56:20


-- Nate, Smitty, & Jake are joined by cash game vlogger/overall legend Brad Owen. We discuss taking the leap into playing poker full-time, what it's like to play in front of 500K people, & what's in store for the future -- Thank you guys so much for listening! 100 episodes!

Age of Agility
39. Cracking the Challenges of Digital Transformation with Nate Greenberg

Age of Agility

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 37:14


This week we're joined by Nate Greenberg, director of information technology for Mono County and the town of Mammoth Lakes, California. Mono County has been recognized a number of times for their digital transformation efforts. We learn how Nate's team built a flexible tech stack which enabled them to  move government services online, quickly,  during the Covid-19 pandemic,.  Nate also shares what projects his team are planning in the next stage of Mono County's digital transformation Learn more about Mono County's story: https://www.quickbase.com/blog/how-mono-county-cracked-the-challenges-of-digital-transformation-with-quickbaseConnect with Nate on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/nate-greenberg-7581b723/

Black and Brown
What's Cracking - The Gifts Episode

Black and Brown

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 51:08


The fellas are back with the usual bottle pops and fist ratings. They drop opinions as a precursor to the Second Annual Black Bourbon Run in Louisville, KY, they talk about what they're cracking and what you should be cracking too. You can find them in the Louisville streets next weekend, and if you do, say "Whaddup"! Pour one up and vibe with them. Stay Black and Keep it Brown! Instagram: @dablackandbrownpodcast @delvinj33 @agbk06 @my_government_name_is Organizer of the Back Bourbon Run: @black.bourbon.maverick --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/dablackandbrownpodcast/support

The Creek Church Video Podcast
Cracking Ice | Reason (Week 2)

The Creek Church Video Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 49:49


The Creek Church Audio Podcast
Cracking Ice | Reason (Week 2)

The Creek Church Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 49:49


Optimal Health Daily
1484: Q&A - Is Cracking Your Knuckles Bad For You and What Happens when Your Knuckles Crack

Optimal Health Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 7:47


Ask Dr. Neal your question about health, nutrition, diet, fitness, and more here: http://OLDPodcast.com/ask or call: 614-568-3643 Episode 1484: Q&A - Is Cracking Your Knuckles Bad For You and What Happens when Your Knuckles Crack The original post is located here: https://oldpodcast.com/cracking-knuckles  Apple Vacations packages include roundtrip airfare, hotel accommodations, meals, drinks, entertainment, and tips. For a limited time, you can use promo code SAND75 and take $75 off your stay at Live Aqua in Cancun or Punta Cana. Go to AppleVacations.com/optimal-health-daily to get this deal to your favorite Live Aqua resort. Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalHealthDailyDietNutritionFitness Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Optimal Health Daily
1484: Q&A - Is Cracking Your Knuckles Bad For You and What Happens when Your Knuckles Crack

Optimal Health Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 7:03


Ask Dr. Neal your question about health, nutrition, diet, fitness, and more here: http://OLDPodcast.com/ask or call: 614-568-3643 Episode 1484: Q&A - Is Cracking Your Knuckles Bad For You and What Happens when Your Knuckles Crack The original post is located here: https://oldpodcast.com/cracking-knuckles  Apple Vacations packages include roundtrip airfare, hotel accommodations, meals, drinks, entertainment, and tips. For a limited time, you can use promo code SAND75 and take $75 off your stay at Live Aqua in Cancun or Punta Cana. Go to AppleVacations.com/optimal-health-daily to get this deal to your favorite Live Aqua resort. Please Rate & Review the Show! Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com and in The O.L.D. Facebook Group  Join the Ol' Family to get your Free Gifts Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalHealthDailyDietNutritionFitness

SKOR North United
It's going to be clumsy, cluttery and clattery!

SKOR North United

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 43:28


This is a very tasty show, but do yourself a favor and stay through to the very end. The boys lose it, big time. Cracking stuff.

Work Smart Hypnosis | Hypnosis Training and Outstanding Business Success
WSH342 - Brian Eslick on Cracking the Hypnotic Marketing Code

Work Smart Hypnosis | Hypnosis Training and Outstanding Business Success

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 54:48


Brian Eslick is a Hypnotic Performer, Board Certified Hypnotist (BCH), and Certified Stress Management Consultant. He is the author of Inside Hypnosis and has starred in his own off-Broadway show in New York City. Brian previously served twenty years in the United States Air Force, seeing combat during the Gulf War. He later studied and received the title Certified Stage Hypnotist with the Stage Hypnosis Center, before expanding his offering to include hypnotherapy. Want more like this? Discover how to help more people and run a thriving hypnosis business at https://HypnoticBusinessSystems.com/ Brian joins me today to discuss cracking the hypnotic marketing code. He shares why you shouldn't dive into everything and try to do it all at once and why it is very rarely the platform and almost always the strategy. Brian highlights the benefits of turning down the marketing efforts and using just a few step-by-step strategies to create month-on-month success and why you should focus on your local market first, ahead of branching out nationally or globally. Brian also shares the intricacies of outsourcing to optimize your efforts and build professional expertise in what you do, positioning you as the clear choice to help your clients. “I've narrowed my marketing and everything that I do so that I have a lot more time on my hands.” - Brian Eslick Setting up your first practice, website, and initial marketing steps to raise awareness Areas of caution when using paid services such as Yelp or Bing Finding clients with Google Maps (Google My Business), Reviews, and AdWords Three things you must consider with every marketing strategy, platform, and service How to set your monthly and daily marketing budget and gain more inquiries by focusing on your local audience Outsourcing and automating services to build prestige How to set up your sales funnel and appointment booking processes Marketing analytics, testing systems, and making adjustments Resources Mentioned: Session #287 – Howard's Marketing Epiphany Session #108– Dan Perez on Explosive Hypnotic Business Google My Business Connect with Brian Eslick: Website: Brian Eslick New Jersey Family Hypnosis Email: newjerseyfamilyhypnosis@gmail.com Join our next online certification course… wherever you are in the world! https://WorkSmartHypnosisLIVE.com/ Get an all-access pass to Jason's digital library to help you grow your hypnosis business: https://www.hypnoticbusinesssystems.com/ Get instant access to Jason Linett's entire hypnotherapeutic training library: https://www.hypnoticworkers.com/ If you enjoyed today's episode, please send us your valuable feedback! https://www.worksmarthypnosis.com/itunes https://www.facebook.com/worksmarthypnosis/ Join the new WORK SMART HYPNOSIS COMMUNITY on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/groups/worksmarthypnosis/ Want to work with Jason? Check out: https://www.virginiahypnosis.com/call/

Tech Leader Talk
Scaling your tech company to $1 Billion – Paul Ruppert

Tech Leader Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 37:53


Listen in as Paul Ruppert and I talk about how he has scaled tech companies to $1 Billion and lessons he's learned from helping generate $400 Million in B2B enterprise sales. Paul also shares his experience with improving customer engagement. Paul is the CEO of Global Point View and provides strategic advice to tech companies on high-stakes sales and cross-border negotiation. Paul is a Harvard graduate and is named as an inventor on two U.S. patents. Paul worked for 12 years as a Federal Trade Lobbyist, serving Congress and multiple White House administrations. He also has 20 years of experience with CpaaS (Communication Platform as a Service), messaging, and customer engagement. “Almost all things are globally scalable.” – Paul Ruppert Today on the Tech Leader Talk podcast: - The importance of network capability in scaling your business - Understanding your value proposition for business growth - How to select your initial customers - Building out your architecture for expanding your business - Customer engagement techniques that are working today Resources Mentioned: Book: Blitzscaling by Reid Hoffman Connect with Paul Ruppert: Paul's Website: http://globalpointview.com/ Email: pruppert@gpvltd.com LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/paulruppertintl/ Thanks for listening! Be sure to get your free copy of Steve's latest book, Cracking the Patent Code, and discover his proven system for identifying and protecting your most valuable inventions. Get the book at https://stevesponseller.com/book.

Brews with Broads
Cracking a Can of Good Times with Grace Weitz

Brews with Broads

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 56:42


Hop Culture x Yeti Presets: Beers With(out) Beards is happening THIS SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 18th!  You can find the full programming lineup here on Hop Culture's Website and tune in to the YouTube livestream right here on Saturday And if you're like me and totally missed the boat on buying a beer box, here is a list of everything featured in the box, so you can do your own shopping spree and feel included wherever you are.Check out Grace's article that explains what exactly an Italian Pilsner is here!AND don't forget to join me for Brews with Broads: Live! On Tuesday September 28th at the TALEA Beer taproom in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Doors are at 6:00 for a 6:30 showtime. And since you're an amazing listener who scrolled allllll the way down to these show notes- I've already got a lil ticket link for you

Teeing It Up with Jeremy Schilling
Teeing It Up with Jeremy Schilling -- Former Ryder Cup Caddie/NBC‘s John Wood Previews the 2021 Edition -- September 14, 2021

Teeing It Up with Jeremy Schilling

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 31:30


Golf Channel & NBC on-course reporter John Wood -- who caddied in six Ryder Cups -- joins Teeing It Up to preview the 43rd Ryder Cup (Sept. 24-26) on Golf Channel and NBC. We dive into players to watch, why some Cups go the way they do, comparisons of the 2021 United States squad to 2008, what the week is like for a caddie, his inaugural campaign at Golf Channel & NBC and much more. Also the documentary we mention, Cracking the Code, airs Monday, September 20 at 9pm ET on Golf Channel.

Natural Born Coaches
NBC 730: Manny Wolfe: Cracking the Lead Gen Code Using Heart-Centered Personal Branding

Natural Born Coaches

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 33:02


Today's special guest is Manny Wolfe, and he's back on the podcast to share his insights and expertise with us! Manny is on a no-BS, no excuses mission to create $100k months for himself, through his own personal branding journey and he teaches others to do the same. Today, Manny reveals how you can generate the right leads for your coaching business by building your own heart-centered personal brand!

Cracking the Vault
*Bonus Episode* Happy Anniversary, CTV!

Cracking the Vault

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 49:02


One year ago today, Cracking the Vault dropped our first episode and it has surely been a wild ride! Join us as we look back on some of our favorite, and not so favorite gems of the last year! We also look to 2022 and discuss some of our "wish-list" gems, our favorite listener moments, a Disney Parks "This or That," and a lot more in a short amount of time.  We want to thank everyone who has downloaded THOUSANDS of our episodes, and continued to support us on this little adventure. This episode is just two Disney nerds, reflecting on the last year of memories you have all been a part of, and for that, we are eternally grateful! Enjoy!  

Rocketship.fm
Cracking the Product Management career with Jackie Bavaro

Rocketship.fm

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 29:28


Jackie Bavaro brings her expertise to this episode with some advice for those who are looking to get ahead in their career as a Product Manager, and move into product leadership roles. *** This episode is brought to you by: Vidyard: The Top Video Tool for SaaS Marketing and Sales http://vidyard.com/rocketship NetSuite: NetSuite by Oracle is a scalable solution to run all of your key back office operations. Go to netsuite.com/rocketship today. Blinkist: Rocketship.fm is now on Blinkist! Listen to 12 minute episodes with no ads! Get seven days free when you check out Blinkist. Indeed: Indeed is the job site that makes hiring as easy as 1-2-3. Get started with a free $75 sponsored job credit at indeed.com/rocketship. BetterHelp: Unlimited Professional Counseling via Online Chat, Video or Phone Anytime, Anywhere. Get 10% off when you visit betterhelp.com/rocketship. Fundrise: Fundrise makes investing in private real estate as easy as investing in stocks, bonds, or mutual funds. Go to fundrise.com/rocketship today. Airfocus: The home for products and the people who build them. Airfocus is an easy-to-use and flexible product management platform that combines product strategy superpowers with modularity. Visit airfocus.com/rocketship and try it for free today. WIX: When your agency partners with Wix, you unlock an entire digital ecosystem for creating, managing and growing your business online. Head over to Wix.com/Partners and reimagine what your agency can accomplish. *** This show is a part of the Podglomerate network, a company that produces, distributes, and monetizes podcasts. We encourage you to visit the website and sign up for our newsletter for more information about our shows, launches, and events. For more information on how The Podglomerate treats data, please see our Privacy Policy.    Since you're listening to Rocketship, we'd like to suggest you also try other Podglomerate shows surrounding entrepreneurship, business, and careers like Creative Elements and Freelance to Founder. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Air Hug Community
056 Cracking the Fat Loss Code

Air Hug Community

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 12:18


Strategies for fat loss are abundant. Here are some important questions you must ask before starting any fat loss program.  Is this sustainable for you? Is this designed for your current body? What works for a 25-year-old is not going to work for a midlifer.  Fat loss is not a one size fits all strategy.  If you are looking for midlife fat loss, then search out a midlife fat loss professional who has walked your path. If you are a 30 something guy looking to get big and lean, then search out a professional trainer who specializes in young adult males.  There are 5 strategies that all fat loss programs need to employ. Find out what they are in this  (no-nonsense) episode. Check out my FREE masterclass on Manifesting Motivation so you can get our fat loss program going. Thank you for tuning and remember to check back every Tuesday for a new episode. Connect with me on Instagram LinkedIn  Contact me judy@judyarazoza.com      

Black and Brown
What's Cracking with Body More Bottles

Black and Brown

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2021 48:10


The fellas catch up with the mastermind behind the number one bottle show in Baltimore City, Body More Bottles, you can find and follow him on Instagram, YouTube and Twitter @bodymorebottles. He talks bottles, bourbon and why he is the number one rated show, cause HE said so!! In this rare occasion, he is the "Ichiro", and leads the team in the reviews, black fists and what they get on this weeks #bourbonsoundslike. Get ya glasses and join them as they crack bottles. Cheers. Follow the Squad on Instagram: @my_government_name_is @agbk06 @delvinj33 Tell a friend to tell a friend!! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/dablackandbrownpodcast/support

Just a Tip with Megan Batoon
Going Viral (w/ Karen X. Cheng)

Just a Tip with Megan Batoon

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 73:52


Megan talks with creative director Karen X. Cheng about all things social media. They dive into the strategy behind going viral, facing online burnout, and even discuss their advice for creatives.   Show Notes: [01:46] - Karen's First Viral Video [03:32] - Learning to Dance [06:59] - Cracking the Viral Code [09:43] - Effort vs. Views [12:11] - Defining “Influencer” [18:24] - The Dunning Kruger Effect [20:22] - WMAVR Season 2 [27:34] - IG Growth Strategy [34:21] - Staging Inspiration [38:40] - All About Burnout [46:03] - Scarcity Mindset [52:56] - Transitioning Careers [57:35] - Maintaining A Following [1:05:00] - Catering to Followers [1:11:21] - Advice for Creatives   Where to find Karen: Karen's Instagram Karen's Twitter Karen's Website   “Just a Tip with Megan Batoon” is a comedic advice podcast that's equally about tangents as it is about tips. Megan and rotating guests tell stories and act as cautionary tales so you don't make the same mistakes they did. DM your questions to @justatippodcast on Instagram! Be sure to rate Just a Tip 5-stars on Apple Podcasts! Follow Megan: Twitter: @meganbatoon Instagram: @meganbatoon Shop Merch: shop.meganbatoon.com Facebook: www.facebook.com/MeganBatoonFP Just a Tip on Instagram: @justatippodcast Advertise on Just A Tip via Gumball.fm See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Cabral Concept
2031: Nail Fungus, Full Day Fasts, Reduce Testosterone in Women, White Spot on Skin, Strong Gas, Neck Cracking (HouseCall)

The Cabral Concept

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2021 23:21


Welcome back to our weekend Cabral HouseCall shows! This is where we answer our community's wellness, weight loss, and anti-aging questions to help people get back on track! Check out today's questions:  Kate: Can you talk about nail fungus? I have it on all nails in one hand only for two years and nothing has worked. Ive tried anti fungals, and various oils and home remedies. Lorena: Hello! I am a 25 year old healthy woman, I healed myself from a wide range of health issues by following your protocols so thank you very much for that! I continue my journey with the daily foundational protocol L3 & eat a predominantly plant-based diet with some good quality animal protein twice a week. I eat 3 meals a day and exercise 5x a week. I usually do 12-14h fast on a daily basis (sometimes 17h accidentally on weekends when I sleep in) but I was thinking of implementing the 24h fast that I know you do on Mondays myself haha! I don't want to lose more weight but I would do it for health reasons. Do you think it is a bad idea given that I'm a woman and it might be taking it too far? Or do you think that 24h once a week is fine? I wouldn't exercise on that day and would work from home relaxed. I'm a Vata body type so don't want to take it too far with my nervous system but I really want to get those autophagy benefits. Darren: Hey, Dr Cabral. I appreciate all you do for the community. You may likely receive this either during or after the Olympic games but I've a question with regard to the controversy surrounding two young athletes. Christine Mboma and Beatrice Masilingi both 18 years old from Namibia are among the fastest in the world over 400m in world even at that age. However even though both of them were born female and grew up as such, the international governing bodies are saying be they must take drugs to reduce their naturally-occurring testosterone if they want to compete in women's 400m mean because their naturally occurring testosterone is considered too high. They must medically limit that level to less than 5 nmol/L, double the normal female range of below 2 nmol/L. The question here is whether taking medication to reduce natural testosterone is healthy and is there an ayurvedic or natural health means to do so for other women or female athletes who may find themselves sin that situation. Thank you. Kathy: I am a 65 year old female with a white circle in middle of back about 4 inches in width and white spots under arm encompassing armpit. Looks like pigment issues but also where I have rubbed for years when I run 25 miles a week. Could It be from rubbing or something else going on. Anonymous: Hi dr cabral.. thank you for all you do! No one wants to ask this question for sure but maybe i will help someone else too. In short i seem to have for the last couple years my stomach seems to have a hard time digesting? Strong gas. No pretty way to say it. Sometimes it CAN be after your regular culprits like brocoli or kale etc .. but it seems un normal. Would a probiotic help or make it worse or can it help? I tried the healthy gut support hoping it would help and Even the dns seems to contribute to it.. Something tells me i skipped a step there but im honestly feeling a little stressed/anxious about committing and getting through the cbo protocol.. i just want to feel like my best self please help! all the best :) Hayley: Hi Dr. Cabral! I've had neck pain off an on for years. What makes your neck pop and crack some days but not others? I don't typically notice it on days when I don't hurt. Do you have an recommendations for a way to support my neck while I sleep since most of my neck pain starts over night and I notice it when I wake. Thanks!   Thank you for tuning into today's Cabral HouseCall and be sure to check back tomorrow where we answer more of our community's questions!  - - - Show Notes & Resources: http://StephenCabral.com/2031 - - - Get Your Question Answered: http://StephenCabral.com/askcabral   - - - Dr. Cabral's New Book, The Rain Barrel Effect https://amzn.to/2H0W7Ge - - - Join the Community & Get Your Questions Answered: http://CabralSupportGroup.com - - -  Dr. Cabral's Most Popular At-Home Lab Tests: > Complete Minerals & Metals Test (Test for mineral imbalances & heavy metal toxicity) - - - > Complete Candida, Metabolic & Vitamins Test (Test for 75 biomarkers including yeast & bacterial gut overgrowth, as well as vitamin levels) - - - > Complete Stress, Mood & Metabolism Test (Discover your complete thyroid, adrenal, hormone, vitamin D & insulin levels) - - - > Complete Stress, Sleep & Hormones Test (Run your adrenal & hormone levels) - - - > Complete Food Sensitivity Test (Find out your hidden food sensitivities) - - - > Complete Omega-3 & Inflammation Test (Discover your levels of inflammation related to your omega-6 to omega-3 levels) - - - > View all Functional Medicine lab tests (View all Functional Medicine lab tests you can do right at home for you and your

The Jillian Michaels Show
Cracking the Metabolism Code, with Dr. William Li

The Jillian Michaels Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 51:24


Internationally renowned physician, scientist and NYT best-selling author Dr. William Li breaks down the latest study on metabolism and aging, and gives us the top strategies to slow down aging and maintain a healthy body weight. Plus, some vital information on the Delta Variant, breakthrough Covid, new protocols, and if there are foods and supplements that can help.Guest Links:Sign up for Dr. Li's Master Class at https://drwilliamli.com/masterclass/Follow Dr. Li on IG @DrWilliamLiFor 25% off The Fitness App by Jillian Michaels, go to www.thefitenssapp.com/podcastdealFollow us on Instagram @JillianMichaels and @MartiniCindyEmail your questions to JillianPodcast@gmail.comThis Week's Sponsors:SKILLSHARE.com/JILLIAN, for a 1-month, free trial of Premium MembershipTRUNIAGEN.com/JILLIAN to save 10% on your first purchaseYou can find new episodes of Keeping It Real: Conversations with Jillian Michaels, completely ad free, on Wondery+ https://wondery.app.link/jillianSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.